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Title 12 – Banks and Banking–Volume 5

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Title 12 – Banks and Banking–Volume 5


Part


chapter iii – Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation

302

CHAPTER III – FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION

SUBCHAPTER A – PROCEDURE AND RULES OF PRACTICE

PARTS 300-301 [RESERVED]

PART 302 – USE OF SUPERVISORY GUIDANCE


Authority:5 U.S.C. 552; 12 U.S.C. 1818, 1819(a) (Seventh and Tenth), 1831p-1.


Source:86 FR 12085, Mar. 2, 2021, unless otherwise noted.

§ 302.1 Purpose.

The FDIC issues regulations and guidance as part of its supervisory function. This subpart reiterates the distinctions between regulations and guidance, as stated in the Statement Clarifying the Role of Supervisory Guidance (appendix A to this part) (Statement).


§ 302.2 Implementation of the Statement Clarifying the Role of Supervisory Guidance.

The Statement describes the official policy of the FDIC with respect to the use of supervisory guidance in the supervisory process. The Statement is binding on the FDIC.


§ 302.3 Rule of construction.

This subpart does not alter the legal status of guidelines authorized by statute, including but not limited to, 12 U.S.C. 1831p-1, to create binding legal obligations.


Appendix A to Part 302 – Statement Clarifying the Role of Supervisory Guidance

Statement Clarifying the Role of Supervisory Guidance

The FDIC is issuing this statement to explain the role of supervisory guidance and to describe the FDIC’s approach to supervisory guidance.


Difference Between Supervisory Guidance and Laws or Regulations

The FDIC issues various types of supervisory guidance, including interagency statements, advisories, policy statements, questions and answers, and frequently asked questions, to its supervised institutions. A law or regulation has the force and effect of law.
1
Unlike a law or regulation, supervisory guidance does not have the force and effect of law, and the FDIC does not take enforcement actions based on supervisory guidance. Rather, supervisory guidance outlines the FDIC’s supervisory expectations or priorities and articulates the FDIC’s general views regarding appropriate practices for a given subject area. Supervisory guidance often provides examples of practices that the FDIC generally considers consistent with safety-and-soundness standards or other applicable laws and regulations, including those designed to protect consumers. Supervised institutions at times request supervisory guidance, and such guidance is important to provide insight to industry, as well as supervisory staff, in a transparent way that helps to ensure consistency in the supervisory approach.




1 Government agencies issue regulations that generally have the force and effect of law. Such regulations generally take effect only after the agency proposes the regulation to the public and responds to comments on the proposal in a final rulemaking document.


Ongoing Efforts To Clarify the Role of Supervisory Guidance

The FDIC is clarifying the following policies and practices related to supervisory guidance:


• The FDIC intends to limit the use of numerical thresholds or other “bright-lines” in describing expectations in supervisory guidance. Where numerical thresholds are used, the FDIC intends to clarify that the thresholds are exemplary only and not suggestive of requirements. The FDIC will continue to use numerical thresholds to tailor, and otherwise make clear, the applicability of supervisory guidance or programs to supervised institutions, and as required by statute.


• Examiners will not criticize through supervisory recommendations (including matters requiring board attention) a supervised financial institution for, and the FDIC will not issue an enforcement action on the basis of, a “violation” of or “non-compliance” with supervisory guidance. In some situations, examiners may reference (including in writing) supervisory guidance to provide examples of safe and sound conduct, appropriate consumer protection and risk management practices, and other actions for addressing compliance with laws or regulations.


• Supervisory criticisms should continue to be specific as to practices, operations, financial conditions, or other matters that could have a negative effect on the safety and soundness of the financial institution, could cause consumer harm, or could cause violations of laws, regulations, final agency orders, or other legally enforceable conditions.


• The FDIC also has at times sought, and may continue to seek, public comment on supervisory guidance. Seeking public comment on supervisory guidance does not mean that the guidance is intended to be a regulation or have the force and effect of law. The comment process helps the FDIC to improve its understanding of an issue, to gather information on institutions’ risk management practices, or to seek ways to achieve a supervisory objective most effectively and with the least burden on institutions.


• The FDIC will aim to reduce the issuance of multiple supervisory guidance documents on the same topic and will generally limit such multiple issuances going forward.


The FDIC will continue efforts to make the role of supervisory guidance clear in communications to examiners and to supervised financial institutions and encourage supervised institutions with questions about this statement or any applicable supervisory guidance to discuss the questions with their appropriate agency contact.


PART 303 – FILING PROCEDURES


Authority:12 U.S.C. 378, 1463, 1467a, 1813, 1815, 1817, 1818, 1819(a) (Seventh and Tenth), 1820, 1823, 1828, 1831i, 1831e, 1831o, 1831p-1, 1831w, 1831z, 1835a, 1843(l), 3104, 3105, 3108, 3207, 5412; 15 U.S.C. 1601-1607.


Source:67 FR 79247, Dec. 27, 2002, unless otherwise noted.

§ 303.0 Scope.

(a) This part describes the procedures to be followed by both the FDIC and applicants with respect to applications, requests, or notices (filings) required to be filed by statute or regulation. Additional details concerning processing are explained in related FDIC statements of policy.


(b) Additional application procedures may be found in the following FDIC regulations:


(1) 12 CFR part 327 – Assessments (Request for review of assessment risk classification);


(2) 12 CFR part 328 – Advertisement of Membership (Application for temporary waiver of advertising requirements);


(3) 12 CFR part 345 – Community Reinvestment (CRA strategic plans and requests for designation as a wholesale or limited purpose institution);


Subpart A – Rules of General Applicability

§ 303.1 Scope.

Subpart A prescribes the general procedures for submitting filings to the FDIC which are required by statute or regulation. This subpart also prescribes the procedures to be followed by the FDIC, applicants and interested parties during the process of considering a filing, including public notice and comment. This subpart explains the availability of expedited processing for eligible depository institutions (defined in § 303.2(r)). Certain terms used throughout this part are also defined in this subpart.


§ 303.2 Definitions.

Except as modified or otherwise defined in this part, terms used in this part that are defined in the Federal Deposit Insurance Act (12 U.S.C. 1811 et seq.) have the meanings provided in the Federal Deposit Insurance Act. Additional definitions of terms used in this part are as follows:


(a) Act or FDI Act means the Federal Deposit Insurance Act (12 U.S.C. 1811 et seq.).


(b) Adjusted part 324 total assets means adjusted 12 CFR part 324 total assets as calculated and reflected in the FDIC’s Report of Examination.


(c) Adverse comment means any objection, protest, or other adverse written statement submitted by an interested party relative to a filing. The term adverse comment shall not include any comment concerning the Community Reinvestment Act (CRA), fair lending, consumer protection, or civil rights that the appropriate regional director or designee determines to be frivolous (for example, raising issues between the commenter and the applicant that have been resolved). The term adverse comment also shall not include any other comment that the appropriate regional director or designee determines to be frivolous (for example, a non-substantive comment submitted primarily as a means of delaying action on the filing).


(d) Amended order to pay means an order to forfeit and pay civil money penalties, the amount of which has been changed from that assessed in the original notice of assessment of civil money penalties.


(e) Applicant means a person or entity that submits a filing to the FDIC.


(f) Application means a submission requesting FDIC approval to engage in various corporate activities and transactions.


(g) Appropriate FDIC region and appropriate regional director mean, respectively, the FDIC region and the FDIC regional director which the FDIC designates as follows:


(1) When an institution or proposed institution that is the subject of a filing or administrative action is not and will not be part of a group of related institutions, the appropriate FDIC region for the institution and any individual associated with the institution is the FDIC region in which the institution or proposed institution is or will be located, and the appropriate regional director is the regional director for that region; or


(2) When an institution or proposed institution that is the subject of a filing or administrative action is or will be part of a group of related institutions, the appropriate FDIC region for the institution and any individual associated with the institution is the FDIC region in which the group’s major policy and decision makers are located, or any other region the FDIC designates on a case-by-case basis, and the appropriate regional director is the regional director for that region.


(h) Associate director means any associate director of the Division of Supervision and Consumer Protection (DSC) or, in the event such title become obsolete, any official of equivalent authority within the division.


(i) Book capital means total equity capital which is comprised of perpetual preferred stock, common stock, surplus, undivided profits and capital reserves, as those items are defined in the instructions of the Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council (FFIEC) for the preparation of Consolidated Reports of Condition and Income for insured banks.


(j) Comment means any written statement of fact or opinion submitted by an interested party relative to a filing.


(k) Corporation or FDIC means the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation.


(l) CRA protest means any adverse comment from the public related to a pending filing which raises a negative issue relative to the Community Reinvestment Act (CRA) (12 U.S.C. 2901 et seq.), whether or not it is labeled a protest and whether or not a hearing is requested.


(m) Deputy director means the deputy director of the Division of Supervision and Consumer Protection (DSC) or, in the event such title become obsolete, any official of equivalent or higher authority within the division.


(n) Deputy regional director means any deputy regional director of the Division of Supervision and Consumer Protection (DSC) or, in the event such title become obsolete, any official of equivalent authority within the same FDIC region of DSC.


(o) Appropriate FDIC office means the office designated by the appropriate regional director or designee.


(p) DSC means the Division of Supervision and Consumer Protection or, in the event the Division of Supervision and Consumer Protection is reorganized, such successor division.


(q) Director means the Director of the Division of Supervision and Consumer Protection (DSC) or, in the event such title become obsolete, any official of equivalent or higher authority within the division.


(r) Eligible depository institution means a depository institution that meets the following criteria:


(1) Received an FDIC-assigned composite rating of 1 or 2 under the Uniform Financial Institutions Rating System (UFIRS) as a result of its most recent federal or state examination;


(2) Received a satisfactory or better Community Reinvestment Act (CRA) rating from its primary federal regulator at its most recent examination, if the depository institution is subject to examination under part 345 of this chapter;


(3) Received a compliance rating of 1 or 2 from its primary federal regulator at its most recent examination;


(4) Is well-capitalized as defined in the appropriate capital regulation and guidance of the institution’s primary federal regulator; and


(5) Is not subject to a cease and desist order, consent order, prompt corrective action directive, written agreement, memorandum of understanding, or other administrative agreement with its primary federal regulator or chartering authority.


(s) Filing means an application, notice or request submitted to the FDIC under this part.


(t) General Counsel means the head of the Legal Division of the FDIC or any official within the Legal Division exercising equivalent authority for purposes of this part.


(u) Insider means a person who is or is proposed to be a director, officer, organizer, or incorporator of an applicant; a shareholder who directly or indirectly controls 10 percent or more of any class of the applicant’s outstanding voting stock; or the associates or interests of any such person.


(v) Institution-affiliated party shall have the same meaning as provided in section 3(u) of the Act (12 U.S.C. 1813(u)).


(w) Notice means a submission notifying the FDIC that a depository institution intends to engage in or has commenced certain corporate activities or transactions.


(x) Notice to primary regulator means the notice described in section 8(a)(2)(A) of the Act concerning termination of deposit insurance (12 U.S.C. 1818(a)(2)(A)).


(y) Regional counsel means a regional counsel of the Legal Division or, in the event the title becomes obsolete, any official of equivalent authority within the Legal Division.


(z) Regional director means any regional director in the Division of Supervision and Consumer Protection (DSC), or in the event such title become obsolete, any official of equivalent authority within the division.


(aa) [Reserved]


(bb) Standard conditions means the conditions that the FDIC may impose as a routine matter when approving a filing, whether or not the applicant has agreed to their inclusion. The following conditions, or variations thereof, are standard conditions:


(1) That the applicant has obtained all necessary and final approvals from the appropriate federal or state authority or other appropriate authority;


(2) That if the transaction does not take effect within a specified time period, or unless, in the meantime, a request for an extension of time has been approved, the consent granted shall expire at the end of the specified time period;


(3) That until the conditional commitment of the FDIC becomes effective, the FDIC retains the right to alter, suspend or withdraw its commitment should any interim development be deemed to warrant such action; and


(4) In the case of a merger transaction (as defined in ¶ 303.61(a) of this part), including a corporate reorganization, that the proposed transaction not be consummated before the 30th calendar day (or shorter time period as may be prescribed by the FDIC with the concurrence of the Attorney General) after the date of the order approving the merger transaction.


(cc) Tier 1 capital shall have the same meaning as provided in § 324.2 of this chapter.


(dd) Total assets shall have the same meaning as provided in § 324.401(g) of this chapter.


(ee) FDIC-supervised institution means any entity for which the FDIC is the appropriate Federal banking agency pursuant to section 3(q) of the FDI Act, 12 U.S.C. 1813(q).


[67 FR 79247, Dec. 27, 2002, as amended at 68 FR 50459, Aug. 21, 2003; 78 FR 55470, Sept. 10, 2013; 83 FR 17739, Apr. 24, 2018; 85 FR 3243, Jan. 21, 2020; 85 FR 72555, Nov. 13, 2020]


§ 303.3 General filing procedures.

Unless stated otherwise, filings should be submitted to the appropriate FDIC office. Forms and instructions for submitting filings may be obtained from any FDIC regional director. If no form is prescribed, the filing should be in writing; be signed by the applicant or a duly authorized agent; and contain a concise statement of the action requested. For specific filing and content requirements, consult the appropriate subparts of this part. The FDIC may require the applicant to submit additional information.


§ 303.4 Computation of time.

For purposes of this part, and except as otherwise specifically provided, the FDIC begins computing the relevant period on the day after an event occurs (e.g., the day after a substantially complete filing is received by the FDIC or the day after publication begins) through the last day of the relevant period. When the last day is a Saturday, Sunday or federal holiday, the period runs until the end of the next business day.


[67 FR 79247, Dec. 27, 2002, as amended at 68 FR 50459, Aug. 21, 2003]


§ 303.5 Effect of Community Reinvestment Act performance on filings.

Among other factors, the FDIC takes into account the record of performance under the Community Reinvestment Act (CRA) of each applicant in considering a filing for approval of:


(a) The establishment of a domestic branch;


(b) The relocation of the bank’s main office or a domestic branch;


(c) The relocation of an insured branch of a foreign bank;


(d) A transaction subject to the Bank Merger Act; and


(e) Deposit insurance.


§ 303.6 Investigations and examinations.

The FDIC may examine or investigate and evaluate facts related to any filing under this chapter to the extent necessary to reach an informed decision and take any action necessary or appropriate under the circumstances.


§ 303.7 Public notice requirements.

(a) General. The public must be provided with prior notice of a filing to establish a domestic branch, relocate a domestic branch or the main office, relocate an insured branch of a foreign bank, engage in a merger transaction, initiate a change of control transaction, or request deposit insurance. The public has the right to comment on, or to protest, these types of proposed transactions during the relevant comment period. In order to fully apprise the public of this right, an applicant shall publish a public notice of its filing in a newspaper of general circulation. For specific publication requirements, consult subparts B (Deposit Insurance), C (Branches and Relocations), D (Merger Transactions), E (Change in Bank Control), and J (International Banking) of this part.


(b) Confirmation of publication. The applicant shall mail or otherwise deliver a copy of the newspaper notice to the appropriate FDIC office as part of its filing, or, if a copy is not available at the time of filing, promptly after publication.


(c) Content of notice. (1) The public notice referred to in paragraph (a) of this section shall consist of the following:


(i) In the case of an application for deposit insurance for a de novo depository institution, include the names of all organizers or incorporators. In the case of an application to establish a branch, include the location of the proposed branch or, in the case of an application to relocate a branch or main office, include the current and proposed address of the office. In the case of a merger application, include the names of all parties to the transaction. In the case of a notice of acquisition of control, include the name(s) of the acquiring parties. In the case of an application to relocate an insured branch of a foreign bank, include the current and proposed address of the branch.


(ii) Type of filing being made;


(iii) Name of the depository institution(s) that is the subject matter of the filing;


(iv) That the public may submit comments to the appropriate FDIC regional director;


(v) The address of the appropriate FDIC office where comments may be sent (the same location where the filing will be made);


(vi) The closing date of the public comment period as specified in the appropriate subpart of this part; and


(vii) That the nonconfidential portions of the application are on file in the appropriate FDIC office and are available for public inspection during regular business hours; photocopies of the nonconfidential portion of the application file will be made available upon request.


(2) The requirements of paragraphs (c)(1)(iv) through (vii) of this section may be satisfied through use of the following notice:



Any person wishing to comment on this application may file his or her comments in writing with the regional director of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation at the appropriate FDIC office [insert address of office] not later than [insert closing date of the public comment period specified in the appropriate subpart of part 303]. The non-confidential portions of the application are on file at the appropriate FDIC office and are available for public inspection during regular business hours. Photocopies of the nonconfidential portion of the application file will be made available upon request.

(d) Multiple transactions. The FDIC may consider more than one transaction, or a series of transactions, to be a single filing for purposes of the publication requirements of this section. When publishing a single public notice for multiple transactions, the applicant shall explain in the public notice how the transactions are related. The closing date of the comment period shall be the closing date of the longest public comment period that applies to any of the related transactions.


(e) Joint public notices. For a transaction subject to public notice requirements by the FDIC and another federal or state banking authority, the FDIC will accept publication of a single joint notice containing all the information required by both the FDIC and the other federal agency or state banking authority, provided that the notice states that comments must be submitted to the appropriate FDIC office and, if applicable, the other federal or state banking authority.


(f) Where public notice is required, the FDIC may determine on a case-by-case basis that unusual circumstances surrounding a particular filing warrant modification of the publication requirements.


[67 FR 79247, Dec. 27, 2002, as amended at 86 FR 8097, Feb. 3, 2021]


§ 303.8 Public access to filing.

(a) General. For filings subject to a public notice requirement, any person may inspect or request a copy of the non-confidential portions of a filing (the public file) until 180 days following final disposition of a filing. Following the 180-day period, non-confidential portions of an application file will be made available in accordance with ‘ 303.8(c). The public file generally consists of portions of the filing, supporting data, supplementary information, and comments submitted by interested persons (if any) to the extent that the documents have not been afforded confidential treatment. To view or request photocopies of the public file, an oral or written request should be submitted to the appropriate FDIC office. The public file will be produced for review not more than one business day after receipt by the appropriate FDIC office of the request (either written or oral) to see the file. The FDIC may impose a fee for photocopying in accordance with § 309.5(f) of this chapter at the rates the FDIC publishes annually in the Federal Register.


(b) Confidential treatment. (1) The applicant may request that specific information be treated as confidential. The following information generally is considered confidential:


(i) Personal information, the release of which would constitute a clearly unwarranted invasion of privacy;


(ii) Commercial or financial information, the disclosure of which could result in substantial competitive harm to the submitter; and


(iii) Information, the disclosure of which could seriously affect the financial condition of any depository institution.


(2) If an applicant requests confidential treatment for information that the FDIC does not consider to be confidential, the FDIC may include that information in the public file after notifying the applicant. On its own initiative, the FDIC may determine that certain information should be treated as confidential and withhold that information from the public file.


(c) FOIA requests. A written request for information withheld from the public file, or copies of the public file following closure of the file 180 days after final disposition, should be submitted pursuant to the Freedom of Information Act (5 U.S.C. 552) and part 309 of this chapter to the FDIC, Attn: FOIA/Privacy Group, Legal Division, 550 17th Street, NW., Washington, DC 20429.


§ 303.9 Comments.

(a) Submission of comments. For filings subject to a public notice requirement, any person may submit comments to the appropriate FDIC regional director during the comment period.


(b) Comment period – (1) General. Consult appropriate subparts of this part for the comment period applicable to a particular filing.


(2) Extension. The FDIC may extend or reopen the comment period if:


(i) The applicant fails to file all required information on a timely basis to permit review by the public or makes a request for confidential treatment not granted by the FDIC that delays the public availability of that information;


(ii) Any person requesting an extension of time satisfactorily demonstrates to the FDIC that additional time is necessary to develop factual information that the FDIC determines may materially affect the application; or


(iii) The FDIC determines that other good cause exists.


(3) Solicitation of comments. Whenever appropriate, the appropriate regional director may solicit comments from any person or institution which might have an interest in or be affected by the pending filing.


(4) Applicant response. The FDIC will provide copies of all comments received to the applicant and may give the applicant an opportunity to respond.


§ 303.10 Hearings and other meetings.

(a) Matters covered. This section covers hearings and other proceedings in connection with filings and determinations for or by:


(1) Deposit insurance by a proposed new depository institution or operating non-insured institution;


(2) An insured state nonmember bank to establish a domestic branch or to relocate a main office or domestic branch;


(3) Relocation of an insured branch of a foreign bank;


(4)(i) Merger transaction which requires the FDIC’s prior approval under the Bank Merger Act (12 U.S.C. 1828(c));


(ii) Except as otherwise expressly provided, the provisions of this § 303.10 shall not be applicable to any proposed merger transaction which the FDIC Board of Directors determines must be acted upon immediately to prevent the probable failure of one of the institutions involved, or must be handled with expeditious action due to an existing emergency condition, as permitted by the Bank Merger Act (12 U.S.C. 1828(c)(6));


(5) Nullification of a decision on a filing; and


(6) Any other purpose or matter which the FDIC Board of Directors in its sole discretion deems appropriate.


(b) Hearing requests. (1) Any person may submit a written request for a hearing on a filing:


(i) To the appropriate regional director before the end of the comment period; or


(ii) To the appropriate regional director, pursuant to a notice to nullify a decision on a filing issued pursuant to § 303.11(g)(2)(i) or (ii).


(2) The request must describe the nature of the issues or facts to be presented and the reasons why written submissions would be insufficient to make an adequate presentation of those issues or facts to the FDIC. A person requesting a hearing shall simultaneously submit a copy of the request to the applicant.

(c) Action on a hearing request. The appropriate regional director, after consultation with the Legal Division, may grant or deny a request for a hearing and may limit the issues that he or she deems relevant or material. The FDIC generally grants a hearing request only if it determines that written submissions would be insufficient or that a hearing otherwise would be in the public interest.


(d) Denial of a hearing request. If the appropriate regional director, after consultation with the Legal Division, denies a hearing request, he or she shall notify the person requesting the hearing of the reason for the denial. A decision to deny a hearing request shall be a final agency determination and is not appealable.


(e) FDIC procedures prior to the hearing – (1) Notice of hearing. The FDIC shall issue a notice of hearing if it grants a request for a hearing or orders a hearing because it is in the public interest. The notice of hearing shall state the subject and date of the filing, the time and place of the hearing, and the issues to be addressed. The FDIC shall send a copy of the notice of hearing to the applicant, to the person requesting the hearing, and to anyone else requesting a copy.


(2) The presiding officer shall be the regional director or designee or such other person as may be named by the Board or the Director. The presiding officer is responsible for conducting the hearing and determining all procedural questions not governed by this section.


(f) Participation in the hearing. Any person who wishes to appear (participant) shall notify the appropriate regional director of his or her intent to participate in the hearing no later than 10 days from the date that the FDIC issues the Notice of Hearing. At least 5 days before the hearing, each participant shall submit to the appropriate regional director, as well as to the applicant and any other person as required by the FDIC, the names of witnesses, a statement describing the proposed testimony of each witness, and one copy of each exhibit the participant intends to present.


(g) Transcripts. The FDIC shall arrange for a hearing transcript. The person requesting the hearing and the applicant each shall bear the cost of one copy of the transcript for his or her use unless such cost is waived by the presiding officer and incurred by the FDIC.


(h) Conduct of the hearing – (1) Presentations. Subject to the rulings of the presiding officer, the applicant and participants may make opening and closing statements and present and examine witnesses, material, and data.


(2) Information submitted. Any person presenting material shall furnish one copy to the FDIC, one copy to the applicant, and one copy to each participant.


(3) Laws not applicable to hearings. The Administrative Procedure Act (5 U.S.C. 551 et seq.), the Federal Rules of Evidence (28 U.S.C. Appendix), the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure (28 U.S.C. Rule 1 et seq.), and the FDIC’s Rules of Practice and Procedure (12 CFR part 308) do not govern hearings under this § 303.10.


(i) Closing the hearing record. At the applicant’s or any participant’s request, or at the FDIC’s discretion, the FDIC may keep the hearing record open for up to 10 days following the FDIC’s receipt of the transcript. The FDIC shall resume processing the filing after the record closes.


(j) Disposition and notice thereof. The presiding officer shall make a recommendation to the FDIC within 20 days following the date the hearing and record on the proceeding are closed. The FDIC shall notify the applicant and all participants of the final disposition of a filing and shall provide a statement of the reasons for the final disposition.


(k) Computation of time. In computing periods of time under this section, the provisions of § 308.12 of the FDIC’s Rules of Practice and Procedure (12 CFR 308.12) shall apply.


(l) Informal proceedings. The FDIC may arrange for an informal proceeding with an applicant and other interested parties in connection with a filing, either upon receipt of a written request for such a meeting made during the comment period, or upon the FDIC’s own initiative. No later than 10 days prior to an informal proceeding, the appropriate regional director shall notify the applicant and each person who requested a hearing or oral presentation of the date, time, and place of the proceeding. The proceeding may assume any form, including a meeting with FDIC representatives at which participants will be asked to present their views orally. The regional director may hold separate meetings with each of the participants.


(m) Authority retained by FDIC Board of Directors to modify procedures. The FDIC Board of Directors may delegate authority by resolution on a case-by-case basis to the presiding officer to adopt different procedures in individual matters and on such terms and conditions as the Board of Directors determines in its discretion. The resolution shall be made available for public inspection and copying in the Office of the General Counsel, Executive Secretary Section under the Freedom of Information Act (5 U.S.C. 552(a)(2)).


§ 303.11 Decisions.

(a) General procedures. The FDIC may approve, conditionally approve, deny, or not object to a filing after appropriate review and consideration of the record. The FDIC will promptly notify the applicant and any person who makes a written request of the final disposition of a filing. If the FDIC denies a filing, the FDIC will immediately notify the applicant in writing of the reasons for the denial.


(b) Authority retained by FDIC Board of Directors to modify procedures. In acting on any filing under this part, the FDIC Board of Directors may by resolution adopt procedures which differ from those contained in this part when it deems it necessary or in the public interest to do so. The resolution shall be made available for public inspection and copying in the Office of the General Counsel, Executive Secretary Section under the Freedom of Information Act (5 U.S.C. 552(a)(2)).


(c) Expedited processing. (1) A filing submitted by an eligible depository institution as defined in § 303.2(r) will receive expedited processing as specified in the appropriate subparts of this part unless the FDIC determines to remove the filing from expedited processing for any of the reasons set forth in paragraph (c)(2) of this section. Except for filings made pursuant to subpart J (International Banking), expedited processing will not be available for any filing that the appropriate regional director does not have delegated authority to approve.


(2) Removal of filing from expedited processing. The FDIC may remove a filing from expedited processing at any time prior to final disposition if:


(i) For filings subject to public notice under § 303.7, an adverse comment is received that warrants additional investigation or review;


(ii) For filings subject to evaluation of CRA performance under § 303.5, a CRA protest is received that warrants additional investigation or review, or the appropriate regional director determines that the filing presents a significant CRA or compliance concern;


(iii) For any filing, the appropriate regional director determines that the filing presents a significant supervisory concern, or raises a significant legal or policy issue; or


(iv) For any filing, the appropriate regional director determines that other good cause exists for removal.


(3) For purposes of this section, a significant CRA concern includes, but is not limited to, a determination by the appropriate regional director that, although a depository institution may have an institution-wide rating of satisfactory or better, a depository institution’s CRA rating is less than satisfactory in a state or multi-state metropolitan statistical area, or a depository institution’s CRA performance is less than satisfactory in a metropolitan statistical area as defined in 12 CFR 345.12 (MSA) or in the non-MSA portion of a state in which it seeks to expand through approval of an application for a deposit facility as defined in 12 U.S.C. 2902(3).


(4) If the FDIC determines that it is necessary to remove a filing from expedited processing pursuant to paragraph (c)(2) of this section, the FDIC promptly will provide the applicant with a written explanation


(d) Multiple transactions. If the FDIC is considering related transactions, some or all of which have been granted expedited processing, then the longest processing time for any of the related transactions shall govern for purposes of approval.


(e) Abandonment of filing. A filing must contain all information set forth in the applicable subpart of this part. To the extent necessary to evaluate a filing, the FDIC may require an applicant to provide additional information. If information requested by the FDIC is not provided within the time period specified by the agency, the FDIC may deem the filing abandoned and shall provide written notification to the applicant and any interested parties that submitted comments to the FDIC that the file has been closed.


(f) Appeals and requests for reconsideration – (1) General. Appeal procedures for a denial of a change in bank control (subpart E), change in senior executive officer or board of directors (subpart F) or denial of an application pursuant to section 19 of the FDI Act (subpart L) are contained in 12 CFR part 308, subparts D, L, and M, respectively. For all other filings covered by this chapter for which appeal procedures are not provided by regulation or other written guidance, the procedures specified in paragraphs (f)(2) and (3) of this section shall apply. A decision to deny a request for a hearing is a final agency determination and is not appealable.


(2) Filing procedures. Within 15 days of receipt of notice from the FDIC that its filing has been denied, any applicant may file a request for reconsideration with the appropriate regional director.


(3) Content of filing. A request for reconsideration must contain the following information:


(i) A resolution of the board of directors of the applicant authorizing filing of the request if the applicant is a corporation, or a letter signed by the individual(s) filing the request if the applicant is not a corporation;


(ii) Relevant, substantive information that for good cause was not previously set forth in the filing; and


(iii) Specific reasons why the FDIC should reconsider its prior decision.


(4)-(5) [Reserved]


(6) Processing. The FDIC will notify the applicant whether reconsideration will be granted or denied within 15 days of receipt of a request for reconsideration. If a request for reconsideration is granted pursuant to § 303.11(f), the FDIC will notify the applicant of the final agency decision on such filing within 60 days of its receipt of the request for reconsideration.


(g) Nullification, withdrawal, revocation, amendment, and suspension of decisions on filings – (1) Grounds for action. Except as otherwise provided by law or regulation, the FDIC may nullify, withdraw, revoke, amend or suspend a decision on a filing if it becomes aware at anytime:


(i) Of any material misrepresentation or omission related to the filing or of any material change in circumstance that occurred prior to the consummation of the transaction or commencement of the activity authorized by the decision on the filing; or


(ii) That the decision on the filing is contrary to law or regulation or was granted due to clerical or administrative error.


(iii) Any person responsible for a material misrepresentation or omission in a filing or supporting materials may be subject to an enforcement action and other penalties, including criminal penalties provided in title 18 of the United States Code.


(2) Notice of intent and temporary order. (i) Except as provided in § 303.11(g)(2)(ii), before taking action under this § 303.11(g), the FDIC shall issue and serve on an applicant written notice of its intent to take such action. A notice of intent to act on a filing shall include:


(A) The reasons for the proposed action; and


(B) The date by which the applicant may file a written response with the FDIC.


(ii) The FDIC may issue a temporary order on a decision on a filing without providing an applicant a prior notice of intent if the FDIC determines that:


(A) It is necessary to reevaluate the impact of a change in circumstance prior to the consummation of the transaction or commencement of the activity authorized by the decision on the filing; or


(B) The activity authorized by the filing may pose a threat to the interests of the depository institution’s depositors or may threaten to impair public confidence in the depository institution.


(iii) A temporary order shall provide the applicant with an opportunity to make a written response in accordance with § 303.11(g)(3) of this section.


(3) Response to notice of intent or temporary order. An applicant may file a written response to a notice of intent or a temporary order within 15 days from the date of service of the notice or temporary order. The written response should include:


(i) An explanation of why the proposed action or temporary order is not warranted; and


(ii)(A) Any other relevant information, mitigation circumstance, documentation, or other evidence in support of the applicant’s position. An applicant may also request a hearing under § 303.10.


(B) Failure by an applicant to file a written response with the FDIC to a notice of intent or a temporary order within the specified time period, shall constitute a waiver of the opportunity to respond and shall constitute consent to a final order under this paragraph (g). The FDIC shall consider any such response, if filed in a timely manner, within 30 days of receiving the response.


(4) Effective date. All orders issued pursuant to this section shall become effective immediately upon issuance unless otherwise stated therein.


[67 FR 79247, Dec. 27, 2002, as amended at 68 FR 50459, Aug. 21, 2003]


§ 303.12 Waivers.

(a) The Board of Directors, of the FDIC (Board) may, for good cause and to the extent permitted by statute, waiver the applicability of any provision of this chapter.


(b) The provisions of this chapter may be suspended, revoked, amended or waived for good cause shown, in whole or in part, at any time by the Board, subject to the provisions of the Administrative Procedure Act and the provisions of this chapter. Any provision of the rules may be waived by the Board on its own motion or on petition if good cause thereof is shown.


[68 FR 50459, Aug. 21, 2003]


§ 303.13 [Reserved]

§ 303.14 Being “engaged in the business of receiving deposits other than trust funds.”

(a) Except as provided in paragraphs (b), (c), and (d) of this section, a depository institution shall be “engaged in the business of receiving deposits other than trust funds” only if it maintains one or more non-trust deposit accounts in the minimum aggregate amount of $500,000.


(b) An applicant for federal deposit insurance under section 5 of the FDI Act, 12 U.S.C. 1815(a), shall be deemed to be “engaged in the business of receiving deposits other than trust funds” from the date that the FDIC approves deposit insurance for the institution until one year after it opens for business.


(c) Any depository institution that fails to satisfy the minimum deposit standard specified in paragraph (a) of this section as of two consecutive call report dates (i.e., March 31st, June 30th, September 30th, and December 31st) shall be subject to a determination by the FDIC that the institution is not “engaged in the business of receiving deposits other than trust funds” and to termination of its insured status under section 8(p) of the FDI Act, 12 U.S.C. 1818(p). For purposes of this paragraph, the first three call report dates after the institution opens for business are excluded.


(d) Notwithstanding any failure by an insured depository institution to satisfy the minimum deposit standard in paragraph (a) of this section, the institution shall continue to be “engaged in the business of receiving deposits other than trust funds” for purposes of section 3 of the FDI Act until the institution’s insured status is terminated by the FDIC pursuant to a proceeding under section 8(a) or section 8(p) of the FDI Act. 12 U.S.C. 1818(a) or 1818(p).


§ 303.15 Certain limited liability companies deemed incorporated under State law.

(a) For purposes of the definition of “State bank” in 12 U.S.C. 1813(a)(2) and this Chapter, a banking institution that is chartered as a limited liability company (LLC) under the law of any State is deemed to be “incorporated” under the law of the State, if


(1) The institution is not subject to automatic termination, dissolution, or suspension upon the happening of some event (including, e.g., the death, disability, bankruptcy, expulsion, or withdrawal of an owner of the institution), other than the passage of time;


(2) The exclusive authority to manage the institution is vested in a board of managers or directors that is elected or appointed by the owners, and that operates in substantially the same manner as, and has substantially the same rights, powers, privileges, duties, responsibilities, as a board of directors of a bank chartered as a corporation in the State;


(3) Neither State law, nor the institution’s operating agreement, bylaws, or other organizational documents provide that an owner of the institution is liable for the debts, liabilities, and obligations of the institution in excess of the amount of the owner’s investment; and


(4) Neither State law, nor the institution’s operating agreement, bylaws, or other organizational documents require the consent of any other owner of the institution in order for an owner to transfer an ownership interest in the institution, including voting rights.


(b) For purposes of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act and this chapter:


(1) Each of the terms “stockholder” and “shareholder” includes an owner of any interest in a depository institution chartered as an LLC, including a member or participant;


(2) The term “director” includes a manager or director of a depository institution chartered as an LLC, or other person who has, with respect to such a depository institution, authority substantially similar to that of a director of a corporation;


(3) The term “officer” includes an officer of a depository institution chartered as an LLC, or other person who has, with respect to such a depository institution, authority substantially similar to that of an officer of a corporation; and


(4) Each of the terms “voting stock,” “voting shares,” and “voting securities” includes ownership interests in a depository institution chartered as an LLC, as well as any certificates or other evidence of such ownership interests.


[68 FR 7308, Feb. 13, 2003, as amended at 86 FR 8097, Feb. 3, 2021]


§§ 303.16-303.19 [Reserved]

Subpart B – Deposit Insurance

§ 303.20 Scope.

This subpart sets forth the procedures for applying for deposit insurance for a proposed depository institution or an operating noninsured depository institution under section 5 of the FDI Act (12 U.S.C. 1815). It also sets forth the procedures for requesting continuation of deposit insurance for a state-chartered bank withdrawing from membership in the Federal Reserve System and for interim institutions chartered to facilitate a merger transaction. Each bank that results from the conversion of a Federal savings association into multiple banks pursuant to section 5(i)(5) of the Home Owners’ Loan Act, 12 U.S.C. 1464(i)(5), is treated as a proposed depository institution or a de novo institution, as appropriate, for purposes of this subpart.


[67 FR 79247, Dec. 27, 2002, as amended at 73 FR 2145, Jan. 14, 2008]


§ 303.21 Filing procedures.

(a) Applications for deposit insurance shall be filed with the appropriate FDIC office. The relevant application forms and instructions for applying for deposit insurance for an existing or proposed depository institution may be obtained from any FDIC regional director.


(b) An application for deposit insurance for an interim depository institution shall be filed and processed in accordance with the procedures set forth in § 303.24, subject to the provisions of § 303.62(b)(2) regarding deposit insurance for interim institutions. An interim institution is defined as a state- or federally-chartered depository institution that does not operate independently but exists solely as a vehicle to accomplish a merger transaction.


(c) A request for continuation of deposit insurance upon withdrawing from membership in the Federal Reserve System shall be in letter form and shall provide the information prescribed in § 303.25.


§ 303.22 Processing.

(a) Expedited processing for proposed institutions. (1) An application for deposit insurance for a proposed institution which will be a subsidiary of an eligible depository institution as defined in § 303.2(r) or an eligible holding company will be acknowledged in writing by the FDIC and will receive expedited processing unless the applicant is notified in writing to the contrary and provided with the basis for that decision. An eligible holding company is defined as a bank or thrift holding company that has consolidated assets of at least $150 million or more; a BOPEC rating of at least “2” for bank holding companies or an above average or “A” rating for thrift holding companies; and at least 75 percent of its consolidated depository institution assets comprised of eligible depository institutions. The FDIC may remove an application from expedited processing for any of the reasons set forth in § 303.11(c)(2).


(2) Under expedited processing, the FDIC will take action on an application within 60 days of receipt of a substantially complete application or 5 days after the expiration of the comment period described in § 303.23, whichever is later. Final action may be withheld until the FDIC has assurance that permission to organize the proposed institution will be granted by the chartering authority. Notwithstanding paragraph (a)(1) of this section, if the FDIC does not act within the expedited processing period, it does not constitute an automatic or default approval.


(b) Standard processing. For those applications that are not processed pursuant to the expedited procedures, the FDIC will provide the applicant with written notification of the final action when the decision is rendered.


[67 FR 79247, Dec. 27, 2002, as amended at 68 FR 50459, Aug. 21, 2003]


§ 303.23 Public notice requirements.

(a) De novo institutions and operating noninsured institutions. The applicant shall publish a notice as prescribed in § 303.7 in a newspaper of general circulation in the community in which the main office of the depository institution is or will be located. Notice shall be published as close as practicable to, but no sooner than five days before, the date the application is mailed or delivered to the appropriate FDIC office. Comments by interested parties must be received by the appropriate regional director within 30 days following the date of publication, unless the comment period has been extended or reopened in accordance with § 303.9(b)(2).


(b) Exceptions to public notice requirements. No publication shall be required in connection with the granting of insurance to a new depository institution established pursuant to the resolution of a depository institution in default, or to an interim depository institution formed solely to facilitate a merger transaction, or for a request for continuation of federal deposit insurance by a state-chartered bank withdrawing from membership in the Federal Reserve System.


§ 303.24 Application for deposit insurance for an interim institution.

(a) Application required. Subject to § 303.62(b)(2), a deposit insurance application is required for a state-chartered interim institution if the related merger transaction is subject to approval by a federal banking agency other than the FDIC. A separate application for deposit insurance for an interim institution is not required in connection with any merger requiring FDIC approval pursuant to subpart D of this part.


(b) Content of separate application. A letter application for deposit insurance for an interim institution, accompanied by a copy of the related merger application, shall be filed with the appropriate FDIC office. The letter application shall briefly describe the transaction and contain a statement that deposit insurance is being requested for an interim institution that does not operate independently but exists solely as a vehicle to accomplish a merger transaction which will be reviewed by a federal banking agency other than the FDIC.


(c) Processing. An application for deposit insurance for an interim depository institution will be acknowledged in writing by the FDIC. Final action will be taken within 21 days after receipt of a substantially complete application, unless the applicant is notified in writing that additional review is warranted. If the FDIC does not act within the expedited processing period, it does not constitute an automatic or default approval.


§ 303.25 Continuation of deposit insurance upon withdrawing from membership in the Federal Reserve System.

(a) Content of application. To continue its insured status upon withdrawal from membership in the Federal Reserve System, a state-chartered bank shall submit a letter application to the appropriate FDIC office. A complete application shall consist of the following information:


(1) A copy of the letter, and any attachments thereto, sent to the appropriate Federal Reserve Bank setting forth the bank’s intention to terminate its membership;


(2) A copy of the letter from the Federal Reserve Bank acknowledging the bank’s notice to terminate membership;


(3) A statement regarding any anticipated changes in the bank’s general business plan during the next 12-month period; and


(4)(i) A statement by the bank’s management that there are no outstanding or proposed corrective programs or supervisory agreements with the Federal Reserve System.


(ii) If such programs or agreements exist, a statement by the applicant that its Board of Directors is willing to enter into similar programs or agreements with the FDIC which would become effective upon withdrawal from the Federal Reserve System.


(b) Processing. An application for deposit insurance under this section will be acknowledged in writing by the FDIC. The FDIC shall notify the applicant, within 15 days of receipt of a substantially complete application, either that federal deposit insurance will continue upon termination of membership in the Federal Reserve System or that additional review is warranted and the applicant will be notified, in writing, of the FDIC’s final decision regarding continuation of deposit insurance. If the FDIC does not act within the expedited processing period, it does not constitute an automatic or default approval.


§§ 303.26-303.39 [Reserved]

Subpart C – Establishment and Relocation of Domestic Branches and Offices

§ 303.40 Scope.

(a) General. This subpart sets forth the application requirements and procedures for insured state nonmember banks to establish a branch, relocate a branch or main office, and retain existing branches after the interstate relocation of the main office subject to the approval by the FDIC pursuant to sections 13(f), 13(k), 18(d) and 44 of the FDI Act.


(b) Merger transaction. Applications for approval of the acquisition and establishment of branches in connection with a merger transaction under section 18(c) of the FDI Act (12 U.S.C. 1828(c)), are processed in accordance with subpart D (Merger Transactions) of this part.


(c) Insured branches of foreign banks and foreign branches of domestic banks. Applications regarding insured branches of foreign banks and foreign branches of domestic banks are processed in accordance with subpart J (International Banking) of this part.


(d) Interstate acquisition of individual branch. Applications requesting approval of the interstate acquisition of an individual branch or branches located in a state other than the applicant’s home state without the acquisition of the whole bank are treated as interstate bank merger transactions under section 44 of the FDI Act (12 U.S.C. 1831a(u)), and are processed in accordance with subpart D (Merger Transactions) of this part.


§ 303.41 Definitions.

For purposes of this subpart:


(a) Branch, except as provided in this paragraph, includes any branch bank, branch office, additional office, or any branch place of business located in any State of the United States or in any territory of the United States, Puerto Rico, Guam, American Samoa, the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands, the Virgin Islands, and the Northern Mariana Islands at which deposits are received or checks paid or money lent. A branch does not include an automated teller machine, an automated loan machine, a remote service unit, or a facility described in section 303.46. The term branch also includes the following:


(1) A messenger service that is operated by a bank or its affiliate that picks up and delivers items relating to transactions in which deposits are received or checks paid or money lent. A messenger service established and operated by a non-affiliated third party generally does not constitute a branch for purposes of this subpart. Banks contracting with third parties to provide messenger services should consult with the FDIC to determine if the messenger service constitutes a branch.


(2) A mobile branch, other than a messenger service, that does not have a single, permanent site and uses a vehicle that travels to various locations to enable the public to conduct banking business. A mobile branch may serve defined locations on a regular schedule or may serve a defined area at varying times and locations.


(3) A temporary branch that operates for a limited period of time not to exceed one year as a public service, such as during an emergency or disaster situation.


(4) A seasonal branch that operates at various periodically recurring intervals, such as during state and local fairs, college registration periods, and other similar occasions.


(b) Branch relocation means a move within the same immediate neighborhood of the existing branch that does not substantially affect the nature of the business of the branch or the customers of the branch. Moving a branch to a location outside its immediate neighborhood is considered the closing of an existing branch and the establishment of a new branch. Closing of a branch is covered in the FDIC Statement of Policy Concerning Branch Closing Notices and Policies. 1 FDIC Law, Regulations, Related Acts 5391; see § 309.4 (a) and (b) of this chapter for availability.


(c) De novo branch means a branch of a bank which is established by the bank as a branch and does not become a branch of such bank as a result of:


(1) The acquisition by the bank of an insured depository institution or a branch of an insured depository institution; or


(2) The conversion, merger, or consolidation of any such institution or branch.


(d) Home state means the state by which the bank is chartered.


(e) Host state means a state, other than the home state of the bank, in which the bank maintains, or seeks to establish and maintain, a branch.


[67 FR 79247, Dec. 27, 2002, as amended at 73 FR 35338, June 23, 2008; 73 FR 55432, Sept. 25, 2008]


§ 303.42 Filing procedures.

(a) General. An applicant shall submit an application to the appropriate FDIC office on the date the notice required by § 303.44 is published, or within 5 days after the date of the last required publication.


(b) Content of filing. A complete letter application shall include the following information:


(1) A statement of intent to establish a branch, or to relocate the main office or a branch;


(2) The exact location of the proposed site including the street address. With regard to messenger services, specify the geographic area in which the services will be available. With regard to a mobile branch specify the community or communities in which the vehicle will operate and the manner in which it will be used;


(3) Details concerning any involvement in the proposal by an insider of the bank as defined in § 303.2(u), including any financial arrangements relating to fees, the acquisition of property, leasing of property, and construction contracts;


(4) Comments on any changes in services to be offered, the community to be served, or any other effect the proposal may have on the applicant’s compliance with the CRA;


(5) A copy of each newspaper publication required by § 303.44 of this subpart, the name and address of the newspaper, and date of the publication;


(6) When an application is submitted to relocate the main office of the applicant from one state to another, a statement of the applicant’s intent regarding retention of branches in the state where the main office exists prior to relocation.


(c) Undercapitalized institutions. Applications to establish a branch by applicants subject to section 38 of the FDI Act (12 U.S.C. 1831o) also should provide the information required by § 303.204. Applications pursuant to sections 38 and 18(d) of the FDI Act (12 U.S.C. 1831o and 1828(d)) may be filed concurrently or as a single application.


(d) Additional information. The FDIC may request additional information to complete processing.


[67 FR 79247, Dec. 27, 2002, as amended at 85 FR 72555, Nov. 13, 2020]


§ 303.43 Processing.

(a) Expedited processing for eligible depository institutions. An application filed under this subpart by an eligible depository institution as defined in § 303.2(r) will be acknowledged in writing by the FDIC and will receive expedited processing, unless the applicant is notified in writing to the contrary and provided with the basis for that decision. The FDIC may remove an application from expedited processing for any of the reasons set forth in § 303.11(c)(2). Absent such removal, an application processed under expedited processing will be deemed approved on the latest of the following:


(1) The 21st day after receipt by the FDIC of a substantially complete filing;


(2) The 5th day after expiration of the comment period described in§ 303.44; or


(3) In the case of an application to establish and operate a de novo branch in a state that is not the applicant’s home state and in which the applicant does not maintain a branch, the 5th day after the FDIC receives confirmation from the host state that the applicant has both complied with the filing requirements of the host state and submitted a copy of the application with the FDIC to the host state bank supervisor.


(b) Standard processing. For those applications which are not processed pursuant to the expedited procedures, the FDIC will provide the applicant with written notification of the final action when the decision is rendered.


§ 303.44 Public notice requirements.

(a) Newspaper publications. For applications to establish or relocate a branch, a notice as described in § 303.7(c) shall be published once in a newspaper of general circulation. For applications to relocate a main office, notice shall be published at least once each week on the same day for two consecutive weeks. The required publication shall be made in the following communities:


(1) To establish a branch. In the community in which the main office is located and in the communities to be served by the branch (including messenger services and mobile branches).


(2) To relocate a main office. In the community in which the main office is currently located and in the community to which it is proposed the main office will relocate.


(3) To relocate a branch. In the community in which the branch is located.


(b) Public comments. Comments by interested parties must be received by the appropriate regional director within 15 days after the date of the last newspaper publication required by paragraph (a) of this section, unless the comment period has been extended or reopened in accordance with § 303.9(b)(2).


(c) Lobby notices. In the case of applications to relocate a main office or a branch, a copy of the required newspaper publication shall be posted in the public lobby of the office to be relocated for at least 15 days beginning on the date of the last published notice required by paragraph (a) of this section.


§ 303.45 Special provisions.

(a) Emergency or disaster events. (1) In the case of an emergency or disaster at a main office or a branch which requires that an office be immediately relocated to a temporary location, applicants shall notify the appropriate FDIC office within 3 days of such temporary relocation.


(2) Within 10 days of the temporary relocation resulting from an emergency or disaster, the bank shall submit a written application to the appropriate FDIC office, that identifies the nature of the emergency or disaster, specifies the location of the temporary branch, and provides an estimate of the duration the bank plans to operate the temporary branch.


(3) As part of the review process, the FDIC will determine on a case by case basis whether additional information is necessary and may waive public notice requirements.


(b) Redesignation of main office and existing branch. In cases where an applicant desires to redesignate its main office as a branch and redesignate an existing branch as the main office, a single application shall be submitted. The FDIC may waive the public notice requirements in instances where an application presents no significant or novel policy, supervisory, CRA, compliance or legal concerns. A waiver will be granted only to a redesignation within the applicant’s home state.


(c) Expiration of approval. Approval of an application expires if within 18 months after the approval date a branch has not commenced business or a relocation has not been completed.


§ 303.46 Financial education programs that include the provision of bank products and services.

No branch application or prior approval is required in order for a state nonmember bank to participate in one or more financial education programs that involve receiving deposits, paying withdrawals, or lending money if:


(a) Such service or services are provided on school premises, or a facility used by the school;


(b) Such service or services are provided at the discretion of the school;


(c) The principal purpose of each program is financial education. For example, the principal purpose of a program would be considered to be financial education if the program is designed to teach students the principles of personal financial management, banking operations, or the benefits of saving for the future, and is not designed for the purpose of profit-making; and


(d) Each program is conducted in a manner that is consistent with safe and sound banking practices and complies with applicable law.


[73 FR 35338, June 23, 2008]


§§ 303.47-303.59 [Reserved]

Subpart D – Merger Transactions

§ 303.60 Scope.

This subpart sets forth the application requirements and procedures for transactions subject to FDIC approval under the Bank Merger Act, section 18(c) of the FDI Act (12 U.S.C. 1828(c)). Additional guidance is contained in the FDIC “Statement of Policy on Bank Merger Transactions” (1 FDIC Law, Regulations, Related Acts 5145; see § 309.4(a) and (b) of this chapter for availability).


§ 303.61 Definitions.

For purposes of this subpart:


(a) Merger transaction includes any transaction:


(1) In which an insured depository institution merges or consolidates with any other insured depository institution or, either directly or indirectly, acquires the assets of, or assumes liability to pay any deposits made in, any other insured depository institution; or


(2) In which an insured depository institution merges or consolidates with any noninsured bank or institution or assumes liability to pay any deposits made in, or similar liabilities of, any noninsured bank or institution, or in which an insured depository institution transfers assets to any noninsured bank or institution in consideration of the assumption of any portion of the deposits made in the insured depository institution.


(b) Corporate reorganization means a merger transaction that involves solely an insured depository institution and one or more of its affiliates.


(c) Interim merger transaction means a merger transaction (other than a purchase and assumption transaction) between an operating depository institution and a newly-formed depository institution or corporation that will not operate independently and that exists solely for the purpose of facilitating a corporate reorganization.


(d) Resulting institution refers to the acquiring, assuming or resulting institution in a merger transaction.


[67 FR 79247, Dec. 27, 2002, as amended at 71 FR 20526, Apr. 21, 2006; 73 FR 2145, Jan. 14, 2008]


§ 303.62 Transactions requiring prior approval.

(a) Merger transactions. The following merger transactions require the prior written approval of the FDIC under this subpart:


(1) Any merger transaction, including any corporate reorganization, interim merger transaction, or optional conversion, in which the resulting institution is to be an FDIC-supervised institution; and


(2) Any merger transaction, including any corporate reorganization, or interim merger transaction, that involves an uninsured bank or institution.


(b) Related regulations. Transactions covered by this subpart also may be subject to other regulations or application requirements, including the following:


(1) Interstate merger transactions. Merger transactions between insured banks that are chartered in different states are subject to the regulations of section 44 of the FDI Act (12 U.S.C. 1831u). In the case of a merger transaction that consists of the acquisition by an out of state bank of a branch without acquisition of the bank, the branch is treated for section 44 purposes as a bank whose home state is the state in which the branch is located.


(2) Deposit insurance. An application for deposit insurance will be required in connection with a merger transaction between a state-chartered interim institution and an insured depository institution if the related merger application is being acted upon by a Federal banking agency other than the FDIC. If the FDIC is the Federal banking agency responsible for acting on the related merger application, a separate application for deposit insurance is not necessary. Procedures for applying for deposit insurance are set forth in subpart B of this part. An application for deposit insurance will not be required in connection with a merger transaction (other than a purchase and assumption transaction) of a federally-chartered interim institution and an insured institution, even if the resulting institution is to operate under the charter of the Federal interim institution.


(3) Branch closings. Branch closings in connection with a merger transaction are subject to the notice requirements of section 42 of the FDI Act (12 U.S.C. 1831r-1), including requirements for notice to customers. These requirements are addressed in the “Interagency Policy Statement Concerning Branch Closings Notices and Policies” (1 FDIC Law, Regulations, Related Acts (FDIC) 5391; see § 309.4(a) and (b) of this chapter for availability).


(4) Undercapitalized institutions. Applications for a merger transaction by applicants subject to section 38 of the FDI Act (12 U.S.C. 1831o) should also provide the information required by § 303.204. Applications pursuant to sections 38 and 18(c) of the FDI Act (12 U.S.C, 1831o and 1828(c)) may be filed concurrently or as a single application.


(5) Certification of assumption of deposit liability. Whenever all of the deposit liabilities of an insured depository institution are assumed by one or more insured depository institutions by merger, consolidation, other statutory assumption, or by contract, the transferring insured depository institution, or its legal successor, shall provide an accurate written certification to the FDIC that its deposit liabilities have been assumed, in accordance with 12 CFR part 307.


[85 FR 3243, Jan. 21, 2020]


§ 303.63 Filing procedures.

(a) General. Applications required under this subpart shall be filed with the appropriate FDIC office. The appropriate forms and instructions may be obtained upon request from any FDIC regional director.


(b) Merger transactions. Applications for approval of merger transactions shall be accompanied by copies of all agreements or proposed agreements relating to the merger transaction and any other information requested by the FDIC.


(c) Interim merger transactions. Applications for approval of interim merger transactions and any related deposit insurance applications shall be made by filing the forms and other documents required by paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section and such other information as may be required by the FDIC for consideration of the request for deposit insurance.


[67 FR 79247, Dec. 27, 2002, as amended at 73 FR 2145, Jan. 14, 2008]


§ 303.64 Processing.

(a) Expedited processing for eligible depository institutions – (1) General. An application filed under this subpart by an eligible depository institution as defined in § 303.2(r) and which meets the additional criteria in paragraph (a)(4) of this section will be acknowledged by the FDIC in writing and will receive expedited processing, unless the applicant is notified in writing to the contrary and provided with the basis for that decision. The FDIC may remove an application from expedited processing for any of the reasons set forth in § 303.11(c)(2).


(2) Timing. Under expedited processing, the FDIC will take action on an application by the date that is the latest of:


(i) 45 days after the date of the FDIC’s receipt of a substantially complete merger application; or


(ii) 10 days after the date of the last notice publication required under § 303.65 of this subpart; or


(iii) 5 days after receipt of the Attorney General’s report on the competitive factors involved in the proposed transaction; or


(iv) For an interstate merger transaction subject to the provisions of section 44 of the FDI Act (12 U.S.C. 1831u), 5 days after the FDIC receives confirmation from the host state (as defined in § 303.41(e)) that the applicant has both complied with the filing requirements of the host state and submitted a copy of the FDIC merger application to the host state’s bank supervisor.


(3) No automatic approval. Notwithstanding paragraph (a)(1) or (2) of this section, if the FDIC does not act within the expedited processing period, it does not constitute an automatic or default approval.


(4) Criteria. The FDIC will process an application using expedited procedures if:


(i) Immediately following the merger transaction, the resulting institution will be “well-capitalized” pursuant to subpart H of part 324 of this chapter (12 CFR part 324), as applicable; and


(ii)(A) All parties to the merger transaction are eligible depository institutions as defined in § 303.2(r); or


(B) The acquiring party is an eligible depository institution as defined in § 303.2(r) and the amount of the total assets to be transferred does not exceed an amount equal to 10 percent of the acquiring institution’s total assets as reported in its report of condition for the quarter immediately preceding the filing of the merger application.


(b) Standard processing. For those applications not processed pursuant to the expedited procedures, the FDIC will provide the applicant with written notification of the final action taken by the FDIC on the application when the decision is rendered.


(c) Processing for State savings associations. Notwithstanding paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section, the FDIC will approve or disapprove an application filed by a State savings association to acquire or be acquired by another insured depository institution that is required to be filed with the FDIC within 60 days after the date of the FDIC’s receipt of a substantially complete merger application, subject to the FDIC’s discretion to extend such period by an additional 30 days if any material information submitted is substantially inaccurate or incomplete.


(1) The FDIC shall notify an applicant that is a State savings association in writing of the date the application is deemed substantially complete. The FDIC may request additional information at any time.


(2) Notwithstanding this paragraph (c), if the FDIC does not approve or disapprove an application within the 60-day or extended processing period it does not constitute an automatic or default approval.


[85 FR 3244, Jan. 21, 2020]


§ 303.65 Public notice requirements.

(a) General. Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, an applicant for approval of a merger transaction must publish notice of the proposed transaction on at least three occasions at approximately equal intervals in a newspaper of general circulation in the community or communities where the main offices of the merging institutions are located or, if there is no such newspaper in the community, then in the newspaper of general circulation published nearest thereto.


(1) First publication. The first publication of the notice should be as close as practicable to the date on which the application is filed with the FDIC, but no more than 5 days prior to the filing date.


(2) Last publication. The last publication of the notice shall be on the 25th day after the first publication or, if the newspaper does not publish on the 25th day, on the newspaper’s publication date that is closest to the 25th day.


(b) Exceptions – (1) Emergency requiring expeditious action. If the FDIC determines that an emergency exists requiring expeditious action, notice shall be published twice. The first notice shall be published as soon as possible after the FDIC notifies the applicant of such determination. The second notice shall be published on the 7th day after the first publication or, if the newspaper does not publish on the 7th day, on the newspaper’s publication date that is closest to the 7th day.


(2) Probable failure. If the FDIC determines that it must act immediately to prevent the probable failure of one of the institutions involved in a proposed merger transaction, publication is not required.


(c) Content of notice – (1) General. The notice shall conform to the public notice requirements set forth in § 303.7.


(2) Branches. If it is contemplated that the resulting institution will operate offices of the other institution(s) as branches, the following statement shall be included in the notice required in § 303.7(b):



It is contemplated that all offices of the above-named institutions will continue to be operated (with the exception of [insert identity and location of each office that will not be operated]).

(3) Emergency requiring expeditious action. If the FDIC determines that an emergency exists requiring expeditious action, the notice shall specify as the closing date of the public comment period the date that is the 10th day after the date of the first publication.


(d) Public comments. Comments must be received by the appropriate FDIC office within 30 days after the first publication of the notice, unless the comment period has been extended or reopened in accordance with § 303.9(b)(2). If the FDIC has determined that an emergency exists requiring expeditious action, comments must be received by the appropriate FDIC office within 10 days after the first publication.


§§ 303.66-303.79 [Reserved]

Subpart E – Change in Bank Control


Source:80 FR 65899, Oct. 28, 2015, unless otherwise noted.

§ 303.80 Scope.

This subpart implements the provisions of the Change in Bank Control Act of 1978, section 7(j) of the FDI Act (12 U.S.C. 1817(j)) (CBCA), and sets forth the filing requirements and processing procedures for a notice of change in control with respect to the acquisition of control of a State nonmember bank, a State savings association, or certain parent companies of either a State nonmember bank or a State savings association.


§ 303.81 Definitions.

For purposes of this subpart:


(a) Acting in concert means knowing participation in a joint activity or parallel action towards a common goal of acquiring control of a covered institution whether or not pursuant to an express agreement.


(b) Company means a company as defined in section 2 of the Bank Holding Company Act of 1956, as amended (12 U.S.C. 1841 et seq.) and any person that is not an individual including for example, a limited liability company.


(c) Control means the power, directly or indirectly, to direct the management or policies of a covered institution or to vote 25 percent or more of any class of voting securities of a covered institution.


(d) Convertible securities mean debt or equity interests that may be converted into voting securities.


(e) Covered institution means an insured State nonmember bank, an insured State savings association, and any company that controls, directly or indirectly, an insured State nonmember bank or an insured State savings association other than a holding company that is the subject of an exemption described in either section 303.84(a)(3) or (a)(8).


(f) Immediate family means a person’s parents, mother-in-law, father-in-law, children, step-children, siblings, step-siblings, brothers-in-law, sisters-in-law, grandparents, and grandchildren, whether biological, adoptive, adjudicated, contractual, or de facto; the spouse of any of the foregoing; and the person’s spouse.


(g) Person means an individual, corporation, limited liability company (LLC), partnership, trust, association, joint venture, pool, syndicate, sole proprietorship, unincorporated organization, voting trust, or any other form of entity; and includes each party to a voting agreement and any group of persons acting in concert.


(h) Management official means any officer, LLC manager, director, partner, or trustee of an entity, or other person with similar functions and powers with respect to a company.


(i)(1) Voting securities means shares of common or preferred stock, general or limited partnership shares or interests, membership interests, or similar interests if the shares or interests, by statute, charter, or in any manner, entitle the holder:


(i) To vote for, or to select, directors, trustees, managers of an LLC, partners, or other persons exercising similar functions of the issuing entity; or


(ii) To vote on, or to direct, the conduct of the operations or significant policies of the issuing entity.


(2) Nonvoting shares: Shares of common or preferred stock, limited partnership shares or interests, membership interests, or similar interests are not “voting securities” if:


(i) Any voting rights associated with the shares or interests are limited solely to the type customarily provided by State statute with regard to matters that would significantly and adversely affect the rights or preference of the security or other interest, such as the issuance of additional amounts or classes of senior securities, the modification of the terms of the security or interest, the dissolution of the issuing entity, or the payment of dividends by the issuing entity when preferred dividends are in arrears;


(ii) The shares or interests represent an essentially passive investment or financing device and do not otherwise provide the holder with control over the issuing entity; and


(iii) The shares or interests do not entitle the holder, by statute, charter, or in any manner, to select, or to vote for the selection of, directors, trustees, managers of an LLC, partners, or persons exercising similar functions of the issuing entity.


(3) Class of voting securities: Voting securities issued by a single issuer are deemed to be the same class of voting securities, regardless of differences in dividend rights or liquidation preference, if the securities are voted together as a single class on all matters for which the securities have voting rights other than matters described in paragraph (i)(2)(i) of this section that affect solely the rights or preferences of the securities.


§ 303.82 Transactions that require prior notice.

(a) Prior notice requirement. (1) Except as provided in §§ 303.83 and 303.84, no person, acting directly or indirectly, or through or in concert with one or more persons, shall acquire control of a covered institution unless the person shall have given the FDIC prior notice of the proposed acquisition as provided in the CBCA and this subpart, and the FDIC has not disapproved the acquisition within 60 days or such longer period as may be permitted under the CBCA; and


(2) Except as provided in §§ 303.83 and 303.84, and unless waived by the FDIC, no person who has been approved to acquire control of a covered institution and who has maintained that control shall acquire, directly or indirectly, or through or in concert with one or more persons, voting securities of such covered institution if that person’s ownership, control, or power to vote will increase from less than 25 percent to 25 percent or more of any class of voting securities of the covered institution, unless the person shall have given the FDIC prior notice of the proposed acquisition as provided in the CBCA and this subpart, and the FDIC has not disapproved the acquisition within 60 days or such longer period as may be permitted under the CBCA.


(b) Rebuttable presumptions – (1) Rebuttable presumptions of control. The FDIC presumes that an acquisition of voting securities of a covered institution constitutes the acquisition of the power to direct the management or policies of that institution requiring prior notice to the FDIC, if, immediately after the transaction, the acquiring person will own, control, or hold with power to vote 10 percent or more of any class of voting securities of the institution, and if:


(i) The institution has registered securities under section 12 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (15 U.S.C. 78l); or


(ii) No other person will own, control or hold the power to vote a greater percentage of that class of voting securities immediately after the transaction.


(2) Rebuttable presumptions of acting in concert. The following persons who own or control, or propose to own or control voting securities in a covered institution, shall be presumed to be acting in concert for purposes of this subpart:


(i) A company and any controlling shareholder or management official of the company;


(ii) An individual and one or more members of the individual’s immediate family;


(iii) Companies under common control or a company and each company it controls;


(iv) Two or more persons that have made, or propose to make, a joint filing related to the proposed acquisition under sections 13 or 14 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (15 U.S.C. 78m or 78n), and the rules promulgated thereunder by the Securities and Exchange Commission;


(v) A person and any trust for which the person serves as trustee or any trust for which the person is a beneficiary; and


(vi) Persons that are parties to any agreement, contract, understanding, relationship, or other arrangement, whether written or otherwise, regarding the acquisition, voting, or transfer of control of voting securities of a covered institution, other than through revocable proxies as described in § 303.84(a)(5).


(3) Convertible securities, options, and warrants. The acquisition of convertible securities, or options or warrants to acquire voting securities is presumed to constitute the acquisition of voting securities.


(4) Rebuttal of presumptions. The FDIC will afford any person seeking to rebut a presumption in this paragraph (b) an opportunity to present its views in writing.


(c) Acquisition of loans in default. An acquisition of a loan in default that is secured by voting securities of a covered institution is deemed to be an acquisition of the underlying securities for purposes of this subpart. Before acquiring a loan in default that upon foreclosure would result in the acquiring person owning, controlling, or holding with the power to vote a controlling amount of a covered institution’s voting securities, the potential acquirer must give the FDIC prior written notice as specified in this subpart.


§ 303.83 Transactions that require notice, but not prior notice.

(a) Notice within 90 days after the acquisition. The following acquisitions of voting securities of a covered institution, which otherwise would require prior notice under this subpart, instead require the acquirer to provide to the appropriate FDIC office within 90 calendar days after the acquisition all relevant information requested by the FDIC:


(1) The acquisition of voting securities as a bona fide gift;


(2) The acquisition of voting securities in satisfaction of a debt previously contracted in good faith, except as provided in § 303.82(c); and


(3) The acquisition of voting securities through inheritance.


(b) Notice within 90 days after receiving notice of the event giving rise to the acquisition of control. The following acquisitions of control of a covered institution, which otherwise would require prior notice under this subpart, instead require the person acquiring control to provide to the appropriate FDIC office, within 90 calendar days after receiving notice of the event giving rise to the acquisition of control, all relevant information requested by the FDIC:


(1) The acquisition of control resulting from a redemption of voting securities by the issuing covered institution; and


(2) The acquisition of control as a result of any event or action (including without limitation the sale of securities) by any third party that is not within the control of the person acquiring control.


(c) The FDIC may disapprove a notice filed after an acquisition of control, and nothing in this section limits the authority of the FDIC to disapprove a notice pursuant to § 303.86(c).


(d) The relevant information that the FDIC may require under this section may include all information and documents routinely required for a prior notice as provided in § 303.85.


(e) If the FDIC disapproves a Notice filed under this § 303.83, the notificant(s) must divest control of the covered institution which may include, without limitation, disposing of some or all of the voting securities so that the notificant(s) is no longer in control of the covered institution, within such period of time and in the manner that the FDIC may determine.


§ 303.84 Transactions that do not require notice.

(a) Exempt transactions. The following transactions do not require notice to the FDIC under this subpart:


(1) The acquisition of additional voting securities of a covered institution by a person who:


(i) Held the power to vote 25 percent or more of any class of voting securities of the institution continuously since the later of March 9, 1979, or the date that the institution commenced business; or


(ii) Is presumed, under § 303.82(b) to have controlled the institution continuously since March 9, 1979, if the aggregate amount of voting securities held does not exceed 25 percent or more of any class of voting securities of the institution or, in other cases, where the FDIC determines that the person has controlled the institution continuously since March 9, 1979;


(2) The acquisition of additional voting securities of a covered institution by a person who has lawfully acquired and maintained control of the institution (for purposes of § 303.82) after obtaining the FDIC’s non-objection under the CBCA and the FDIC’s regulations or the OTS’s non-objection under the repealed Change in Savings and Loan Control Act, 12 U.S.C. 1730(q), and the regulations thereunder then in effect, to acquire control of the institution, unless a notice is required for an increase in ownership described in 12 CFR 303.82(a)(2);


(3) Acquisitions of voting securities subject to approval under section 3 of the Bank Holding Company Act (12 U.S.C. 1842(a)), section 18(c) of the FDI Act (12 U.S.C. 1828(c)), or section 10 of the Home Owners’ Loan Act (12 U.S.C. 1467a);


(4) Any transaction described in sections 2(a)(5), 3(a)(A), or 3(a)(B) of the Bank Holding Company Act (12 U.S.C. 1841(a)(5), 1842(a)(A), or 1842(a)(B)) by a person described in those provisions;


(5) A customary one-time solicitation of a revocable proxy;


(6) The receipt of voting securities of a covered institution through a pro rata stock dividend or stock split if the proportional interests of the recipients remain substantially the same;


(7) The acquisition of voting securities in a foreign bank that has an insured branch in the United States. (This exemption does not extend to the reports and information required under paragraphs 9, 10, and 12 of the CBCA (12 U.S.C. 1817(j)(9), (10), and (12)); and


(8) The acquisition of voting securities of a depository institution holding company for which the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System reviews a notice pursuant to the CBCA (12 U.S.C. 1817(j)).


§ 303.85 Filing procedures.

(a) Filing notice. (1) A notice required under this subpart shall be filed with the appropriate FDIC office and shall contain all the information required by paragraph 6 of the CBCA, section 7(j) of the FDI Act, (12 U.S.C. 1817(j)(6)), or prescribed in the designated interagency forms which may be obtained from any FDIC regional director.


(2) The FDIC may waive any of the informational requirements of the notice if the FDIC determines that it is in the public interest.


(3) A notificant shall notify the appropriate FDIC office immediately of any material changes in the information contained in a notice submitted to the FDIC, including changes in financial or other conditions.


(4) When the acquiring person is an individual, or group of individuals acting in concert, the requirement to provide personal financial data may be satisfied by a current statement of assets and liabilities and an income summary, as required in the designated interagency form, together with a statement of any material changes since the date of the statement or summary. The FDIC may require additional information if appropriate.


(b) Other laws. Nothing in this subpart shall affect any obligation which the acquiring person(s) may have to comply with the federal securities laws or other laws.


§ 303.86 Processing.

(a) Acceptance of notice, additional information. The FDIC shall notify the person or persons submitting a notice under this subpart in writing of the date the notice is accepted as substantially complete. The FDIC may request additional information at any time.


(b) Commencement of the 60-day notice period: consummation of acquisition. (1) The 60-day notice period specified in § 303.82 shall commence on the day after the date of acceptance of a substantially complete notice by the appropriate regional director. The notificant(s) may consummate the proposed acquisition after the expiration of the 60-day notice period, unless the FDIC disapproves the proposed acquisition or extends the notice period as provided in the CBCA.


(2) The notificant(s) may consummate the proposed transaction before the expiration of the 60-day period, including any extensions, if the FDIC notifies the notificant(s) in writing of its intention not to disapprove the acquisition.


(c) Disapproval of acquisition of control. Subpart D of 12 CFR part 308 sets forth the rules of practice and procedure for a notice of disapproval.


§ 303.87 Public notice requirements.

(a) Publication – (1) Newspaper announcement. Any person(s) filing a notice under this subpart shall publish an announcement soliciting public comment on the proposed acquisition. The announcement shall be published in a newspaper of general circulation in the community in which the home office of the covered institution to be acquired is located.


(2) Timing of publication. The announcement shall be published as close as is practicable to the date the notice is filed with the appropriate FDIC office, but in no event more than 10 calendar days before or after the filing date. If the filing is not filed in accordance with the CBCA and this subpart within the time periods specified herein, the acquiring person(s) shall, within 10 days of being directed by the FDIC to file a Notice, publish an announcement of the acquisition of control.


(3) Contents of newspaper announcement. The newspaper announcement shall conform to the public notice requirements set forth in § 303.7. If the filing is not filed in accordance with the CBCA and this subpart within the time periods specified herein, the announcement shall also include the date of the acquisition and contain a statement indicating that the FDIC is currently reviewing the acquisition of control.


(b) Delay of publication. The FDIC may permit delay in the publication required by this section if the FDIC determines, for good cause, that it is in the public interest to grant such a delay. Requests for delay of publication may be submitted to the appropriate FDIC office.


(c) Shortening or waiving public comment period, waiving publications; acting before close of public comment period. The FDIC may shorten the public comment period to a period of not less than 10 days, or waive the public comment or newspaper publication requirements of paragraph (a) of this section, or act on a notice before the expiration of a public comment period, if it determines in writing either that an emergency exists or that disclosure of the notice, solicitation of public comment, or delay until expiration of the public comment period would seriously threaten the safety and soundness of the State nonmember bank or State savings association to be acquired.


(d) Consideration of public comments. In acting upon a notice filed under this subpart, the FDIC shall consider all public comments received in writing within 20 days following the required newspaper publication or, if the FDIC has shortened the public comment period pursuant to paragraph (c) of this section, within such shorter period.


§ 303.88 Reporting of stock loans and changes in chief executive officers and directors.

(a) Requirements of reporting stock loans. (1) Any foreign bank or affiliate of a foreign bank that has credit outstanding to any person or group of persons, in the aggregate, which is secured, directly or indirectly, by 25 percent or more of any class of voting securities of a covered institution, shall file a consolidated report with the appropriate FDIC office.


(2) Any voting securities of the covered institution held by the foreign bank or any affiliate of the foreign bank as principal must be included in the calculation of the number of voting securities in which the foreign bank or its affiliate has a security interest for purposes of this paragraph (a).


(b) Definitions. For purposes of paragraph (a) of this section:


(1) Foreign bank shall have the same meaning as in section 1(b) of the International Banking Act of 1978 (12 U.S.C. 3101).


(2) Affiliate shall have the same meaning as in section 1(b) of the International Banking Act of 1978 (12 U.S.C. 3101).


(3) Credit outstanding includes any loan or extension of credit; the issuance of a guarantee, acceptance, or letter of credit, including an endorsement or standby letter of credit; and any other type of transaction that extends credit or financing to the person or group of persons.


(4) Group of persons includes any number of persons that the foreign bank or any affiliate of a foreign bank has reason to believe:


(i) Are acting together, in concert, or with one another to acquire or control voting securities of the same covered institution, including an acquisition of voting securities of the same covered institution at approximately the same time under substantially the same terms; or


(ii) Have made, or propose to make, a joint filing under section 13 or 14 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (15 U.S.C. 78m or 78n), and the rules promulgated thereunder by the Securities and Exchange Commission regarding ownership of the voting securities of the same covered institution.


(c) Exceptions. Compliance with paragraph (a) of this section is not required if:


(1) The person or group of persons referred to in paragraph (a) has disclosed the amount borrowed and the security interest therein to the appropriate FDIC office in connection with a notice filed under the CBCA, an application filed under either 12 U.S.C. 1841, et seq. or 12 U.S.C. 1467a, or any other application filed with the FDIC as a substitute for a notice under § 303.82 of this subpart, including an application filed under section 18(c) of the FDI Act (Bank Merger Act, 12 U.S.C. 1828(c)) or section 5 of the FDI Act (12 U.S.C. 1815); or


(2) The transaction involves a person or group of persons that has been the owner or owners of record of the stock for a period of one year or more; or, if the transaction involves stock issued by a newly chartered bank, before the bank is opened for business.


(d) Report requirements for purposes of paragraph (a) of this section. (1) The consolidated report must indicate the number and percentage of voting securities securing each applicable extension of credit, the identity of the borrower, the number of voting securities held as principal by the foreign bank and any affiliate thereof, and any additional information that the FDIC may require in connection with a particular report.


(2) A foreign bank, or any affiliate of a foreign bank, shall file the consolidated report in writing within 30 days of the date on which the foreign bank or affiliate first believes that the security for any outstanding credit consists of 25 percent or more of any class of voting securities of a covered institution.


(e) Foreign bank or affiliate not supervised by FDIC. If the foreign bank, or any affiliate thereof, is not supervised by the FDIC, it shall file a copy of the report filed under paragraph (a) of this section with its appropriate Federal banking agency.


(f) Reporting requirement. After the consummation of a change in control, a covered institution must notify the FDIC in writing of any changes or replacements of its chief executive officer or of any director occurring during the 12-month period beginning on the date of consummation. This notice must be filed within 10 days of such change or replacement and must include a statement of the past and current business and professional affiliations of the new chief executive officers or directors.


§§ 303.89-303.99 [Reserved]

Subpart F – Change of Director or Senior Executive Officer

§ 303.100 Scope.

This subpart sets forth the circumstances under which an FDIC-supervised institution must notify the FDIC of a change in any member of its board of directors or any senior executive officer and the procedures for filing such notice. This subpart implements section 32 of the FDI Act (12 U.S.C. 1831i).


[85 FR 3244, Jan. 21, 2020]


§ 303.101 Definitions.

For purposes of this subpart:


(a) Director means a person who serves on the board of directors or board of trustees of an FDIC-supervised institution, except that this term does not include an advisory director who:


(1) Is not elected by the shareholders;


(2) Is not authorized to vote on any matters before the board of directors or board of trustees or any committee thereof;


(3) Solely provides general policy advice to the board of directors or board of trustees and any committee thereof; and


(4) Has not been identified by the FDIC as a person who performs the functions of a director for purposes of this subpart.


(b) Senior executive officer means a person who holds the title of president, chief executive officer, chief operating officer, chief managing official (in an insured state branch of a foreign bank), chief financial officer, chief lending officer, chief investment officer, or, without regard to title, salary, or compensation, performs the function of one or more of these positions. Senior executive officer also includes any other person identified by the FDIC, whether or not hired as an employee, with significant influence over, or who participates in, major policymaking decisions of the FDIC-supervised institution.


(c) Troubled condition means any FDIC-supervised institution that:


(1) Has a composite rating, as determined in its most recent report of examination, of 4 or 5 under the Uniform Financial Institutions Rating System (UFIRS), or in the case of an insured state branch of a foreign bank, an equivalent rating; or


(2) Is subject to a proceeding initiated by the FDIC for termination or suspension of deposit insurance; or


(3) Is subject to a cease-and-desist order or written agreement issued by either the FDIC or the appropriate state banking authority that requires action to improve the financial condition of the FDIC-supervised institution or is subject to a proceeding initiated by the FDIC or state authority which contemplates the issuance of an order that requires action to improve the financial condition of the FDIC-supervised institution, unless otherwise informed in writing by the FDIC; or


(4) Is informed in writing by the FDIC that it is in troubled condition for purposes of the requirements of this subpart on the basis of the FDIC-supervised institution’s most recent report of condition or report of examination, or other information available to the FDIC.


(d) FDIC-supervised institution means any entity for which the FDIC is the appropriate Federal banking agency pursuant to section 3(q) of the FDI Act, 12 U.S.C. 1813(q).


[67 FR 79247, Dec. 27, 2002, as amended at 85 FR 3244, Jan. 21, 2020]


§ 303.102 Filing procedures and waiver of prior notice.

(a) FDIC-supervised institutions. An FDIC-supervised institution shall give the FDIC written notice, as specified in paragraph (c)(1) of this section, at least 30 days prior to adding or replacing any member of its board of directors, employing any person as a senior executive officer of the institution, or changing the responsibilities of any senior executive officer so that the person would assume a different senior executive officer position, if the FDIC-supervised institution:


(1) Is not in compliance with all minimum capital requirements applicable to the FDIC-supervised institution as determined on the basis of the institution’s most recent report of condition or report of examination;


(2) Is in troubled condition; or


(3) The FDIC determines, in connection with its review of a capital restoration plan required under section 38(e)(2) of the FDI Act (12 U.S.C. 1831o(e)(2)) or otherwise, that such notice is appropriate.


(b) Insured branches of foreign banks. In the case of the addition of a member of the board of directors or a change in senior executive officer in a foreign bank having an insured state branch, the notice requirement shall not apply to such additions and changes in the foreign bank parent, but only to changes in senior executive officers in the state branch.


(c) Waiver of prior notice – (1) Waiver requests. The FDIC may permit an individual, upon petition by the FDIC-supervised institution to the appropriate FDIC office, to serve as a senior executive officer or director before filing the notice required under this subpart if the FDIC finds that:


(i) Delay would threaten the safety and soundness of the FDIC-supervised institution;


(ii) Delay would not be in the public interest; or


(iii) Other extraordinary circumstances exist that justify waiver of prior notice.


(2) Automatic waiver. The prior 30-day notice is automatically waived in the case of the election of a new director not proposed by management at a meeting of the shareholders of an FDIC-supervised institution, and the individual immediately may begin serving, provided that a complete notice is filed with the appropriate FDIC office within two business days after the individual’s election.


(3) Effect on disapproval authority. A waiver shall not affect the authority of the FDIC to disapprove a notice within 30 days after a waiver is granted under paragraph (c)(1) of this section or the election of an individual who has filed a notice and is serving pursuant to an automatic waiver under paragraph (c)(2) of this section.


(d)(1) Content of filing. The notice required by paragraph (a) of this section shall be filed with the appropriate FDIC office and shall contain information pertaining to the competence, experience, character, or integrity of the individual with respect to whom the notice is submitted, as prescribed in the designated interagency form which is available from any FDIC regional director. The FDIC may require additional information.


(2) Modification. The FDIC may modify or accept other information in place of the requirements of paragraph (d)(1) of this section for a notice filed under this subpart.


[67 FR 79247, Dec. 27, 2002, as amended at 85 FR 3245, Jan. 21, 2020]


§ 303.103 Processing.

(a) Processing. The 30-day notice period specified in § 303.102(a) shall begin on the date substantially all information required to be submitted by the notificant pursuant to § 303.102(c)(1) is received by the appropriate FDIC office. The FDIC shall notify the FDIC-supervised institution submitting the notice of the date on which the notice is accepted for processing and of the date on which the 30-day notice period will expire. If processing cannot be completed with 30 days, the notificant will be advised in writing, prior to expiration of the 30-day period, of the reason for the delay in processing and of the additional time period, not to exceed 60 days, in which processing will be completed.


(b) Commencement of service – (1) At expiration of period. A proposed director or senior executive officer may begin service after the end of the 30-day period or any other additional period as provided under paragraph (a) of this section, unless the FDIC disapproves the notice before the end of the period.


(2) Prior to expiration of the period. A proposed director or senior executive officer may begin service before the end of the 30-day period or any additional time period as provided under paragraph (a) of this section, if the FDIC notifies the FDIC-supervised institution and the individual in writing of the FDIC’s intention not to disapprove the notice.


(c) Notice of disapproval. The FDIC may disapprove a notice filed under § 303.102 if the FDIC finds that the competence, experience, character, or integrity of the individual with respect to whom the notice is submitted indicates that it would not be in the best interests of depositors of the FDIC-supervised institution or in the best interests of the public to permit the individual to be employed by, or associated with the FDIC-supervised institution. Subpart L of 12 CFR part 308 sets forth the rules of practice and procedure for a notice of disapproval.


[85 FR 3245, Jan. 21, 2020]


§§ 303.104-303.119 [Reserved]

Subpart G – Activities of Insured State Banks

§ 303.120 Scope.

This subpart sets forth procedures for complying with notice and application requirements contained in subpart A of part 362 of this chapter, governing insured state banks and their subsidiaries engaging in activities which are not permissible for national banks and their subsidiaries. This subpart sets forth procedures for complying with notice and application requirements contained in subpart B of part 362 of this chapter, governing certain activities of insured state nonmember banks, their subsidiaries, and certain affiliates. This subpart also sets forth procedures for complying with the notice requirements contained in subpart E of part 362 of this chapter, governing subsidiaries of insured state nonmember banks engaging in financial activities.


§ 303.121 Filing procedures.

(a) Where to file. A notice or application required by subpart A, subpart B, or subpart E of part 362 of this chapter shall be submitted in writing to the appropriate FDIC office.


(b) Contents of filing. A complete letter notice or letter application shall include the following information:


(1) Filings generally. (i) A brief description of the activity and the manner in which it will be conducted;


(ii) The amount of the bank’s existing or proposed direct or indirect investment in the activity as well as calculations sufficient to indicate compliance with any specific capital ratio or investment percentage limitation detailed in subpart A, B, or E of part 362 of this chapter;


(iii) A copy of the bank’s business plan regarding the conduct of the activity;


(iv) A citation to the state statutory or regulatory authority for the conduct of the activity;


(v) A copy of the order or other document from the appropriate regulatory authority granting approval for the bank to conduct the activity if such approval is necessary and has already been granted;


(vi) A brief description of the bank’s policy and practice with regard to any anticipated involvement in the activity by a director, executive office or principal shareholder of the bank or any related interest of such a person; and


(vii) A description of the bank’s expertise in the activity.


(2) [Reserved]


(3) Copy of application or notice filed with another agency. If an insured state bank has filed an application or notice with another federal or state regulatory authority which contains all of the information required by paragraph (b)(1) of this section, the insured state bank may submit a copy to the FDIC in lieu of a separate filing.


(4) Additional information. The FDIC may request additional information to complete processing.


§ 303.122 Processing.

(a) Expedited processing. A notice filed by an insured state bank seeking to commence or continue an activity under § 362.3(a)(2)(iii)(A)(2), § 362.4(b)(3)(i), or § 362.4(b)(5) of this chapter will be acknowledged in writing by the FDIC and will receive expedited processing, unless the applicant is notified in writing to the contrary and provided a basis for that decision. The FDIC may remove the notice from expedited processing for any of the reasons set forth in § 303.11(c)(2). Absent such removal, a notice processed under expedited processing is deemed approved 30 days after receipt of a complete notice by the FDIC (subject to extension for an additional 15 days upon written notice to the bank) or on such earlier date authorized by the FDIC in writing.


(b) Standard processing for applications and notices that have been removed from expedited processing. For an application filed by an insured state bank seeking to commence or continue an activity under § 362.3(a)(2)(iii)(A)(2), § 362.3(b)(2)(i), § 362.3(b)(2)(ii)(A), § 362.3(b)(2)(ii)(C), § 362.4(b)(1), § 362.4(b)(4), § 362.5(b)(2), or § 362.8(b) or seeking a waiver or modification under § 362.18(e) or § 362.18(g)(3) of this chapter or for notices which are not processed pursuant to the expedited processing procedures, the FDIC will provide the insured State bank with written notification of the final action as soon as the decision is rendered. The FDIC will normally review and act in such cases within 60 days after receipt of a completed application or notice (subject to extension for an additional 30 days upon written notice to the bank), but failure of the FDIC to act prior to the expiration of these periods does not constitute approval.


§§ 303.123-303.139 [Reserved]

Subpart H – Activities of Insured Savings Associations

§ 303.140 Scope.

This subpart sets forth procedures for complying with the notice and application requirements contained in subpart C of part 362 of this chapter, governing insured state savings associations and their service corporations engaging in activities which are not permissible for federal savings associations and their service corporations. This subpart also sets forth procedures for complying with the notice requirements contained in subpart D of part 362 of this chapter, governing insured savings associations which establish or engage in new activities through a subsidiary.


§ 303.141 Filing procedures.

(a) Where to file. All applications and notices required by subpart C or subpart D of part 362 of this chapter are to be in writing and filed with the appropriate FDIC office.


(b) Contents of filing – (1) Filings generally. A complete letter notice or letter application shall include the following information:


(i) A brief description of the activity and the manner in which it will be conducted;


(ii) The amount of the association’s existing or proposed direct or indirect investment in the activity as well as calculations sufficient to indicate compliance with any specific capital ratio or investment percentage limitation detailed in subpart C or D of part 362 of this chapter;


(iii) A copy of the association’s business plan regarding the conduct of the activity;


(iv) A citation to the state statutory or regulatory authority for the conduct of the activity;


(v) A copy of the order or other document from the appropriate regulatory authority granting approval for the association to conduct the activity if such approval is necessary and has already been granted;


(vi) A brief description of the association’s policy and practice with regard to any anticipated involvement in the activity by a director, executive officer or principal shareholder of the association or any related interest of such a person; and


(vii) A description of the association’s expertise in the activity.


(2) [Reserved]


(3) Copy of application or notice filed with another agency. If an insured savings association has filed an application or notice with another federal or state regulatory authority which contains all of the information required by paragraph (b)(1) of this section, the insured state bank may submit a copy to the FDIC in lieu of a separate filing.


(4) Additional information. The FDIC may request additional information to complete processing.


§ 303.142 Processing.

(a) Expedited processing. A notice filed by an insured state savings association seeking to commence or continue an activity under § 362.11(b)(2)(ii) of this chapter will be acknowledged in writing by the FDIC and will receive expedited processing, unless the applicant is notified in writing to the contrary and provided a basis for that decision. The FDIC may remove the notice from expedited processing for any of the reasons set forth in § 303.11(c)(2). Absent such removal, a notice processed under expedited processing is deemed approved 30 days after receipt of a complete notice by the FDIC (subject to extension for an additional 15 days upon written notice to the bank) or on such earlier date authorized by the FDIC in writing.


(b) Standard processing for applications and notices that have been removed from expedited processing. For an application filed by an insured state savings association seeking to commence or continue an activity under § 362.11(a)(2)(ii), § 362.11(b)(2)(i), § 362.12(b)(1) of this chapter or for notices which are not processed pursuant to the expedited processing procedures, the FDIC will provide the insured state savings association with written notification of the final action as soon as the decision is rendered. The FDIC will normally review and act in such cases within 60 days after receipt of a completed application or notice (subject to extension for an additional 30 days upon written notice to the bank), but failure of the FDIC to act prior to the expiration of these periods does not constitute approval.


(c) Notices of activities in excess of an amount permissible for a federal savings association; subsidiary notices. Receipt of a notice filed by an insured state savings association as required by § 362.11(b)(3) or § 362.15 of this chapter will be acknowledged in writing by the FDIC. The notice will be reviewed at the appropriate FDIC office, which will take such action as it deems necessary and appropriate.


§§ 303.143-303.159 [Reserved]

Subpart I – Mutual-To-Stock Conversions

§ 303.160 Scope.

This subpart sets forth the notice requirements and procedures for the conversion of an insured mutual state-chartered savings bank to the stock form of ownership. The substantive requirements governing such conversions are contained in § 333.4 of this chapter.


§ 303.161 Filing procedures.

(a) Prior notice required. In addition to complying with the substantive requirements in § 333.4 of this chapter, an insured state-chartered mutually owned savings bank that proposes to convert from mutual to stock form shall file with the FDIC a notice of intent to convert to stock form.


(b) General. (1) A notice required under this subpart shall be filed in letter form with the appropriate FDIC office at the same time as required conversion application materials are filed with the institution’s state regulator.


(2) An insured mutual savings bank chartered by a state that does not require the filing of a conversion application shall file a notice in letter form with the appropriate FDIC office as soon as practicable after adoption of its plan of conversion.


(c) Content of notice. The notice shall provide a description of the proposed conversion and include all materials that have been filed with any state or federal banking regulator and any state or federal securities regulator. At a minimum, the notice shall include, as applicable, copies of:


(1) The plan of conversion, with specific information concerning the record date used for determining eligible depositors and the subscription offering priority established in connection with any proposed stock offering;


(2) Certified board resolutions relating to the conversion;


(3) A business plan, including a detailed discussion of how the capital acquired in the conversion will be used, expected earnings for at least a three-year period following the conversion, and a justification for any proposed stock repurchases;


(4) The charter and bylaws of the converted institution;


(5) The bylaws and operating plans of any other entities formed in connection with the conversion transaction, such as a holding company or charitable foundation;


(6) A full appraisal report, prepared by an independent appraiser, of the value of the converting institution and the pricing of the stock to be sold in the conversion transaction;


(7) Detailed descriptions of any proposed management or employee stock benefit plans or employment agreements and a discussion of the rationale for the level of benefits proposed, individually and by participant group;


(8) Indemnification agreements;


(9) A preliminary proxy statement and sample proxy;


(10) Offering circular(s) and order form;


(11) All contracts or agreements relating to solicitation, underwriting, market-making, or listing of conversion stock and any agreements among members of a group regarding the purchase of unsubscribed shares;


(12) A tax opinion concerning the federal income tax consequences of the proposed conversion;


(13) Consents from experts to use their opinions as part of the notice; and


(14) An estimate of conversion-related expenses.


(d) Additional information. The FDIC, in its discretion, may request any additional information it deems necessary to evaluate the proposed conversion. The institution proposing to convert from mutual to stock form shall promptly provide such information to the FDIC.


(e) Acceptance of notice. The 60-day notice period specified in§ 303.163 shall commence on the date of receipt of a substantially complete notice. The FDIC shall notify the institution proposing to convert in writing of the date the notice is accepted.


(f) Related applications. Related applications that require FDIC action may include:


(1) Applications for deposit insurance, as required by subpart B of this part; and


(2) Applications for consent to merge, as required by subpart D of this part.


§ 303.162 Waiver from compliance.

(a) General. An institution proposing to convert from mutual to stock form may file with the appropriate FDIC office a letter requesting waiver of compliance with this subpart or § 333.4 of this chapter:


(1) When compliance with any provision of this section or § 333.4 of this chapter would be inconsistent or in conflict with applicable state law, or


(2) For any other good cause shown.


(b) Content of filing. In making a request for waiver under paragraph (a) of this section, the institution shall demonstrate that the requested waiver, if granted, would not result in any effects that would be detrimental to the safety and soundness of the institution, entail a breach of fiduciary duty on part of the institution’s management or otherwise be detrimental or inequitable to the institution, its depositors, any other insured depository institution(s), the Deposit Insurance Fund, or to the public interest.


[67 FR 79247, Dec. 27, 2002, as amended at 71 FR 20526, Apr. 21, 2006]


§ 303.163 Processing.

(a) General considerations. The FDIC shall review the notice and other materials submitted by the institution proposing to convert from mutual to stock form, specifically considering the following factors:


(1) The proposed use of the proceeds from the sale of stock, as set forth in the business plan;


(2) The adequacy of the disclosure materials;


(3) The participation of depositors in approving the transaction;


(4) The form of the proxy statement required for the vote of the depositors/members on the conversion;


(5) Any proposed increased compensation and other remuneration (including stock grants, stock option rights and other similar benefits) to be granted to officers and directors/trustees of the bank in connection with the conversion;


(6) The adequacy and independence of the appraisal of the value of the mutual savings bank for purposes of determining the price of the shares of stock to be sold;


(7) The process by which the bank’s trustees approved the appraisal, the pricing of the stock, and the proposed compensation arrangements for insiders;


(8) The nature and apportionment of stock subscription rights; and


(9) The bank’s plans to fulfill its commitment to serving the convenience and needs of its community.


(b) Additional considerations. (1) In reviewing the notice and other materials submitted under this subpart, the FDIC will take into account the extent to which the proposed conversion transaction conforms with the various provisions of the mutual-to-stock conversion regulations of the Office of Thrift Supervision (OTS) (12 CFR part 563b), as currently in effect at the time the notice is submitted. Any non-conformity with those provisions will be closely reviewed.


(2) Conformity with the OTS requirements will not be sufficient for FDIC regulatory purposes if the FDIC determines that the proposed conversion transaction would pose a risk to the bank’s safety or soundness, violate any law or regulation, or present a breach of fiduciary duty.


(c) Notice period. (1) The period in which the FDIC may object to the proposed conversion transaction shall be the later of:


(i) 60 days after receipt of a substantially complete notice of proposed conversion; or


(ii) 20 days after the last applicable state or other federal regulator has approved the proposed conversion.


(2) The FDIC may, in its discretion, extend the initial 60-day period for up to an additional 60 days by providing written notice to the institution.


(d) Letter of non-objection. If the FDIC determines, in its discretion, that the proposed conversion transaction would not pose a risk to the institution’s safety or soundness, violate any law or regulation, or present a breach of fiduciary duty, then the FDIC shall issue to the institution proposing to convert a letter of non-objection to the proposed conversion.


(e) Letter of objection. If the FDIC determines, in its discretion, that the proposed conversion transaction poses a risk to the institution’s safety or soundness, violates any law or regulation, or presents a breach of fiduciary duty, then the FDIC shall issue a letter to the institution stating its objection(s) to the proposed conversion and advising the institution not to consummate the proposed conversion until such letter is rescinded. A copy of the letter of objection shall be furnished to the institution’s primary state regulator and any other state or federal banking regulator and state or federal securities regulator involved in the conversion.


(f) Consummation of the conversion. (1) An institution may consummate the proposed conversion upon either:


(i) The receipt of a letter of non-objection; or


(ii) The expiration of the notice period.


(2) If a letter of objection is issued, then the institution shall not consummate the proposed conversion until the FDIC rescinds such letter.


§§ 303.164-303.179 [Reserved]

Subpart J – International Banking

§ 303.180 Scope.

This subpart sets forth procedures for complying with application requirements relating to the foreign activities of insured state nonmember banks, U.S. activities of insured branches of foreign banks, and certain foreign mergers of insured depository institutions.


§ 303.181 Definitions.

For the purposes of this subpart, the following additional definitions apply:


(a) Board of Governors means the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System.


(b) Comptroller means the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency.


(c) Eligible insured branch. An insured branch will be treated as an eligible depository institution within the meaning of § 303.2(r) if the insured branch:


(1) Received an FDIC-assigned composite ROCA supervisory rating (which rates risk management, operational controls, compliance, and asset quality) of 1 or 2 as a result of its most recent federal or state examination, and the FDIC, Comptroller, or Board of Governors have not expressed concern about the condition or operations of the foreign banking organization or the support it offers the branch;


(2) Received a satisfactory or better Community Reinvestment Act (CRA) rating from its primary federal regulator at its most recent examination, if the depository institution is subject to examination under part 345 of this chapter;


(3) Received a compliance rating of 1 or 2 from its primary federal regulator at its most recent examination;


(4) Is well-capitalized as defined in subpart H of part 324 of this chapter; and


(5) Is not subject to a cease and desist order, consent order, prompt corrective action directive, written agreement, memorandum of understanding, or other administrative agreement with any U.S. bank regulatory authority.


(d) Federal branch means a federal branch of a foreign bank as defined by § 347.202 of this chapter.


(e) Foreign bank means a foreign bank as defined by § 347.202 of this chapter.


(f) Foreign branch means a foreign branch of an insured state nonmember bank as defined by § 347.102 of this chapter.


(g) Foreign organization means a foreign organization as defined by § 347.102 of this chapter.


(h) Insured branch means an insured branch of a foreign bank as defined by § 347.202 of this chapter.


(i) Noninsured branch means a noninsured branch of a foreign bank as defined by § 347.202 of this chapter.


(j) State branch means a state branch of a foreign bank as defined by § 347.202 of this chapter.


[67 FR 79247, Dec. 27, 2002, as amended at 78 FR 55470, Sept. 10, 2013; 83 FR 17739, Apr. 24, 2018]


§ 303.182 Establishing, moving or closing a foreign branch of an insured state nonmember bank.

(a) Notice procedures for general consent. Notice in the form of a letter from an eligible depository institution establishing or relocating a foreign branch pursuant to § 347.117(a) of this chapter must be provided to the appropriate FDIC office no later than 30 days after taking such action. The notice must include the location of the foreign branch, including a street address. The FDIC will provide written acknowledgment of receipt of the notice.


(b) Filing procedures for other branch establishments – (1) Where to file. An applicant seeking to establish a foreign branch other than under § 347.117(a) of this chapter shall submit an application to the appropriate FDIC office.


(2) Content of filing. A complete letter application must include the following information:


(i) The exact location of the proposed foreign branch, including the street address.


(ii) Details concerning any involvement in the proposal by an insider of the applicant, as defined in § 303.2(u) of this part, including any financial arrangements relating to fees, the acquisition of property, leasing of property, and construction contracts;


(iii) A brief description of the applicant’s business plan with respect to the foreign branch; and


(iv) A brief description of the proposed activities of the branch and, to the extent any of the proposed activities are not authorized by § 347.115 of this chapter, the applicant’s reasons why they should be approved.


(3) Additional information. The FDIC may request additional information to complete processing.


(c) Processing – (1) Expedited processing for eligible depository institutions. An application filed under § 347.118(a) of this chapter by an eligible depository institution as defined in § 303.2(r) of this part seeking to establish a foreign branch by expedited processing will be acknowledged in writing by the FDIC and will receive expedited processing, unless the applicant is notified in writing to the contrary and provided with the basis for that decision. The FDIC may remove the application from expedited processing for any of the reasons set forth in § 303.11(c)(2) of this part. Absent such removal, an application processed under expedited processing is deemed approved 45 days after receipt of a substantially complete application by the FDIC, or on such earlier date authorized by the FDIC in writing.


(2) Standard processing. For those applications that are not processed pursuant to the expedited procedures, the FDIC will provide the applicant with written notification of the final action when the decision is rendered.


(d) Closing. Notices of branch closing under § 347.121 of this chapter, in the form of a letter including the name, location, and date of closing of the closed branch, shall be filed with the appropriate FDIC office no later than 30 days after the branch is closed.


[70 FR 17558, Apr. 6, 2005, as amended at 85 FR 72555, Nov. 13, 2020]


§ 303.183 Investment by insured state nonmember banks in foreign organization.

(a) Notice procedures for general consent. Notice in the form of a letter from an eligible depository institution making direct or indirect investments in a foreign organization pursuant to § 347.117(b) of this chapter shall be provided to the appropriate FDIC office no later than 30 days after taking such action. The FDIC will provide written acknowledgment of receipt of the notice.


(b) Filing procedures for other investments – (1) Where to file. An applicant seeking to make a foreign investment other than under § 347.117(b) of this chapter shall submit an application to the appropriate FDIC office.


(2) Content of filing. A complete application shall include the following information:


(i) Basic information about the terms of the proposed transaction, the amount of the investment in the foreign organization and the proportion of its ownership to be acquired;


(ii) Basic information about the foreign organization, its financial position and income, including any available balance sheet and income statement for the prior year, or financial projections for a new foreign organization;


(iii) A listing of all shareholders known to hold ten percent or more of any class of the foreign organization’s stock or other evidence of ownership, and the amount held by each;


(iv) A brief description of the applicant’s business plan with respect to the foreign organization;


(v) A brief description of any business or activities which the foreign organization will conduct directly or indirectly in the United States, and to the extent such activities are not authorized by subpart A of part 347, the applicant’s reasons why they should be approved;


(vi) A brief description of the foreign organization’s activities, and to the extent such activities are not authorized by subpart A of part 347, the applicant’s reasons why they should be approved; and


(vii) If the applicant seeks approval to engage in underwriting or dealing activities, a description of the applicant’s plans and procedures to address all relevant risks.


(3) Additional information. The FDIC may request additional information to complete processing.


(c) Processing – (1) Expedited processing for eligible depository institutions. An application filed under § 347.118(b) of this chapter by an eligible depository institution as defined in § 303.2(r) of this part seeking to make direct or indirect investments in a foreign organization will be acknowledged in writing by the FDIC and will receive expedited processing, unless the applicant is notified in writing to the contrary and provided with the basis for that decision. The FDIC may remove the application from expedited processing for any of the reasons set forth in § 303.11(c)(2) of this part. Absent such removal, an application processed under expedited processing is deemed approved 45 days after receipt of a substantially complete application by the FDIC, or on such earlier date authorized by the FDIC in writing.


(2) Standard processing. For those applications which are not processed pursuant to the expedited procedures, the FDIC will provide the applicant with written notification of the final action when the decision is rendered.


(d) Divestiture. If an insured state nonmember bank holding 50 percent or more of the voting equity interests of a foreign organization or otherwise controlling the foreign organization divests itself of such ownership or control, the insured state nonmember bank shall file a notice in the form of a letter, including the name, location, and date of divestiture of the foreign organization, with the appropriate FDIC office no later than 30 days after the divestiture.


[67 FR 79247, Dec. 27, 2002, as amended at 70 FR 17558, Apr. 6, 2005]


§ 303.184 Moving an insured branch of a foreign bank.

(a) Filing procedures – (1) Where and when to file. An application by an insured branch of a foreign bank seeking the FDIC’s consent to move from one location to another, as required by section 18(d)(1) of the FDI Act (12 U.S.C. 1828(d)(1)), shall be submitted in writing to the appropriate FDIC office on the date the notice required by paragraph (c) of this section is published, or within 5 days after the date of the last required publication.


(2) Content of filing. A complete letter application shall include the following information:


(i) The exact location of the proposed site, including the street address;


(ii) Details concerning any involvement in the proposal by an insider of the applicant, as defined in § 303.2(u), including any financial arrangements relating to fees, the acquisition of property, leasing of property, and construction contracts;


(iii) Comments on any changes in services to be offered, the community to be served, or any other effect the proposal may have on the applicant’s compliance with the CRA; and


(iv) A copy of the newspaper publication required by paragraph (c) of this section, as well as the name and address of the newspaper and the date of the publication.


(3) Comptroller’s application. If the applicant is filing an application with the Comptroller which contains the information required by paragraph (a)(2) of this section, the applicant may submit a copy to the FDIC in lieu of a separate application.


(4) Additional information. The FDIC may request additional information to complete processing.


(b) Processing – (1) Expedited processing for eligible insured branches. An application filed by an eligible insured branch as defined in § 303.181(c) of this part will be acknowledged in writing by the FDIC and will receive expedited processing if the applicant is proposing to move within the same state, unless the applicant is notified to the contrary and provided with the basis for that decision. The FDIC may remove an application from expedited processing for any of the reasons set forth in § 303.11(c)(2) of this part. Absent such removal, an application processed under expedited processing will be deemed approved on the latest of the following:


(i) The 21st day after the FDIC’s receipt of a substantially complete application; or


(ii) The 5th day after expiration of the comment period described in paragraph (c) of this section.


(2) Standard processing. For those applications that are not processed pursuant to the expedited procedures, the FDIC will provide the applicant with written notification of the final action as soon as the decision is rendered.


(c) Publication requirement and comment period – (1) Newspaper publications. The applicant shall publish a notice of its proposal to move from one location to another, as described in § 303.7(b), in a newspaper of general circulation in the community in which the insured branch is located prior to its being moved and in the community to which it is to be moved. The notice shall include the insured branch’s current and proposed addresses.


(2) Public comments. All public comments must be received by the appropriate regional director within 15 days after the date of the last newspaper publication required by paragraph (c)(1) of this section, unless the comment period has been extended or reopened in accordance with § 303.9(b)(2).


(3) Lobby notices. If the insured branch has a public lobby, a copy of the newspaper publication shall be posted in the public lobby for at least 15 days beginning on the date of the publication required by paragraph (c)(1) of this section.


(d) Other approval criteria. (1) The FDIC may approve an application under this section if the criteria in paragraphs (d)(1)(i) through (d)(1)(vi) of this section is satisfied.


(i) The factors set forth in section 6 of the FDI Act (12 U.S.C. 1816) have been considered and favorably resolved;


(ii) The applicant is at least adequately capitalized as defined in subpart H of part 324 of this chapter;


(iii) Any financial arrangements which have been made in connection with the proposed relocation and which involve the applicant’s directors, officers, major shareholders, or their interests are fair and reasonable in comparison to similar arrangements that could have been made with independent third parties;


(iv) Compliance with the CRA and any applicable related regulations, including 12 CFR part 345, has been considered and favorably resolved;


(v) No CRA protest as defined in § 303.2(l) has been filed which remains unresolved or, where such a protest has been filed and remains unresolved, the Director or designee concurs that approval is consistent with the purposes of the CRA and the applicant agrees in writing to any conditions imposed regarding the CRA; and


(vi) The applicant agrees in writing to comply with any conditions imposed by the FDIC, other than the standard conditions defined in § 303.2(dd) which may be imposed without the applicant’s written consent.


(e) Relocation of insured branch from one state to another. If the foreign bank proposes to relocate an insured state branch to a state that is outside the state where the branch is presently located, in addition to meeting the approval criteria contained in paragraph (d) of this section, the foreign bank must:


(i) Comply with any applicable state laws or regulations of the states affected by the proposed relocation; and


(ii) Obtain any required regulatory approvals from the appropriate state licensing authority of the state to which the insured branch proposes to relocate before relocating the existing branch operations and surrendering its existing license to the appropriate state licensing authority of the state from which the branch is relocating.


[67 FR 79247, Dec. 27, 2002, as amended at 70 FR 17559, Apr. 6, 2005; 78 FR 55470, Sept. 10, 2013; 83 FR 17739, Apr. 24, 2018; 85 FR 72555, Nov. 13, 2020; 86 FR 9433, Feb. 16, 2021]


§ 303.185 Merger transactions involving foreign banks or foreign organizations.

(a) Merger transactions involving an insured branch of a foreign bank. Merger transactions requiring the FDIC’s prior approval as set forth in § 303.62 include any merger transaction in which the resulting institution is an insured branch of a foreign bank which is not a federal branch, or any merger transaction which involves any insured branch and any uninsured institution. In such cases:


(1) References to an eligible depository institution in subpart D of this part include an eligible insured branch as defined in § 303.181;


(2) The definition of a corporate reorganization in § 303.61(b) includes a merger transaction between an insured branch and other branches, agencies, or subsidiaries in the United States of the same foreign bank; and


(3) For the purposes of § 303.62(b)(1) on interstate mergers, a merger transaction involving an insured branch is one involving the acquisition of a branch of an insured bank without the acquisition of the bank for purposes of section 44 of the FDI Act (12 U.S.C. 1831u) only when the merger transaction involves fewer than all the insured branches of the same foreign bank in the same state.


(b) Certain merger transactions with foreign organizations outside any State. Merger transactions requiring the FDIC’s prior approval as set forth in § 303.62 include any merger transaction in which an insured depository institution becomes directly liable for obligations which will, after the merger transaction, be treated as deposits under section 3(l)(5)(A)(i)-(ii) of the FDI Act (12 U.S.C. 1813(l)(5)(A)(i)-(ii)), as a result of a merger or consolidation with a foreign organization or an assumption of liabilities of a foreign organization.


§ 303.186 Exemptions from insurance requirements for a state branch of a foreign bank.

(a) Filing procedures – (1) Where to file. An application by a foreign bank for consent to operate as a noninsured state branch, as permitted by § 347.215(b) of this chapter, shall be submitted in writing to the appropriate FDIC office.


(2) Content of filing. A complete letter application shall include the following information:


(i) The kinds of deposit activities in which the state branch proposes to engage;


(ii) The expected source of deposits;


(iii) The manner in which deposits will be solicited;


(iv) How the activity will maintain or improve the availability of credit to all sectors of the United States economy, including the international trade finance sector;


(v) That the activity will not give the foreign bank an unfair competitive advantage over United States banking organizations; and


(vi) A resolution by the applicant’s board of directors, or evidence of approval by senior management if a resolution is not required pursuant to the applicant’s organizational documents, authorizing the filing of the application.


(3) Additional information. The FDIC may request additional information to complete processing.


(4) Processing. The FDIC will provide the applicant with written notification of the final action taken.


[67 FR 79247, Dec. 27, 2002, as amended at 70 FR 17559, Apr. 6, 2005]


§ 303.187 Approval for an insured state branch of a foreign bank to conduct activities not permissible for federal branches.

(a) Filing procedures – (1) Where to file. An application by an insured state branch seeking approval to conduct activities not permissible for a federal branch, as required by § 347.212(a) of this chapter, shall be submitted in writing to the appropriate FDIC office.


(2) Content of filing. A complete letter application shall include the following information:


(i) A brief description of the activity, including the manner in which it will be conducted and an estimate of the expected dollar volume associated with the activity;


(ii) An analysis of the impact of the proposed activity on the condition of the United States operations of the foreign bank in general and of the branch in particular, including a copy of the feasibility study, management plan, financial projections, business plan, or similar document concerning the conduct of the activity;


(iii) A resolution by the applicant’s board of directors, or evidence of approval by senior management if a resolution is not required pursuant to the applicant’s organizational documents, authorizing the filing of the application;


(iv) A statement by the applicant of whether it is in compliance with sections 347.209 and 347.210 of this chapter;


(v) A statement by the applicant that it has complied with all requirements of the Board of Governors concerning applications to conduct the activity in question and the status of each such application, including a copy of the Board of Governors’ disposition of such application, if applicable; and


(vi) A statement of why the activity will pose no significant risk to the Deposit Insurance Fund.


(3) Board of Governors application. If the application to the Board of Governors contains the information required by paragraph (a) of this section, the applicant may submit a copy to the FDIC in lieu of a separate letter application.


(4) Additional information. The FDIC may request additional information to complete processing.


(b) Divestiture or cessation – (1) Where to file. Divestiture plans necessitated by a change in law or other authority, as required by § 347.212(e) of this chapter, shall be submitted in writing to the appropriate FDIC office.


(2) Content of filing. A complete letter application shall include the following information:


(i) A detailed description of the manner in which the applicant proposes to divest itself of or cease the activity in question; and


(ii) A projected timetable describing how long the divestiture or cessation is expected to take.


(3) Additional information. The FDIC may request additional information to complete processing.


[67 FR 79247, Dec. 27, 2002, as amended at 70 FR 17559, Apr. 6, 2005; 71 FR 20526, Apr. 21, 2006]


§§ 303.188-303.199 [Reserved]

Subpart K – Prompt Corrective Action

§ 303.200 Scope.

(a) General. (1) This subpart covers applications filed pursuant to section 38 of the FDI Act (12 U.S.C. 1831o), which requires insured depository institutions that are not adequately capitalized to receive approval prior to engaging in certain activities. Section 38 restricts or prohibits certain activities and requires an insured depository institution to submit a capital restoration plan when it becomes undercapitalized. The restrictions and prohibitions become more severe as an institution’s capital level declines.


(2) Definitions of the capital categories referenced in this Prompt Corrective Action subpart may be found in subpart H of part 324 of this chapter.


(b) Institutions covered. Restrictions and prohibitions contained in subpart H of part 324 of this chapter apply primarily to FDIC-supervised institutions, as well as to directors and senior executive officers of those institutions. Portions of subpart H of part 324 of this chapter also apply to all insured depository institutions that are deemed to be critically undercapitalized.


[67 FR 79247, Dec. 27, 2002, as amended at 78 FR 55470, Sept. 10, 2013; 83 FR 17739, Apr. 24, 2018; 85 FR 3245, Jan. 21, 2020]


§ 303.201 Filing procedures.

Applications shall be filed with the appropriate FDIC office. The application shall contain the information specified in each respective section of this subpart, and shall be in letter form as prescribed in § 303.3. Additional information may be requested by the FDIC. Such letter shall be signed by the president, senior officer or a duly authorized agent of the insured depository institution and be accompanied by a certified copy of a resolution adopted by the institution’s board of directors or trustees authorizing the application.


§ 303.202 Processing.

The FDIC will provide the applicant with a subsequent written notification of the final action taken as soon as the decision is rendered.


§ 303.203 Applications for capital distributions.

(a) Scope. An FDIC-supervised institution shall submit an application for a capital distribution if, after having made a capital distribution, the institution would be undercapitalized, significantly undercapitalized, or critically undercapitalized.


(b) Content of filing. An application to repurchase, redeem, retire, or otherwise acquire shares or ownership interests of the FDIC-supervised institution shall describe the proposal, the shares or obligations that are the subject thereof, and the additional shares or obligations of the institution that will be issued in at least an amount equivalent to the distribution. The application also shall explain how the proposal will reduce the institution’s financial obligations or otherwise improve its financial condition. If the proposed action also requires an application under § 303.241 of this part regarding prior consent to retire capital, such application should be filed concurrently with, or made a part of, the application filed pursuant to section 38 of the FDI Act (12 U.S.C. 1831o).


[85 FR 3245, Jan. 21, 2020]


§ 303.204 Applications for acquisitions, branching, and new lines of business.

(a) Scope. (1) Any insured State nonmember bank, any insured State savings association, and any insured branch of a foreign bank which is undercapitalized or significantly undercapitalized, and any insured depository institution which is critically undercapitalized, shall submit an application to engage in acquisitions, branching or new lines of business.


(2) A new line of business will include any new activity exercised which, although it may be permissible, has not been exercised by the institution.


(b) Content of filing. Applications shall describe the proposal, state the date the institution’s capital restoration plan was accepted by its primary Federal regulator, describe the institution’s status in implementing the plan, and explain how the proposed action is consistent with and will further the achievement of the plan or otherwise further the purposes of section 38 of the FDI Act. If the FDIC is not the applicant’s primary Federal regulator, the application also should state whether approval has been requested from the applicant’s primary Federal regulator, the date of such request and the disposition of the request, if any. If the proposed action also requires applications pursuant to section 18 (c) or (d) of the FDI Act (mergers and branches) (12 U.S.C. 1828 (c) or (d)), such applications should be filed concurrently with, or made a part of, the application filed pursuant to section 38 of the FDI Act (12 U.S.C. 1831o).


[86 FR 8097, Feb. 3, 2021]


§ 303.205 Applications for bonuses and increased compensation for senior executive officers.

(a) Scope. Any insured State nonmember bank, insured State savings association, or insured branch of a foreign bank that is significantly or critically undercapitalized, or any insured State nonmember bank, any insured State savings association, or any insured branch of a foreign bank that is undercapitalized and which has failed to submit or implement in any material respect an acceptable capital restoration plan, shall submit an application to pay a bonus or increase compensation for any senior executive officer.


(b) Content of filing. Applications shall list each proposed bonus or increase in compensation, and for the latter shall identify compensation for each of the twelve calendar months preceding the calendar month in which the institution became undercapitalized. Applications also shall state the date the institution’s capital restoration plan was accepted by the FDIC, and describe any progress made in implementing the plan.


[67 FR 79247, Dec. 27, 2002, as amended at 86 FR 8097, Feb. 3, 2021]


§ 303.206 Application for payment of principal or interest on subordinated debt.

(a) Scope. Any critically undercapitalized insured depository institution shall submit an application to pay principal or interest on subordinated debt.


(b) Content of filing. Applications shall describe the proposed payment and provide an explanation of action taken under section 38(h)(3)(A)(ii) of the FDI Act (action other than receivership or conservatorship). The application also shall explain how such payments would further the purposes of section 38 of the FDI Act (12 U.S.C. 1831o). Existing approvals pursuant to requests filed under section 18(i)(1) of the FDI Act (12 U.S.C. 1828(i)(1)) (capital stock reductions or retirements) shall not be deemed to be the permission needed pursuant to section 38.


§ 303.207 Restricted activities for critically undercapitalized institutions.

(a) Scope. Any critically undercapitalized insured depository institution shall submit an application to engage in certain restricted activities.


(b) Content of filing. Applications to engage in any of the following activities, as set forth in sections 38(i)(2) (A) through (G) of the FDI Act, shall describe the proposed activity and explain how the activity would further the purposes of section 38 of the FDI Act (12 U.S.C. 1831o):


(1) Enter into any material transaction other than in the usual course of business including any action with respect to which the institution is required to provide notice to the appropriate federal banking agency. Materiality will be determined on a case-by-case basis;


(2) Extend credit for any highly leveraged transaction. A highly leveraged transaction means an extension of credit to or investment in a business by an insured depository institution where the financing transaction involves a buyout, acquisition, or recapitalization of an existing business and one of the following criteria is met:


(i) The transaction results in a liabilities-to-assets leverage ratio higher than 75 percent; or


(ii) The transaction at least doubles the subject company’s liabilities and results in a liabilities-to-assets leverage ratio higher than 50 percent; or


(iii) The transaction is designated an highly leverage transaction by a syndication agent or a federal bank regulator.


(iv) Loans and exposures to any obligor in which the total financing package, including all obligations held by all participants is $20 million or more, or such lower level as the FDIC may establish by order on a case-by-case basis, will be excluded from this definition.


(3) Amend the institution’s charter or bylaws, except to the extent necessary to carry out any other requirement of any law, regulation, or order;


(4) Make any material change in accounting methods;


(5) Engage in any covered transaction (as defined in section 23A(b) of the Federal Reserve Act (12 U.S.C. 371c(b));


(6) Pay excessive compensation or bonuses. Part 364 of this chapter provides guidance for determining excessive compensation; or


(7) Pay interest on new or renewed liabilities at a rate that would increase the institution’s weighted average cost of funds to a level significantly exceeding the prevailing rates of interest on insured deposits in the institution’s normal market area. Section 337.6 of this chapter (Brokered deposits) provides guidance for defining the relevant terms of this provision; however this provision does not supersede the general prohibitions contained in § 337.6.


[67 FR 79247, Dec. 27, 2002, as amended at 78 FR 55470, Sept. 10, 2013]


§§ 303.208-303.219 [Reserved]

Subpart L – Section 19 of the FDI Act (Consent to Service of Persons Convicted of, or Who Have Program Entries for, Certain Criminal Offenses)


Source:85 FR 51319, Aug. 20, 2020, unless otherwise noted.

§ 303.220 What is section 19 of the FDI Act?

(a) This subpart covers applications under section 19 of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act (FDI Act), 12 U.S.C. 1829. Under section 19, any person who has been convicted of any criminal offense involving dishonesty, breach of trust, or money laundering, or has agreed to enter into a pretrial diversion or similar program (program entry) in connection with a prosecution for such offense, may not become, or continue as, an institution-affiliated party (IAP) of an insured depository institution (IDI); own or control, directly or indirectly, any IDI; or otherwise participate, directly or indirectly, in the conduct of the affairs of any IDI without the prior written consent of the FDIC.


(b) In addition, the law bars an IDI from permitting such a person to engage in any conduct or to continue any relationship prohibited by section 19. IDIs should therefore make a reasonable inquiry regarding an applicant’s history to ensure that a person who has a conviction or program entry covered by the provisions of section 19 is not hired or permitted to participate in its affairs without the written consent of the FDIC issued under this subpart. FDIC-supervised IDIs may extend a conditional offer of employment contingent on the completion of a background check satisfactory to the institution and to determine if the applicant is barred under section 19, but the job applicant may not work for, be employed by, or otherwise participate in the affairs of the IDI until the IDI has determined that the applicant is not barred under section 19.


(c) If there is a conviction or program entry covered by the bar of section 19, an application under this subpart must be filed seeking the FDIC’s consent to become, or to continue as, an IAP; to own or control, directly or indirectly, an IDI; or to otherwise participate, directly or indirectly, in the affairs of the IDI. The application must be filed, and consented to, prior to serving in any of the foregoing capacities unless such application is not required under the subsequent provisions of this subpart. The purpose of an application is to provide the applicant an opportunity to demonstrate that, notwithstanding the bar, a person is fit to participate in the conduct of the affairs of an IDI without posing a risk to its safety and soundness or impairing public confidence in that institution. The burden is upon the applicant to establish that the application warrants approval.


§ 303.221 Who is covered by section 19?

(a) Section 19 covers IAPs, as defined by 12 U.S.C. 1813(u), and others who are participants in the conduct of the affairs of an IDI. Therefore, all employees of an IDI that fall within the scope of section 19, including de facto employees, as determined by the FDIC based upon generally applicable standards of employment law, will also be subject to section 19. Whether other persons who are not IAPs are covered depends upon their degree of influence or control over the management or affairs of an IDI. In the context of the FDIC’s application of section 19, coverage would apply to an IDI’s holding company’s directors and officers to the extent that they have the power to define and direct the management or affairs of an IDI. Similarly, directors and officers of affiliates, subsidiaries or joint ventures of an IDI or its holding company will be covered if they participate in the affairs of the IDI or are in a position to influence or control the management or affairs of the insured institution. Typically, an independent contractor does not have a relationship with the IDI other than the activity for which the institution has contracted. An independent contractor who influences or controls the management or affairs of the IDI would be covered by section 19.


(b) The term “person,” for purposes of section 19, means an individual, and does not include a corporation, firm, or other business entity.


(c) Individuals who file an application with the FDIC under the provisions of section 19 who also seek to participate in the affairs of a bank holding company or savings and loan holding company may have to comply with any filing requirements of the Board of the Governors of the Federal Reserve System under 12 U.S.C. 1829(d) and (e).


(d) Section 19 specifically prohibits a person subject to its provisions from owning or controlling an IDI. The terms “control” and “ownership” under section 19 shall have the meaning given to the term “control” in the Change in Bank Control Act (12 U.S.C. 1817(j)(8)(B)). A person will be deemed to exercise “control” if that person has the power to vote 25 percent or more of the voting shares of an IDI (or 10 percent of the voting shares if no other person has more shares) or the ability to direct the management or policies of the institution. Under the same standards, a person will be deemed to “own” an IDI if that person owns 25 percent or more of the institution’s voting stock, or 10 percent of the voting shares if no other person owns more. These standards would also apply to an individual acting in concert with others so as to have such ownership or control. Absent the FDIC’s consent, persons subject to the prohibitions of section 19 will be required to divest their control or ownership of shares above the foregoing limits.


§ 303.222 What offenses are covered under section 19?

(a) The conviction or program entry must be for a criminal offense involving dishonesty, breach of trust, or money laundering. “Dishonesty” means directly or indirectly to cheat or defraud, to cheat or defraud for monetary gain or its equivalent, or wrongfully to take property belonging to another in violation of any criminal statute. Dishonesty includes acts involving want of integrity, lack of probity, or a disposition to distort, cheat, or act deceitfully or fraudulently, and includes offenses that Federal, state or local laws define as dishonest. “Breach of trust” means a wrongful act, use, misappropriation, or omission with respect to any property or fund that has been committed to a person in a fiduciary or official capacity, or the misuse of one’s official or fiduciary position to engage in a wrongful act, use, misappropriation, or omission.


(b) Whether a crime involves dishonesty, breach of trust, or money laundering will be determined from the statutory elements of the offense itself or from court determinations that the statutory provisions of the offense involve dishonesty, breach of trust, or money laundering.


(c) All convictions or program entries for offenses concerning the illegal manufacture, sale, distribution of, or trafficking in controlled substances shall require an application unless no application is required under this subpart. Convictions or program entries for criminal offenses involving the simple possession of a controlled substance are not covered under section 19.


§ 303.223 What constitutes a conviction under section 19?

(a) Convictions requiring an application. There must be a conviction of record. Section 19 does not cover arrests or pending cases not brought to trial, unless the person has a program entry as set out in § 303.224. Section 19 does not cover acquittals or any conviction that has been reversed on appeal, unless the reversal was for the purpose of re-sentencing. A conviction with regard to which an appeal is pending requires an application. A conviction for which a pardon has been granted will require an application.


(b) Convictions not requiring an application. When an individual is charged with a covered offense and, in the absence of a program entry as set out in § 303.224, is subsequently convicted of an offense that is not a covered offense, the conviction is not subject to section 19.


(c) Expungements. If an order of expungement or an order to seal has been issued in regard to a conviction, or if a record has been otherwise expunged by operation of law, then the conviction shall not be considered a conviction of record and shall not require an application.


(d) Youthful offenders. An adjudication by a court against a person as a “youthful offender” under any youth-offender law applicable to minors as defined by state law, or any judgment as a “juvenile delinquent” by any court having jurisdiction over minors as defined by state law, does not require an application. Such an adjudication does not constitute a matter covered under section 19 and is not a conviction or program entry for determining the applicability of § 303.227.


§ 303.224 What constitutes a pretrial diversion or similar program (program entry) under section 19?

(a) A program entry is characterized by a suspension or eventual dismissal or reversal of charges or criminal prosecution upon agreement, whether formal or informal, by the accused to treatment, rehabilitation, restitution, or other non-criminal or non-punitive alternatives. Whether the outcome of a case constitutes a program entry is determined by relevant Federal, State, or local law, and, if not so designated under applicable law, then the determination of whether a disposition is a program entry will be made by the FDIC on a case-by-case basis. Program entries prior to November 29, 1990, are not covered by section 19.


(b) When a covered offense either is reduced by a program entry to an offense that would otherwise not be covered by section 19 or is dismissed upon successful completion of a program entry, the covered offense remains a covered offense for purposes of section 19. The covered offense will require an application unless it is de minimis as provided by § 303.227 of this subpart.


(c) Expungements or sealings of program entries will be treated the same as those for convictions.


§ 303.225 What are the types of applications that can be filed?

(a) Institution filing requirement (bank-sponsored applications). Applications are required to be filed by the IDI, which intends for a person covered by the provisions of section 19 to participate in its affairs. Bank-sponsored applications shall be filed with the appropriate FDIC Regional Office, as required by this subpart.


(b) Waiver applications. If an IDI does not file an application regarding an individual, the individual may file a request for a waiver of the institution filing requirement. Such a waiver application shall be filed with the appropriate FDIC Regional Office and shall set forth substantial good cause why the application should be granted.


§ 303.226 When must an application be filed?

Except for situations in which no application is required under this subpart, an application must be filed when there is present a conviction by a court of competent jurisdiction for a covered offense by any adult or minor treated as an adult, or when such person has a program entry regarding that offense. Before an application is considered by the FDIC, all of the sentencing requirements associated with a conviction, or conditions imposed by the program entry, including but not limited to, imprisonment, fines, condition of rehabilitation, and probation requirements, must be completed, and the case must be considered final by the procedures of the applicable jurisdiction. The FDIC’s application forms as well as additional information concerning section 19 can be accessed at the FDIC’s regional offices or on the FDIC’s website.


§ 303.227 When is an application not required for a covered offense or program entry (de minimis offenses)?

(a) In general. Approval is automatically granted and an application will not be required where all of the following de minimis criteria are met.


(1) The individual has been convicted of, or has program entries for, no more than two covered offenses, including those subject to paragraph (b) of this section; and for each covered offense, all of the sentencing requirements associated with the conviction, or conditions imposed by the program entry, have been completed (the sentence- or program-completion requirement does not apply under paragraphs (b)(2) and (4) of this section);


(2) Each covered offense was punishable by imprisonment for a term of one year or less and/or a fine of $2,500 or less, and the individual served three days or less of jail time for each covered offense. The FDIC considers jail time to include any significant restraint on an individual’s freedom of movement which includes, as part of the restriction, confinement to a specific facility or building on a continuous basis where the person may leave temporarily only to perform specific functions or during specified times periods or both. Jail time includes confinement to a psychiatric treatment center in lieu of a jail, prison, or house of correction on mental-competency grounds. The definition is not intended to include any of the following:


(i) Persons on probation or parole who may be restricted to a particular jurisdiction, or who must report occasionally to an individual or to a specified location;


(ii) Persons who are restricted to a substance-abuse treatment program facility for part or all of the day; and


(iii) Persons who are ordered to attend outpatient psychiatric treatment;


(3) If there are two convictions or program entries for a covered offense, each conviction or program entry was entered at least three years prior to the date an application would otherwise be required, except as provided in paragraph (b)(1) of this section; and


(4) Each covered offense was not committed against an IDI or insured credit union.


(b) Other types of offenses for which the de minimis exception applies and no application is required – (1) Age of person at time of covered offense. If there are two convictions or program entries for a covered offense, and the actions that resulted in both convictions or program entries all occurred when the individual was 21 years of age or younger, then the de minimis criteria in paragraph (a)(3) of this section shall be met if the convictions or program entries were entered at least 18 months prior to the date an application would otherwise be required.


(2) Convictions or program entries for insufficient funds checks. Convictions or program entries of record based on the writing of “bad” or insufficient funds check(s) shall be considered de minimis offenses under this provision if the following conditions apply:


(i) The aggregate total face value of all “bad” or insufficient funds check(s) cited across all the conviction(s) or program entry(ies) for “bad” or insufficient funds checks is $1,000 or less;


(ii) No IDI or insured credit union was a payee on any of the “bad” or insufficient funds checks that were the basis of the conviction(s) or program entry(ies); and


(iii) The individual has no more than one other de minimis offense under this section.


(3) Convictions or program entries for small-dollar, simple theft. Convictions or program entries based on the simple theft of goods, services, or currency (or other monetary instrument) shall be considered de minimis offenses under this provision if the following conditions apply. Simple theft excludes burglary, forgery, robbery, identity theft, and fraud.


(i) The value of the currency, goods, or services taken is $1,000 or less;


(ii) The theft was not committed against an IDI or insured credit union;


(iii) The individual has no more than one other de minimis offense under this section; and


(iv) If there are two de minimis offenses under this section, each conviction or program entry was entered at least three years prior to the date an application would otherwise be required, or at least 18 months prior to the date an application would otherwise be required if the actions that resulted in the conviction or program entry all occurred when the individual was 21 years of age or younger.


(4) Convictions or program entries for the use of a fake, false, or altered identification. A conviction or program entry for the creation or possession of a fake, false, or altered form of identification by a person under the age of 21, or the use of a fake, false, or altered form of identification by such a person to circumvent age-based restrictions on purchases, activities, or premises entry, shall be considered a de minimis offense under this provision if the following conditions apply.


(i) The individual has no more than one other de minimis offense under this section; and


(ii) If there are two de minimis offenses under this section, each conviction or program entry was entered at least three years prior to the date an application would otherwise be required; or at least 18 months prior to the date an application would otherwise be required if the actions that resulted in the conviction or program entry all occurred when the individual was 21 years of age or younger.


(c) Fidelity bond coverage and disclosure to institutions. Any person who meets the criteria under this section shall be covered by a fidelity bond to the same extent as others in similar positions, and shall disclose the presence of the conviction(s) or program entry(ies) to all IDIs in the affairs of which he or she intends to participate.


(d) Non-qualifying convictions or program entries. No conviction or program entry for a violation of the Title 18 sections set out in 12 U.S.C. 1829(a)(2) can qualify under any of the de minimis exceptions set out in this section.


§ 303.228 How to file an application.

Forms and instructions should be obtained from the FDIC’s website (www.fdic.gov), and the application must be filed with the appropriate FDIC Regional Director. The application must be filed by an IDI on behalf of a person (bank-sponsored) unless the FDIC grants a waiver of that requirement (individual waiver). Individual waivers will be considered on a case-by-case basis where substantial good cause for granting a waiver is shown. A person may request an individual waiver and file an application on her or his own behalf within the same application. The appropriate Regional Office for a bank-sponsored application is the office covering the state where the IDI’s home office is located. The appropriate Regional Office for an individual filing for a waiver of the institution filing requirement is the office covering the state where the person resides. States covered by each FDIC Regional Office can be located on the FDIC’s website.


§ 303.229 How an application is evaluated.

(a) The ultimate determinations in assessing an application are whether the person has demonstrated his or her fitness to participate in the conduct of the affairs of an IDI, and whether the affiliation, ownership, control, or participation by the person in the conduct of the affairs of the institution may constitute a threat to the safety and soundness of the institution or the interests of its depositors or threaten to impair public confidence in the institution. In determining the degree of risk, the FDIC will consider:


(1) Whether the conviction or program entry is for a criminal offense involving dishonesty, breach of trust, or money laundering and the specific nature and circumstances of the offense;


(2) Whether the participation directly or indirectly by the person in any manner in the conduct of the affairs of the IDI constitutes a threat to the safety and soundness of the institution or the interests of its depositors or threatens to impair public confidence in the institution;


(3) Evidence of rehabilitation including the person’s age at the time of the covered offense, the amount of time that has elapsed since the occurrence of the conviction or program entry, and the person’s employment history and full legal history;


(4) The position to be held or the level of participation by the person at an IDI;


(5) The amount of influence the person will be able to exercise over the operation, management, or affairs of an IDI;


(6) The ability of management of the IDI to supervise and control the person’s activities;


(7) The level of ownership or control the person will have at an insured depository institution;


(8) The applicability of the IDI’s fidelity bond coverage to the person; and


(9) Any additional factors in the specific case that appear relevant to the application or the applicant including, but not limited to, the opinion or position of the primary Federal or State regulator.


(b) The question of whether a person, who was convicted of a crime or who agreed to a program entry, was guilty of that crime shall not be at issue in a proceeding under this subpart or under 12 CFR part 308, subpart M.


(c) The foregoing factors will also be applied by the FDIC to determine whether the interests of justice are served in seeking an exception in the appropriate court when an application is made to terminate the ten-year ban prior to its expiration date under 12 U.S.C. 1829(a)(2) for certain Federal offenses.


(d) All approvals and orders will be subject to the condition that the person be covered by a fidelity bond to the same extent as others in similar positions. In cases in which a waiver of the institution filing requirement has been granted to an individual, approval of the application will also be conditioned upon that person disclosing the presence of the conviction(s) or program entry(ies) to all IDIs in the affairs of which he or she wishes to participate.


(e) When deemed appropriate, bank-sponsored applications are to allow the person to work in a specific job at a specific bank and may also be subject to the additional conditions, including that the prior consent of the FDIC will be required for any proposed significant changes in the person’s duties or responsibilities. In the case of bank-sponsored applications, such proposed changes may, in the discretion of the Regional Director, require a new application.


(f) In situations in which an approval has been granted for a person to participate in the affairs of a particular IDI and the person subsequently seeks to participate at another IDI, another application must be submitted and approved by the FDIC prior to the person participating in the affairs of the other IDI.


§ 303.230 What will the FDIC do if the application is denied?

(a) The FDIC will inform the applicant in writing that the application has been denied and summarize or cite the relevant considerations specified in § 303.229 of this subpart.


(b) The denial will also notify the applicant that a written request for a hearing under 12 CFR part 308, subpart M, may be filed with the Executive Secretary within 60 days after the denial. The request for a hearing must include the relief desired, the grounds supporting the request for relief, and any supporting evidence.


§ 303.231 Waiting time for a subsequent application if an application is denied.

An application under section 19 may be made in writing at any time more than one year after the issuance of a decision denying an application under section 19. If the original denial is subject to a request for a hearing, then the subsequent application may be filed at any time more than one year after the decision of the Board of Directors, or its designee, denying the application. The prohibition against participating in the affairs of an IDI under section 19 shall continue until the individual has been granted consent in writing to participate in the affairs of an IDI by the Board of Directors or its designee.


Subpart M – Other Filings

§ 303.240 General.

This subpart sets forth the filing procedures to be followed when seeking the FDIC’s consent to engage in certain activities or accomplish other matters as specified in the individual sections contained herein. For those matters covered by this subpart that also have substantive FDIC regulations or related statements of policy, references to the relevant regulations or statements of policy are contained in the specific sections.


§ 303.241 Reduce or retire capital stock or capital debt instruments.

(a) Scope – (1) Insured State nonmember banks. The procedures contained in this section are to be followed by an insured State nonmember bank to seek the prior approval of the FDIC to reduce the amount or retire any part of its common or preferred stock, or to retire any part of its capital notes or debentures pursuant to section 18(i)(1) of the FDI Act (12 U.S.C. 1828(i)(1)).


(2) Insured State savings associations. The procedures contained in this section are to be followed by an insured State savings association to seek the prior approval of the FDIC to reduce the amount or retire any part of its common or preferred stock, or to retire any part of its capital notes or debentures, as if the insured State savings association were a State nonmember bank subject to section 18(i)(1) of the Act (12 U.S.C. 1828(i)(1)).


(b) Where to file. Applicants shall submit a letter application to the appropriate FDIC office.


(c) Content of filing. The application shall contain the following:


(1) The type and amount of the proposed change to the capital structure and the reason for the change;


(2) A schedule detailing the present and proposed capital structure;


(3) The time period that the proposal will encompass;


(4) If the proposal involves a series of transactions affecting Tier 1 capital components which will be consummated over a period of time which shall not exceed twelve months, the application shall certify that the insured depository institution will maintain itself as a well-capitalized institution as defined in part 324 of this chapter both before and after each of the proposed transactions;


(5) If the proposal involves the repurchase of capital instruments, the amount of the repurchase price and the basis for establishing the fair market value of the repurchase price;


(6) A statement that the proposal will be available to all holders of a particular class of outstanding capital instruments on an equal basis, and if not, the details of any restrictions; and


(7) The date that the applicant’s board of directors approved the proposal.


(d) Additional information. The FDIC may request additional information at any time during processing of the application.


(e) Undercapitalized institutions. Procedures regarding applications by an undercapitalized insured depository institution to retire capital stock or capital debt instruments pursuant to section 38 of the FDI Act (12 U.S.C. 1831o) are set forth in subpart K (Prompt Corrective Action), § 303.203. Applications pursuant to section 38 and this section should be filed concurrently, or as a single application.


(f) Expedited processing for eligible depository institutions. An application filed under this section by an eligible depository institution as defined in§ 303.2(r) will be acknowledged in writing by the FDIC and will receive expedited processing, unless the applicant is notified in writing to the contrary and provided with the basis for that decision. The FDIC may remove an application from expedited processing for any of the reasons set forth in § 303.11(c)(2). Absent such removal, an application processed under expedited processing will be deemed approved 20 days after the FDIC’s receipt of a substantially complete application.


(g) Standard processing. For those applications that are not processed pursuant to expedited procedures, the FDIC will provide the applicant with written notification of the final action as soon as the decision is rendered.


[67 FR 79247, Dec. 27, 2002, as amended at 78 FR 55470, Sept. 30, 2013; 83 FR 17739, Apr. 24, 2018; 85 FR 3245, Jan. 21, 2020]


§ 303.242 Exercise of trust powers.

(a) Scope. This section contains the procedures to be followed by a State nonmember bank or State savings association that seeks to obtain the FDIC’s prior written consent to exercise trust powers. The FDIC’s prior written consent to exercise trust powers is not required in the following circumstances:


(1) Where a State nonmember bank or State savings association received authority to exercise trust powers from its chartering authority prior to December 1, 1950; or


(2) Where the institution continues to conduct trust activities pursuant to authority granted by its chartering authority subsequent to a charter conversion or withdrawal from membership in the Federal Reserve System.


(b) Where to file. Applicants shall submit to the appropriate FDIC office a completed form, “Application for Consent to Exercise Trust Powers.” This form may be obtained from any FDIC regional director.


(c) Content of filing. The filing shall consist of the completed trust application form.


(d) Additional information. The FDIC may request additional information at any time during processing of the filing.


(e) Expedited processing for eligible depository institutions. An application filed under this section by an eligible depository institution as defined in § 303.2(r) will be acknowledged in writing by the FDIC and will receive expedited processing, unless the applicant is notified in writing to the contrary and provided with the basis for that decision. The FDIC may remove an application from expedited processing for any of the reasons set forth in § 303.11(c)(2.). Absent such removal, an application processed under expedited procedures will be deemed approved 30 days after the FDIC’s receipt of a substantially complete application.


(f) Standard processing. For those applications that are not processed pursuant to the expedited procedures, the FDIC will provide the applicant with written notification of the final action when the decision is rendered.


[83 FR 60337, Nov. 26, 2018]


§ 303.243 Brokered deposits.

(a) Brokered deposit waivers – (1) Scope. Pursuant to section 29 of the FDI Act (12 U.S.C. 1831f) and part 337 of this chapter, an adequately capitalized insured depository institution may not accept, renew or roll over any brokered deposits unless it has obtained a waiver from the FDIC. A well-capitalized insured depository institution may accept brokered deposits without a waiver, and an undercapitalized insured depository institution may not accept, renew or roll over any brokered deposits under any circumstances. This section contains the procedures to be followed to file with the FDIC for a brokered deposit waiver. The FDIC will provide notice to the depository institution’s appropriate federal banking agency and any state regulatory agency, as appropriate, that a request for a waiver has been filed and will consult with such agency or agencies, prior to taking action on the institution’s request for a waiver. Prior notice and/or consultation shall not be required in any particular case if the FDIC determines that the circumstances require it to take action without giving such notice and opportunity for consultation.


(2) Where to file. Applicants shall submit a letter application to the appropriate FDIC office.


(3) Content of filing. The application shall contain the following:


(i) The time period for which the waiver is requested;


(ii) A statement of the policy governing the use of brokered deposits in the institution’s overall funding and liquidity management program;


(iii) The volume, rates and maturities of the brokered deposits held currently and anticipated during the waiver period sought, including any internal limits placed on the terms, solicitation and use of brokered deposits;


(iv) How brokered deposits are costed and compared to other funding alternatives and how they are used in the institution’s lending and investment activities, including a detailed discussion of asset growth plans;


(v) Procedures and practices used to solicit brokered deposits, including an identification of the principal sources of such deposits;


(vi) Management systems overseeing the solicitation, acceptance and use of brokered deposits;


(vii) A recent consolidated financial statement with balance sheet and income statements; and


(viii) The reasons the institution believes its acceptance, renewal, or rollover of brokered deposits would pose no undue risk.


(4) Additional information. The FDIC may request additional information at any time during processing of the application.


(5) Expedited processing for eligible depository institutions. An application filed under this section by an eligible depository institution as defined in this paragraph will be acknowledged in writing by the FDIC and will receive expedited processing, unless the applicant is notified in writing to the contrary and provided with the basis for that decision. For the purpose of this section, an applicant will be deemed an eligible depository institution if it satisfies all of the criteria contained in § 303.2(r) except that the applicant may be adequately capitalized rather than well-capitalized. The FDIC may remove an application from expedited processing for any of the reasons set forth in § 303.11(c)(2). Absent such removal, an application processed under expedited procedures will be deemed approved 21 days after the FDIC’s receipt of a substantially complete application.


(6) Standard processing. For those filings which are not processed pursuant to the expedited procedures, the FDIC will provide the applicant with written notification of the final action as soon as the decision is rendered.


(7) Conditions for approval. A waiver issued pursuant to this section shall:


(i) Be for a fixed period, generally no longer than two years, but may be extended upon refiling; and


(ii) May be revoked by the FDIC at any time by written notice to the institution.


(b) Primary purpose exception notices and applications – (1) Scope. This section sets forth a process for an agent or nominee, or an insured depository institution on behalf of an agent or nominee, to notify the FDIC that it will rely upon a designated exception in § 337.6(a)(5)(v)(I)(1)(i) and (ii) of this chapter. This section also sets forth a process for an agent or nominee, or an insured depository institution on behalf of an agent or nominee, to apply for the primary purpose exception, as described in § 337.6(a)(5)(v)(I)(2) of this chapter.


(2) Definitions. For purposes of this paragraph (b):


(i) Third party means an agent or nominee that submits a notice that it will rely upon a designated exception in § 337.6(a)(5)(v)(I)(1)(i) and (ii) of this chapter or applies to be excluded from the definition of deposit broker pursuant to the primary purpose exception as described in § 337.6(a)(5)(v)(I)(2) of this chapter.


(ii) Notice filer means a third party or an insured depository institution on behalf of a third party, that submits a written notice that the third party will rely upon a designated business exception in § 337.6(a)(5)(v)(I)(1)(i) and (ii) of this chapter.


(iii) Applicant means a third party, or an insured depository institution on behalf of a third party, that applies to be excluded from the definition of deposit broker pursuant to the primary purpose exception, as described in § 337.6(a)(5)(v)(I)(2) of this chapter.


(3) Notice requirement for designated business exceptions. A third party, or an insured depository institution on behalf of a third party, must notify the FDIC through a written notice that the third party will rely upon a designated business exception described in § 337.6(a)(5)(v)(I)(1)(i) and (ii) of this chapter in order to rely on that designated business exception.


(i) Contents of notice. The notice must include: The designated exception upon which the third party will rely; a brief description of the business line; the applicable specific contents for the designated exception; either a statement that there is no involvement of any additional third party who qualifies as a deposit broker or a brief description of any additional third party that may qualify as a deposit broker; and if the notice is provided by a nonbank third party, a list of the insured depository institutions that are receiving deposits by or through the particular business line. The applicable specific contents for the following designated exceptions are:


(A) 25 percent test (as described in § 337.6(a)(5)(v)(I)(1)(i) of this chapter). (1) The total amount of customer assets under administration by the third party for that particular business line; and


(2) The total amount of deposits placed by the third party on behalf of its customers, for that particular business line, at all depository institutions, being placed by that third party.


(B) Enabling transactions test (as described in § 337.6(a)(5)(v)(I)(1)(ii) of this chapter). (1) Contractual evidence that there is no interest, fees, or other remuneration, being paid to any customer accounts; and


(2) A certification that all customer deposits that are placed at insured depository institutions are in transaction accounts.


(ii) Additional information for notices. The FDIC may request additional information from the notice filer at any time after receipt of the notice.


(iii) Additional notice filers. The FDIC may include notice and/or reporting requirements as part of a designated exception identified under § 337.6(a)(5)(v)(I)(2)(xiv) of this chapter.


(iv) Subsequent notices. A notice filer that previously submitted a notice under this section shall submit a subsequent notice to the FDIC if, at any point, the notice filer no longer meets the designated business exception that was the subject of its previous notice.


(v) Ongoing requirements for notice filers. Notice filers that submit a notice under the 25 percent test must provide quarterly updates to the FDIC on the figures described in paragraph (b)(3)(i)(A) of this section that were provided as part of the written notice. Notice filers that submit a notice under the enabling transactions test must provide an annual certification to the FDIC that the third party continues to place all customer funds at insured depository institutions into transaction accounts and that customers do not receive any interest, fees, or other remuneration.


(vi) Revocation of primary purpose exception. The FDIC may, with notice, revoke a primary purpose exception of a third party, or a person required to submit a notice under paragraph (b)(3)(iii) of this section, that qualifies for the primary purpose exception due to reliance on a designated exception, if:


(A) The third party no longer meets the criteria for a designated exception;


(B) The notice or subsequent reporting is inaccurate; or


(C) The notice filer fails to submit required reports.


(4) Application requirements. A third party, or an insured depository institution on behalf of a third party, may submit an application to the FDIC seeking a primary purpose exception for business relationships not designated in § 337.6(a)(5)(v)(I)(1) of this chapter.


(i) For applications for primary purpose exception to enable transactions with fees, interest, or other remuneration provided to the depositor. Applicants that seek the primary purpose exception where customer funds that are placed at depository institutions are placed into transaction accounts, and fees, interest, or other remuneration are provided to the depositor, must include the following information, with respect to the particular business line:


(A) Contractual evidence on the amount of interest, fees, or other remuneration, being paid on customer accounts;


(B) Any marketing materials provided by the third party to insured depository institutions or its customers;


(C) The average number of transactions for all customer accounts, and an explanation of how its customers utilize its services for the purpose of making payments and not for the receipt of a deposit placement service or deposit insurance;


(D) The percentage of customer funds placed in deposit accounts that are not transaction accounts;


(E) A description of any additional third parties that provide assistance with the placement of deposits at insured depository institutions; and


(F) Any other information that the FDIC requires to initiate its review and render the application complete.


(ii) For applications for primary purpose exception not covered by paragraph (b)(4)(i) of this section. Applicants that seek the primary purpose exception, other than applications under paragraph (b)(4)(i) of this section, must include, to the extent applicable:


(A) A description of the deposit placement arrangements between the third party and insured depository institutions for the particular business line, including the services provided by any relevant third parties;


(B) A description of the particular business line;


(C) A description of the primary purpose of the particular business line;


(D) The total amount of customer assets under management by the third party, with respect to the particular business line;


(E) The total amount of deposits placed by the third party at all insured depository institutions, including the amounts placed with the applicant, if the applicant is an insured depository institution, with respect to the particular business line. This includes the total amount of term deposits and transactional deposits placed by the third party, but should be exclusive of the amount of brokered CDs, as defined in § 337.6(a)(5)(v)(I)(3) of this chapter, being placed by that third party;


(F) Revenue generated from the third party’s activities related to the placement, or facilitating the placement, of deposits, with respect to the particular business line;


(G) Revenue generated from the third party’s activities not related to the placement, or facilitating the placement, of deposits, with respect to the particular business line;


(H) A description of the marketing activities provided by the third party, with respect to the particular business line;


(I) The reasons the third party meets the primary purpose exception;


(J) Any other information the applicant deems relevant; and


(K) Any other information that the FDIC requires to initiate its review and render the application complete.


(iii) Additional information for applications. The FDIC may request additional information from the applicant at any time during processing of the application.


(iv) Application timing. (A) An applicant that submits a complete application under this section will receive a written determination by the FDIC within 120 days of receipt of a complete application.


(B) If an application is submitted that is not complete, the FDIC will, within 45 days of submission, notify the applicant and explain what is needed to render the application complete.


(C) The FDIC may extend the 120-day timeframe, if necessary, to complete its review of a complete application, with notice to the applicant, for a maximum of 120 additional days.


(v) Application approvals. The FDIC will approve an application –


(A) Submitted under paragraph (b)(4)(i) of this section if the FDIC finds that the third party’s marketing materials indicate that the primary purpose of placing customer deposits at insured depository institutions is to enable transactions, and:


(1) Nominal interest, fees, or other remuneration is being paid on any customer accounts, or


(2) The third party’s customers make, on average, more than 6 transactions a month.


(B) Submitted under paragraph (b)(4)(ii) of this section if the FDIC finds that the applicant demonstrates that, with respect to the particular business line under which the third party places or facilitates the placement of deposits, the primary purpose of the third party’s business relationship with its customers is a purpose other than the placement or facilitation of the placement of deposits.


(vi) Ongoing reporting for applications. (A) The FDIC will describe any reporting requirements, if applicable, as part of its written approval for a primary purpose exception.


(B) Applicants that receive a written approval for the primary purpose exception, shall provide reporting to the FDIC and, in the case of an insured depository institution, to its primary Federal regulator, if required under this section.


(vii) Requesting additional information, requiring re-application, imposing additional conditions, and withdrawing approvals. At any time after approval of an application for the primary purpose exception, the FDIC may at its discretion, with written notice and adequate justification:


(A) Require additional information from an applicant to ensure that the approval is still appropriate, or for purposes of verifying the accuracy and correctness of the information provided to an insured depository institution or submitted to the FDIC as part of the application under this section;


(B) Require the applicant to reapply for approval;


(C) Impose additional conditions on an approval; or


(D) Withdraw an approval.


[86 FR 6787, Jan. 22, 2021]


§ 303.244 Golden parachute and severance plan payments.

(a) Scope. Pursuant to section 18(k) of the FDI Act (12 U.S.C. 1828(k)) and part 359 of this chapter, an insured depository institution or depository institution holding company may not make golden parachute payments or excess nondiscriminatory severance plan payments unless the depository institution or holding company obtains permission to make such payments in accordance with the rules contained in part 359 of this chapter. This section contains the procedures to file for the FDIC’s consent when such consent is necessary under part 359 of this chapter.


(1) Golden parachute payments. A troubled insured depository institution or a troubled depository institution holding company is prohibited from making golden parachute payments (as defined in § 359.1(f)(1) of this chapter) unless it obtains the consent of the appropriate federal banking agency and the written concurrence of the FDIC. Therefore, in the case of golden parachute payments, the procedures in this section apply to all troubled insured depository institutions and troubled depository institution holding companies.


(2) Excess nondiscriminatory severance plan payments. In the case of excess nondiscriminatory severance plan payments as provided by § 359.1(f)(2)(v) of this chapter, the FDIC’s consent is necessary for state nonmember banks that meet the criteria set forth in § 359.1(f)(1)(ii) of this chapter. In addition, the FDIC’s consent is required for all insured depository institutions or depository institution holding companies that meet the same criteria and seek to make payments in excess of the 12-month amount specified in § 359.1(f)(2)(v).


(b) Where to file. Applicants shall submit a letter application to the appropriate FDIC regional director.


(c) Content of filing. The application shall contain the following:


(1) The reasons why the applicant seeks to make the payment;


(2) An identification of the institution-affiliated party who will receive the payment;


(3) A copy of any contract or agreement regarding the subject matter of the filing;


(4) The cost of the proposed payment and its impact on the institution’s capital and earnings;


(5) The reasons why the consent to the payment should be granted; and


(6) Certification and documentation as to each of the points cited in § 359.4(a)(4).


(d) Additional information. The FDIC may request additional information at any time during processing of the filing.


(e) Processing. The FDIC will provide the applicant with a subsequent written notification of the final action taken as soon as the decision is rendered.


[67 FR 79247, Dec. 27, 2002, as amended at 68 FR 50461, Aug. 21, 2003]


§ 303.245 Waiver of liability for commonly controlled depository institutions.

(a) Scope. Section 5(e) of the FDI Act (12 U.S.C. 1815(e)) creates liability for commonly controlled insured depository institutions for losses incurred or anticipated to be incurred by the FDIC in connection with the default of a commonly controlled insured depository institution or any assistance provided by the FDIC to any commonly controlled insured depository institution in danger of default. In addition to certain statutory exceptions and exclusions contained in sections 5(e)(6), (7) and (8), the FDI Act also permits the FDIC, in its discretion, to exempt any insured depository institution from this liability if it determines that such exemption is in the best interests of the Deposit Insurance Fund. This section describes procedures to request a conditional waiver of liability pursuant to section 5 of the FDI Act (12 U.S.C. 1815(e)(5)(A)).


(b) Definition. Conditional waiver of liability means an exemption from liability pursuant to section 5(e) of the FDI Act (12 U.S.C. 1815(e)) subject to terms and conditions.


(c) Where to file. Applicants shall submit a letter application to the appropriate FDIC office.


(d) Content of filing. The application shall contain the following information:


(1) The basis for requesting a waiver;


(2) The existence of any significant events (e.g., change in control, capital injection, etc.) that may have an impact upon the applicant and/or any potentially liable institution;


(3) Current, and if applicable, pro forma financial information regarding the applicant and potentially liable institution(s); and


(4) The benefits to the appropriate FDIC insurance fund resulting from the waiver and any related events.


(e) Additional information. The FDIC may request additional information at any time during the processing of the filing.


(f) Processing. The FDIC will provide the applicant with written notification of the final action as soon as the decision is rendered.


(g) Failure to comply with terms of conditional waiver. In the event a conditional waiver of liability is issued, failure to comply with the terms specified therein may result in the termination of the conditional waiver of liability. The FDIC reserves the right to revoke the conditional waiver of liability after giving the applicant written notice of such revocation and a reasonable opportunity to be heard on the matter pursuant to § 303.10.


[67 FR 79247, Dec. 27, 2002, as amended at 71 FR 20526, Apr. 21, 2006]


§ 303.246 Conversion with diminution of capital.

(a) Scope. This section contains the procedures to be followed by an insured federal depository institution seeking the prior written consent of the FDIC pursuant to section 18(i)(2) of the FDI Act (12 U.S.C. 1828(i)(2)) to convert from an insured federal depository institution to an insured state nonmember bank (except a District bank) where the capital stock or surplus of the resulting bank will be less than the capital stock or surplus, respectively, of the converting institution at the time of the shareholders’ meeting approving such conversion.


(b) Where to file. Applicants shall submit a letter application to the appropriate FDIC office.


(c) Content of filing. The application shall contain the following information:


(1) A description of the proposed transaction;


(2) A schedule detailing the present and proposed capital structure; and


(3) A copy of any documents submitted to the state chartering authority with respect to the charter conversion.


(d) Additional information. The FDIC may request additional information at any time during the processing.


(e) Processing. The FDIC will provide the applicant with written notification of the final action when the decision is rendered.


[67 FR 79247, Dec. 27, 2002. Redesignated at 71 FR 20526, Apr. 21, 2006]


§ 303.247 Continue or resume status as an insured institution following termination under section 8 of the FDI Act.

(a) Scope. This section relates to an application by a depository institution whose insured status has been terminated under section 8 of the FDI Act (12 U.S.C. 1818) for permission to continue or resume its status as an insured depository institution. This section covers institutions whose deposit insurance continues in effect for any purpose or for any length of time under the terms of an FDIC order terminating deposit insurance, but does not cover operating non-insured depository institutions which were previously insured by the FDIC, or any non-insured, non-operating depository institution whose charter has not been surrendered or revoked.


(b) Where to file. Applicants shall submit a letter application to the appropriate FDIC office.


(c) Content of filing. The filing shall contain the following information:


(1) A complete statement of the action requested, all relevant facts, and the reason for such requested action; and


(2) A certified copy of the resolution of the depository institution’s board of directors authorizing submission of the filing.


(d) Additional information. The FDIC may request additional information at any time during processing of the filing.


(e) Processing. The FDIC will provide the applicant with written notification of the final action as soon as the decision is rendered.


[67 FR 79247, Dec. 27, 2002. Redesignated at 71 FR 20526, Apr. 21, 2006]


§ 303.248 Truth in Lending Act – Relief from reimbursement.

(a) Scope. This section applies to requests for relief from reimbursement pursuant to the Truth in Lending Act (15 U.S.C. 1601 et seq.) and Regulation Z (12 CFR part 226). Related delegations of authority are also set forth.


(b) Procedures to be followed in filing initial requests for relief. Requests for relief from reimbursement shall be filed with the appropriate FDIC office or within 60 days after receipt of the compliance report of examination containing the request to conduct a file search and make restitution to affected customers. The filing shall contain a complete and concise statement of the action requested, all relevant facts, the reasons and analysis relied upon as the basis for such requested action, and all supporting documentation.


(c) Additional information. The FDIC may request additional information at any time during processing of any such requests.


(d) Processing. The FDIC will acknowledge receipt of the request for reconsideration and provide the applicant with written notification of its determination within 60 days of its receipt of the request for reconsideration.


(e) Procedures to be followed in filing requests for reconsideration. Within 15 days of receipt of written notice that its request for relief has been denied, the requestor may petition the appropriate FDIC office for reconsideration of such request in accordance with the procedures set forth in§ 303.11(f).


[67 FR 79247, Dec. 27, 2002. Redesignated at 71 FR 20526, Apr. 21, 2006]


§ 303.249 Management official interlocks.

(a) Scope. This section contains the procedures to be followed by an insured State nonmember bank or an insured State savings association to seek the approval of FDIC to establish an interlock pursuant to the Depository Institutions Management Interlocks Act (12 U.S.C. 3207), section 13 of the FDI Act (12 U.S.C. 1823(k)), and part 348 of this chapter.


(b) Where to file. Applicants shall submit a letter application to the appropriate FDIC office.


(c) Content of filing. The application shall contain the following:


(1) A description of the proposed interlock;


(2) A statement of reason as to why the interlock will not result in a monopoly or a substantial lessening of competition; and


(3) If the applicant is seeking an exemption set forth in § 348.6 of this chapter, a description of the particular exemption which is being requested and a statement of reasons as to why the exemption is applicable.


(d) Additional information. The FDIC may request additional information at any time during processing of the filing.


(e) Processing. The FDIC will provide the applicant with written notification of the final action when the decision is rendered.


[67 FR 79247, Dec. 27, 2002. Redesignated at 71 FR 20526, Apr. 21, 2006; 84 FR 2706, Feb. 8, 2019; 86 FR 8097, Feb. 3, 2021]


§ 303.250 Modification of conditions.

(a) Scope. This section contains the procedures to be followed by an insured depository institution to seek the prior consent of the FDIC to modify the requirement of a prior approval of a filing issued by the FDIC.


(b) Where to file. Applicants should submit a letter application to the appropriate FDIC regional director.


(c) Content of filing. The application should contain the following information:


(1) A description of the original approved application;


(2) A description of the modification requested; and


(3) The reason for the request.


(d) Additional information. The FDIC may request additional information at any time during processing of the filing.


(e) Processing. The FDIC will provide the applicant with a written notification of the final action as soon as the decision is rendered.


[67 FR 79247, Dec. 27, 2002. Redesignated at 71 FR 20526, Apr. 21, 2006]


§ 303.251 Extension of time.

(a) Scope. This section contains the procedures to be followed by an insured depository institution to seek the prior consent of the FDIC for additional time to fulfill a condition required in an approval of a filing issued by the FDIC or to consummate a transaction which was the subject of an approval by the FDIC.


(b) Where to file. Applicants shall submit a letter application to the appropriate FDIC office.


(c) Content of filing. The application shall contain the following information:


(1) A description of the original approved application;


(2) Identification of the original time limitation;


(3) The additional time period requested; and


(4) The reason for the request.


(d) Additional information. The FDIC may request additional information at any time during processing of the filing.


(e) Processing. The FDIC will provide the applicant with written notification of the final action as soon as the decision is rendered.


[67 FR 79247, Dec. 27, 2002. Redesignated at 71 FR 20526, Apr. 21, 2006]


§§ 303.252-303.259 [Reserved]

PART 304 – FORMS, INSTRUCTIONS, AND REPORTS


Authority:5 U.S.C. 552; 12 U.S.C. 1463, 1464, 1811, 1813, 1817, 1819, 1831, and 1861-1867.


Source:84 FR 29052, June 21, 2019, unless otherwise noted.

Subpart A – In General

§ 304.1 Purpose.

This subpart informs the public where it may obtain forms and instructions for reports, applications, and other submittals used by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC), and describes certain forms that are not described elsewhere in FDIC regulations in this chapter.


[86 FR 66443, Nov. 23, 2021]


§ 304.2 Where to obtain forms and instructions.

Forms and instructions used in connection with applications, reports, and other submittals used by the FDIC can be obtained by contacting the FDIC Public Information Center (550 17th Street NW, Washington, DC 20429; telephone: (877) 275-3342 or (703) 562-2200), except as noted in § 304.3. In addition, many forms and instructions can be obtained from FDIC regional offices. A list of FDIC regional offices can be obtained from the FDIC Public Information Center, or found at the FDIC’s website at http://www.fdic.gov, or in the directory of FDIC Law, Regulations, Related Acts published by the FDIC.


§ 304.3 Reports.

(a) Consolidated Reports of Condition and Income, Forms FFIEC 031, 041, and 051. Pursuant to section 7(a) of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act (12 U.S.C. 1817(a)) and other applicable law, every insured depository institution is required to file Consolidated Reports of Condition and Income (also known as the Call Report) in accordance with the instructions for these reports. All assets and liabilities, including contingent assets and liabilities, must be reported in, or otherwise taken into account in the preparation of, the Call Report. The FDIC uses Call Report data from all insured depository institutions to calculate deposit insurance assessments and monitor the condition, performance, and risk profile of individual banks and the banking industry. Reporting banks must also submit annually such information on small business and small farm lending as the FDIC may need to assess the availability of credit to these sectors of the economy. The report forms and instructions can be obtained from the Division of Insurance and Research (DIR), FDIC, 550 17th Street NW, Washington, DC 20429 or through the website of the Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council, http://www.ffiec.gov/.


(b) Report of Assets and Liabilities of U.S. Branches and Agencies of Foreign Banks, Form FFIEC 002. Pursuant to section 7(a) of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act (12 U.S.C. 1817(a)) and other applicable law, every insured U.S. branch of a foreign bank is required to file a Report of Assets and Liabilities of U.S. Branches and Agencies of Foreign Banks in accordance with the instructions for the report. All assets and liabilities, including contingent assets and liabilities, must be reported in, or otherwise taken into account in the preparation of the report. The FDIC uses the reported data to calculate deposit insurance assessments and monitor the condition, performance, and risk profile of individual insured branches and the banking industry. Insured branches must also submit annually such information on small business and small farm lending as the FDIC may need to assess the availability of credit to these sectors of the economy. Because the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System collects and processes this report on behalf of the FDIC, the report forms and instructions can be obtained from Federal Reserve District Banks or through the website of the Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council, http://www.ffiec.gov/.


(c) Summary of Deposits, Form FDIC 8020/05. Form 8020/05 is a report on the amount of deposits for each authorized office of an insured depository institution with branches; institutions with only a main office are exempt from reporting. Reports as of June 30 of each year must be submitted no later than the immediately succeeding July 31. The report forms and the instructions for completing the reports will be furnished to all such institutions by, or may be obtained upon request from, the Division of Insurance and Research (DIR), FDIC, 550 17th Street NW, Washington, DC 20429.


(d) Notification of Performance of Bank Services, Form FDIC 6120/06. Pursuant to section 7 of the Bank Service Company Act (12 U.S.C. 1867), as amended, FDIC-supervised institutions must notify the agency about the existence of a service relationship within thirty days after the making of the contract or the performance of the service, whichever occurs first. Form FDIC 6120/06 may be used to satisfy the notice requirement. The form contains identification, location, and contact information for the institution, the servicer, and a description of the services provided. In lieu of the form, notification may be provided by letter. Either the form or the letter containing the notice information must be submitted to the regional director – Division of Risk Management Supervision (RMS) of the region in which the institution’s main office is located.


(Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control numbers 3064-0052, 7100-0032, 3064-0061, and 3064-0029)


§§ 304.4-304.10 [Reserved]

Subpart B – Implementation of Reduced Reporting Requirement


Authority:12 U.S.C. 1464(v), 1817(a), and 1819 Tenth.

§ 304.11 Authority, purpose, and scope.

(a) Authority. This subpart is issued pursuant to 12 U.S.C. 1464(v), and section 7 (12 U.S.C. 1817(a)(12)) and section 9 (12 U.S.C. 1819 Tenth) of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act.


(b) Purpose. This subpart implements 12 U.S.C. 1817(a)(12) to allow reduced reporting for a covered depository institution when such institution makes its reports of condition for the first and third calendar quarters of a year.


(c) Scope. This subpart applies to an insured depository institution, as that term is defined in section 3(c) of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act, 12 U.S.C. 1813(c), that meets the definition of a covered depository institution under § 304.12.


(d) Preservation of authority. Nothing in this subpart in any way limits the authority of the Corporation under other provisions of applicable law and regulation.


§ 304.12 Definitions.

(a) Covered depository institution means an insured depository institution, as such term is defined in section 3 of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act, 12 U.S.C. 1813, for which the Corporation is the appropriate Federal banking agency and that meets all of the following criteria:


(1) Has less than $5 billion in total consolidated assets as reported in its report of condition for the second calendar quarter of the preceding year;


(2) Has no foreign offices, as defined in this section;


(3) Is not required to or has not elected to use 12 CFR part 324, subpart E, to calculate its risk-based capital requirements;


(4) Is not a large institution or highly complex institution, as such terms are defined in 12 CFR 327.8, or treated as a large institution, as requested under 12 CFR 327.16(f); and


(5) Is not a state-licensed insured branch of a foreign bank, as such terms are defined in section 3(s) of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act, 12 U.S.C. 1813(s).


(6) In determining whether an insured depository institution meets the asset threshold in paragraph (1) of the definition of “covered depository institution” in paragraph (a)(1) of this section, for purposes of a report required to be submitted for calendar year 2021, an insured depository institution may refer to the lesser of its total consolidated assets as reported in its report of condition as of December 31, 2019, and its total consolidated assets as reported in its report of condition for the second calendar quarter of 2020.


(b) Foreign country refers to one or more foreign nations, and includes the overseas territories, dependencies, and insular possessions of those nations and of the United States.


(c) Foreign office means:


(1) A branch or consolidated subsidiary in a foreign country, unless the branch is located on a U.S. military facility;


(2) An international banking facility as such term is defined in 12 CFR 204.8;


(3) A majority-owned Edge Act or Agreement subsidiary including both its U.S. and its foreign offices; and


(4) For an institution chartered or headquartered in any U.S. state or the District of Columbia, a branch or consolidated subsidiary located in a U.S. territory or possession.


(d) Report of condition means the FFIEC 031, FFIEC 041, or FFIEC 051 versions of the Consolidated Report of Condition and Income (Call Report) or the FFIEC 002 (Report of Assets and Liabilities of U.S. Branches and Agencies of Foreign Banks), as applicable, and as they may be amended or superseded from time to time in accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, 44 U.S.C. chapter 35.


(e) Total consolidated assets means total assets as reported in an insured depository institution’s report of condition.


[84 FR 29052, June 21, 2019, as amended at 85 FR 77363, Dec. 2, 2020]


§ 304.13 Reduced reporting.

A covered depository institution may file the FFIEC 051 version of the report of condition, or any successor thereto, which shall provide for reduced reporting for the reports of condition for the first and third calendar quarters for a year.


§ 304.14 Reservation of authority.

Notwithstanding § 304.13, the Corporation, in consultation with the applicable state chartering authority, may require an otherwise eligible covered depository institution to file the FFIEC 041 version of the report of condition, or any successor thereto, based on an institution-specific determination. In making this determination, the Corporation may consider criteria including, but not limited to, whether the institution is significantly engaged in one or more complex, specialized, or other higher-risk activities, such as those for which limited information is reported in the FFIEC 051 version of the report of condition compared to the FFIEC 041 version of the report of condition. Nothing in this part shall be construed to limit the Corporation’s authority to obtain information from insured depository institutions.


§§ 304.15-304.20 [Reserved]

Subpart C – Computer-Security Incident Notification


Source:86 FR 66443, Nov. 23, 2021, unless otherwise noted.

§ 304.21 Authority, purpose, and scope.

(a) Authority. This subpart is issued under the authority of 12 U.S.C. 1463, 1811, 1813, 1817, 1819, and 1861-1867.


(b) Purpose. This subpart promotes the timely notification of computer-security incidents that may materially and adversely affect FDIC-supervised institutions.


(c) Scope. This subpart applies to all insured state nonmember banks, insured state licensed branches of foreign banks, and insured State savings associations. This subpart also applies to bank service providers, as defined in § 304.22(b)(2).


§ 304.22 Definitions.

(a) Except as modified in this subpart, or unless the context otherwise requires, the terms used in this subpart have the same meanings as set forth in 12 U.S.C. 1813.


(b) For purposes of this subpart, the following definitions apply.


(1) Banking organization means an FDIC-supervised insured depository institution, including all insured state nonmember banks, insured state-licensed branches of foreign banks, and insured State savings associations; provided, however, that no designated financial market utility shall be considered a banking organization.


(2) Bank service provider means a bank service company or other person that performs covered services; provided, however, that no designated financial market utility shall be considered a bank service provider.


(3) Business line means a product or service offered by a banking organization to serve its customers or support other business needs.


(4) Computer-security incident is an occurrence that results in actual harm to the confidentiality, integrity, or availability of an information system or the information that the system processes, stores, or transmits.


(5) Covered services are services performed, by a person, that are subject to the Bank Service Company Act (12 U.S.C. 1861-1867).


(6) Designated financial market utility has the same meaning as set forth at 12 U.S.C. 5462(4).


(7) Notification incident is a computer-security incident that has materially disrupted or degraded, or is reasonably likely to materially disrupt or degrade, a banking organization’s –


(i) Ability to carry out banking operations, activities, or processes, or deliver banking products and services to a material portion of its customer base, in the ordinary course of business;


(ii) Business line(s), including associated operations, services, functions, and support, that upon failure would result in a material loss of revenue, profit, or franchise value; or


(iii) Operations, including associated services, functions and support, as applicable, the failure or discontinuance of which would pose a threat to the financial stability of the United States.


(8) Person has the same meaning as set forth at 12 U.S.C. 1817(j)(8)(A).


§ 304.23 Notification.

A banking organization must notify the appropriate FDIC supervisory office, or an FDIC-designated point of contact, about a notification incident through email, telephone, or other similar methods that the FDIC may prescribe. The FDIC must receive this notification from the banking organization as soon as possible and no later than 36 hours after the banking organization determines that a notification incident has occurred.


§ 304.24 Bank service provider notification.

(a) A bank service provider is required to notify at least one bank-designated point of contact at each affected banking organization customer as soon as possible when the bank service provider determines that it has experienced a computer-security incident that has materially disrupted or degraded, or is reasonably likely to materially disrupt or degrade, covered services provided to such banking organization for four or more hours.


(1) A bank-designated point of contact is an email address, phone number, or any other contact(s), previously provided to the bank service provider by the banking organization customer.


(2) If the banking organization customer has not previously provided a bank-designated point of contact, such notification shall be made to the Chief Executive Officer and Chief Information Officer of the banking organization customer, or two individuals of comparable responsibilities, through any reasonable means.


(b) The notification requirement in paragraph (a) of this section does not apply to any scheduled maintenance, testing, or software update previously communicated to a banking organization customer.


§§ 304.25-304.30 [Reserved]

PARTS 305-306 [RESERVED]

PART 307 – CERTIFICATION OF ASSUMPTION OF DEPOSITS AND NOTIFICATION OF CHANGES OF INSURED STATUS


Authority:12 U.S.C. 1818(a)(6); 1818(q); and 1819(a) [Tenth].


Source:71 FR 8791, Feb. 21, 2006, unless otherwise noted.

§ 307.1 Scope and purpose.

(a) Scope. This Part applies to all insured depository institutions, as defined in section 3(c)(2) of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act (FDI Act) (12 U.S.C. 1813(c)(2)).


(b) Purpose. This Part sets forth the rules governing:


(1) The time and manner for providing certification to the FDIC regarding the assumption of all of the deposit liabilities of an insured depository institution by one or more insured depository institutions; and


(2) The notification that an insured depository institution shall provide its depositors when a depository institution’s insured status is being voluntarily terminated without its deposits being assumed by one or more insured depository institutions.


§ 307.2 Certification of assumption of deposit liabilities.

(a) When certification is required. Whenever all of the deposit liabilities of an insured depository institution are assumed by one or more insured depository institutions by merger, consolidation, other statutory assumption, or by contract, the transferring insured depository institution, or its legal successor, shall provide an accurate written certification to the FDIC that its deposit liabilities have been assumed. No certification shall be required when deposit liabilities are assumed by an operating insured depository institution from an insured depository institution in default, as defined in section 3(x)(1) of the FDI Act (12 U.S.C. 1813(x)(1)), and that has been placed under FDIC receivership.


(b) Certification requirements. The certification required by paragraph (a) of this section shall be provided on official letterhead of the transferring insured depository institution or its legal successor, signed by a duly authorized official, and state the date the assumption took effect. The certification shall indicate the date on which the transferring institution’s authority to engage in banking has terminated or will terminate as well as the method of termination (e.g., whether by the surrender of its charter, by the cancellation of its charter or license to conduct a banking business, or otherwise). The certification may follow the form contained in Appendix A of this part. In a merger or consolidation where there is only one surviving entity which is the legal successor to both the transferring and assuming institutions, the surviving entity shall provide any required certification.


(c) Filing. The certification required by paragraph (a) of this section shall be provided within 30 calendar days after the assumption takes effect, and shall be submitted to the appropriate Regional Director of the FDIC’s Division of Supervision and Consumer Protection, as defined in 12 CFR 303.2(g).


(d) Evidence of assumption. The receipt by the FDIC of an accurate certification for a total assumption as required by paragraphs (a), (b) and (c) of this section shall constitute satisfactory evidence of such deposit assumption, as required by section 8(q) of the FDI Act (12 U.S.C. 1818(q)), and the insured status of the transferring institution shall terminate on the date of the receipt of the certification. In appropriate circumstances, the FDIC, in its sole discretion, may require additional information, or may consider other evidence of a deposit assumption to constitute satisfactory evidence of such assumption for purposes of section 8(q).


(e) Issuance of an order. The Executive Secretary, upon request from the Director of the Division of Supervision and Consumer Protection and with the concurrence of the General Counsel, or their respective designees, shall issue an order terminating the insured status of the transferring insured depository institution as of the date of receipt by the FDIC of satisfactory evidence of such assumption, pursuant to section 8(q) of the FDI Act and this regulation. Generally, no order shall be issued, under this paragraph, and insured status shall be cancelled by operation of law:


(1) If the charter of the transferring institution has been cancelled, revoked, rescinded, or otherwise terminated by operation of applicable state or federal statutes or regulations, or by action of the chartering authority for the transferring institution essentially contemporaneously, that is, generally within five business days after all deposits have been assumed; or


(2) If the transferring institution is an insured depository institution in default and for which the FDIC has been appointed receiver.


§ 307.3 Notice to depositors when insured status is voluntarily terminated and deposits are not assumed.

(a) Notice required. An insured depository institution that has obtained authority from the FDIC to terminate its insured status under sections 8(a), 8(p) or 18(i)(3) of the FDI Act without its deposit liabilities being assumed by one or more insured depository institutions shall provide to each of its depositors, at the depositor’s last known address of record on the books of the institution, prior written notification of the date the institution’s insured status shall terminate.


(b) Prior approval of notice. The insured depository institution shall provide the appropriate Regional Director of the FDIC’s Division of Supervision and Consumer Protection, as defined in 12 CFR 303.2(g), a copy of the proposed notice for approval. After being approved, the notice shall be provided to depositors by the insured depository institution at the time and in the manner specified by the appropriate Regional Director.


(c) Form of notice. The notice to depositors required by paragraph (a) of this section shall be provided on the official letterhead of the insured depository institution, shall bear the signature of a duly authorized officer, and, unless otherwise specified by the appropriate Regional Director, may follow the form of the notice contained in Appendix B of this part.


(d) Other requirements possible. The FDIC may require the insured depository institution to take such other actions as the FDIC considers necessary and appropriate for the protection of depositors.


Appendix A to Part 307 – Transferring Institution Letterhead

[Date]

[Name and Address of appropriate FDIC Regional Director]

SUBJECT: Certification of Total Assumption of Deposits

This certification is being provided pursuant to 12 U.S.C. 1818(q) and 12 CFR 307.2. On [state the date the deposit assumption took effect], [state the name of the depository institution assuming the deposit liabilities] assumed all of the deposits of [state the name and location of the transferring institution whose deposits were assumed]. [If applicable, state the date and method by which the transferring institution’s authority to engage in banking was or will be terminated.] Please contact the undersigned, at [telephone number], if additional information is needed.


Sincerely,

By:

[Name and Title of Authorized Representative]


Appendix B to Part 307 – Institution Letterhead

[Date]

[Name and Address of Depositor]

SUBJECT: Notice to Depositor of Voluntary Termination of Insured Status

The insured status of [name of insured depository institution], under the provisions of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act, will terminate as of the close of business on [state the date] (“termination date”). Insured deposits in the [name of insured depository institution] on the termination date, less all withdrawals from such deposits made subsequent to that date, will continue to be insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, to the extent provided by law, until [state the date]. The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation will not insure any new deposits or additions to existing deposits made by you after the termination date.


This Notice is being provided pursuant to 12 CFR 307.3.


Please contact [name of institution official in charge of depositor inquiries], at [name and address of insured depository institution] if additional information is needed regarding this Notice or the insured status of your account(s).


Sincerely,

By:

[Name and Title of Authorized Representative]


PART 308 – RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE


Authority:5 U.S.C. 504, 554-557; 12 U.S.C. 93(b), 164, 505, 1464, 1467(d), 1467a, 1468, 1815(e), 1817, 1818, 1819, 1820, 1828, 1829, 1829(b), 1831i, 1831m(g)(4), 1831o, 1831p-1, 1832(c), 1884(b), 1972, 3102, 3108(a), 3349, 3909, 4717, 5412(b)(2)(C), 5414(b)(3); 15 U.S.C. 78(h) and (i), 78o(c)(4), 78o-4(c), 78o-5, 78q-1, 78s, 78u, 78u-2, 78u-3, 78w, 6801(b), 6805(b)(1); 28 U.S.C. 2461 note; 31 U.S.C. 330, 5321; 42 U.S.C. 4012a; Pub. L. 104-134, sec. 31001(s), 110 Stat. 1321; Pub. L. 109-351, 120 Stat. 1966; Pub. L. 111-203, 124 Stat. 1376; Pub. L. 114-74, sec. 701, 129 Stat. 584.



Source:56 FR 37975, Aug. 9, 1991, unless otherwise noted.

Subpart A – Uniform Rules of Practice and Procedure

§ 308.1 Scope.

This subpart prescribes rules of practice and procedure applicable to adjudicatory proceedings as to which hearings on the record are provided for by the following statutory provisions:


(a) Cease-and-desist proceedings under section 8(b) of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act (“FDIA”) (12 U.S.C. 1818(b));


(b) Removal and prohibition proceedings under section 8(e) of the FDIA (12 U.S.C. 1818(e));


(c) Change-in-control proceedings under section 7(j)(4) of the FDIA (12 U.S.C. 1817(j)(4)) to determine whether the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (“FDIC”), should issue an order to approve or disapprove a person’s proposed acquisition of an institution and/or institution holding company;


(d) Proceedings under section 15C(c)(2) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (“Exchange Act”) (15 U.S.C. 78o-5), to impose sanctions upon any government securities broker or dealer or upon any person associated or seeking to become associated with a government securities broker or dealer for which the FDIC is the appropriate regulatory agency;


(e) Assessment of civil money penalties by the FDIC against institutions, institution-affiliated parties, and certain other persons for which it is the appropriate regulatory agency for any violation of:


(1) Sections 22(h) and 23 of the Federal Reserve Act (FRA), or any regulation issued thereunder, and certain unsafe or unsound practices or breaches of fiduciary duty, pursuant to 12 U.S.C. 1828(j) or 12 U.S.C. 1468;


(2) Section 106(b) of the Bank Holding Company Act Amendments of 1970 (“BHCA Amendments of 1970”), and certain unsafe or unsound practices or breaches of fiduciary duty, pursuant to 12 U.S.C. 1972(2)(F);


(3) Any provision of the Change in Bank Control Act of 1978, as amended (the “CBCA”), or any regulation or order issued thereunder, and certain unsafe or unsound practices, or breaches of fiduciary duty, pursuant to 12 U.S.C. 1817(j)(16);


(4) Section 7(a)(1) of the FDIA, pursuant to 12 U.S.C. 1817(a)(1);


(5) Any provision of the International Lending Supervision Act of 1983 (“ILSA”), or any rule, regulation or order issued thereunder, pursuant to 12 U.S.C. 3909;


(6) Any provision of the International Banking Act of 1978 (“IBA”), or any rule, regulation or order issued thereunder, pursuant to 12 U.S.C. 3108;


(7) Certain provisions of the Exchange Act, pursuant to section 21B of the Exchange Act (15 U.S.C. 78u-2);


(8) Section 1120 of the Financial Institutions Reform, Recovery, and Enforcement Act of 1989 (“FIRREA”) (12 U.S.C. 3349), or any order or regulation issued thereunder;


(9) The terms of any final or temporary order issued under section 8 of the FDIA or of any written agreement executed by the FDIC or the former Office of Thrift Supervision (OTS), the terms of any condition imposed in writing by the FDIC in connection with the grant of an application or request, certain unsafe or unsound practices or breaches of fiduciary duty, or any law or regulation not otherwise provided herein pursuant to 12 U.S.C. 1818(i)(2);


(10) Any provision of law referenced in section 102(f) of the Flood Disaster Protection Act of 1973 (42 U.S.C. 4012a(f)) or any order or regulation issued thereunder; and


(11) Any provision of law referenced in 31 U.S.C. 5321 or any order or regulation issued thereunder;


(12) Certain provisions of Section 5 of the Home Owners’ Loan Act (HOLA) or any regulation or order issued thereunder, pursuant to 12 U.S.C. 1464(d)(1), (5)-(8), (s), and (v);


(13) Section 9 of the HOLA or any regulation or order issued thereunder, pursuant to 12 U.S.C. 1467(d);


(14) Section 10 of HOLA, pursuant to 12 U.S.C. 1467a(a)(2)(D), (g), (i)(2)-(4) and (r); and


(f) Remedial action under section 102(g) of the Flood Disaster Protection Act of 1973 (42 U.S.C. 4012a(g));


(g) Proceedings under section 10(k) of the FDIA (12 U.S.C. 1820(k)) to impose penalties for violations of the post-employment restrictions under that subsection; and


(h) This subpart also applies to all other adjudications required by statute to be determined on the record after opportunity for an agency hearing, unless otherwise specifically provided for in the Local Rules.


[56 FR 37975, Aug. 9, 1991, as amended at 61 FR 20347, May 6, 1996; 70 FR 69639, Nov. 17, 2005; 80 FR 5011, Jan. 30, 2015]


§ 308.2 Rules of construction.

For purposes of this subpart:


(a) Any term in the singular includes the plural, and the plural includes the singular, if such use would be appropriate;


(b) Any use of a masculine, feminine, or neuter gender encompasses all three, if such use would be appropriate;


(c) The term counsel includes a non-attorney representative; and


(d) Unless the context requires otherwise, a party’s counsel of record, if any, may, on behalf of that party, take any action required to be taken by the party.


§ 308.3 Definitions.

For purposes of this subpart, unless explicitly stated to the contrary:


Administrative law judge means one who presides at an administrative hearing under authority set forth at 5 U.S.C. 556.


Administrative Officer means an inferior officer of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, duly appointed by the Board of Directors of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation to serve as the Board’s designee to hear certain motions or requests in an adjudicatory proceeding and to be the official custodian of the record for the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation.


Adjudicatory proceeding means a proceeding conducted pursuant to these rules and leading to the formulation of a final order other than a regulation.


Assistant Administrative Officer means an inferior officer of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, duly appointed by the Board of Directors of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation to serve as the Board’s designee to hear certain motions or requests in an adjudicatory proceeding upon the designation or unavailability of the Administrative Officer.


Board of Directors or Board means the Board of Directors of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or its designee.


Decisional employee means any member of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation’s or administrative law judge’s staff who has not engaged in an investigative or prosecutorial role in a proceeding and who may assist the Board of Directors, the administrative law judge, or the Administrative Officer, or the Assistant Administrative Officer, in preparing orders, recommended decisions, decisions, and other documents under the Uniform Rules.


Designee of the Board of Directors means officers or officials of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation acting pursuant to authority delegated by the Board of Directors.


Enforcement Counsel means any individual who files a notice of appearance as counsel on behalf of the FDIC in an adjudicatory proceeding.


FDIC means the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation.


Final order means an order issued by the FDIC with or without the consent of the affected institution or the institution-affiliated party, that has become final, without regard to the pendency of any petition for reconsideration or review.


Institution includes:


(1) Any bank as that term is defined in section 3(a) of the FDIA (12 U.S.C. 1813(a));


(2) Any bank holding company or any subsidiary (other than a bank) of a bank holding company as those terms are defined in the BHCA (12 U.S.C. 1841 et seq.);


(3) Any savings association as that term is defined in section 3(b) of the FDIA (12 U.S.C. 1813(b)), any savings and loan holding company or any subsidiary thereof (other than a bank) as those terms are defined in section 10(a) of the HOLA (12 U.S.C. 1467a(a));


(4) Any organization operating under section 25 of the FRA (12 U.S.C. 601 et seq.);


(5) Any foreign bank or company to which section 8 of the IBA (12 U.S.C. 3106), applies or any subsidiary (other than a bank) thereof; and


(6) Any federal agency as that term is defined in section 1(b) of the IBA (12 U.S.C. 3101(5)).


Investigation means any investigation conducted pursuant to section 10(c) of the FDIA or pursuant to section 5(d)(1)(B) of HOLA (12 U.S.C. 1464(d)(1)(B)).


Local Rules means those rules promulgated by the FDIC in those subparts of this part other than subpart A.


Office of Financial Institution Adjudication (OFIA) means the executive body charged with overseeing the administration of administrative enforcement proceedings of the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC), the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve Board (FRB), the FDIC, and the National Credit Union Administration (NCUA).


Party means the FDIC and any person named as a party in any notice.


Person means an individual, sole proprietor, partnership, corporation, unincorporated association, trust, joint venture, pool, syndicate, agency, or other entity or organization, including an institution as defined in this section.


Respondent means any party other than the FDIC.


Uniform Rules means those rules in subpart A of this part that pertain to the types of formal administrative enforcement actions set forth at § 308.1 and as specified in subparts B through P of this part.


Violation includes any action (alone or with another or others) for or toward causing, bringing about, participating in, counseling, or aiding or abetting a violation.


[56 FR 37975, Aug. 9, 1991, as amended at 80 FR 5012, Jan. 30, 2015; 86 FR 2247, Jan. 12, 2021]


§ 308.4 Authority of Board of Directors.

The Board of Directors may, at any time during the pendency of a proceeding, perform, direct the performance of, or waive performance of, any act which could be done or ordered by the administrative law judge.


§ 308.5 Authority of the administrative law judge.

(a) General rule. All proceedings governed by this part shall be conducted in accordance with the provisions of chapter 5 of title 5 of the United States Code. The administrative law judge shall have all powers necessary to conduct a proceeding in a fair and impartial manner and to avoid unnecessary delay.


(b) Powers. The administrative law judge shall have all powers necessary to conduct the proceeding in accordance with paragraph (a) of this section, including the following powers:


(1) To administer oaths and affirmations;


(2) To issue subpoenas, subpoenas duces tecum, and protective orders, as authorized by this part, and to quash or modify any such subpoenas and orders;


(3) To receive relevant evidence and to rule upon the admission of evidence and offers of proof;


(4) To take or cause depositions to be taken as authorized by this subpart;


(5) To regulate the course of the hearing and the conduct of the parties and their counsel;


(6) To hold scheduling and/or pre-hearing conferences as set forth in § 308.31;


(7) To consider and rule upon all procedural and other motions appropriate in an adjudicatory proceeding, provided that only the Board of Directors shall have the power to grant any motion to dismiss the proceeding or to decide any other motion that results in a final determination of the merits of the proceeding;


(8) To prepare and present to the Board of Directors a recommended decision as provided herein;


(9) To recuse himself or herself by motion made by a party or on his or her own motion;


(10) To establish time, place and manner limitations on the attendance of the public and the media for any public hearing; and


(11) To do all other things necessary and appropriate to discharge the duties of a presiding officer.


§ 308.6 Appearance and practice in adjudicatory proceedings.

(a) Appearance before the FDIC or an administrative law judge – (1) By attorneys. Any member in good standing of the bar of the highest court of any state, commonwealth, possession, territory of the United States, or the District of Columbia may represent others before the FDIC if such attorney is not currently suspended or debarred from practice before the FDIC.


(2) By non-attorneys. An individual may appear on his or her own behalf; a member of a partnership may represent the partnership; a duly authorized officer, director, or employee of any government unit, agency, institution, corporation or authority may represent that unit, agency, institution, corporation or authority if such officer; director, or employee is not currently suspended or debarred from practice before the FDIC.


(3) Notice of appearance. Any individual acting as counsel on behalf of a party, including the FDIC, shall file a notice of appearance with OFIA at or before the time that individual submits papers or otherwise appears on behalf of a party in the adjudicatory proceeding. The notice of appearance must include a written declaration that the individual is currently qualified as provided in paragraph (a)(1) or (a)(2) of this section and is authorized to represent the particular party. By filing a notice of appearance on behalf of a party in an adjudicatory proceeding, the counsel agrees and represents that he or she is authorized to accept service on behalf of the represented party and that, in the event of withdrawal from representation, he or she will, if required by the administrative law judge, continue to accept service until new counsel has filed a notice of appearance or until the represented party indicates that he or she will proceed on a pro se basis.


(b) Sanctions. Dilatory, obstructionist, egregious, contemptuous or contumacious conduct at any phase of any adjudicatory proceeding may be grounds for exclusion or suspension of counsel from the proceeding.


[56 FR 37975, Aug. 9, 1991, as amended at 61 FR 20347, May 6, 1996]


§ 308.7 Good faith certification.

(a) General requirement. Every filing or submission of record following the issuance of a notice shall be signed by at least one counsel of record in his or her individual name and shall state that counsel’s address and telephone number. A party who acts as his or her own counsel shall sign his or her individual name and state his or her address and telephone number on every filing or submission of record.


(b) Effect of signature. (1) The signature of counsel or a party shall constitute a certification that: The counsel or party has read the filing or submission of record; to the best of his or her knowledge, information, and belief formed after reasonable inquiry, the filing or submission of record is well-grounded in fact and is warranted by existing law or a good faith argument for the extension, modification, or reversal of existing law; and the filing or submission of record is not made for any improper purpose, such as to harass or to cause unnecessary delay or needless increase in the cost of litigation.


(2) If a filing or submission of record is not signed, the administrative law judge shall strike the filing or submission of record, unless it is signed promptly after the omission is called to the attention of the pleader or movant.


(c) Effect of making oral motion or argument. The act of making any oral motion or oral argument by any counsel or party constitutes a certification that to the best of his or her knowledge, information, and belief formed after reasonable inquiry, his or her statements are well-grounded in fact and are warranted by existing law or a good faith argument for the extension, modification, or reversal of existing law, and are not made for any improper purpose, such as to harass or to cause unnecessary delay or needless increase in the cost of litigation.


§ 308.8 Conflicts of interest.

(a) Conflict of interest in representation. No person shall appear as counsel for another person in an adjudicatory proceeding if it reasonably appears that such representation may be materially limited by that counsel’s responsibilities to a third person or by the counsel’s own interests. The administrative law judge may take corrective measures at any stage of a proceeding to cure a conflict of interest in representation, including the issuance of an order limiting the scope of representation or disqualifying an individual from appearing in a representative capacity for the duration of the proceeding.


(b) Certification and waiver. If any person appearing as counsel represents two or more parties to an adjudicatory proceeding or also represents a non-party on a matter relevant to an issue in the proceeding, counsel must certify in writing at the time of filing the notice of appearance required by § 308.6(a):


(1) That the counsel has personally and fully discussed the possibility of conflicts of interest with each such party and non-party; and


(2) That each such party and non-party waives any right it might otherwise have had to assert any known conflicts of interest or to assert any non-material conflicts of interest during the course of the proceeding.


[56 FR 37975, Aug. 9, 1991, as amended at 61 FR 20347, May 6, 1996]


§ 308.9 Ex parte communications.

(a) Definition – (1) Ex parte communication means any material oral or written communication relevant to the merits of an adjudicatory proceeding that was neither on the record nor on reasonable prior notice to all parties that takes place between:


(i) An interested person outside the FDIC (including such person’s counsel); and


(ii) The administrative law judge handling that proceeding, the Board of Directors, or a decisional employee.


(2) Exception. A request for status of the proceeding does not constitute an ex parte communication.


(b) Prohibition of ex parte communications. From the time the notice is issued by the FDIC until the date that the Board of Directors issues its final decision pursuant to § 308.40(c):


(1) No interested person outside the FDIC shall make or knowingly cause to be made an ex parte communication to any member of the Board of Directors, the administrative law judge, or a decisional employee; and


(2) No member of the Board of Directors, no administrative law judge, or decisional employee shall make or knowingly cause to be made to any interested person outside the FDIC any ex parte communication.


(c) Procedure upon occurrence of ex parte communication. If an ex parte communication is received by the administrative law judge, any member of the Board of Directors or other person identified in paragraph (a) of this section, that person shall cause all such written communications (or, if the communication is oral, a memorandum stating the substance of the communication) to be placed on the record of the proceeding and served on all parties. All other parties to the proceeding shall have an opportunity, within ten days of receipt of service of the ex parte communication, to file responses thereto and to recommend any sanctions that they believe to be appropriate under the circumstances. The administrative law judge or the Board of Directors shall then determine whether any action should be taken concerning the ex parte communication in accordance with paragraph (d) of this section.


(d) Sanctions. Any party or his or her counsel who makes a prohibited ex parte communication, or who encourages or solicits another to make any such communication, may be subject to any appropriate sanction or sanctions imposed by the Board of Directors or the administrative law judge including, but not limited to, exclusion from the proceedings and an adverse ruling on the issue which is the subject of the prohibited communication.


(e) Separation of functions. Except to the extent required for the disposition of ex parte matters as authorized by law, the administrative law judge may not consult a person or party on any matter relevant to the merits of the adjudication, unless on notice and opportunity for all parties to participate. An employee or agent engaged in the performance of investigative or prosecuting functions for the FDIC in a case may not, in that or a factually related case, participate or advise in the decision, recommended decision, or agency review of the recommended decision under § 308.40 except as witness or counsel in public proceedings.


[56 FR 37975, Aug. 9, 1991, as amended at 60 FR 24762, May 10, 1995]


§ 308.10 Filing of papers.

(a) Filing. Any papers required to be filed, excluding documents produced in response to a discovery request pursuant to §§ 308.25 and 308.26, shall be filed with the OFIA, except as otherwise provided.


(b) Manner of filing. Unless otherwise specified by the Board of Directors or the administrative law judge, filing may be accomplished by:


(1) Personal service;


(2) Delivering the papers to a reliable commercial courier service, overnight delivery service, or to the U.S. Post Office for Express Mail delivery;


(3) Mailing the papers by first class, registered, or certified mail; or


(4) Transmission by electronic media, only if expressly authorized, and upon any conditions specified, by the Board of Directors or the administrative law judge. All papers filed by electronic media shall also concurrently be filed in accordance with paragraph (c) of this section.


(c) Formal requirements as to papers filed – (1) Form. All papers filed must set forth the name, address, and telephone number of the counsel or party making the filing and must be accompanied by a certification setting forth when and how service has been made on all other parties. All papers filed must be double-spaced and printed or typewritten on 8
1/2 × 11 inch paper, and must be clear and legible.


(2) Signature. All papers must be dated and signed as provided in § 308.7.


(3) Caption. All papers filed must include at the head thereof, or on a title page, the name of the FDIC and of the filing party, the title and docket number of the proceeding, and the subject of the particular paper.


(4) Number of copies. Unless otherwise specified by the Board of Directors, or the administrative law judge, an original and one copy of all documents and papers shall be filed, except that only one copy of transcripts of testimony and exhibits shall be filed.


§ 308.11 Service of papers.

(a) By the parties. Except as otherwise provided, a party filing papers shall serve a copy upon the counsel of record for all other parties to the proceeding so represented, and upon any party not so represented.


(b) Method of service. Except as provided in paragraphs (c)(2) and (d) of this section, a serving party shall use one or more of the following methods of service:


(1) Personal service;


(2) Delivering the papers to a reliable commercial courier service, overnight delivery service, or to the U.S. Post Office for Express Mail delivery;


(3) Mailing the papers by first class, registered, or certified mail; or


(4) Transmission by electronic media, only if the parties mutually agree. Any papers served by electronic media shall also concurrently be served in accordance with the requirements of § 308.10(c).


(c) By the Board of Directors. (1) All papers required to be served by the Board of Directors or the administrative law judge upon a party who has appeared in the proceeding in accordance with § 308.6, shall be served by any means specified in paragraph (b) of this section.


(2) If a party has not appeared in the proceeding in accordance with § 308.6, the Board of Directors or the administrative law judge shall make service by any of the following methods:


(i) By personal service;


(ii) If the person to be served is an individual, by delivery to a person of suitable age and discretion at the physical location where the individual resides or works;


(iii) If the person to be served is a corporation or other association, by delivery to an officer, managing or general agent, or to any other agent authorized by appointment or by law to receive service and, if the agent is one authorized by statute to receive service and the statute so requires, by also mailing a copy to the party;


(iv) By registered or certified mail addressed to the party’s last known address; or


(v) By any other method reasonably calculated to give actual notice.


(d) Subpoenas. Service of a subpoena may be made:


(1) By personal service;


(2) If the person to be served is an individual, by delivery to a person of suitable age and discretion at the physical location where the individual resides or works;


(3) By delivery to an agent which, in the case of a corporation or other association, is delivery to an officer, managing or general agent, or to any other agent authorized by appointment or by law to receive service and, if the agent is one authorized by statute to receive service and the statute so requires, by also mailing a copy to the party;


(4) By registered or certified mail addressed to the person’s last known address; or


(5) In such other manner as is reasonably calculated to give actual notice.


(e) Area of service. Service in any state, territory, possession of the United States, or the District of Columbia, on any person or company doing business in any state, territory, possession of the United States, or the District of Columbia, or on any person as otherwise provided by law, is effective without regard to the place where the hearing is held, provided that if service is made on a foreign bank in connection with an action or proceeding involving one or more of its branches or agencies located in any state, territory, possession of the United States, or the District of Columbia, service shall be made on at least one branch or agency so involved.


[56 FR 37975, Aug. 9, 1991, as amended at 61 FR 20347, May 6, 1996]


§ 308.12 Construction of time limits.

(a) General rule. In computing any period of time prescribed by this subpart, the date of the act or event that commences the designated period of time is not included. The last day so computed is included unless it is a Saturday, Sunday, or Federal holiday. When the last day is a Saturday, Sunday, or Federal holiday, the period runs until the end of the next day that is not a Saturday, Sunday, or Federal holiday. Intermediate Saturdays, Sundays, and Federal holidays are included in the computation of time. However, when the time period within which an act is to be performed is ten days or less, not including any additional time allowed for in paragraph (c) of this section, intermediate Saturdays, Sundays, and Federal holidays are not included.


(b) When papers are deemed to be filed or served. (1) Filing and service are deemed to be effective:


(i) In the case of personal service or same day commercial courier delivery, upon actual service;


(ii) In the case of overnight commercial delivery service, U.S. Express Mail delivery, or first class, registered, or certified mail, upon deposit in or delivery to an appropriate point of collection;


(iii) In the case of transmission by electronic media, as specified by the authority receiving the filing, in the case of filing, and as agreed among the parties, in the case of service.


(2) The effective filing and service dates specified in paragraph (b)(1) of this section may be modified by the Board of Directors or administrative law judge in the case of filing or by agreement of the parties in the case of service.


(c) Calculation of time for service and filing of responsive papers. Whenever a time limit is measured by a prescribed period from the service of any notice or paper, the applicable time limits are calculated as follows:


(1) If service is made by first class, registered, or certified mail, add three calendar days to the prescribed period;


(2) If service is made by express mail or overnight delivery service, add one calendar day to the prescribed period; or


(3) If service is made by electronic media transmission, add one calendar day to the prescribed period, unless otherwise determined by the Board of Directors or the administrative law judge in the case of filing, or by agreement among the parties in the case of service.


[56 FR 37975, Aug. 9, 1991, as amended at 61 FR 20348, May 6, 1996]


§ 308.13 Change of time limits.

Except as otherwise provided by law, the administrative law judge may, for good cause shown, extend the time limits prescribed by the Uniform Rules or by any notice or order issued in the proceedings. After the referral of the case to the Board of Directors pursuant to § 308.38, the Board of Directors may grant extensions of the time limits for good cause shown. Extensions may be granted at the motion of a party or of the Board of Directors after notice and opportunity to respond is afforded all non-moving parties, or on the administrative law judge’s own motion.


§ 308.14 Witness fees and expenses.

Witnesses subpoenaed for testimony or depositions shall be paid the same fees for attendance and mileage as are paid in the United States district courts in proceedings in which the United States is a party, provided that, in the case of a discovery subpoena addressed to a party, no witness fees or mileage need be paid. Fees for witnesses shall be tendered in advance by the party requesting the subpoena, except that fees and mileage need not be tendered in advance where the FDIC is the party requesting the subpoena. The FDIC shall not be required to pay any fees to, or expenses of, any witness not subpoenaed by the FDIC.


§ 308.15 Opportunity for informal settlement.

Any respondent may, at any time in the proceeding, unilaterally submit to Enforcement Counsel written offers or proposals for settlement of a proceeding, without prejudice to the rights of any of the parties. No such offer or proposal shall be made to any FDIC representative other than Enforcement Counsel. Submission of a written settlement offer does not provide a basis for adjourning or otherwise delaying all or any portion of a proceeding under this part. No settlement offer or proposal, or any subsequent negotiation or resolution, is admissible as evidence in any proceeding.


§ 308.16 FDIC’s right to conduct examination.

Nothing contained in this subpart limits in any manner the right of the FDIC to conduct any examination, inspection, or visitation of any institution or institution-affiliated party, or the right of the FDIC to conduct or continue any form of investigation authorized by law.


§ 308.17 Collateral attacks on adjudicatory proceeding.

If an interlocutory appeal or collateral attack is brought in any court concerning all or any part of an adjudicatory proceeding, the challenged adjudicatory proceeding shall continue without regard to the pendency of that court proceeding. No default or other failure to act as directed in the adjudicatory proceeding within the times prescribed in this subpart shall be excused based on the pendency before any court of any interlocutory appeal or collateral attack.


§ 308.18 Commencement of proceeding and contents of notice.

(a) Commencement of proceeding. (1)(i) Except for change-in-control proceedings under section 7(j)(4) of the FDIA (12 U.S.C. 1817(j)(4)), a proceeding governed by this subpart is commenced by issuance of a notice by the FDIC.


(ii) The notice must be served by Enforcement Counsel upon the respondent and given to any other appropriate financial institution supervisory authority where required by law.


(iii) The notice must be filed with the OFIA.


(2) Change-in-control proceedings under section 7(j)(4) of the FDIA (12 U.S.C. 1817(j)(4)) commence with the issuance of an order by the FDIC.


(b) Contents of notice. The notice must set forth:


(1) The legal authority for the proceeding and for the FDIC’s jurisdiction over the proceeding;


(2) A statement of the matters of fact or law showing that the FDIC is entitled to relief;


(3) A proposed order or prayer for an order granting the requested relief;


(4) The time, place, and nature of the hearing as required by law or regulation;


(5) The time within which to file an answer as required by law or regulation;


(6) The time within which to request a hearing as required by law or regulation; and


(7) That the answer and/or request for a hearing shall be filed with OFIA.


[56 FR 37975, Aug. 9, 1991, as amended at 86 FR 2247, Jan. 12, 2021]


§ 308.19 Answer.

(a) When. Within 20 days of service of the notice, respondent shall file an answer as designated in the notice. In a civil money penalty proceeding, respondent shall also file a request for a hearing within 20 days of service of the notice.


(b) Content of answer. An answer must specifically respond to each paragraph or allegation of fact contained in the notice and must admit, deny, or state that the party lacks sufficient information to admit or deny each allegation of fact. A statement of lack of information has the effect of a denial. Denials must fairly meet the substance of each allegation of fact denied; general denials are not permitted. When a respondent denies part of an allegation, that part must be denied and the remainder specifically admitted. Any allegation of fact in the notice which is not denied in the answer must be deemed admitted for purposes of the proceeding. A respondent is not required to respond to the portion of a notice that constitutes the prayer for relief or proposed order. The answer must set forth affirmative defenses, if any, asserted by the respondent.


(c) Default – (1) Effect of failure to answer. Failure of a respondent to file an answer required by this section within the time provided constitutes a waiver of his or her right to appear and contest the allegations in the notice. If no timely answer is filed, Enforcement Counsel may file a motion for entry of an order of default. Upon a finding that no good cause has been shown for the failure to file a timely answer, the administrative law judge shall file with the Board of Directors a recommended decision containing the findings and the relief sought in the notice. Any final order issued by the Board of Directors based upon a respondent’s failure to answer is deemed to be an order issued upon consent.


(2) Effect of failure to request a hearing in civil money penalty proceedings. If respondent fails to request a hearing as required by law within the time provided, the notice of assessment constitutes a final and unappealable order.


§ 308.20 Amended pleadings.

(a) Amendments. The notice or answer may be amended or supplemented at any stage of the proceeding. The respondent must answer an amended notice within the time remaining for the respondent’s answer to the original notice, or within ten days after service of the amended notice, whichever period is longer, unless the Board of Directors or administrative law judge orders otherwise for good cause.


(b) Amendments to conform to the evidence. When issues not raised in the notice or answer are tried at the hearing by express or implied consent of the parties, they will be treated in all respects as if they had been raised in the notice or answer, and no formal amendments are required. If evidence is objected to at the hearing on the ground that it is not within the issues raised by the notice or answer, the administrative law judge may admit the evidence when admission is likely to assist in adjudicating the merits of the action and the objecting party fails to satisfy the administrative law judge that the admission of such evidence would unfairly prejudice that party’s action or defense upon the merits. The administrative law judge may grant a continuance to enable the objecting party to meet such evidence.


[61 FR 20348, May 6, 1996]


§ 308.21 Failure to appear.

Failure of a respondent to appear in person at the hearing or by a duly authorized counsel constitutes a waiver of respondent’s right to a hearing and is deemed an admission of the facts as alleged and consent to the relief sought in the notice. Without further proceedings or notice to the respondent, the administrative law judge shall file with the Board of Directors a recommended decision containing the findings and the relief sought in the notice.


§ 308.22 Consolidation and severance of actions.

(a) Consolidation. (1) On the motion of any party, or on the administrative law judge’s own motion, the administrative law judge may consolidate, for some or all purposes, any two or more proceedings, if each such proceeding involves or arises out of the same transaction, occurrence or series of transactions or occurrences, or involves at least one common respondent or a material common question of law or fact, unless such consolidation would cause unreasonable delay or injustice.


(2) In the event of consolidation under paragraph (a)(1) of this section, appropriate adjustment to the prehearing schedule must be made to avoid unnecessary expense, inconvenience, or delay.


(b) Severance. The administrative law judge may, upon the motion of any party, sever the proceeding for separate resolution of the matter as to any respondent only if the administrative law judge finds that:


(1) Undue prejudice or injustice to the moving party would result from not severing the proceeding; and


(2) Such undue prejudice or injustice would outweigh the interests of judicial economy and expedition in the complete and final resolution of the proceeding.


§ 308.23 Motions.

(a) In writing. (1) Except as otherwise provided herein, an application or request for an order or ruling must be made by written motion.


(2) All written motions must state with particularity the relief sought and must be accompanied by a proposed order.


(3) No oral argument may be held on written motions except as otherwise directed by the administrative law judge. Written memoranda, briefs, affidavits or other relevant material or documents may be filed in support of or in opposition to a motion.


(b) Oral motions. A motion may be made orally on the record unless the administrative law judge directs that such motion be reduced to writing.


(c) Filing of motions. Motions must be filed with the administrative law judge, except that following the filing of the recommended decision, motions must be filed with the Administrative Officer for disposition by the Board of Directors.


(d) Responses. (1) Except as otherwise provided in this paragraph (d), within ten days after service of any written motion, or within such other period of time as may be established by the administrative law judge or the Administrative Officer, any party may file a written response to a motion. The administrative law judge shall not rule on any oral or written motion before each party has had an opportunity to file a response.


(2) The failure of a party to oppose a written motion or an oral motion made on the record is deemed a consent by that party to the entry of an order substantially in the form of the order accompanying the motion.


(e) Dilatory motions. Frivolous, dilatory or repetitive motions are prohibited. The filing of such motions may form the basis for sanctions.


(f) Dispositive motions. Dispositive motions are governed by §§ 308.29 and 308.30.


[56 FR 37975, Aug. 9, 1991, as amended at 86 FR 2247, Jan. 12, 2021]


§ 308.24 Scope of document discovery.

(a) Limits on discovery. (1) Subject to the limitations set out in paragraphs (b), (c), and (d) of this section, a party to a proceeding under this subpart may obtain document discovery by serving a written request to produce documents. For purposes of a request to produce documents, the term “documents” may be defined to include drawings, graphs, charts, photographs, recordings, data stored in electronic form, and other data compilations from which information can be obtained, or translated, if necessary, by the parties through detection devices into reasonably usable form, as well as written material of all kinds.


(2) Discovery by use of deposition is governed by subpart I of this part.


(3) Discovery by use of interrogatories is not permitted.


(b) Relevance. A party may obtain document discovery regarding any matter, not privileged, that has material relevance to the merits of the pending action. Any request to produce documents that calls for irrelevant material, that is unreasonable, oppressive, excessive in scope, unduly burdensome, or repetitive of previous requests, or that seeks to obtain privileged documents will be denied or modified. A request is unreasonable, oppressive, excessive in scope or unduly burdensome if, among other things, it fails to include justifiable limitations on the time period covered and the geographic locations to be searched, the time provided to respond in the request is inadequate, or the request calls for copies of documents to be delivered to the requesting party and fails to include the requestor’s written agreement to pay in advance for the copying, in accordance with § 308.25.


(c) Privileged matter. Privileged documents are not discoverable. Privileges include the attorney-client privilege, work-product privilege, any government’s or government agency’s deliberative-process privilege, and any other privileges the Constitution, any applicable act of Congress, or the principles of common law provide.


(d) Time limits. All discovery, including all responses to discovery requests, shall be completed at least 20 days prior to the date scheduled for the commencement of the hearing. No exceptions to this time limit shall be permitted, unless the administrative law judge finds on the record that good cause exists for waiving the requirements of this paragraph.


[56 FR 37975, Aug. 9, 1991, as amended at 61 FR 20348, May 6, 1996]


§ 308.25 Request for document discovery from parties.

(a) General rule. Any party may serve on any other party a request to produce for inspection any discoverable documents that are in the possession, custody, or control of the party upon whom the request is served. The request must identify the documents to be produced either by individual item or by category, and must describe each item and category with reasonable particularity. Documents must be produced as they are kept in the usual course of business or must be organized to correspond with the categories in the request.


(b) Production or copying. The request must specify a reasonable time, place, and manner for production and performing any related acts. In lieu of inspecting the documents, the requesting party may specify that all or some of the responsive documents be copied and the copies delivered to the requesting party. If copying of fewer than 250 pages is requested, the party to whom the request is addressed shall bear the cost of copying and shipping charges. If a party requests 250 pages or more of copying, the requesting party shall pay for the copying and shipping charges. Copying charges are the current per page copying rate imposed by 12 CFR part 309 implementing the Freedom of Information Act (5 U.S.C. 552). The party to whom the request is addressed may require payment in advance before producing the documents.


(c) Obligation to update responses. A party who has responded to a discovery request with a response that was complete when made is not required to supplement the response to include documents thereafter acquired, unless the responding party learns that:


(1) The response was materially incorrect when made; or


(2) The response, though correct when made, is no longer true and a failure to amend the response is, in substance, a knowing concealment.


(d) Motions to limit discovery. (1) Any party that objects to a discovery request may, within ten days of being served with such request, file a motion in accordance with the provisions of § 308.23 to strike or otherwise limit the request. If an objection is made to only a portion of an item or category in a request, the portion objected to shall be specified. Any objections not made in accordance with this paragraph and § 308.23 are waived.


(2) The party who served the request that is the subject of a motion to strike or limit may file a written response within five days of service of the motion. No other party may file a response.


(e) Privilege. At the time other documents are produced, the producing party must reasonably identify all documents withheld on the grounds of privilege and must produce a statement of the basis for the assertion of privilege. When similar documents that are protected by deliberative process, attorney-work-product, or attorney-client privilege are voluminous, these documents may be identified by category instead of by individual document. The administrative law judge retains discretion to determine when the identification by category is insufficient.


(f) Motions to compel production. (1) If a party withholds any documents as privileged or fails to comply fully with a discovery request, the requesting party may, within ten days of the assertion of privilege or of the time the failure to comply becomes known to the requesting party, file a motion in accordance with the provisions of § 308.23 for the issuance of a subpoena compelling production.


(2) The party who asserted the privilege or failed to comply with the request may file a written response to a motion to compel within five days of service of the motion. No other party may file a response.


(g) Ruling on motions. After the time for filing responses pursuant to this section has expired, the administrative law judge shall rule promptly on all motions filed pursuant to this section. If the administrative law judge determines that a discovery request, or any of its terms, calls for irrelevant material, is unreasonable, oppressive, excessive in scope, unduly burdensome, or repetitive of previous requests, or seeks to obtain privileged documents, he or she may deny or modify the request, and may issue appropriate protective orders, upon such conditions as justice may require. The pendency of a motion to strike or limit discovery or to compel production is not a basis for staying or continuing the proceeding, unless otherwise ordered by the administrative law judge. Notwithstanding any other provision in this part, the administrative law judge may not release, or order a party to produce, documents withheld on grounds of privilege if the party has stated to the administrative law judge its intention to file a timely motion for interlocutory review of the administrative law judge’s order to produce the documents, and until the motion for interlocutory review has been decided.


(h) Enforcing discovery subpoenas. If the administrative law judge issues a subpoena compelling production of documents by a party, the subpoenaing party may, in the event of noncompliance and to the extent authorized by applicable law, apply to any appropriate United States district court for an order requiring compliance with the subpoena. A party’s right to seek court enforcement of a subpoena shall not in any manner limit the sanctions that may be imposed by the administrative law judge against a party who fails to produce subpoenaed documents.


[56 FR 37975, Aug. 9, 1991, as amended at 61 FR 20348, May 6, 1996; 80 FR 5011, Jan. 30, 2015]


§ 308.26 Document subpoenas to nonparties.

(a) General rules. (1) Any party may apply to the administrative law judge for the issuance of a document discovery subpoena addressed to any person who is not a party to the proceeding. The application must contain a proposed document subpoena and a brief statement showing the general relevance and reasonableness of the scope of documents sought. The subpoenaing party shall specify a reasonable time, place, and manner for making production in response to the document subpoena.


(2) A party shall only apply for a document subpoena under this section within the time period during which such party could serve a discovery request under § 308.24(d). The party obtaining the document subpoena is responsible for serving it on the subpoenaed person and for serving copies on all parties. Document subpoenas may be served in any state, territory, or possession of the United States, the District of Columbia, or as otherwise provided by law.


(3) The administrative law judge shall promptly issue any document subpoena requested pursuant to this section. If the administrative law judge determines that the application does not set forth a valid basis for the issuance of the subpoena, or that any of its terms are unreasonable, oppressive, excessive in scope, or unduly burdensome, he or she may refuse to issue the subpoena or may issue it in a modified form upon such conditions as may be consistent with the Uniform Rules.


(b) Motion to quash or modify. (1) Any person to whom a document subpoena is directed may file a motion to quash or modify such subpoena, accompanied by a statement of the basis for quashing or modifying the subpoena. The movant shall serve the motion on all parties, and any party may respond to such motion within ten days of service of the motion.


(2) Any motion to quash or modify a document subpoena must be filed on the same basis, including the assertion of privilege, upon which a party could object to a discovery request under § 308.25(d), and during the same time limits during which such an objection could be filed.


(c) Enforcing document subpoenas. If a subpoenaed person fails to comply with any subpoena issued pursuant to this section or any order of the administrative law judge which directs compliance with all or any portion of a document subpoena, the subpoenaing party or any other aggrieved party may, to the extent authorized by applicable law, apply to an appropriate United States district court for an order requiring compliance with so much of the document subpoena as the administrative law judge has not quashed or modified. A party’s right to seek court enforcement of a document subpoena shall in no way limit the sanctions that may be imposed by the administrative law judge on a party who induces a failure to comply with subpoenas issued under this section.


§ 308.27 Deposition of witness unavailable for hearing.

(a) General rules. (1) If a witness will not be available for the hearing, a party desiring to preserve that witness’ testimony for the record may apply in accordance with the procedures set forth in paragraph (a)(2) of this section, to the administrative law judge for the issuance of a subpoena, including a subpoena duces tecum, requiring the attendance of the witness at a deposition. The administrative law judge may issue a deposition subpoena under this section upon showing that:


(i) The witness will be unable to attend or may be prevented from attending the hearing because of age, sickness or infirmity, or will otherwise be unavailable;


(ii) The witness’ unavailability was not procured or caused by the subpoenaing party;


(iii) The testimony is reasonably expected to be material; and


(iv) Taking the deposition will not result in any undue burden to any other party and will not cause undue delay of the proceeding.


(2) The application must contain a proposed deposition subpoena and a brief statement of the reasons for the issuance of the subpoena. The subpoena must name the witness whose deposition is to be taken and specify the time and place for taking the deposition. A deposition subpoena may require the witness to be deposed at any place within the country in which that witness resides or has a regular place of employment or such other convenient place as the administrative law judge shall fix.


(3) Any requested subpoena that sets forth a valid basis for its issuance must be promptly issued, unless the administrative law judge on his or her own motion, requires a written response or requires attendance at a conference concerning whether the requested subpoena should be issued.


(4) The party obtaining a deposition subpoena is responsible for serving it on the witness and for serving copies on all parties. Unless the administrative law judge orders otherwise, no deposition under this section shall be taken on fewer than ten days’ notice to the witness and all parties. Deposition subpoenas may be served in any state, territory, possession of the United States, or the District of Columbia, on any person or company doing business in any state, territory, possession of the United States, or the District of Columbia, or as otherwise permitted by law.


(b) Objections to deposition subpoenas. (1) The witness and any party who has not had an opportunity to oppose a deposition subpoena issued under this section may file a motion with the administrative law judge to quash or modify the subpoena prior to the time for compliance specified in the subpoena, but not more than ten days after service of the subpoena.


(2) A statement of the basis for the motion to quash or modify a subpoena issued under this section must accompany the motion. The motion must be served on all parties.


(c) Procedure upon deposition. (1) Each witness testifying pursuant to a deposition subpoena must be duly sworn, and each party shall have the right to examine the witness. Objections to questions or documents must be in short form, stating the grounds for the objection. Failure to object to questions or documents is not deemed a waiver except where the ground for the objection might have been avoided if the objection had been timely presented. All questions, answers, and objections must be recorded.


(2) Any party may move before the administrative law judge for an order compelling the witness to answer any questions the witness has refused to answer or submit any evidence the witness has refused to submit during the deposition.


(3) The deposition must be subscribed by the witness, unless the parties and the witness, by stipulation, have waived the signing, or the witness is ill, cannot be found, or has refused to sign. If the deposition is not subscribed by the witness, the court reporter taking the deposition shall certify that the transcript is a true and complete transcript of the deposition.


(d) Enforcing subpoenas. If a subpoenaed person fails to comply with any order of the administrative law judge which directs compliance with all or any portion of a deposition subpoena under paragraph (b) or (c)(3) of this section, the subpoenaing party or other aggrieved party may, to the extent authorized by applicable law, apply to an appropriate United States district court for an order requiring compliance with the portions of the subpoena that the administrative law judge has ordered enforced. A party’s right to seek court enforcement of a deposition subpoena in no way limits the sanctions that may be imposed by the administrative law judge on a party who fails to comply with, or procures a failure to comply with, a subpoena issued under this section.


§ 308.28 Interlocutory review.

(a) General rule. The Board of Directors may review a ruling of the administrative law judge prior to the certification of the record to the Board of Directors only in accordance with the procedures set forth in this section and § 308.23.


(b) Scope of review. The Board of Directors may exercise interlocutory review of a ruling of, the administrative law judge if the Board of Directors finds that:


(1) The ruling involves a controlling question of law or policy as to which substantial grounds exist for a difference of opinion;


(2) Immediate review of the ruling may materially advance the ultimate termination of the proceeding;


(3) Subsequent modification of the ruling at the conclusion of the proceeding would be an inadequate remedy; or


(4) Subsequent modification of the ruling would cause unusual delay or expense.


(c) Procedure. Any request for interlocutory review shall be filed by a party with the administrative law judge within ten days of his or her ruling and shall otherwise comply with § 308.23. Any party may file a response to a request for interlocutory review in accordance with § 308.23(d). Upon the expiration of the time for filing all responses, the administrative law judge shall refer the matter to the Board of Directors for final disposition.


(d) Suspension of proceeding. Neither a request for interlocutory review nor any disposition of such a request by the Board of Directors under this section suspends or stays the proceeding unless otherwise ordered by the administrative law judge or the Board of Directors.


§ 308.29 Summary disposition.

(a) In general. The administrative law judge shall recommend that the Board of Directors issue a final order granting a motion for summary disposition if the undisputed pleaded facts, admissions, affidavits, stipulations, documentary evidence, matters as to which official notice may be taken, and any other evidentiary materials properly submitted in connection with a motion for summary disposition show that:


(1) There is no genuine issue as to any material fact; and


(2) The moving party is entitled to a decision in its favor as a matter of law.


(b) Filing of motions and responses. (1) Any party who believes that there is no genuine issue of material fact to be determined and that he or she is entitled to a decision as a matter of law may move at any time for summary disposition in its favor of all or any part of the proceeding. Any party, within 20 days after service of such a motion, or within such time period as allowed by the administrative law judge, may file a response to such motion.


(2) A motion for summary disposition must be accompanied by a statement of the material facts as to which the moving party contends there is no genuine issue. Such motion must be supported by documentary evidence, which may take the form of admissions in pleadings, stipulations, depositions, investigatory depositions, transcripts, affidavits and any other evidentiary materials that the moving party contends support his or her position. The motion must also be accompanied by a brief containing the points and authorities in support of the contention of the moving party. Any party opposing a motion for summary disposition must file a statement setting forth those material facts as to which he or she contends a genuine dispute exists. Such opposition must be supported by evidence of the same type as that submitted with the motion for summary disposition and a brief containing the points and authorities in support of the contention that summary disposition would be inappropriate.


(c) Hearing on motion. At the request of any party or on his or her own motion, the administrative law judge may hear oral argument on the motion for summary disposition.


(d) Decision on motion. Following receipt of a motion for summary disposition and all responses thereto, the administrative law judge shall determine whether the moving party is entitled to summary disposition. If the administrative law judge determines that summary disposition is warranted, the administrative law judge shall submit a recommended decision to that effect to the Board of Directors. If the administrative law judge finds that no party is entitled to summary disposition, he or she shall make a ruling denying the motion.


§ 308.30 Partial summary disposition.

If the administrative law judge determines that a party is entitled to summary disposition as to certain claims only, he or she shall defer submitting a recommended decision as to those claims. A hearing on the remaining issues must be ordered. Those claims for which the administrative law judge has determined that summary disposition is warranted will be addressed in the recommended decision filed at the conclusion of the hearing.


§ 308.31 Scheduling and prehearing conferences.

(a) Scheduling conference. Within 30 days of service of the notice or order commencing a proceeding or such other time as parties may agree, the administrative law judge shall direct counsel for all parties to meet with him or her in person at a specified time and place prior to the hearing or to confer by telephone for the purpose of scheduling the course and conduct of the proceeding. This meeting or telephone conference is called a “scheduling conference.” The identification of potential witnesses, the time for and manner of discovery, and the exchange of any prehearing materials including witness lists, statements of issues, stipulations, exhibits and any other materials may also be determined at the scheduling conference.


(b) Prehearing conferences. The administrative law judge may, in addition to the scheduling conference, on his or her own motion or at the request of any party, direct counsel for the parties to meet with him or her (in person or by telephone) at a prehearing conference to address any or all of the following:


(1) Simplification and clarification of the issues;


(2) Stipulations, admissions of fact, and the contents, authenticity and admissibility into evidence of documents;


(3) Matters of which official notice may be taken;


(4) Limitation of the number of witnesses;


(5) Summary disposition of any or all issues;


(6) Resolution of discovery issues or disputes;


(7) Amendments to pleadings; and


(8) Such other matters as may aid in the orderly disposition of the proceeding.


(c) Transcript. The administrative law judge, in his or her discretion, may require that a scheduling or prehearing conference be recorded by a court reporter. A transcript of the conference and any materials filed, including orders, becomes part of the record of the proceeding. A party may obtain a copy of the transcript at his or her expense.


(d) Scheduling or prehearing orders. At or within a reasonable time following the conclusion of the scheduling conference or any prehearing conference, the administrative law judge shall serve on each party an order setting forth any agreements reached and any procedural determinations made.


§ 308.32 Prehearing submissions.

(a) Within the time set by the administrative law judge, but in no case later than 14 days before the start of the hearing, each party shall serve on every other party, his or her:


(1) Prehearing statement;


(2) Final list of witnesses to be called to testify at the hearing, including name and address of each witness and a short summary of the expected testimony of each witness;


(3) List of the exhibits to be introduced at the hearing along with a copy of each exhibit; and


(4) Stipulations of fact, if any.


(b) Effect of failure to comply. No witness may testify and no exhibits may be introduced at the hearing if such witness or exhibit is not listed in the prehearing submissions pursuant to paragraph (a) of this section, except for good cause shown.


§ 308.33 Public hearings.

(a) General rule. All hearings shall be open to the public, unless the FDIC, in its discretion, determines that holding an open hearing would be contrary to the public interest. Within 20 days of service of the notice or, in the case of change-in-control proceedings under section 7(j)(4) of the FDIA (12 U.S.C. 1817(j)(4)), within 20 days from service of the hearing order, any respondent may file with the Administrative Officer a request for a private hearing, and any party may file a reply to such a request. A party must serve on the administrative law judge a copy of any request or reply the party files with the Administrative Officer. The form of, and procedure for, these requests and replies are governed by § 308.23. A party’s failure to file a request or a reply constitutes a waiver of any objections regarding whether the hearing will be public or private.


(b) Filing document under seal. Enforcement Counsel, in his or her discretion, may file any document or part of a document under seal if disclosure of the document would be contrary to the public interest. The administrative law judge shall take all appropriate steps to preserve the confidentiality of such documents or parts thereof, including closing portions of the hearing to the public.


[56 FR 37975, Aug. 9, 1991, as amended at 61 FR 20349, May 6, 1996; 86 FR 2248, Jan. 12, 2021]


§ 308.34 Hearing subpoenas.

(a) Issuance. (1) Upon application of a party showing general relevance and reasonableness of scope of the testimony or other evidence sought, the administrative law judge may issue a subpoena or a subpoena duces tecum requiring the attendance of a witness at the hearing or the production of documentary or physical evidence at the hearing. The application for a hearing subpoena must also contain a proposed subpoena specifying the attendance of a witness or the production of evidence from any state, territory, or possession of the United States, the District of Columbia, or as otherwise provided by law at any designated place where the hearing is being conducted. The party making the application shall serve a copy of the application and the proposed subpoena on every other party.


(2) A party may apply for a hearing subpoena at any time before the commencement of a hearing. During a hearing, a party may make an application for a subpoena orally on the record before the administrative law judge.


(3) The administrative law judge shall promptly issue any hearing subpoena requested pursuant to this section. If the administrative law judge determines that the application does not set forth a valid basis for the issuance of the subpoena, or that any of its terms are unreasonable, oppressive, excessive in scope, or unduly burdensome, he or she may refuse to issue the subpoena or may issue it in a modified form upon any conditions consistent with this subpart. Upon issuance by the administrative law judge, the party making the application shall serve the subpoena on the person named in the subpoena and on each party.


(b) Motion to quash or modify. (1) Any person to whom a hearing subpoena is directed or any party may file a motion to quash or modify the subpoena, accompanied by a statement of the basis for quashing or modifying the subpoena. The movant must serve the motion on each party and on the person named in the subpoena. Any party may respond to the motion within ten days of service of the motion.


(2) Any motion to quash or modify a hearing subpoena must be filed prior to the time specified in the subpoena for compliance, but not more than ten days after the date of service of the subpoena upon the movant.


(c) Enforcing subpoenas. If a subpoenaed person fails to comply with any subpoena issued pursuant to this section or any order of the administrative law judge which directs compliance with all or any portion of a document subpoena, the subpoenaing party or any other aggrieved party may seek enforcement of the subpoena pursuant to § 308.26(c).


[56 FR 37975, Aug. 9, 1991, as amended at 61 FR 20349, May 6, 1996]


§ 308.35 Conduct of hearings.

(a) General rules. (1) Hearings shall be conducted so as to provide a fair and expeditious presentation of the relevant disputed issues. Each party has the right to present its case or defense by oral and documentary evidence and to conduct such cross examination as may be required for full disclosure of the facts.


(2) Order of hearing. Enforcement Counsel shall present its case-in-chief first, unless otherwise ordered by the administrative law judge, or unless otherwise expressly specified by law or regulation. Enforcement Counsel shall be the first party to present an opening statement and a closing statement, and may make a rebuttal statement after the respondent’s closing statement. If there are multiple respondents, respondents may agree among themselves as to their order of presentation of their cases, but if they do not agree the administrative law judge shall fix the order.


(3) Examination of witnesses. Only one counsel for each party may conduct an examination of a witness, except that in the case of extensive direct examination, the administrative law judge may permit more than one counsel for the party presenting the witness to conduct the examination. A party may have one counsel conduct the direct examination and another counsel conduct re-direct examination of a witness, or may have one counsel conduct the cross examination of a witness and another counsel conduct the re-cross examination of a witness.


(4) Stipulations. Unless the administrative law judge directs otherwise, all stipulations of fact and law previously agreed upon by the parties, and all documents, the admissibility of which have been previously stipulated, will be admitted into evidence upon commencement of the hearing.


(b) Transcript. The hearing must be recorded and transcribed. The reporter will make the transcript available to any party upon payment by that party to the reporter of the cost of the transcript. The administrative law judge may order the record corrected, either upon motion to correct, upon stipulation of the parties, or following notice to the parties upon the administrative law judge’s own motion.


[56 FR 37975, Aug. 9, 1991, as amended at 61 FR 20349, May 6, 1996]


§ 308.36 Evidence.

(a) Admissibility. (1) Except as is otherwise set forth in this section, relevant, material, and reliable evidence that is not unduly repetitive is admissible to the fullest extent authorized by the Administrative Procedure Act and other applicable law.


(2) Evidence that would be admissible under the Federal Rules of Evidence is admissible in a proceeding conducted pursuant to this subpart.


(3) Evidence that would be inadmissible under the Federal Rules of Evidence may not be deemed or ruled to be inadmissible in a proceeding conducted pursuant to this subpart if such evidence is relevant, material, reliable and not unduly repetitive.


(b) Official notice. (1) Official notice may be taken of any material fact which may be judicially noticed by a United States district court and any material information in the official public records of any Federal or state government agency.


(2) All matters officially noticed by the administrative law judge or Board of Directors shall appear on the record.


(3) If official notice is requested or taken of any material fact, the parties, upon timely request, shall be afforded an opportunity to object.


(c) Documents. (1) A duplicate copy of a document is admissible to the same extent as the original, unless a genuine issue is raised as to whether the copy is in some material respect not a true and legible copy of the original.


(2) Subject to the requirements of paragraph (a) of this section, any document, including a report of examination, supervisory activity, inspection or visitation, prepared by an appropriate Federal financial institution regulatory agency or state regulatory agency, is admissible either with or without a sponsoring witness.


(3) Witnesses may use existing or newly created charts, exhibits, calendars, calculations, outlines or other graphic material to summarize, illustrate, or simplify the presentation of testimony. Such materials may, subject to the administrative law judge’s discretion, be used with or without being admitted into evidence.


(d) Objections. (1) Objections to the admissibility of evidence must be timely made and rulings on all objections must appear on the record.


(2) When an objection to a question or line of questioning propounded to a witness is sustained, the examining counsel may make a specific proffer on the record of what he or she expected to prove by the expected testimony of the witness, either by representation of counsel or by direct interrogation of the witness.


(3) The administrative law judge shall retain rejected exhibits, adequately marked for identification, for the record, and transmit such exhibits to the Board of Directors.


(4) Failure to object to admission of evidence or to any ruling constitutes a waiver of the objection.


(e) Stipulations. The parties may stipulate as to any relevant matters of fact or the authentication of any relevant documents. Such stipulations must be received in evidence at a hearing, and are binding on the parties with respect to the matters therein stipulated.


(f) Depositions of unavailable witnesses. (1) If a witness is unavailable to testify at a hearing, and that witness has testified in a deposition to which all parties in a proceeding had notice and an opportunity to participate, a party may offer as evidence all or any part of the transcript of the deposition, including deposition exhibits, if any.


(2) Such deposition transcript is admissible to the same extent that testimony would have been admissible had that person testified at the hearing, provided that if a witness refused to answer proper questions during the depositions, the administrative law judge may, on that basis, limit the admissibility of the deposition in any manner that justice requires.


(3) Only those portions of a deposition received in evidence at the hearing constitute a part of the record.


§ 308.37 Post-hearing filings.

(a) Proposed findings and conclusions and supporting briefs. (1) Using the same method of service for each party, the administrative law judge shall serve notice upon each party, that the certified transcript, together with all hearing exhibits and exhibits introduced but not admitted into evidence at the hearing, has been filed. Any party may file with the administrative law judge proposed findings of fact, proposed conclusions of law, and a proposed order within 30 days following service of this notice by the administrative law judge or within such longer period as may be ordered by the administrative law judge.


(2) Proposed findings and conclusions must be supported by citation to any relevant authorities and by page references to any relevant portions of the record. A post-hearing brief may be filed in support of proposed findings and conclusions, either as part of the same document or in a separate document. Any party who fails to file timely with the administrative law judge any proposed finding or conclusion is deemed to have waived the right to raise in any subsequent filing or submission any issue not addressed in such party’s proposed finding or conclusion.


(b) Reply briefs. Reply briefs may be filed within 15 days after the date on which the parties’ proposed findings, conclusions, and order are due. Reply briefs must be strictly limited to responding to new matters, issues, or arguments raised in another party’s papers. A party who has not filed proposed findings of fact and conclusions of law or a post-hearing brief may not file a reply brief.


(c) Simultaneous filing required. The administrative law judge shall not order the filing by any party of any brief or reply brief in advance of the other party’s filing of its brief.


[56 FR 37975, Aug. 9, 1991, as amended at 61 FR 20349, May 6, 1996]


§ 308.38 Recommended decision and filing of record.

(a) Filing of recommended decision and record. Within 45 days after expiration of the time allowed for filing reply briefs under § 308.37(b), the administrative law judge shall file with and certify to the Administrative Officer, for decision, the record of the proceeding. The record must include the administrative law judge’s recommended decision, recommended findings of fact, recommended conclusions of law, and proposed order; all prehearing and hearing transcripts, exhibits, and rulings; and the motions, briefs, memoranda, and other supporting papers filed in connection with the hearing. The administrative law judge shall serve upon each party the recommended decision, findings, conclusions, and proposed order.


(b) Filing of index. At the same time the administrative law judge files with and certifies to the Administrative Officer for final determination the record of the proceeding, the administrative law judge shall furnish to the Administrative Officer a certified index of the entire record of the proceeding. The certified index shall include, at a minimum, an entry for each paper, document or motion filed with the administrative law judge in the proceeding, the date of the filing, and the identity of the filer. The certified index shall also include an exhibit index containing, at a minimum, an entry consisting of exhibit number and title or description for: Each exhibit introduced and admitted into evidence at the hearing; each exhibit introduced but not admitted into evidence at the hearing; each exhibit introduced and admitted into evidence after the completion of the hearing; and each exhibit introduced but not admitted into evidence after the completion of the hearing.


[86 FR 2248, Jan. 12, 2021]


§ 308.39 Exceptions to recommended decision.

(a) Filing exceptions. Within 30 days after service of the recommended decision, findings, conclusions, and proposed order under § 308.38, a party may file with the Administrative Officer written exceptions to the administrative law judge’s recommended decision, findings, conclusions, or proposed order, to the admission or exclusion of evidence, or to the failure of the administrative law judge to make a ruling proposed by a party. A supporting brief may be filed at the time the exceptions are filed, either as part of the same document or in a separate document.


(b) Effect of failure to file or raise exceptions. (1) Failure of a party to file exceptions to those matters specified in paragraph (a) of this section within the time prescribed is deemed a waiver of objection thereto.


(2) No exception need be considered by the Board of Directors if the party taking exception had an opportunity to raise the same objection, issue, or argument before the administrative law judge and failed to do so.


(c) Contents. (1) All exceptions and briefs in support of such exceptions must be confined to the particular matters in, or omissions from, the administrative law judge’s recommendations to which that party takes exception.


(2) All exceptions and briefs in support of exceptions must set forth page or paragraph references to the specific parts of the administrative law judge’s recommendations to which exception is taken, the page or paragraph references to those portions of the record relied upon to support each exception, and the legal authority relied upon to support each exception.


[56 FR 37975, Aug. 9, 1991, as amended at 86 FR 2248, Jan. 12, 2021]


§ 308.40 Review by Board of Directors.

(a) Notice of submission to Board of Directors. When the Administrative Officer determines that the record in the proceeding is complete, the Administrative Officer shall serve notice upon the parties that the proceeding has been submitted to the Board of Directors for final decision.


(b) Oral argument before the Board of Directors. Upon the initiative of the Board of Directors or on the written request of any party filed with the Administrative Officer within the time for filing exceptions, the Board of Directors may order and hear oral argument on the recommended findings, conclusions, decision, and order of the administrative law judge. A written request by a party must show good cause for oral argument and state reasons why arguments cannot be presented adequately in writing. A denial of a request for oral argument may be set forth in the Board of Directors’ final decision. Oral argument before the Board of Directors must be on the record.


(c) Final decision. (1) Decisional employees may advise and assist the Board of Directors in the consideration and disposition of the case. The final decision of the Board of Directors will be based upon review of the entire record of the proceeding, except that the Board of Directors may limit the issues to be reviewed to those findings and conclusions to which opposing arguments or exceptions have been filed by the parties.


(2) The Board of Directors shall render a final decision within 90 days after notification of the parties that the case has been submitted for final decision, or 90 days after oral argument, whichever is later, unless the Board of Directors orders that the action or any aspect thereof be remanded to the administrative law judge for further proceedings. Copies of the final decision and order of the Board of Directors shall be served upon each party to the proceeding, upon other persons required by statute, and, if directed by the Board of Directors or required by statute, upon any appropriate state or Federal supervisory authority.


[56 FR 37975, Aug. 9, 1991, as amended at 86 FR 2248, Jan. 12, 2021]


§ 308.41 Stays pending judicial review.

The commencement of proceedings for judicial review of a final decision and order of the FDIC may not, unless specifically ordered by the Board of Directors or a reviewing court, operate as a stay of any order issued by the FDIC. The Board of Directors may, in its discretion, and on such terms as it finds just, stay the effectiveness of all or any part of its order pending a final decision on a petition for review of that order.


Subpart B – General Rules of Procedure

§ 308.101 Scope of Local Rules.

(a) Subparts B and C of the Local Rules prescribe rules of practice and procedure to be followed in the administrative enforcement proceedings initiated by the FDIC as set forth in § 308.1 of the Uniform Rules.


(b) Except as otherwise specifically provided, the Uniform Rules and subpart B of the Local Rules shall not apply to subparts D through T of the Local Rules.


(c) Subpart C of the Local Rules shall apply to any administrative proceeding initiated by the FDIC.


(d) Subparts A, B, and C of this part prescribe the rules of practice and procedure to applicable to adjudicatory proceedings as to which hearings on the record are provided for by the assessment of civil money penalties by the FDIC against institutions, institution-affiliated parties, and certain other persons for which it is the appropriate regulatory agency for any violation of section 15(c)(4) of the Exchange Act (15 U.S.C. 78o(c)(4)).


[56 FR 37975, Aug. 9, 1991, as amended at 64 FR 62100, Nov. 16, 1999; 66 FR 9189, Feb. 7, 2001; 80 FR 5012, Jan. 30, 2015]


§ 308.102 Authority of Board of Directors and Administrative Officer.

(a) The Board of Directors. (1) The Board of Directors may, at any time during the pendency of a proceeding, perform, direct the performance of, or waive performance of, any act which could be done or ordered by the Administrative Officer.


(2) Nothing contained in this part shall be construed to limit the power of the Board of Directors granted by applicable statutes or regulations.


(b) The Administrative Officer. (1) When no administrative law judge has jurisdiction over a proceeding, the Administrative Officer may act in place of, and with the same authority as, an administrative law judge, except that the Administrative Officer may not hear a case on the merits or make a recommended decision on the merits to the Board of Directors.


(2) Pursuant to authority delegated by the Board of Directors, the Administrative Officer and Assistant Administrative Officer, upon the advice and recommendation of the Deputy General Counsel for Litigation or, in his absence, the Assistant General Counsel for General Litigation, may issue rulings in proceedings under sections 7(j), 8, 18(j), 19, 32 and 38 of the FDIA (12 U.S.C. 1817(j), 1818, 1828(j), 1829, 1831i and 1831o) concerning:


(i) Denials of requests for private hearing;


(ii) Interlocutory appeals;


(iii) Stays pending judicial review;


(iv) Reopenings of the record and/or remands of the record to the ALJ;


(v) Supplementation of the evidence in the record;


(vi) All remands from the courts of appeals not involving substantive issues;


(vii) Extensions of stays of orders terminating deposit insurance; and


(viii) All matters, including final decisions, in proceedings under section 8(g) of the FDIA (12 U.S.C. 1818(g)).


[56 FR 37975, Aug. 9, 1991, as amended at 64 FR 62100, Nov. 16, 1999; 67 FR 71071, Nov. 29, 2002; 86 FR 2248, Jan. 12, 2021]


§ 308.103 Appointment of administrative law judge.

(a) Appointment. Unless otherwise directed by the Board of Directors or as otherwise provided in the Local Rules, a hearing within the scope of this part 308 shall be held before an administrative law judge of the Office of Financial Institution Adjudication (“OFIA”).


(b) Procedures. (1) The Enforcement Counsel shall promptly after issuance of the notice file the matter with the Office of Financial Institution Adjudication (“OFIA”) which shall secure the appointment of an administrative law judge to hear the proceeding.


(2) OFIA shall advise the parties, in writing, that an administrative law judge has been appointed.


[56 FR 37975, Aug. 9, 1991, as amended at 86 FR 2248, Jan. 12, 2021]


§ 308.104 Filings with the Board of Directors.

(a) General rule. All materials required to be filed with or referred to the Board of Directors in any proceedings under this part shall be filed with the Administrative Officer, Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, 550 17th Street NW, Washington, DC 20429.


(b) Scope. Filings to be made with the Administrative Officer include pleadings and motions filed during the proceeding; the record filed by the administrative law judge after the issuance of a recommended decision; the recommended decision filed by the administrative law judge following a motion for summary disposition; referrals by the administrative law judge of motions for interlocutory review; motions and responses to motions filed by the parties after the record has been certified to the Board of Directors; exceptions and requests for oral argument; and any other papers required to be filed with the Board of Directors under this part.


[86 FR 2249, Jan. 12, 2021]


§ 308.105 Custodian of the record.

The Administrative Officer is the official custodian of the record when no administrative law judge has jurisdiction over the proceeding. As the official custodian, the Administrative Officer shall maintain the official record of all papers filed in each proceeding.


[86 FR 2249, Jan. 12, 2021]


§ 308.106 Written testimony in lieu of oral hearing.

(a) General rule. (1) At any time more than fifteen days before the hearing is to commence, on the motion of any party or on his or her own motion, the administrative law judge may order that the parties present part or all of their case-in-chief and, if ordered, their rebuttal, in the form of exhibits and written statements sworn to by the witness offering such statements as evidence, provided that if any party objects, the administrative law judge shall not require such a format if that format would violate the objecting party’s right under the Administrative Procedure Act, or other applicable law, or would otherwise unfairly prejudice that party.


(2) Any such order shall provide that each party shall, upon request, have the same right of oral cross-examination (or redirect examination) as would exist had the witness testified orally rather than through a written statement. Such order shall also provide that any party has a right to call any hostile witness or adverse party to testify orally.


(b) Scheduling of submission of written testimony. (1) If written direct testimony and exhibits are ordered under paragraph (a) of this section, the administrative law judge shall require that it be filed within the time period for commencement of the hearing, and the hearing shall be deemed to have commenced on the day such testimony is due.


(2) Absent good cause shown, written rebuttal, if any, shall be submitted and the oral portion of the hearing begun within 30 days of the date set for filing written direct testimony.


(3) The administrative law judge shall direct, unless good cause requires otherwise, that –


(i) All parties shall simultaneously file any exhibits and written direct testimony required under paragraph (b)(1) of this section; and


(ii) All parties shall simultaneously file any exhibits and written rebuttal required under paragraph (b)(2) of this section.


(c) Failure to comply with order to file written testimony. (1) The failure of any party to comply with an order to file written testimony or exhibits at the time and in the manner required under this section shall be deemed a waiver of that party’s right to present any evidence, except testimony of a previously identified adverse party or hostile witness. Failure to file written testimony or exhibits is, however, not a waiver of that party’s right of cross-examination or a waiver of the right to present rebuttal evidence that was not required to be submitted in written form.


(2) Late filings of papers under this section may be allowed and accepted only upon good cause shown.


§ 308.107 Document discovery.

(a) Parties to proceedings set forth at § 308.1 of the Uniform Rules and as provided in the Local Rules may obtain discovery only through the production of documents. No other form of discovery shall be allowed.


(b) Any questioning at a deposition of a person producing documents pursuant to a document subpoena shall be strictly limited to the identification of documents produced by that person and a reasonable examination to determine whether the subpoenaed person made an adequate search for, and has produced, all subpoenaed documents.


[56 FR 37975, Aug. 9, 1991, as amended at 80 FR 5012, Jan. 30, 2015]


Subpart C – Rules of Practice Before the FDIC and Standards of Conduct

§ 308.108 Sanctions.

(a) General rule. Appropriate sanctions may be imposed when any counsel or party has acted, or failed to act, in a manner required by applicable statute, regulations, or order, and that act or failure to act:


(1) Constitutes contemptuous conduct;


(2) Has in a material way injured or prejudiced some other party in terms of substantive injury, incurring additional expenses including attorney’s fees, prejudicial delay, or otherwise;


(3) Is a clear and unexcused violation of an applicable statute, regulation, or order; or


(4) Has unduly delayed the proceeding.


(b) Sanctions. Sanctions which may be imposed include any one or more of the following:


(1) Issuing an order against the party;


(2) Rejecting or striking any testimony or documentary evidence offered, or other papers filed, by the party;


(3) Precluding the party from contesting specific issues or findings;


(4) Precluding the party from offering certain evidence or from challenging or contesting certain evidence offered by another party;


(5) Precluding the party from making a late filing or conditioning a late filing on any terms that are just; and


(6) Assessing reasonable expenses, including attorney’s fees, incurred by any other party as a result of the improper action or failure to act.


(c) Limits on dismissal as a sanction. No recommendation of dismissal shall be made by the administrative law judge or granted by the Board of Directors based on the failure to hold a hearing within the time period called for in this part 308, or on the failure of an administrative law judge to render a recommended decision within the time period called for in this part 308, absent a finding:


(1) That the delay resulted solely or principally from the conduct of the FDIC enforcement counsel;


(2) That the conduct of the FDIC enforcement counsel is unexcused;


(3) That the moving respondent took all reasonable steps to oppose and prevent the subject delay;


(4) That the moving respondent has been materially prejudiced or injured; and


(5) That no lesser or different sanction is adequate.


(d) Procedure for imposition of sanctions. (1) The administrative law judge, upon the request of any party, or on his or her own motion, may impose sanctions in accordance with this section, provided that the administrative law judge may only recommend to the Board of Directors the sanction of entering a final order determining the case on the merits.


(2) No sanction, other than refusing to accept late papers, authorized by this section shall be imposed without prior notice to all parties and an opportunity for any counsel or party against whom sanctions would be imposed to be heard. Such opportunity to be heard may be on such notice, and the response may be in such form, as the administrative law judge directs. The opportunity to be heard may be limited to an opportunity to respond orally immediately after the act or inaction covered by this section is noted by the administrative law judge.


(3) Requests for the imposition of sanctions by any party, and the imposition of sanctions, shall be treated for interlocutory review purposes in the same manner as any other ruling by the administrative law judge.


(4) Section not exclusive. Nothing in this section shall be read as precluding the administrative law judge or the Board of Directors from taking any other action, or imposing any restriction or sanction, authorized by applicable statute or regulation.


§ 308.109 Suspension and disbarment.

(a) Discretionary suspension and disbarment. (1) The Board of Directors may suspend or revoke the privilege of any counsel to appear or practice before the FDIC if, after notice of and opportunity for hearing in the matter, that counsel is found by the Board of Directors:


(i) Not to possess the requisite qualifications to represent others;


(ii) To be seriously lacking in character or integrity or to have engaged in material unethical or improper professional conduct;


(iii) To have engaged in, or aided and abetted, a material and knowing violation of the FDIA; or


(iv) To have engaged in contemptuous conduct before the FDIC. Suspension or revocation on the grounds set forth in paragraphs (a)(1)(ii), (iii), and (iv) of this section shall only be ordered upon a further finding that the counsel’s conduct or character was sufficiently egregious as to justify suspension or revocation.


(2) Unless otherwise ordered by the Board of Directors, an application for reinstatement by a person suspended or disbarred under paragraph (a)(1) of this section may be made in writing at any time more than three years after the effective date of the suspension or disbarment and, thereafter, at any time more than one year after the person’s most recent application for reinstatement. The suspension or disbarment shall continue until the applicant has been reinstated by the Board of Directors for good cause shown or until, in the case of a suspension, the suspension period has expired. An applicant for reinstatement under this provision may, in the Board of Directors’ sole discretion, be afforded a hearing.


(b) Mandatory suspension and disbarment. (1) Any counsel who has been and remains suspended or disbarred by a court of the United States or of any state, territory, district, commonwealth, or possession; or any person who has been and remains suspended or barred from practice before the OCC, Board of Governors, the OTS, the NCUA, the Securities and Exchange Commission, or the Commodity Futures Trading Commission; or any person who has been, within the last ten years, convicted of a felony, or of a misdemeanor involving moral turpitude, shall be suspended automatically from appearing or practicing before the FDIC. A disbarment, suspension, or conviction within the meaning of this paragraph (b) shall be deemed to have occurred when the disbarring, suspending, or convicting agency or tribunal enters its judgment or order, regardless of whether an appeal is pending or could be taken, and includes a judgment or an order on a plea of nolo contendere or on consent, regardless of whether a violation is admitted in the consent.


(2) Any person appearing or practicing before the FDIC who is the subject of an order, judgment, decree, or finding of the types set forth in paragraph (b)(1) of this section shall promptly file with the Administrative Officer a copy thereof, together with any related opinion or statement of the agency or tribunal involved. Any person who fails to so file a copy of the order, judgment, decree, or finding within 30 days after the entry of the order, judgment, decree, or finding or the date such person initiates practice before the FDIC, for that reason alone may be disqualified from practicing before the FDIC until such time as the appropriate filing shall be made. Failure to file any such paper shall not impair the operation of any other provision of this section.


(3) A suspension or disbarment under paragraph (b)(1) of this section from practice before the FDIC shall continue until the applicant has been reinstated by the Board of Directors for good cause shown, provided that any person suspended or disbarred under paragraph (b)(1) of this section shall be automatically reinstated by the Administrative Officer, upon appropriate application, if all the grounds for suspension or disbarment under paragraph (b)(1) of this section are subsequently removed by a reversal of the conviction (or the passage of time since the conviction) or termination of the underlying suspension or disbarment. An application for reinstatement on any other grounds by any person suspended or disbarred under paragraph (b)(1) of this section may be filed no sooner than one year after the suspension or disbarment, and thereafter, a new request for reinstatement may be made no sooner than one year after the counsel’s most recent reinstatement application. The application must comply with the requirements of § 303.3 of this chapter. An applicant for reinstatement under this provision may, in the Board of Directors’ sole discretion, be afforded a hearing.


(c) Hearings under this section. Hearings conducted under this section shall be conducted in substantially the same manner as other hearings under the Uniform Rules, provided that in proceedings to terminate an existing FDIC suspension or disbarment order, the person seeking the termination of the order shall bear the burden of going forward with an application and with the burden of proving the grounds supporting the application, and that the Board of Directors may, in its sole discretion, direct that any proceeding to terminate an existing suspension or disbarment by the FDIC be limited to written submissions.


(d) Summary suspension for contemptuous conduct. A finding by the administrative law judge of contemptuous conduct during the course of any proceeding shall be grounds for summary suspension by the administrative law judge of a counsel or other representative from any further participation in that proceeding for the duration of that proceeding.


(e) Practice defined. Unless the Board of Directors orders otherwise, for the purposes of this section, practicing before the FDIC includes, but is not limited to, transacting any business with the FDIC as counsel or agent for any other person and the preparation of any statement, opinion, or other paper by a counsel, which statement, opinion, or paper is filed with the FDIC in any registration statement, notification, application, report, or other document, with the consent of such counsel.


[56 FR 37975, Aug. 9, 1991, as amended at 64 FR 62100, Nov. 16, 1999; 68 FR 48270, Aug. 13, 2003; 80 FR 5012, Jan. 30, 2015; 86 FR 2249, Jan. 12, 2021]


Subpart D – Rules and Procedures Applicable to Proceedings Relating to Disapproval of Acquisition of Control

§ 308.110 Scope.

Except as specifically indicated in this subpart, the rules and procedures in this subpart, subpart B of the Local Rules, and the Uniform Rules shall apply to proceedings in connection with the disapproval by the Board of Directors or its designee of a proposed acquisition of control of an insured nonmember bank.


§ 308.111 Grounds for disapproval.

The following are grounds for disapproval of a proposed acquisition of control of an insured nonmember bank:


(a) The proposed acquisition of control would result in a monopoly or would be in furtherance of any combination or conspiracy to monopolize or attempt to monopolize the banking business in any part of the United States;


(b) The effect of the proposed acquisition of control in any section of the United States may be to substantially lessen competition or to tend to create a monopoly or would in any other manner be in restraint of trade, and the anticompetitive effects of the proposed acquisition of control are not clearly outweighed in the public interest by the probable effect of the transaction in meeting the convenience and needs of the community to be served;


(c) Either the financial condition of any acquiring person or the future prospects of the institution might jeopardize the financial stability of the bank or prejudice the interest of the depositors of the bank.


(d) The competence, experience, or integrity of any acquiring person or of any of the proposed management personnel indicates that it would not be in the interest of the depositors of the bank, or in the interest of the public, to permit such person to control the bank;


(e) Any acquiring person neglects, fails, or refuses to furnish to the FDIC all the information required by the FDIC; or


(f) The FDIC determines that the proposed acquisition would result in an adverse effect on the Deposit Insurance Fund.


[56 FR 37975, Aug. 9, 1991, as amended at 71 FR 20526, Apr. 21, 2006; 73 FR 2145, Jan. 14, 2008]


§ 308.112 Notice of disapproval.

(a) General rule. (1) Within three days of the decision by the Board of Directors or its designee to disapprove a proposed acquisition of control of an insured nonmember bank, a written notice of disapproval shall be mailed by first class mail to, or otherwise served upon, the party seeking acquire control.


(2) The notice of disapproval shall:


(i) Contain a statement of the basis for the disapproval; and


(ii) Indicate that a hearing may be requested by filing a written request with the Administrative Officer within ten days after service of the notice of disapproval; and if a hearing is requested, that an answer to the notice of disapproval, as required by § 308.113, must be filed within 20 days after service of the notice of disapproval.


(b) Waiver of hearing. Failure to request a hearing pursuant to this section shall constitute a waiver of the opportunity for a hearing and the notice of disapproval shall constitute a final and unappealable order.


(c) Section 308.18(b) of the Uniform Rules shall not apply to the content of the Notice of Disapproval.


[56 FR 37975, Aug. 9, 1991, as amended at 86 FR 2249, Jan. 12, 2021]


§ 308.113 Answer to notice of disapproval.

(a) Contents. (1) An answer to the notice of disapproval of a proposed acquisition of control shall be filed within 20 days after service of the notice of disapproval and shall specifically deny those portions of the notice of disapproval which are disputed. Those portions of the notice of disapproval which are not specifically denied are deemed admitted by the applicant.


(2) Any hearing under this subpart shall be limited to those parts of the notice of disapproval that are specifically denied.


(b) Failure to answer. Failure of a respondent to file an answer required by this section within the time provided constitutes a waiver of his or her right to appear and contest the allegations in the notice of disapproval. If no timely answer is filed, Enforcement Counsel may file a motion for entry of an order of default. Upon a finding that no good cause has been shown for the failure to file a timely answer, the administrative law judge shall file a recommended decision containing the findings and relief sought in the notice. A final order issued by the Board of Directors based upon a respondent’s failure to answer is deemed to be an order issued upon consent.


§ 308.114 Burden of proof.

The ultimate burden of proof shall be upon the person proposing to acquire a depository institution. The burden of going forward with a prima facie case shall be upon the FDIC.


Subpart E – Rules and Procedures Applicable to Proceedings Relating to Assessment of Civil Penalties for Willful Violations of the Change in Bank Control Act

§ 308.115 Scope.

The rules and procedures of this subpart, subpart B of the Local Rules and the Uniform Rules shall apply to proceedings to assess civil penalties against any person for willful violation of the Change in Bank Control Act of 1978 (12 U.S.C. 1817(j)), or any regulation or order issued pursuant thereto, in connection with the affairs of an insured nonmember bank.


§ 308.116 Assessment of penalties.

(a) In general. The civil money penalty shall be assessed upon the service of a Notice of Assessment which shall become final and unappealable unless the respondent requests a hearing pursuant to § 308.19(c)(2).


(b) Maximum penalty amounts. Under 12 U.S.C. 1817(j)(16), a civil money penalty may be assessed for violations of change in control of insured depository institution provisions in the maximum amounts calculated and published in accordance with § 308.132(d).


(c) Mitigating factors. In assessing the amount of the penalty, the Board of Directors or its designee shall consider the gravity of the violation, the history of previous violations, respondent’s financial resources, good faith, and any other matters as justice may require.


(d) Failure to answer. Failure of a respondent to file an answer required by this section within the time provided constitutes a waiver of his or her right to appear and contest the allegations in the notice of disapproval. If no timely answer is filed, Enforcement Counsel may file a motion for entry of an order of default. Upon a finding that no good cause has been shown for the failure to file a timely answer, the administrative law judge shall file a recommended decision containing the findings and relief sought in the notice. A final order issued by the Board of Directors based upon a respondent’s failure to answer is deemed to be an order issued upon consent.


[56 FR 37975, Aug. 9, 1991, as amended at 61 FR 57990, Nov. 12, 1996; 65 FR 64887, Oct. 31, 2000; 69 FR 61305, Oct. 18, 2004; 73 FR 73157, Dec. 2, 2008; 77 FR 74577, Dec. 17, 2012; 81 FR 42239, June 29, 2016; 81 FR 95416, Dec. 28, 2016; 83 FR 1522, Jan. 12, 2018; 83 FR 61114, Nov. 28, 2018]


§ 308.117 Effective date of, and payment under, an order to pay.

If the respondent both requests a hearing and serves an answer, civil penalties assessed pursuant to this subpart are due and payable 60 days after an order to pay, issued after the hearing or upon default, is served upon the respondent, unless the order provides for a different period of payment. Civil penalties assessed pursuant to an order to pay issued upon consent are due and payable within the time specified therein.


§ 308.118 Collection of penalties.

The FDIC may collect any civil penalty assessed pursuant to this subpart by agreement with the respondent, or the FDIC may bring an action against the respondent to recover the penalty amount in the appropriate United States district court. All penalties collected under this section shall be paid over to the Treasury of the United States.


Subpart F – Rules and Procedures Applicable to Proceedings for Involuntary Termination of Insured Status

§ 308.119 Scope.

(a) Involuntary termination of insurance pursuant to section 8(a) of the FDIA. The rules and procedures in this subpart, subpart B of the Local Rules and the Uniform Rules shall apply to proceedings in connection with the involuntary termination of the insured status of an insured bank depository institution or an insured branch of a foreign bank pursuant to section 8(a) of the FDIA (12 U.S.C. 1818(a)), except that the Uniform Rules and subpart B of the Local Rules shall not apply to the temporary suspension of insurance pursuant to section 8(a)(8) of the FDIA (12 U.S.C. 1818(a)(8)).


(b) Involuntary termination of insurance pursuant to section 8(p) of the Act. The rules and procedures in § 308.124 of this subpart F shall apply to proceedings in connection with the involuntary termination of the insured status of an insured depository institution or an insured branch of a foreign bank pursuant to section 8(p) of the FDIA (12 U.S.C. 1818(p)). The Uniform Rules shall not apply to proceedings under section 8(p) of the FDIA.


§ 308.120 Grounds for termination of insurance.

(a) General rule. The following are grounds for involuntary termination of insurance pursuant to section 8(a) of the FDIA:


(1) An insured depository institution or its directors or trustees have engaged or are engaging in unsafe or unsound practices in conducting the business of such depository institution;


(2) An insured depository institution is in an unsafe or unsound condition such that it should not continue operations as an insured depository institution; or


(3) An insured depository institution or its directors or trustees have violated an applicable law, rule, regulation, order, condition imposed in writing by the FDIC in connection with the granting of any application or other request by the insured depository institution or have violated any written agreement entered into between the insured depository institution and the FDIC.


(b) Extraterritorial acts of foreign banks. An act or practice committed outside the United States by a foreign bank or its directors or trustees which would otherwise be a ground for termination of insured status under this section shall be a ground for termination if the Board of Directors finds:


(1) The act or practice has been, is, or is likely to be a cause of, or carried on in connection with or in furtherance of, an act or practice committed within any state, territory, or possession of the United States or the District of Columbia that, in and of itself, would be an appropriate basis for action by the FDIC; or


(2) The act or practice committed outside the United States, if proven, would adversely affect the insurance risk of the FDIC.


(c) Failure of foreign bank to secure removal of personnel. The failure of a foreign bank to comply with any order of removal or prohibition issued by the Board of Directors or the failure of any person associated with a foreign bank to appear promptly as a party to a proceeding pursuant to section 8(e) of the FDIA (12 U.S.C. 1818(e)), shall be a ground for termination of insurance of deposits in any branch of the bank.


§ 308.121 Notification to primary regulator.

(a) Service of notification. (1) Upon a determination by the Board of Directors or its designee pursuant to § 308.120 of an unsafe or unsound practice or condition or of a violation, a notification shall be served upon the appropriate Federal banking agency of the insured depository institution, or the State banking supervisor if the FDIC is the appropriate Federal banking agency.


The notification shall be served not less than 30 days before the Notice of Intent to Terminate Insured Status required by section 8(a)(2)(B) of the FDIA (12 U.S.C. 1818(a)(2)(B)), and § 308.122, except that this period for notification may be reduced or eliminated with the agreement of the appropriate Federal banking agency.

(2) Appropriate Federal banking agency shall have the meaning given that term in section 3(q) of the FDIA (12 U.S.C. 1813(q)), and shall be the OCC in the case of a national bank, a District bank or an insured Federal branch of a foreign bank; the FDIC in the case of an insured nonmember bank, including an insured State branch of a foreign bank; the Board of Governors in the case of a state member bank; or the OTS in the case of an insured Federal or state savings association.


(3) In the case of a state nonmember bank, insured Federal branch of a foreign bank, or state member bank, in addition to service of the notification upon the appropriate Federal banking agency, a copy of the notification shall be sent to the appropriate State banking supervisor.


(4) In instances in which a Temporary Order Suspending Insurance is issued pursuant to section 8(a)(8) of the FDIA (12 U.S.C. 1818(a)(8)), the notification may be served concurrently with such order.


(b) Contents of notification. The notification shall contain the FDIC’s determination, and the facts and circumstances upon which such determination is based, for the purpose of securing correction of such practice, condition, or violation.


§ 308.122 Notice of intent to terminate.

(a) If, after serving the notification under § 308.121, the Board of Directors determines that any unsafe or unsound practices, condition, or violation, specified in the notification, requires the termination of the insured status of the insured depository institution, the Board of Directors or its designee, if it determines to proceed further, shall cause to be served upon the insured depository institution a notice of its intention to terminate insured status not less than 30 days after service of the notification, unless a shorter time period has been agreed upon by the appropriate Federal banking agency.


(b) The Board of Directors or its designee shall cause a copy of the notice to be sent to the appropriate Federal banking agency and to the appropriate state banking supervisor, if any.


§ 308.123 Notice to depositors.

If the Board of Directors enters an order terminating the insured status of an insured depository institution or branch, the insured depository institution shall, on the day that order becomes final, or on such other day as that order prescribes, mail a notification of termination of insured status to each depositor at the depositor’s last address of record on the books of the insured depository institution or branch. The insured depository institution shall also publish the notification in two issues of a local newspaper of general circulation and shall furnish the FDIC with proof of such publications. The notification to depositors shall include information provided in substantially the following form:



Notice

(Date)__________.


1. The status of the __________, as an (insured depository institution) (insured branch) under the provisions of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act, will terminate as of the close of business on the ________ day of____________, 19____.


2. Any deposits made by you after that date, either new deposits or additions to existing deposits, will not be insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation.


3. Insured deposits in the (depository institution) (branch) on the ________ day of____________, 19____, will continue to be insured, as provided by Federal Deposit Insurance Act, for 2 years after the close of business on the ________ day of ____________, 19____. Provided, however, that any withdrawals after the close of business on the ________ day of ____________, 19____, will reduce the insurance coverage by the amount of such withdrawals.




(Name of (depository institution or branch)



(Address)

The notification may include any additional information the depository institution deems advisable, provided that the information required by this section shall be set forth in a conspicuous manner on the first page of the notification.

§ 308.124 Involuntary termination of insured status for failure to receive deposits.

(a) Notice to show cause. When the Board of Directors or its designee has evidence that an insured depository institution is not engaged in the business of receiving deposits, other than trust funds, the Board of Directors or its designee shall give written notice of this evidence to the depository institution and shall direct the depository institution to show cause why its insured status should not be terminated under the provisions of section 8(p) of the FDIA (12 U.S.C. 1818(p)). The insured depository institution shall have 30 days after receipt of the notice, or such longer period as is prescribed in the notice, to submit affidavits, other written proof, and any legal arguments that it is engaged in the business of receiving deposits other than trust funds.


(b) Notice of termination date. If, upon consideration of the affidavits, other written proof, and legal arguments, the Board of Directors determines that the depository institution is not engaged in the business of receiving deposits, other than trust funds, the finding shall be conclusive and the Board of Directors shall notify the depository institution that its insured status will terminate at the expiration of the first full semiannual assessment period following issuance of that notification.


(c) Notification to depositors of termination of insured status. Within the time specified by the Board of Directors and prior to the date of termination of its insured status, the depository institution shall mail a notification of termination of insured status to each depositor at the depositor’s last address of record on the books of the depository institution. The depository institution shall also publish the notification in two issues of a local newspaper of general circulation and shall furnish the FDIC with proof of such publications. The notification to depositors shall include information provided in substantially the following form:



Notice

(Date)__________.


The status of the __________, as an (insured depository institution) (insured branch) under the Federal Deposit Insurance Act, will terminate on the ________ day of____________, 19____, and its deposits will thereupon cease to be insured.




(Name of depository institution or branch)



(Address)

The notification may include any additional information the depository institution deems advisable, provided that the information required by this section shall be set forth in a conspicuous manner on the first page of the notification.


§ 308.125 Temporary suspension of deposit insurance.

(a) If, while an action is pending under section 8(a)(2) of the FDIA (12 U.S.C. 1818(a)(2)), the Board of Directors, after consultation with the appropriate Federal banking agency, finds that an insured depository institution (other than a special supervisory association to which § 308.126 of this subpart applies) has no tangible capital under the capital guidelines or regulations of the appropriate Federal banking agency, the Board of Directors may issue a Temporary Order Suspending Deposit Insurance, pending completion of the proceedings under section 8(a)(2) of the FDIA (12 U.S.C. 1818(a)(2)).


(b) The temporary order shall be served upon the insured institution and a copy sent to the appropriate Federal banking agency and to the appropriate State banking supervisor.


(c) The temporary order shall become effective ten days from the date of service upon the insured depository institution. Unless set aside, limited, or suspended in proceedings under section 8(a)(8)(D) of the FDIA (12 U.S.C. 1818 (a)(8)(D)), the temporary order shall remain effective and enforceable until an order terminating the insured status of the institution is entered by the Board of Directors and becomes final, or the Board of Directors dismisses the proceedings.


(d) Notification to depositors of suspension of insured status. Within the time specified by the Board of Directors and prior to the suspension of insured status, the depository institution shall mail a notification of suspension of insured status to each depositor at the depositor’s last address of record on the books of the depository institution. The depository institution shall also publish the notification in two issues of a local newspaper of general circulation and shall furnish the FDIC with proof of such publications. The notification to depositors shall include information provided in substantially the following form:



Notice

(Date)____________.


1. The status of the __________, as an (insured depository institution) (insured branch) under the provisions of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act, will be suspended as of the close of business on the ________ day of ____________, 19____, pending the completion of administrative proceedings under section 8(a) of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act.


2. Any deposits made by you after that date, either new deposits or additions to existing deposits, will not be insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation.


3. Insured deposits in the (depository institution) (branch) on the ________ day of ____________, 19____, will continue to be insured for ____________ after the close of business on the__________ day of __________, 19____. Provided, however, that any withdrawals after the close of business on the ________ day of____________, 19____, will reduce the insurance coverage by the amount of such withdrawals.




(Name of depository institution or branch)



(Address)

The notification may include any additional information the depository institution deems advisable, provided that the information required by this section shall be set forth in a conspicuous manner on the first page of the notification.


§ 308.126 Special supervisory associations.

If the Board of Directors finds that a savings association is a special supervisory association under the provisions of section 8(a)(8)(B) of the FDIA (12 U.S.C. 1818(a)(8)(B)) for purposes of temporary suspension of insured status, the Board of Directors shall serve upon the association its findings with regard to the determination that the capital of the association, as computed using applicable accounting standards, has suffered a material decline; that such association or its directors or officers, is engaging in an unsafe or unsound practice in conducting the business of the association; that such association is in an unsafe or unsound condition to continue operating as an insured association; or that such association or its directors or officers, has violated any law, rule, regulation, order, condition imposed in writing by any Federal banking agency, or any written agreement, or that the association failed to enter into a capital improvement plan acceptable to the Corporation prior to January, 1990.


Subpart G – Rules and Procedures Applicable to Proceedings Relating to Cease-and-Desist Orders

§ 308.127 Scope.

(a) Cease-and-desist proceedings under sections 8 and 50 of the FDIA. The rules and procedures of this subpart, subpart B of the Local Rules and the Uniform Rules shall apply to proceedings to order an insured nonmember bank or an institution-affiliated party to cease and desist from practices and violations described in section 8(b) of the FDIA, 12 U.S.C. 1818(b), and section 50 of the FDIA, 12 U.S.C. 1831aa.


(b) Proceedings under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. (1) The rules and procedures of this subpart, subpart B of the Local Rules and the Uniform Rules shall apply to proceedings by the Board of Directors to order a municipal securities dealer to cease and desist from any violation of law or regulation specified in section 15B(c)(5) of the Securities Exchange Act, as amended (15 U.S.C. 78o-4(c)(5)) where the municipal securities dealer is an insured nonmember bank or a subsidiary thereof.


(2) The rules and procedures of this subpart, subpart B of the Local Rules and the Uniform Rules shall apply to proceedings by the Board of Directors to order a clearing agency or transfer agent to cease and desist from failure to comply with the applicable provisions of section 17, 17A and 19 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (15 U.S.C. 78q, 78q-l, 78s), and the applicable rules and regulations thereunder, where the clearing agency or transfer agent is an insured nonmember bank or a subsidiary thereof.


[56 FR 37975, Aug. 9, 1991, as amended at 64 FR 62100, Nov. 16, 1999; 72 FR 67235, Nov. 28, 2007]


§ 308.128 Grounds for cease-and-desist orders.

(a) General rule. The Board of Directors or its designee may issue and have served upon any insured nonmember bank or an institution-affiliated party a notice, as set forth in § 308.18 of the Uniform Rules for practices and violations as described in § 308.127.


(b) Extraterritorial acts of foreign banks. An act, violation or practice committed outside the United States by a foreign bank or an institution-affiliated party that would otherwise be a ground for issuing a cease-and-desist order under paragraph (a) of this section or a temporary cease-and-desist order under § 308.131 of this subpart, shall be a ground for an order if the Board of Directors or its designee finds that:


(1) The act, violation or practice has been, is, or is likely to be a cause of, or carried on in connection with or in furtherance of, an act, violation or practice committed within any state, territory, or possession of the United States or the District of Columbia which act, violation or practice, in and of itself, would be an appropriate basis for action by the FDIC; or


(2) The act, violation or practice, if proven, would adversely affect the insurance risk of the FDIC.


§ 308.129 Notice to state supervisory authority.

The Board of Directors or its designee shall give the appropriate state supervisory authority notification of its intent to institute a proceeding pursuant to subpart G of this part, and the grounds thereof. Any proceedings shall be conducted according to subpart G of this part, unless, within the time period specified in such notification, the state supervisory authority has effected satisfactory corrective action. No insured institution or other party who is the subject of any notice or order issued by the FDIC under this section shall have standing to raise the requirements of this subpart as grounds for attacking the validity of any such notice or order.


§ 308.130 Effective date of order and service on bank.

(a) Effective date. A cease-and-desist order issued by the Board of Directors after a hearing, and a cease-and-desist order issued based upon a default, shall become effective at the expiration of 30 days after the service of the order upon the bank or its official. A cease-and-desist order issued upon consent shall become effective at the time specified therein. All cease-and-desist orders shall remain effective and enforceable, except to the extent they are stayed, modified, terminated, or set aside by the Board of Directors or its designee or by a reviewing court.


(b) Service on banks. In cases where the bank is not the respondent, the cease-and-desist order shall also be served upon the bank.


§ 308.131 Temporary cease-and-desist order.

(a) Issuance. (1) When the Board of Directors or its designee determines that the violation, or the unsafe or unsound practice, as specified in the notice, or the continuation thereof, is likely to cause insolvency or significant dissipation of assets or earnings of the bank, or is likely to weaken the condition of the bank or otherwise prejudice the interests of its depositors prior to the completion of the proceedings under section 8(b) of the FDIA (12 U.S.C. 1818(b)) and § 308.128 of this subpart, the Board of Directors or its designee may issue a temporary order requiring the bank or an institution-affiliated party to immediately cease and desist from any such violation, practice or to take affirmative action to prevent such insolvency, dissipation, condition or prejudice pending completion of the proceedings under section 8(b) of the FDIA (12 U.S.C. 1818(b)).


(2) When the Board of Directors or its designee issues a Notice of charges pursuant to 12 U.S.C. 1818(b)(1) which specifies on the basis of particular facts and circumstances that a bank’s books and records are so incomplete or inaccurate that the FDIC is unable, through the normal supervisory process, to determine the financial condition of the bank or the details or purpose of any transaction or transactions that may have a material effect on the financial condition of the bank, then the Board of Directors or its designee may issue a temporary order requiring:


(i) The cessation of any activity or practice which gave rise, whether in whole or in part, to the incomplete or inaccurate state of the books or records; or


(ii) Affirmative action to restore such books or records to a complete and accurate state, until the completion of the proceedings under section 8(b) of the FDIA (12 U.S.C. 1818(b)).


(3) The temporary order shall be served upon the bank or the institution-affiliated party named therein and shall also be served upon the bank in the case where the temporary order applies only to an institution-affiliated party.


(b) Effective date. A temporary order shall become effective when served upon the bank or the institution-affiliated party. Unless the temporary order is set aside, limited, or suspended by a court in proceedings authorized under section 8(c)(2) of the FDIA (12 U.S.C. 1818(c)(2)), the temporary order shall remain effective and enforceable pending completion of administrative proceedings pursuant to section 8(b) of the FDIA (12 U.S.C. 1818(b)) and entry of an order which has become final, or with respect to paragraph (a)(2) of this section the FDIC determines by examination or otherwise that the bank’s books and records are accurate and reflect the financial condition of the bank.


(c) Uniform Rules do not apply. The Uniform Rules and subpart B of the Local Rules shall not apply to the issuance of temporary orders under this section.


Subpart H – Rules and Procedures Applicable to Proceedings Relating to Assessment and Collection of Civil Money Penalties for Violation of Cease-and-Desist Orders and of Certain Federal Statutes, Including Call Report Penalties

§ 308.132 Assessment of penalties.

(a) Scope. The rules and procedures of this subpart, subpart B of the Local Rules, and the Uniform Rules shall apply to proceedings to assess and collect civil money penalties.


(b) Relevant considerations. In determining the amount of the civil penalty to be assessed, the Board of Directors or its designee shall consider the financial resources and good faith of the institution or official, the gravity of the violation, the history of previous violations, and any such other matters as justice may require.


(c) Authority of the Board of Directors. The Board of Directors or its designee may assess civil money penalties under section 8(i) of the FDIA (12 U.S.C. 1818(i)), and § 308.1(e) of the Uniform Rules (this part).


(d) Maximum civil money penalty amounts. Under the Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act Improvements Act of 2015, the Board of Directors or its designee may assess civil money penalties in the maximum amounts using the following framework:


(1) Statutory formula to calculate inflation adjustments. The FDIC is required by statute to annually adjust for inflation the maximum amount of each civil money penalty within its jurisdiction to administer. The inflation adjustment is calculated by multiplying the maximum dollar amount of the civil money penalty for the previous calendar year by the cost-of-living inflation adjustment multiplier provided annually by the Office of Management and Budget and rounding the total to the nearest dollar.


(2) Notice of inflation adjustments. By January 15 of each calendar year, the FDIC will publish notice in the Federal Register of the maximum penalties that may be assessed after each January 15, based on the formula in paragraph (d)(1) of this section, for conduct occurring on or after November 2, 2015.


(e) Civil money penalties for violations of 12 U.S.C. 1464(v) and 12 U.S.C. 1817(a) – (1) Late filing – Tier One penalties. Where an institution fails to make or publish its Report of Condition and Income (Call Report) within the appropriate time periods, but where the institution maintains procedures in place reasonably adapted to avoid inadvertent error and the late filing occurred unintentionally and as a result of such error, or where the institution inadvertently transmitted a Call Report that is minimally late, the Board of Directors or its designee may assess a Tier One civil money penalty. The amount of such a penalty shall not exceed the maximum amount calculated and published annually in the Federal Register under paragraph (d)(2) of this section. Such a penalty may be assessed for each day that the violation continues.


(i) First offense. Generally, in such cases, the amount assessed shall be an amount calculated and published annually in the Federal Register under paragraph (d)(2) of this section. The Federal Register notice will contain a presumptive penalty amount per day for each of the first 15 days for which the failure continues, and a presumptive amount per day for each subsequent days the failure continues, beginning on the 16th day. The annual Federal Register notice will also provide penalty amounts that generally may be assessed for institutions with less than $25,000,000 in assets.


(ii) Subsequent offense. The FDIC will calculate and publish in the Federal Register a presumptive daily Tier One penalty to be imposed where an institution has been delinquent in making or publishing its Call Report within the preceding five quarters. The published penalty shall identify the amount that will generally be imposed per day for each of the first 15 days for which the failure continues, and the amount that will generally be imposed per day for each subsequent day the failure continues, beginning on the 16th day. The annual Federal Register notice will also provide penalty amounts that generally may be assessed for institutions with less than $25,000,000 in assets.


(iii) Lengthy or repeated violations. The amounts set forth in this paragraph (e)(1) will be assessed on a case-by-case basis where the amount of time of the institution’s delinquency is lengthy or the institution has been delinquent repeatedly in making or publishing its Call Reports.


(iv) Waiver. Absent extraordinary circumstances outside the control of the institution, penalties assessed for late filing shall not be waived.


(2) Late-filing – Tier Two penalties. Where an institution fails to make or publish its Call Report within the appropriate time period, the Board of Directors or its designee may assess a Tier Two civil money penalty for each day the failure continues. The amount of such a penalty will not exceed the maximum amount calculated and published annually in the Federal Register under paragraph (d)(2) of this section.


(3) False or misleading reports or information – (i) Tier One penalties. In cases in which an institution submits or publishes any false or misleading Call Report or information, the Board of Directors or its designee may assess a Tier One civil money penalty for each day the information is not corrected, where the institution maintains procedures in place reasonably adapted to avoid inadvertent error and the violation occurred unintentionally and as a result of such error, or where the institution inadvertently transmits a Call Report or information that is false or misleading. The amount of such a penalty will not exceed the maximum amount calculated and published annually in the Federal Register under paragraph (d)(2) of this section.


(ii) Tier Two penalties. Where an institution submits or publishes any false or misleading Call Report or other information, the Board of Directors or its designee may assess a Tier Two civil money penalty for each day the information is not corrected. The amount of such a penalty will not exceed the maximum amount calculated and published annually in the Federal Register under paragraph (d)(2) of this section.


(iii) Tier Three penalties. Where an institution knowingly or with reckless disregard for the accuracy of any Call Report or information submits or publishes any false or misleading Call Report or other information, the Board of Directors or its designee may assess a Tier Three civil money penalty for each day the information is not corrected. The penalty shall not exceed the lesser of 1 percent of the institution’s total assets per day or the amount calculated and published annually in the Federal Register under paragraph (d)(2) of this section.


(4) Mitigating factors. The amounts set forth in paragraphs (e)(1) through (e)(3) of this section may be reduced based upon the factors set forth in paragraph (b) of this section.


[77 FR 74577, Dec. 17, 2012, as amended at 81 FR 42239, June 29, 2016; 81 FR 95416, Dec. 28, 2016; 83 FR 1522, Jan. 12, 2018; 83 FR 61114, Nov. 28, 2018]


§ 308.133 Effective date of, and payment under, an order to pay.

(a) Effective date. (1) Unless otherwise provided in the Notice, except in situations covered by paragraph (a)(2) of this section, civil penalties assessed pursuant to this subpart are due and payable 60 days after the Notice is served upon the respondent.


(2) If the respondent both requests a hearing and serves an answer, civil penalties assessed pursuant to this subpart are due and payable 60 days after an order to pay, issued after the hearing or upon default, is served upon the respondent, unless the order provides for a different period of payment. Civil penalties assessed pursuant to an order to pay issued upon consent are due and payable within the time specified therein.


(b) Payment. All penalties collected under this section shall be paid over to the Treasury of the United States.


Subpart I – Rules and Procedures for Imposition of Sanctions Upon Municipal Securities Dealers or Persons Associated With Them and Clearing Agencies or Transfer Agents

§ 308.134 Scope.

The rules and procedures in this subpart, subpart B of the Local Rules and the Uniform Rules shall apply to proceedings by the Board of Directors or its designee:


(a) To censure, limit the activities of, suspend, or revoke the registration of, any municipal securities dealer for which the FDIC is the appropriate regulatory agency;


(b) To censure, suspend, or bar from being associated with such a municipal securities dealer, any person associated with such a municipal securities dealer; and


(c) To deny registration, to censure limit the activities of, suspend, or revoke the registration of, any transfer agent or clearing agency for which the FDIC is the appropriate regulatory agency. This subpart and the Uniform Rules shall not apply to proceedings to postpone or suspend registration of a transfer agent or clearing agency pending final determination of denial or revocation of registration.


§ 308.135 Grounds for imposition of sanctions.

(a) Action under section 15(b)(4) of the Exchange Act. The Board of Directors or its designee may issue and have served upon any municipal securities dealer for which the FDIC is the appropriate regulatory agency, or any person associated or seeking to become associated with a municipal securities dealer for which the FDIC is the appropriate regulatory agency, a written notice of its intention to censure, limit the activities or functions or operations of, suspend, or revoke the registration of, such municipal securities dealer, or to censure, suspend, or bar the person from being associated with the municipal securities dealer, when the Board of Directors or its designee determines:


(1) That such municipal securities dealer or such person


(i) Has committed any prohibited act or omitted any required act specified in subparagraph (A), (D), or (E) of section 15(b)(4) of the Exchange Act, as amended (15 U.S.C. 78o);


(ii) Has been convicted of any offense specified in section 15(b)(4)(B) of the Exchange Act within ten years of commencement of proceedings under this subpart; or


(iii) Is enjoined from any act, conduct, or practice specified in section 15(b)(4)(C) of the Exchange Act; and


(2) That it is in the public interest to impose any of the sanctions set forth in paragraph (a) of this section.


(b) Action under sections 17 and 17A of the Exchange Act. The Board of Directors or its designee may issue, and have served upon any transfer agent or clearing agency for which the FDIC is the appropriate regulatory agency, a written Notice of its intention to deny registration to, censure, place limitations on the activities or function or operations of, suspend, or revoke the registration of, the transfer agent or clearing agency, when the Board of Directors or its designee determines:


(1) That the transfer agent or clearing agency has willfully violated, or is unable to comply with, any applicable provision of section 17 or 17A of the Exchange Act, as amended, or any applicable rule or regulation issued pursuant thereto; and


(2) That it is in the public interest to impose any of the sanctions set forth in paragraph (b) of this section.


§ 308.136 Notice to and consultation with the Securities and Exchange Commission.

Before initiating any proceedings under § 308.135, the FDIC shall:


(a) Notify the Securities and Exchange Commission of the identity of the municipal securities dealer or associated person against whom proceedings are to be initiated, and the nature of and basis for the proposed action; and


(b) Consult with the Commission concerning the effect of the proposed action on the protection of investors and the possibility of coordinating the action with any proceeding by the Commission against the municipal securities dealer or associated person.


§ 308.137 Effective date of order imposing sanctions.

An order issued by the Board of Directors after a hearing or an order issued upon default shall become effective at the expiration of 30 days after the service of the order, except that an order of censure, denial, or revocation of registration is effective when served. An order issued upon consent shall become effective at the time specified therein. All orders shall remain effective and enforceable except to the extent they are stayed, modified, terminated, or set aside by the Board of Directors, its designee, or a reviewing court, provided that orders of suspension shall continue in effect no longer than 12 months.


Subpart J – Rules and Procedures Relating to Exemption Proceedings Under Section 12(h) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934

§ 308.138 Scope.

The rules and procedures of this subpart J shall apply to proceedings by the Board of Directors or its designee to exempt, in whole or in part, an issuer of securities from the provisions of sections 12(g), 13, 14(a), 14(c), 14(d), or 14(f) of the Exchange Act, as amended (15 U.S.C. 781, 78m, 78n (a), (c) (d) or (f)), or to exempt an officer or a director or beneficial owner of securities of such an issuer from the provisions of section 16 of the Exchange Act (15 U.S.C. 78p).


§ 308.139 Application for exemption.

Any interested person may file a written application for an exemption under this subpart with the Administrative Officer, Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, 550 17th Street NW, Washington, DC 20429. The application shall specify the exemption sought and the reason therefor, and shall include a statement indicating why the exemption would be consistent with the public interest or the protection of investors.


[86 FR 2249, Jan. 12, 2021]


§ 308.140 Newspaper notice.

(a) General rule. If the Board of Directors or its designee, in its sole discretion, decides to further consider an application for exemption, there shall be served upon the applicant instructions to publish one notification in a newspaper of general circulation in the community where the main office of the issuer is located. The applicant shall furnish proof of such publication to the Administrative Officer or such other person as may be directed in the instructions.


(b) Contents. The notification shall contain the name and address of the issuer and the name and title of the applicant, the exemption sought, a statement that a hearing will be held, and a statement that within 30 days of publication of the newspaper notice, interested persons may submit to the FDIC written comments on the application for exemption and a written request for an opportunity to be heard. The address of the FDIC must appear in the notice.


[56 FR 37975, Aug. 9, 1991, as amended at 86 FR 2249, Jan. 12, 2021]


§ 308.141 Notice of hearing.

Within ten days after expiration of the period for receipt of comments pursuant to § 308.140, the Administrative Officer shall serve upon the applicant and any person who has requested an opportunity to be heard written notification indicating the place and time of the hearing. The hearing shall be held not later than 30 days after service of the notification of hearing. The notification shall contain the name and address of the presiding officer designated by the Administrative Officer and a statement of the matters to be considered.


[86 FR 2249, Jan. 12, 2021]


§ 308.142 Hearing.

(a) Proceedings are informal. Formal rules of evidence, the adjudicative procedures of the APA (5 U.S.C. 554-557), the Uniform Rules and § 308.108 of subpart B of the Local Rules shall not apply to hearings under this subpart.


(b) Hearing Procedure. (1) Parties to the hearing may appear personally or through counsel and shall have the right to introduce relevant and material documents and to make an oral statement.


(2) There shall be no discovery in proceeding under this subpart J.


(3) The presiding officer shall have discretion to permit presentation of witnesses within specified time limits, provided that a list of witnesses is furnished to the presiding officer prior to the hearing. Witnesses shall be sworn, unless otherwise directed by the presiding officer. The presiding officer may ask questions of any witness and each party may cross-examine any witness presented by an opposing party.


(4) The proceedings shall be on the record and the transcript shall be promptly submitted to the Board of Directors. The presiding officer shall make recommendations to the Board of Directors, unless the Board of Directors, in its sole discretion, directs otherwise.


§ 308.143 Decision of Board of Directors.

Following submission of the hearing transcript to the Board of Directors, the Board of Directors may grant the exemption where it determines, by reason of the number of public investors, the amount of trading interest in the securities, the nature and extent of the issuer’s activities, the issuer’s income or assets, or otherwise, that the exemption is consistent with the public interest or the protection of investors. Any exemption shall be set forth in an order specifying the terms of the exemption, the person to whom it is granted, and the period for which it is granted. A copy of the order shall be served upon each party to the proceeding.


Subpart K – Procedures Applicable to Investigations Pursuant to Section 10(c) of the FDIA

§ 308.144 Scope.

The procedures of this subpart shall be followed when an investigation is instituted and conducted in connection with any open or failed insured depository institution, any institutions making application to become insured depository institutions, and affiliates thereof, or with other types of investigations to determine compliance with applicable law and regulations, pursuant to section 10(c) of the FDIA (12 U.S.C. 1820(c)) or section 5(d)(1)(B) of HOLA (12 U.S.C. 1464(d)(1)(B)). The Uniform Rules and subpart B of the Local Rules shall not apply to investigations under this subpart.


[80 FR 5013, Jan. 30, 2015]


§ 308.145 Conduct of investigation.

An investigation shall be initiated only upon issuance of an order by the Board of Directors; or by the General Counsel, the Director of the Division of Risk Management Supervision, the Director of the Division of Depositor and Consumer Protection, or their respective designees. The order shall indicate the purpose of the investigation and designate FDIC’s representative(s) to direct the conduct of the investigation. Upon application and for good cause shown, the persons who issue the order of investigation may limit, quash, modify, or withdraw it. Upon the conclusion of the investigation, an order of termination of the investigation shall be issued by the persons issuing the order of investigation.


[80 FR 5013, Jan. 30, 2015]


§ 308.146 Powers of person conducting investigation.

The person designated to conduct the investigation shall have the power, among other things, to administer oaths and affirmations, to take and preserve testimony under oath, to issue subpoenas and subpoenas duces tecum and to apply for their enforcement to the United States District Court for the judicial district or the United States court in any territory in which the main office of the bank, institution, or affiliate is located or in which the witness resides or conducts business. The person conducting the investigation may obtain the assistance of counsel or others from both within and outside the FDIC. The persons who issue the order of investigation may limit, quash, or modify any subpoena or subpoena duces tecum, upon application and for good cause shown. The person conducting an investigation may report to the Board of Directors any instance where any attorney has engaged in contemptuous, dilatory, obstructionist, or contumacious conduct or has otherwise violated any provision of this part during the course of an investigation. The Board of Directors, upon motion of the person conducting the investigation, or on its own motion, may make a finding of contempt and may then summarily suspend, without a hearing, any attorney representing a witness from further participation in the investigation.


[80 FR 5013, Jan. 30, 2015]


§ 308.147 Investigations confidential.

Investigations shall be confidential. Information and documents obtained by the FDIC in the course of such investigations shall not be disclosed, except as provided in part 309 of this chapter and as otherwise required by law.


[80 FR 5013, Jan. 30, 2015]


§ 308.148 Rights of witnesses.

In an investigation:


(a) Any person compelled or requested to furnish testimony, documentary evidence, or other information, shall upon request be shown and provided with a copy of the order initiating the proceeding;


(b) Any person compelled or requested to provide testimony as a witness or to furnish documentary evidence may be represented by a counsel who meets the requirements of § 308.6 of the Uniform Rules. That counsel may be present and may:


(1) Advise the witness before, during, and after such testimony;


(2) Briefly question the witness at the conclusion of such testimony for clarification purposes; and


(3) Make summary notes during such testimony solely for the use and benefit of the witness;


(c) All persons testifying shall be sequestered. Such persons and their counsel shall not be present during the testimony of any other person, unless permitted in the discretion of the person conducting the investigation. Neither attorney(s) for the institution that is the subject of the investigation, nor attorney(s) for any other interested persons, shall have any right to be present during the testimony of any witness not personally represented by such attorney;


(d) In cases of a perceived or actual conflict of interest arising out of an attorney’s or law firm’s representation of multiple witnesses, the person conducting the investigation may require the attorney to comply with the provisions of § 308.8 of the Uniform Rules; and


(e) Witness fees shall be paid in accordance with § 308.14 of the Uniform Rules.


[56 FR 37975, Aug. 9, 1991, as amended at 64 FR 62100, Nov. 16, 1999; 80 FR 5013, Jan. 30, 2015]


§ 308.149 Service of subpoena.

Service of a subpoena shall be accomplished in accordance with § 308.11 of the Uniform Rules.


§ 308.150 Transcripts.

(a) General rule. Transcripts of testimony, if any, shall be recorded by an official reporter, or by any other person or means designated by the person conducting the investigation. A witness may, solely for the use and benefit of the witness, obtain a copy of the transcript of his or her testimony at the conclusion of the investigation or, at the discretion of the person conducting the investigation, at an earlier time, provided that the witness submits a written request for the transcript and the transcript is available. The witness requesting a copy of his or her testimony shall bear the cost thereof.


(b) Subscription by witness. The transcript of testimony shall be subscribed by the witness, unless the person conducting the investigation and the witness, by stipulation, have waived the signing, or the witness is ill, cannot be found, or has refused to sign. If the transcript of the testimony is not subscribed by the witness, the official reporter taking the testimony shall certify that the transcript is a true and complete transcript of the testimony.


[56 FR 37975, Aug. 9, 1991, as amended at 80 FR 5013, Jan. 30, 2015]


Subpart L – Procedures and Standards Applicable to a Notice of Change in Senior Executive Officer or Director Pursuant to Section 32 of the FDIA

§ 308.151 Scope.

The rules and procedures set forth in this subpart shall apply to the notice filed by a state nonmember bank pursuant to section 32 of the FDIA (12 U.S.C. 1831i) and § 303.102 of this chapter for the consent of the FDIC to add or replace an individual on the Board of Directors, or to employ any individual as a senior executive officer, or change the responsibilities of any individual to a position of senior executive officer where:


(a) The bank is not in compliance with all minimum capital requirements applicable to it as determined by the FDIC on the basis of such institution’s most recent report of condition or report of examination or inspection;


(b) The bank is in a troubled condition as defined in § 303.101(c) of this chapter; or


(c) The FDIC determines, in connection with the review of a capital restoration plan required under section 38(e)(2) of the FDIA (12 U.S.C. 1831o(e)(2)) or otherwise, that such prior notice is appropriate.


[64 FR 62100, Nov. 16, 1999]


§ 308.152 Grounds for disapproval of notice.

The Board of Directors or its designee may issue a notice of disapproval with respect to a notice submitted by a state nonmember bank pursuant to section 32 of the FDIA (12 U.S.C. 1831i) where:


(a) The competence, experience, character, or integrity of the individual with respect to whom such notice is submitted indicates that it would not be in the best interests of the depositors of the state nonmember bank to permit the individual to be employed by or associated with such bank; or


(b) The competence, experience, character, or integrity of the individual with respect to whom such notice is submitted indicates that it would not be in the best interests of the public to permit the individual to be employed by, or associated with, the state nonmember bank.


[56 FR 37975, Aug. 9, 1991, as amended at 64 FR 62101, Nov. 16, 1999]


§ 308.153 Procedures where notice of disapproval issues pursuant to § 303.103(c) of this chapter.

(a) The Notice of Disapproval shall be served upon the insured state nonmember bank and the candidate for director or senior executive officer. The Notice of Disapproval shall:


(1) Summarize or cite the relevant considerations specified in § 308.152;


(2) Inform the individual and the bank that a request for review of the disapproval may be filed within fifteen days of receipt of the Notice of Disapproval; and


(3) Specify that additional information, if any, must be contained in the request for review.


(b) The request for review must be filed at the appropriate regional office.


(c) The request for review must be in writing and should:


(1) Specify the reasons why the FDIC should reconsider its disapproval; and


(2) Set forth relevant, substantive and material documents, if any, that for good cause were not previously set forth in the notice required to be filed pursuant to section 32 of the FDIA (12 U.S.C. 1831i).


[56 FR 37975, Aug. 9, 1991, as amended at 64 FR 62101, Nov. 16, 1999]


§ 308.154 Decision on review.

(a) Within 30 days of receipt of the request for review, the Board of Directors or its designee, shall notify the bank and/or the individual filing the reconsideration (hereafter “petitioner”) of the FDIC’s decision on review.


(b) If the decision is to grant the review and approve the notice, the bank and the individual involved shall be so notified.


(c) A denial of the request for review pursuant to section 32 of the FDIA shall:


(1) Inform the petitioner that a written request for a hearing, stating the relief desired and the grounds therefore, may be filed with the Administrative Officer within 15 days after the receipt of the denial; and


(2) Summarize or cite the relevant considerations specified in § 308.152.


(d) If a decision is not rendered within 30 days, the petitioner may file a request for a hearing within fifteen days from the date of expiration.


[56 FR 37975, Aug. 9, 1991, as amended at 86 FR 2249, Jan. 12, 2021]


§ 308.155 Hearing.

(a) Hearing dates. The Administrative Officer shall order a hearing to be commenced within 30 days after receipt of a request for a hearing filed pursuant to § 308.154. Upon request of the petitioner or the FDIC, the presiding officer or the Administrative Officer may order a later hearing date.


(b) Burden of proof. The ultimate burden of proof shall be upon the candidate for director or senior executive officer. The burden of going forward with a prima facie case shall be upon the FDIC.


(c) Hearing procedure. (1) The hearing shall be held in Washington, DC or at another designated place, before a presiding officer designated by the Administrative Officer.


(2) The provisions of §§ 308.6 through 308.12, 308.16, and 308.21 of the Uniform Rules and §§ 308.101 through 308.102, and 308.104 through 308.106 of subpart B of the Local Rules shall apply to hearings held pursuant to this subpart.


(3) The petitioner may appear at the hearing and shall have the right to introduce relevant and material documents and make an oral presentation. Members of the FDIC enforcement staff may attend the hearing and participate as representatives of the FDIC enforcement staff.


(4) There shall be no discovery in proceedings under this subpart.


(5) At the discretion of the presiding officer, witnesses may be presented within specified time limits, provided that a list of witnesses is furnished to the presiding officer and to all other parties prior to the hearing. Witnesses shall be sworn, unless otherwise directed by the presiding officer. The presiding officer may ask questions of any witness. Each party shall have the opportunity to cross-examine any witness presented by an opposing party. The transcript of the proceedings shall be furnished, upon request and payment of the cost thereof, to the petitioner afforded the hearing.


(6) In the course of or in connection with any hearing under paragraph (c) of this section the presiding officer shall have the power to administer oaths and affirmations, to take or cause to be taken depositions of unavailable witnesses, and to issue, revoke, quash, or modify subpoenas and subpoenas duces tecum. Where the presentation of witnesses is permitted, the presiding officer may require the attendance of witnesses from any state, territory, or other place subject to the jurisdiction of the United States at any location where the proceeding is being conducted. Witness fees shall be paid in accordance with § 308.14 of the Uniform Rules.


(7) Upon the request of the applicant afforded the hearing, or the members of the FDIC enforcement staff, the record shall remain open for five business days following the hearing for the parties to make additional submissions to the record.


(8) The presiding officer shall make recommendations to the Board of Directors or its designee, where possible, within fifteen days after the last day for the parties to submit additions to the record.


(9) The presiding officer shall forward his or her recommendation to the Administrative Officer who shall promptly certify the entire record, including the recommendation to the Board of Directors or its designee. The Administrative Officer’s certification shall close the record.


(d) Written submissions in lieu of hearing. The petitioner may in writing waive a hearing and elect to have the matter determined on the basis of written submissions.


(e) Failure to request or appear at hearing. Failure to request a hearing shall constitute a waiver of the opportunity for a hearing. Failure to appear at a hearing in person or through an authorized representative shall constitute a waiver of hearing. If a hearing is waived, the order shall be final and unappealable, and shall remain in full force and effect.


(f) Decision by Board of Directors or its designee. Within 45 days following the Administrative Officer’s certification of the record to the Board of Directors or its designee, the Board of Directors or its designee shall notify the affected individual whether the denial of the notice will be continued, terminated, or otherwise modified. The notification shall state the basis for any decision of the Board of Directors or its designee that is adverse to the petitioner. The Board of Directors or its designee shall promptly rescind or modify the denial where the decision is favorable to the petitioner.


[56 FR 37975, Aug. 9, 1991, as amended at 64 FR 62101, Nov. 16, 1999; 86 FR 2249, Jan. 12, 2021]


Subpart M – Procedures Applicable to the Request for and Conduct of a Hearing after Denial of an Application under Section 19 of the FDI Act


Source:85 FR 51323, Aug. 20, 2020, unless otherwise noted.

§ 308.156 Scope.

The rules and procedures set forth in this subpart shall apply to an application filed under section 19 of the FDI Act, 12 U.S.C. 1829 (section 19), and 12 CFR part 303, subpart L, by an insured depository institution (IDI) or an individual, which individual has been convicted of any criminal offense involving dishonesty, a breach of trust, or money laundering, or who has agreed to enter into a pretrial diversion or similar program in connection with the prosecution of such offense, to seek the prior written consent of the FDIC for the individual to become or continue as an institution-affiliated party (IAP) with respect to an IDI; to own or control directly or indirectly an IDI; or to participate directly or indirectly in any manner in the conduct of the affairs of an IDI; and shall apply only after such application has been denied under part 12 CFR part 303, subpart L.


§ 308.157 Denial of applications.

If an application is denied under 12 CFR part 303, subpart L, then the applicant may request a hearing under this subpart. The applicant will have 60 days after the date of the denial to file a written request with the Administrative Officer. In the request, the applicant shall state the relief desired, the grounds supporting the request for relief, and provide any supporting evidence that the applicant believes is responsive to the grounds for the denial.


[86 FR 2250, Jan. 12, 2021]


§ 308.158 Hearings.

(a) Hearing dates. The Administrative Officer shall order a hearing to be commenced within 60 days after receipt of a request for hearing on an application filed under § 308.157. Upon the request of the applicant or FDIC enforcement counsel, the presiding officer or the Administrative Officer may order a later hearing date.


(b) Burden of proof. The burden of going forward with a prima facie case shall be upon the FDIC. The ultimate burden of proof shall be upon the person proposing to become or continue as an IAP with respect to an IDI; to own or control directly or indirectly an IDI; or to participate directly or indirectly in any manner in the conduct of the affairs of an IDI.


(c) Hearing procedure. (1) The hearing shall be held in Washington, DC, or at another designated place, before a presiding officer designated by the Administrative Officer.


(2) The provisions of §§ 308.6 through 308.12, 308.16, and 308.21 of the Uniform Rules (subpart A of this part) and §§ 308.101, 308.102, and 308.104 through 308.106 the Local Rules (subpart B of this part) shall apply to hearings held under this subpart.


(3) The applicant may appear at the hearing and shall have the right to introduce relevant and material documents and oral argument. Members of the FDIC enforcement staff may attend the hearing and participate as a party.


(4) There shall be no discovery in proceedings under this subpart.


(5) At the discretion of the presiding officer, witnesses may be presented within specified time limits, provided that a list of witnesses is furnished to the presiding officer and to all other parties prior to the hearing. Witnesses shall be sworn, unless otherwise directed by the presiding officer. The presiding officer may ask questions of any witness. Each party shall have the opportunity to cross-examine any witness presented by an opposing party. The transcript of the proceedings shall be furnished, upon request and payment of the cost thereof, to the applicant afforded the hearing.


(6) In the course of or in connection with any hearing under this paragraph, the presiding officer shall have the power to administer oaths and affirmations; to take or cause to be taken depositions of unavailable witnesses; and to issue, revoke, quash, or modify subpoenas and subpoenas duces tecum. Where the presentation of witnesses is permitted, the presiding officer may require the attendance of witnesses from any state, territory, or other place subject to the jurisdiction of the United States at any location where the proceeding is being conducted. Witness fees shall be paid in accordance with § 308.14 of the Uniform Rules (subpart A of this part).


(7) Upon the request of the applicant afforded the hearing, or FDIC enforcement staff, the record shall remain open for five business days following the hearing for the parties to make additional submissions to the record.


(8) The presiding officer shall make recommendations to the Board of Directors, where possible, within 20 days after the last day for the parties to submit additions to the record.


(9) The presiding officer shall forward his or her recommendation to the Administrative Officer who shall promptly certify the entire record, including the recommendation to the Board of Directors or its designee. The Administrative Officer certification shall close the record.


(d) Written submissions in lieu of hearing. The applicant or the IDI may in writing waive a hearing and elect to have the matter determined on the basis of written submissions.


(e) Failure to request or appear at hearing. Failure to request a hearing shall constitute a waiver of the opportunity for a hearing. Failure to appear at a hearing in person or through an authorized representative shall constitute a waiver of a hearing. If a hearing is waived, the person shall remain barred under section 19.


(f) Decision by Board of Directors or its designee. Within 60 days following the Administrative Officer’s certification of the record to the Board of Directors or its designee, the Board of Directors or its designee shall notify the affected person whether the person shall remain barred under section 19. The notification shall state the basis for any decision of the Board of Directors or its designee that is adverse to the applicant.


[85 FR 51323, Aug. 20, 2020, as amended at 86 FR 2250, Jan. 12, 2021]


§§ 308.159-308.160 [Reserved]

Subpart N – Rules and Procedures Applicable to Proceedings Relating to Suspension, Removal, and Prohibition Where a Felony ls Charged


Source:72 FR 67235, Nov. 28, 2007, unless otherwise noted.

§ 308.161 Scope.

The rules and procedures set forth in this subpart shall apply to the following:


(a) Proceedings to suspend an institution-affiliated party of an insured State nonmember bank, or an insured State savings association, or to prohibit such party from further participation in the conduct of the affairs of any depository institution, if continued service or participation by such party posed, poses, or may pose a threat to the interests of the depositors of, or threatened, threatens, or may threaten to impair public confidence in, any relevant depository institution (as defined at section 1818(g)(1)(E) of Title 12), where the individual is the subject of any state or federal information, indictment, or complaint, involving the commission of, or participation in:


(1) A crime involving dishonesty or breach of trust punishable by imprisonment exceeding one year under state or federal law; or


(2) A criminal violation of section 1956, 1957, or 1960 of title 18 or section 5322 or 5324 of title 31.


(b) Proceedings to remove from office or to prohibit an institution-affiliated party from further participation in the conduct of the affairs of any depository institution without the consent of the Board of Directors or its designee where:


(1) A judgment of conviction or an agreement to enter a pre-trial diversion or other similar program has been entered against such party in connection with a crime described in paragraph (a)(1) of this section that is not subject to further appellate review, if continued service or participation by such party posed, poses, or may pose a threat to the interests of the depositors of, or threatened, threatens, or may threaten to impair public confidence in, any relevant depository institution (as defined at section 1818(g)(1)(E) of title 12); or


(2) A judgment of conviction or an agreement to enter a pre-trial diversion or other similar program has been entered against such party in connection with a crime described in paragraph (a)(2) of this section.


[72 FR 67235, Nov. 28, 2007, as amended at 80 FR 5013, Jan. 30, 2015]


§ 308.162 Relevant considerations.

(a)(1) In proceedings under § 308.161(a) and (b) for a notice of suspension or prohibition, or a removal or prohibition order, the following shall be considered:


(i) Whether the alleged offense is a crime which is punishable by imprisonment for a term exceeding one year under state or federal law and which involves dishonesty or breach of trust; and


(ii) Whether the alleged offense is a criminal violation of section 1956, 1957, or 1960 of title 18 or section 5322 or 5324 of title 31; and


(iii) Whether continued service or participation by the institution-affiliated party posed, poses, or may pose a threat to the interests of the depositors of, or threatened, threatens, or may threaten to impair public confidence in, any relevant depository institution (as defined at section 1818(g)(1)(E) of title 12).


(b) The question of whether an institution-affiliated party is guilty of the subject crime shall not be tried or considered in a proceeding under this subpart.


§ 308.163 Notice of suspension or prohibition, and orders of removal or prohibition.

(a) Notice of suspension or prohibition.


(1) The Board of Directors or its designee may suspend or prohibit from further participation in the conduct of the affairs of any depository institution an institution-affiliated party by written notice of suspension or prohibition upon a determination by the Board of Directors or its designee that the grounds for such suspension or prohibition exist. The written notice of suspension or prohibition shall be served upon the institution-affiliated party and any depository institution that the subject of the action is affiliated with at the time the notice is issued.


(2) The suspension or prohibition shall be effective immediately upon service on the institution-affiliated party, who shall immediately comply with the requirements thereof, and shall remain in effect until final disposition of the information, indictment, complaint, or until it is terminated by the Board of Directors or its designee under the provisions of § 308.164 or otherwise.


(b) Order of removal or prohibition.


(1) The Board of Directors or its designee may issue an order removing or prohibiting from further participation in the conduct of the affairs of any depository institution an institution-affiliated party, when a final judgment of conviction not subject to further appellate review is entered against the institution-affiliated party for a crime referred to in § 308.161(a)(1) and continued service or participation by such party posed, poses, or may pose a threat to the interests of the depositors of, or threatened, threatens, or may threaten to impair public confidence in, any relevant depository institution (as defined at section 1818(g)(1)(E) of title 12).


(2) An order of removal or prohibition shall be entered if a judgment of conviction is entered against the institution-affiliated party for a crime described in § 308.161(a)(2).


(c) The notice of suspension or prohibition or the order of removal or prohibition shall:


(1) Inform the institution-affiliated party that a written request for a hearing, stating the relief desired and grounds therefore, and any supporting evidence, may be filed with the Administrative Officer within 30 days after service of the written notice or order; and


(2) Set forth the basis and facts in support of the notice or order and address the relevant considerations specified in § 308.162.


(d) To obtain a hearing, the institution-affiliated party shall file with the Administrative Officer a written request for a hearing within 30 days after service of the notice of suspension or prohibition or the order of removal or prohibition, which shall:


(1) Admit or deny specifically each allegation in the notice or order, or state that the institution-affiliated party is without knowledge or information, which statement shall have the effect of a denial. Any allegation not denied shall be deemed to be admitted. When an institution-affiliated party intends in good faith to deny only a part of or to qualify an allegation, he shall specify so much of it as is true and shall deny only the remainder; and


(2) Shall state whether the institution-affiliated party is requesting termination or modification of the notice or order, and shall state with particularity how he intends to show that his continued service to or participation in the conduct of the affairs of the depository institution would not, or is not likely to, pose a threat to the interests of its depositors or to impair public confidence in the depository institution.


[72 FR 67235, Nov. 28, 2007, as amended at 80 FR 5014, Jan. 30, 2015; 86 FR 2250, Jan. 12, 2021]


§ 308.164 Hearings.

(a) Hearing dates. The Administrative Officer shall order a hearing to be commenced within 30 days after receipt of a request for hearing filed pursuant to § 308.163. Upon the request of the institution-affiliated party, the presiding officer or the Administrative Officer may order a later hearing date.


(b) Hearing procedure. (1) The hearing shall be held in Washington, DC, or at another designated place, before a presiding officer designated by the Administrative Officer.


(2) The provisions of §§ 308.6 through 308.12, 308.16, and 308.21 of the Uniform Rules and §§ 308.101 through 308.102 and 308.104 through 308.106 of subpart B of the Local Rules shall apply to hearings held pursuant to this subpart.


(3) The institution-affiliated party may appear at the hearing and shall have the right to introduce relevant and material documents. Members of the FDIC enforcement staff may attend the hearing and participate as representatives of the FDIC enforcement staff. Following the introduction of all evidence, the applicant and the representative of the FDIC enforcement staff shall have an opportunity for oral argument; however, the parties may jointly waive the right to oral argument, and, in lieu thereof, elect to submit written argument.


(4) There shall be no discovery in proceedings under this subpart.


(5) At the discretion of the presiding officer, witnesses may be presented within specified time limits, provided that a list of witnesses is furnished to the presiding officer and to all other parties prior to the hearing. Witnesses shall be sworn, unless otherwise directed by the presiding officer. The presiding officer may ask questions of any witness. Each party shall have the opportunity to cross-examine any witness presented by an opposing party. The transcript of the proceedings shall be furnished, upon request and payment of the cost thereof, to the institution-affiliated party afforded the hearing. A copy of the transcript shall be sent directly to the presiding officer, who shall have authority to correct the record sua sponte or upon the motion of any party.


(6) In the course of or in connection with any hearing under paragraph (b) of this section, the presiding officer shall have the power to administer oaths and affirmations, to take or cause to be taken depositions of unavailable witnesses, and to issue, revoke, quash, or modify subpoenas and subpoenas duces tecum. Where the presentation of witnesses is permitted, the presiding officer may require the attendance of witnesses from any state, territory, or other place subject to the jurisdiction of the United States at any location where the proceeding is being conducted. Witness fees shall be paid in accordance with § 308.14 of the Uniform Rules.


(7) Upon the request of the institution-affiliated party afforded the hearing, or the members of the FDIC enforcement staff, the record shall remain open for five business days following the hearing for the parties to make additional submissions to the record.


(8) The presiding officer shall make recommendations to the Board of Directors, where possible, within 10 days after the last day for the parties to submit additions to the record.


(9) The presiding officer shall forward his or her recommendation to the Administrative Officer who shall promptly certify the entire record, including the recommendation to the Board of Directors. The Administrative Officer’s certification shall close the record.


(10) The institution-affiliated party has the burden of showing, by a preponderance of the evidence, that his or her continued service to or participation in the conduct of the affairs of a depository institution does not, or is not likely to, pose a threat to the interests of the depository institution’s depositors or threaten to impair public confidence in the depository institution.


(c) Written submissions in lieu of hearing. The institution-affiliated party may in writing waive a hearing and elect to have the matter determined on the basis of written submissions.


(d) Failure to request or appear at hearing. Failure to request a hearing shall constitute a waiver of the opportunity for a hearing. Failure to appear at a hearing in person or through an authorized representative shall constitute a waiver of hearing. If a hearing is waived, the order shall be final and unappealable, and shall remain in full force and effect pursuant to § 308.163.


(e) Decision by Board of Directors or its designee. Within 60 days following the Administrative Officer’s certification of the record to the Board of Directors or its designee, the Board of Directors or its designee shall notify the institution-affiliated party whether the notice of suspension or prohibition or the order of removal or prohibition will be continued, terminated, or otherwise modified. The notification shall state the basis for any decision of the Board of Directors or its designee that is adverse to the institution-affiliated party. The Board of Directors or its designee shall promptly rescind or modify a notice of suspension or prohibition or an order of removal or prohibition where the decision is favorable to the institution-affiliated party.


[72 FR 67235, Nov. 28, 2007, as amended at 80 FR 5014, Jan. 30, 2015; 86 FR 2250, Jan. 12, 2021]


Subpart O – Liability of Commonly Controlled Depository Institutions

§ 308.165 Scope.

The rules and procedures in this subpart, subpart B of the Local Rules and the Uniform Rules shall apply to proceedings in connection with the assessment of cross-guaranty liability against commonly controlled depository institutions.


§ 308.166 Grounds for assessment of liability.

Any insured depository institution shall be liable for any loss incurred or reasonably anticipated to be incurred by the corporation, subsequent to August 9, 1989, in connection with the default of a commonly controlled insured depository institution, or any loss incurred or reasonably anticipated to be incurred in connection with any assistance provided by the Corporation to any commonly controlled depository institution in danger of default.


§ 308.167 Notice of assessment of liability.

(a) The amount of liability shall be assessed upon service of a Notice of Assessment of Liability upon the liable depository institution, within two years of the date the Corporation incurred the loss.


(b) Contents of Notice. (1) The Notice of Assessment of Liability shall set forth:


(i) The basis for the FDIC’s jurisdiction over the proceeding;


(ii) A statement of the Corporation’s good faith estimate of the amount of loss it has incurred or anticipates incurring;


(iii) A statement of the method by which the estimated loss was calculated;


(iv) A proposed order directing payment by the liable institution of the FDIC’s estimated amount of loss, and the schedule under which the payment will be due;


(v) In cases involving more than one liable institution, the estimated amount of each institution’s share of the liability.


(2) The Notice of Assessment of Liability shall advise the liable institution(s):


(i) That an answer must be filed within 20 days after service of the Notice;


(ii) That, if a hearing is requested, a request for a hearing must be filed within 20 days after service of the Notice;


(iii) That if a hearing is requested, such hearing will be held within the judicial district in which the liable institution is found, or, in cases involving more than one liable institution, within a judicial district in which at least one liable institution is found;


(iv) That, unless the administrative law judge sets a different date, the hearing will commence 120 days after service of the Notice of Assessment of Liability; and


(v) That failure to request a hearing shall render the Notice of Assessment a final and unappealable order.


§ 308.168 Effective date of and payment under an order to pay.

(a) Unless otherwise provided in the Notice of Assessment of Liability, payment of the assessment shall be due on or before the 21st day after service of the Assessment of Liability, under the terms of the schedule for payment set forth therein.


(b) All payments collected shall be paid to the Corporation.


(c) Failure to request a hearing as prescribed herein shall render the order to pay final and unappealable.


Subpart P – Rules and Procedures Relating to the Recovery of Attorney Fees and Other Expenses

§ 308.169 Scope.

This subpart, and the Equal Access to Justice Act (5 U.S.C. 504), which it implements, apply to adversary adjudications before the FDIC. The types of adjudication covered by this subpart are those listed in § 308.01 of the Uniform Rules. The Uniform Rules and subpart B of the Local Rules apply to any proceedings to recover fees and expenses under this subpart.


§ 308.170 Filing, content, and service of documents.

(a) Time to file. An application and any other pleading or document related to the application shall be filed with the Administrative Officer within 30 days after service of the final order of the Board of Directors in disposition of the proceeding whenever:


(1) The applicant seeks an award pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 504(a)(1) as the prevailing party in the adversary adjudication or in a discrete significant substantive portion of the proceeding; or


(2) The applicant, in an adversary adjudication arising from an action to enforce compliance with a statutory or regulatory requirement, asserts pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 504(a)(4) that the demand by the FDIC is substantially in excess of the decision of the administrative law judge and is unreasonable when compared with such decision under the facts and circumstances of the case.


(b) Content. The application and related documents shall conform to the requirements of § 308.10(b) and (c) of the Uniform Rules.


(c) Service. The application and related documents shall be served on all parties to the adversary adjudication in accordance with § 308.11 of the Uniform Rules, except that statements of net worth shall be served only on counsel for the FDIC.


(d) Referral. Upon receipt of an application, the Administrative Officer shall refer the matter to the administrative law judge who heard the underlying adversary proceeding, provided that if the original administrative law judge is unavailable, or the Administrative Officer determines, in his or her sole discretion, that there is cause to refer the matter to a different administrative law judge, the matter shall be referred to a different administrative law judge.


[56 FR 37975, Aug. 9, 1991, as amended at 64 FR 62102, Nov. 16, 1999; 86 FR 2250, Jan. 12, 2021]


§ 308.171 Responses to application.

(a) By FDIC. (1) Within 20 days after service of an application, counsel for the FDIC may file with the Administrative Officer and serve on all parties an answer to the application. Unless counsel for the FDIC requests and is granted an extension of time for filing or files a statement of intent to negotiate under § 308.179, failure to file an answer within the 20-day period will be treated as a consent to the award requested.


(2) The answer shall explain in detail any objections to the award requested and identify the facts relied on in support of the FDIC’s position. If the answer is based on any alleged facts not already in the record of the proceeding, the answer shall include either supporting affidavits or a request for further proceedings under § 308.180.


(b) Reply to answer. The applicant may file a reply with regard to an application filed pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 504 (a)(1), if the FDIC has addressed in its answer any of the following issues: that the position of the FDIC was substantially justified, that the applicant unduly protracted the proceedings, or that special circumstances make an award unjust. The applicant may file a reply with regard to an application filed pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 504 (a)(4), if the FDIC has addressed in its answer any of the following issues: that the applicant has committed a willful violation of law or otherwise acted in bad faith, that the FDIC’s demand is reasonable when compared to the decision of the administrative law judge or that special circumstances make an award unjust. The reply shall be filed within 15 days after service of the answer. If the reply is based on any alleged facts not already in the record of the proceeding, the reply shall include either supporting affidavits or a request for further proceedings under § 308.180.


(c) By other parties. Any party to the adversary adjudication, other than the applicant and the FDIC, may file comments on an application within 20 days after service of the application. If the applicant is entitled to file a reply to the FDIC’s answer under paragraph (b) of this section, another party may file comments on the answer within 15 days after service of the answer. A commenting party may not participate in any further proceedings on the application unless the administrative law judge determines that the public interest requires such participation in order to permit additional exploration of matters raised in the comments.


(d) Additional response. Additional filings in the nature of pleadings may be submitted only by leave of the administrative law judge.


[56 FR 37975, Aug. 9, 1991, as amended at 64 FR 62102, Nov. 16, 1999; 86 FR 2250, Jan. 12, 2021]


§ 308.172 Eligibility of applicants.

(a) Genera1 rule. To be eligible for an award under this subpart, an applicant must have been named or admitted as a party to the proceeding. In addition, the applicant must show that it meets all other conditions of eligibility set out in paragraph (b) of this section.


(b) Types of eligible applicant. The types of eligible applicant are:


(1) An individual with a net worth of not more than $2,000,000 at the time the adversary adjudication was initiated; or


(2) Any owner of an unincorporated business, or any partnership, corporation, associations, unit of local government or organization, the net worth of which did not exceed $7,000,000 and which did not have more than 500 employees at the time the adversary adjudication was initiated.


(3) For purposes of an application filed pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 504(a)(4), a small entity as defined in 5 U.S.C. 601.


(c) Factors to be considered. In determining the types of eligible applicants:


(1) An applicant who owns an unincorporated business shall be considered as an individual rather than a sole owner of an unincorporated business if the issues on which he or she prevails are related to personal interests rather than to business interests.


(2) An applicant’s net worth includes the value of any assets disposed of for the purpose of meeting an eligibility standard and excludes the value of any obligations incurred for this purpose. Transfers of assets or obligations incurred for less than reasonably equivalent value will be presumed to have been made for this purpose.


(3) The net worth of a bank shall be established by the net worth information reported in conformity with applicable instructions and guidelines on the bank’s Consolidated Report of Condition and Income filed for the last reporting date before the initiation of the adversary adjudication.


(4) The employees of an applicant include all those persons who were regularly providing services for remuneration for the applicant, under its direction and control, on the date the adversary adjudication was initiated. Part-time employees are included as though they were full-time employees.


(5) The net worth and number of employees of the applicant and all of its affiliates shall be aggregated to determine eligibility. The aggregated net worth shall be adjusted if necessary to avoid counting the net worth of any entity twice. As used in this subpart, affiliates are individuals, corporations, and entities that directly or indirectly or acting through one or more entities control a majority of the voting shares of the applicant; and corporations and entities of which the applicant directly or indirectly owns or controls a majority of the voting shares. The Board of Directors may, however, on the recommendation of the administrative law judge, or otherwise, determine that such aggregation with regard to one or more of the applicant’s affiliates would be unjust and contrary to the purposes of this subpart in light of the actual relationship between the affiliated entities. In such a case the net worth and employees of the relevant affiliate or affiliates will not be aggregated with those of the applicant. In addition, the Board of Directors may determine that financial relationships of the applicant other than those described in this paragraph constitute special circumstances that would make an award unjust.


(6) An applicant that participates in a proceeding primarily on behalf of one or more other persons or entities that would be ineligible is not itself eligible for an award.


[56 FR 37975, Aug. 9, 1991, as amended at 64 FR 62102, Nov. 16, 1999]


§ 308.173 Prevailing party.

(a) General rule. An eligible applicant who, following an adversary adjudication has gained victory on the merits in the proceeding is a “prevailing party”. An eligible applicant may be a “prevailing party” if a settlement of the proceeding was effected on terms favorable to it or if the proceeding against it has been dismissed. In appropriate situations an applicant may also have prevailed if the outcome of the proceeding has substantially vindicated the applicant’s position on the significant substantive matters at issue, even though the applicant has not totally avoided adverse final action.


(b) Segregation of costs. When a proceeding has presented a number of discrete substantive issues, an applicant may have prevailed even though all the issues were not resolved in its favor. If such an applicant is deemed to have prevailed, any award shall be based on the fees and expenses incurred in connection with the discrete significant substantive issue or issues on which the applicant’s position has been upheld. If such segregation of costs is not practicable, the award may be based on a fair proration of those fees and expenses incurred in the entire proceeding which would be recoverable under § 308.175 if proration were not performed, whether separate or prorated treatment is appropriate, and the appropriate proration percentage, shall be determined on the facts of the particular case. Attention shall be given to the significance and nature of the respective issues and their separability and interrelationship.


§ 308.174 Standards for awards.

(a) For applications filed pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 504(a)(1), a prevailing applicant may receive an award for fees and expenses unless the position of the FDIC during the proceeding was substantially justified or special circumstances make the award unjust. An award will be reduced or denied if the applicant has unduly or unreasonably protracted the proceedings. Awards for fees and expenses incurred before the date on which the adversary adjudication was initiated are allowable if their incurrence was necessary to prepare for the proceeding.


(b) For applications filed pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 504(a)(4), an applicant may receive an award unless the demand by the FDIC was reasonable when compared with the decision of the administrative law judge, the applicant has committed a willful violation of law or otherwise acted in bad faith, or special circumstances make an award unjust.


[64 FR 62102, Nov. 16, 1999]


§ 308.175 Measure of awards.

(a) General rule. Awards will be based on rates customarily charged by persons engaged in the business of acting as attorneys, agents, and expert witnesses, even if the services were made available without charge or at a reduced rate, provided that no award under this subpart for the fee of an attorney or agent may exceed $125 per hour. No award to compensate an expert witness may exceed the highest rate at which the FDIC pays expert witnesses. An award may include the reasonable expenses of the attorney, agent, or expert witness as a separate item, if the attorney, agent, or expert witness ordinarily charges clients separately for such expenses. Fees and expenses awarded under 5 U.S.C. 504(a)(4) related to defending against an excessive demand shall be paid only as a consequence of appropriations paid in advance.


(b) Determination of reasonableness of fees. In determining the reasonableness of the fee sought for an attorney, agent, or expert witness, the administrative law judge shall consider the following:


(1) If the attorney, agent, or expert witness is in private practice, his or her customary fee for like services, or, if he or she is an employee of the applicant, the fully allocated cost of the services;


(2) The prevailing rate for similar services in the community in which the attorney, agent, or expert witness ordinarily performs services;


(3) The time actually spent in the representation of the applicant;


(4) The time reasonably spent in light of the difficulty or complexity of the issues in the proceeding; and


(5) Such other factors as may bear on the value of the services provided.


(c) Awards for studies. The reasonable cost of any study, analysis, test, project, or similar matter prepared on behalf of an applicant may be awarded to the extent that the charge for the service does not exceed the prevailing rate payable for similar services, and the study or other matter was necessary for preparation of the applicant’s case and not otherwise required by law or sound business or financial practice.


[56 FR 37975, Aug. 9, 1991, as amended at 64 FR 62102, Nov. 16, 1999]


§ 308.176 Application for awards.

(a) Contents. An application for an award of fees and expenses under this subpart shall contain:


(1) The name of the applicant and an identification of the proceeding;


(2) For applications filed pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 504(a)(1), a showing that the applicant has prevailed, and an identification of each issue with regard to which the applicant believes that the position of the FDIC in the proceeding was not substantially justified;


(3) For applications filed pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 504(a)(4), a showing that the demand by the FDIC is substantially in excess of the decision of the administrative law judge and is unreasonable when compared with such decision under the facts and circumstances of the case;


(4) A statement of the amount of fees and expenses for which an award is sought;


(5) For applications filed pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 504(a)(4), a statement of the amount of fees and expenses which constitute appropriations paid in advance;


(6) If the applicant is not an individual, a statement of the number of its employees on the date the proceeding was initiated;


(7) A description of any affiliated individuals or entities, as defined in § 308.172(c)(5), or a statement that none exist;


(8) A declaration that the applicant, together with any affiliates, had a net worth not more than the ceiling established for it by § 308.172(b) as of the date the proceeding was initiated;


(9) For applications filed pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 504(a)(1), a statement whether the applicant is a small entity as defined in 5 U.S.C. 601; and


(10) Any other matters that the applicant wishes the FDIC to consider in determining whether and in what amount an award should be made.


(b) Verification. The application shall be signed by the applicant or an authorized officer or attorney of the applicant. It shall also contain or be accompanied by a written verification under oath or under penalty of perjury that the information provided in the application and supporting documents is true and correct.


[56 FR 37975, Aug. 9, 1991, as amended at 64 FR 62102, Nov. 16, 1999]


§ 308.177 Statement of net worth.

(a) General rule. A statement of net worth must be filed with the application for an award of fees. The statement shall reflect the net worth of the applicant and all affiliates of the applicant.


(b) Contents. (1) The statement of net worth may be in any form convenient to the applicant which fully discloses all the assets and liabilities of the applicant and all the assets and liabilities of its affiliates, as of the time of the initiation of the adversary adjudication. Unaudited financial statements are acceptable unless the administrative law judge or the Board of Directors otherwise requires. Financial statements or reports to a Federal or state agency, prepared before the initiation of the adversary adjudication for other purposes, and accurate as of a date not more than three months prior to the initiation of the proceeding, are acceptable in establishing net worth as of the time of the initiation of the proceeding, unless the administrative law judge or the Board of Directors otherwise requires.


(2) In the case of applicants or affiliates that are not banks, net worth shall be considered for the purposes of this subpart to be the excess of total assets over total liabilities, as of the date the underlying proceeding was initiated, except as adjusted under § 308.172(c)(2). Assets and liabilities of individuals shall include those beneficially owned within the meaning of the FDIC’s rules and regulations.


(3) If the applicant or any of its affiliates is a bank, the portion of the statement of net worth which relates to the bank shall consist of a copy of the bank’s last Consolidated Report of Condition and Income filed before the initiation of the adversary adjudication. In all cases the administrative law judge or the Board of Directors may call for additional information needed to establish the applicant’s net worth as of the initiation of the proceeding. Except as adjusted by additional information that was called for under the preceding sentence, net worth shall be considered for the purposes of this subpart to be the total equity capital (or, in the case of mutual savings banks, the total surplus accounts) as reported, in conformity with applicable instructions and guidelines, on the bank’s Consolidated Report of Condition and Income filed for the last reporting date before the initiation of the proceeding.


(c) Statement confidential. Unless otherwise ordered by the Board of Directors or required by law, the statement of net worth shall be for the confidential use of counsel for the FDIC, the Board of Directors, and the administrative law judge.


§ 308.178 Statement of fees and expenses.

The application shall be accompanied by a statement fully documenting the fees and expenses for which an award is sought. A separate itemized statement shall be submitted for each professional firm or individual whose services are covered by the application, showing the hours spent in work in connection with the proceeding by each individual, a description of the specific services performed, the rate at which each fee has been computed, any expenses for which reimbursement is sought, the total amount claimed, and the total amount paid or payable by the applicant or by any other person or entity for the services performed. The administrative law judge or the Board of Directors may require the applicant to provide vouchers, receipts, or other substantiation for any expenses claimed.


§ 308.179 Settlement negotiations.

If counsel for the FDIC and the applicant believe that the issues in a fee application can be settled, they may jointly file with the Administrative Officer with a copy to the administrative law judge a statement of their intent to negotiate a settlement. The filing of this statement shall extend the time for filing an answer under § 308.171 for an additional 30 days, and further extensions may be granted by the administrative law judge upon the joint request of counsel for the FDIC and the applicant.


[86 FR 2251, Jan. 12, 2021]


§ 308.180 Further proceedings.

(a) General rule. Ordinarily, the determination of a recommended award will be made by the administrative law judge on the basis of the written record. However, on request of either the applicant or the FDIC, or on his or her own initiative, the administrative law judge may order further proceedings such as an informal conference, oral argument, additional written submissions, or an evidentiary hearing. Such further proceedings will be held only when necessary for full and fair resolution of the issues arising from the application and will be conducted promptly and expeditiously.


(b) Request for further proceedings. A request for further proceedings under this section shall specifically identify the information sought or the issues in dispute and shall explain why additional proceedings are necessary.


(c) Hearing. Ordinarily, the administrative law judge shall hold an oral evidentiary hearing only on disputed issues of material fact which cannot be adequately resolved through written submissions.


§ 308.181 Recommended decision.

The administrative law judge shall file with the Administrative Officer a recommended decision on the fee application not later than 90 days after the filing of the application or 30 days after the conclusion of the hearing, whichever is later. The recommended decision shall include written proposed findings and conclusions on the applicant’s eligibility and its status as a prevailing party and an explanation of the reasons for any difference between the amount requested and the amount of the recommended award. The recommended decision shall also include, if at issue, proposed findings on whether the FDIC’s position was substantially justified, whether the applicant unduly protracted the proceedings, or whether special circumstances make an award unjust. The administrative law judge shall file the record of the proceeding on the fee application and, at the same time, serve upon each party a copy of the recommended decision, findings, conclusions, and proposed order.


[86 FR 2251, Jan. 12, 2021]


§ 308.182 Board of Directors action.

(a) Exceptions to recommended decision. Within 20 days after service of the recommended decision, findings, conclusions, and proposed order, the applicant or counsel for the FDIC may file with the Administrative Officer written exceptions thereto. A supporting brief may also be filed.


(b) Decision of Board of Directors. The Board of Directors shall render its decision within 60 days after the matter is submitted to it by the Administrative Officer. The Administrative Officer shall furnish copies of the decision and order of the Board of Directors to the parties. Judicial review of the decision and order may be obtained as provided in 5 U.S.C. 504(c)(2).


[86 FR 2251, Jan. 12, 2021]


§ 308.183 Payment of awards.

An applicant seeking payment of an award made by the Board of Directors shall submit to the Administrative Officer a statement that the applicant will not seek judicial review of the decision and order or that the time for seeking further review has passed and no further review has been sought. The FDIC will pay the amount awarded within 30 days after receiving the applicant’s statement, unless judicial review of the award or of the underlying decision of the adversary adjudication has been sought by the applicant or any other party to the proceeding.


[86 FR 2251, Jan. 12, 2021]


Subpart Q – Issuance and Review of Orders Pursuant to the Prompt Corrective Action Provisions of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act


Source:86 FR 8109, Feb. 3, 2021, unless otherwise noted.

§ 308.200 Scope.

The rules and procedures set forth in this subpart apply to FDIC-supervised institutions and senior executive officers and directors of the same that are subject to the provisions of section 38 of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act (section 38) (12 U.S.C. 1831o) and subpart H of part 324 of this chapter. For purposes of this subpart, the term “FDIC-supervised institution” means any insured depository institution for which the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation is the appropriate Federal banking agency pursuant to section 3(q) of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act, 12 U.S.C. 1813(q).


§ 308.201 Directives to take prompt corrective action.

(a) Notice of intent to issue directive – (1) In general. The FDIC shall provide an undercapitalized, significantly undercapitalized, or critically undercapitalized FDIC-supervised institution prior written notice of the FDIC’s intention to issue a directive requiring such FDIC-supervised institution to take actions or to follow proscriptions described in section 38 that are within the FDIC’s discretion to require or impose under section 38 of the FDI Act, including section 38 (e)(5), (f)(2), (f)(3), or (f)(5). The FDIC-supervised institution shall have such time to respond to a proposed directive as provided by the FDIC under paragraph (c) of this section.


(2) Immediate issuance of final directive. If the FDIC finds it necessary in order to carry out the purposes of section 38 of the FDI Act, the FDIC may, without providing the notice prescribed in paragraph (a)(1) of this section, issue a directive requiring an FDIC-supervised institution immediately to take actions or to follow proscriptions described in section 38 that are within the FDIC’s discretion to require or impose under section 38 of the FDI Act, including section 38 (e)(5), (f)(2), (f)(3), or (f)(5). An FDIC-supervised institution that is subject to such an immediately effective directive may submit a written appeal of the directive to the FDIC. Such an appeal must be received by the FDIC within 14 calendar days of the issuance of the directive, unless the FDIC permits a longer period. The FDIC shall consider any such appeal, if filed in a timely matter, within 60 days of receiving the appeal. During such period of review, the directive shall remain in effect unless the FDIC, in its sole discretion, stays the effectiveness of the directive.


(b) Contents of notice. A notice of intention to issue a directive shall include:


(1) A statement of the FDIC-supervised institution’s capital measures and capital levels;


(2) A description of the restrictions, prohibitions, or affirmative actions that the FDIC proposes to impose or require;


(3) The proposed date when such restrictions or prohibitions would be effective or the proposed date for completion of such affirmative actions; and


(4) The date by which the FDIC-supervised institution subject to the directive may file with the FDIC a written response to the notice.


(c) Response to notice – (1) Time for response. An FDIC-supervised institution may file a written response to a notice of intent to issue a directive within the time period set by the FDIC. The date shall be at least 14 calendar days from the date of the notice unless the FDIC determines that a shorter period is appropriate in light of the financial condition of the FDIC-supervised institution or other relevant circumstances.


(2) Content of response. The response should include:


(i) An explanation why the action proposed by the FDIC is not an appropriate exercise of discretion under section 38;


(ii) Any recommended modification of the proposed directive; and


(iii) Any other relevant information, mitigating circumstances, documentation, or other evidence in support of the position of the FDIC-supervised institution regarding the proposed directive.


(d) FDIC consideration of response. After considering the response, the FDIC may:


(1) Issue the directive as proposed or in modified form;


(2) Determine not to issue the directive and so notify the FDIC-supervised institution; or


(3) Seek additional information or clarification of the response from the FDIC-supervised institution or any other relevant source.


(e) Failure to file response. Failure by an FDIC-supervised institution to file with the FDIC, within the specified time period, a written response to a proposed directive shall constitute a waiver of the opportunity to respond and shall constitute consent to the issuance of the directive.


(f) Request for modification or rescission of directive. Any FDIC-supervised institution that is subject to a directive under this subpart may, upon a change in circumstances, request in writing that the FDIC reconsider the terms of the directive and may propose that the directive be rescinded or modified. Unless otherwise ordered by the FDIC, the directive shall continue in place while such request is pending before the FDIC.


§ 308.202 Procedures for reclassifying an FDIC-supervised institution based on criteria other than capital.

(a) Reclassification based on unsafe or unsound condition or practice – (1) Issuance of notice of proposed reclassification – (i) Grounds for reclassification. (A) Pursuant to § 324.403(d) of this chapter, the FDIC may reclassify a well-capitalized FDIC-supervised institution as adequately capitalized or subject an adequately capitalized or undercapitalized institution to the supervisory actions applicable to the next lower capital category if:


(1) The FDIC determines that the FDIC-supervised institution is in unsafe or unsound condition; or


(2) The FDIC, pursuant to section 8(b)(8) of the FDI Act (12 U.S.C. 1818(b)(8)), deems the FDIC-supervised institution to be engaged in an unsafe or unsound practice and not to have corrected the deficiency.


(B) Any action pursuant to this paragraph (a)(1)(i) shall be referred to in this section as reclassification.


(ii) Prior notice to institution. Prior to taking action pursuant to § 324.403(d) of this chapter, the FDIC shall issue and serve on the FDIC-supervised institution a written notice of the FDIC’s intention to reclassify it.


(2) Contents of notice. A notice of intention to reclassify an FDIC-supervised institution based on unsafe or unsound condition shall include:


(i) A statement of the FDIC-supervised institution’s capital measures and capital levels and the category to which the FDIC-supervised institution would be reclassified;


(ii) The reasons for reclassification of the FDIC-supervised institution; and


(iii) The date by which the FDIC-supervised institution subject to the notice of reclassification may file with the FDIC a written appeal of the proposed reclassification and a request for a hearing, which shall be at least 14 calendar days from the date of service of the notice unless the FDIC determines that a shorter period is appropriate in light of the financial condition of the FDIC-supervised institution or other relevant circumstances.


(3) Response to notice of proposed reclassification. An FDIC-supervised institution may file a written response to a notice of proposed reclassification within the time period set by the FDIC. The response should include:


(i) An explanation of why the FDIC-supervised institution is not in an unsafe or unsound condition or otherwise should not be reclassified; and


(ii) Any other relevant information, mitigating circumstances, documentation, or other evidence in support of the position of the FDIC-supervised institution regarding the reclassification.


(4) Failure to file response. Failure by an FDIC-supervised institution to file, within the specified time period, a written response with the FDIC to a notice of proposed reclassification shall constitute a waiver of the opportunity to respond and shall constitute consent to the reclassification.


(5) Request for hearing and presentation of oral testimony or witnesses. The response may include a request for an informal hearing before the FDIC under this section. If the FDIC-supervised institution desires to present oral testimony or witnesses at the hearing, the FDIC-supervised institution shall include a request to do so with the request for an informal hearing. A request to present oral testimony or witnesses shall specify the names of the witnesses and the general nature of their expected testimony. Failure to request a hearing shall constitute a waiver of any right to a hearing, and failure to request the opportunity to present oral testimony or witnesses shall constitute a waiver of any right to present oral testimony or witnesses.


(6) Order for informal hearing. Upon receipt of a timely written request that includes a request for a hearing, the FDIC shall issue an order directing an informal hearing to commence no later than 30 days after receipt of the request, unless the FDIC allows further time at the request of the FDIC-supervised institution. The hearing shall be held in Washington, DC, or at such other place as may be designated by the FDIC before a presiding officer(s) designated by the FDIC to conduct the hearing.


(7) Hearing procedures. (i) The FDIC-supervised institution shall have the right to introduce relevant written materials and to present oral argument at the hearing. The FDIC-supervised institution may introduce oral testimony and present witnesses only if expressly authorized by the FDIC or the presiding officer(s). Neither the provisions of the Administrative Procedure Act (5 U.S.C. 554-557) governing adjudications required by statute to be determined on the record nor the Uniform Rules of Practice and Procedure in this part apply to an informal hearing under this section unless the FDIC orders that such procedures shall apply.


(ii) The informal hearing shall be recorded, and a transcript shall be furnished to the FDIC-supervised institution upon request and payment of the cost thereof. Witnesses need not be sworn, unless specifically requested by a party or the presiding officer(s). The presiding officer(s) may ask questions of any witness.


(iii) The presiding officer(s) may order that the hearing be continued for a reasonable period (normally five business days) following completion of oral testimony or argument to allow additional written submissions to the hearing record.


(8) Recommendation of presiding officers. Within 20 calendar days following the date the hearing and the record on the proceeding are closed, the presiding officer(s) shall make a recommendation to the FDIC on the reclassification.


(9) Time for decision. Not later than 60 calendar days after the date the record is closed or the date of the response in a case where no hearing was requested, the FDIC will decide whether to reclassify the FDIC-supervised institution and notify the FDIC-supervised institution of the FDIC’s decision.


(b) Request for rescission of reclassification. Any FDIC-supervised institution that has been reclassified under this section, may, upon a change in circumstances, request in writing that the FDIC reconsider the reclassification and may propose that the reclassification be rescinded and that any directives issued in connection with the reclassification be modified, rescinded, or removed. Unless otherwise ordered by the FDIC, the FDIC-supervised institution shall remain subject to the reclassification and to any directives issued in connection with that reclassification while such request is pending before the FDIC.


§ 308.203 Order to dismiss a director or senior executive officer.

(a) Service of notice. When the FDIC issues and serves a directive on an FDIC-supervised institution pursuant to § 308.201 requiring the FDIC-supervised institution to dismiss from office any director or senior executive officer under section 38(f)(2)(F)(ii) of the FDI Act, the FDIC shall also serve a copy of the directive, or the relevant portions of the directive where appropriate, upon the person to be dismissed.


(b) Response to directive – (1) Request for reinstatement. A director or senior executive officer who has been served with a directive under paragraph (a) of this section (Respondent) may file a written request for reinstatement. The request for reinstatement shall be filed within 10 calendar days of the receipt of the directive by the Respondent, unless further time is allowed by the FDIC at the request of the Respondent.


(2) Contents of request; informal hearing. The request for reinstatement shall include reasons why the Respondent should be reinstated and may include a request for an informal hearing before the FDIC under this section. If the Respondent desires to present oral testimony or witnesses at the hearing, the Respondent shall include a request to do so with the request for an informal hearing. The request to present oral testimony or witnesses shall specify the names of the witnesses and the general nature of their expected testimony. Failure to request a hearing shall constitute a waiver of any right to a hearing, and failure to request the opportunity to present oral testimony or witnesses shall constitute a waiver of any right or opportunity to present oral testimony or witnesses.


(3) Effective date. Unless otherwise ordered by the FDIC, the dismissal shall remain in effect while a request for reinstatement is pending.


(c) Order for informal hearing. Upon receipt of a timely written request from a Respondent for an informal hearing on the portion of a directive requiring an FDIC-supervised institution to dismiss from office any director or senior executive officer, the FDIC shall issue an order directing an informal hearing to commence no later than 30 days after receipt of the request, unless the Respondent requests a later date. The hearing shall be held in Washington, DC, or at such other place as may be designated by the FDIC, before a presiding officer(s) designated by the FDIC to conduct the hearing.


(d) Hearing procedures. (1) A Respondent may appear at the hearing personally or through counsel. A Respondent shall have the right to introduce relevant written materials and to present oral argument. A Respondent may introduce oral testimony and present witnesses only if expressly authorized by the FDIC or the presiding officer(s). Neither the provisions of the Administrative Procedure Act governing adjudications required by statute to be determined on the record nor the Uniform Rules of Practice and Procedure in this part apply to an informal hearing under this section unless the FDIC orders that such procedures shall apply.


(2) The informal hearing shall be recorded, and a transcript shall be furnished to the Respondent upon request and payment of the cost thereof. Witnesses need not be sworn, unless specifically requested by a party or the presiding officer(s). The presiding officer(s) may ask questions of any witness.


(3) The presiding officer(s) may order that the hearing be continued for a reasonable period (normally five business days) following completion of oral testimony or argument to allow additional written submissions to the hearing record.


(e) Standard for review. A Respondent shall bear the burden of demonstrating that his or her continued employment by or service with the FDIC-supervised institution would materially strengthen the FDIC-supervised institution’s ability:


(1) To become adequately capitalized, to the extent that the directive was issued as a result of the FDIC-supervised institution’s capital level or failure to submit or implement a capital restoration plan; and


(2) To correct the unsafe or unsound condition or unsafe or unsound practice, to the extent that the directive was issued as a result of classification of the FDIC-supervised institution based on supervisory criteria other than capital, pursuant to section 38(g) of the FDI Act.


(f) Recommendation of presiding officers. Within 20 calendar days following the date the hearing and the record on the proceeding are closed, the presiding officer(s) shall make a recommendation to the FDIC concerning the Respondent’s request for reinstatement with the FDIC-supervised institution.


(g) Time for decision. Not later than 60 calendar days after the date the record is closed or the date of the response in a case where no hearing was requested, the FDIC shall grant or deny the request for reinstatement and notify the Respondent of the FDIC’s decision. If the FDIC denies the request for reinstatement, the FDIC shall set forth in the notification the reasons for the FDIC’s action.


§ 308.204 Enforcement of directives.

(a) Judicial remedies. Whenever an FDIC-supervised institution fails to comply with a directive issued under section 38, the FDIC may seek enforcement of the directive in the appropriate United States district court pursuant to section 8(i)(1) of the FDI Act (12 U.S.C. 1818(i)(1)).


(b) Administrative remedies – (1) Failure to comply with directive. Pursuant to section 8(i)(2)(A) of the FDI Act, the FDIC may assess a civil money penalty against any FDIC-supervised institution that violates or otherwise fails to comply with any final directive issued under section 38 and against any institution-affiliated party who participates in such violation or noncompliance.


(2) Failure to implement capital restoration plan. The failure of an FDIC-supervised institution to implement a capital restoration plan required under section 38, or subpart H of part 324 of this chapter, or the failure of a company having control of an FDIC-supervised institution to fulfill a guarantee of a capital restoration plan made pursuant to section 38(e)(2) of the FDI Act shall subject the FDIC-supervised institution to the assessment of civil money penalties pursuant to section 8(i)(2)(A) of the FDI Act.


(c) Other enforcement action. In addition to the actions described in paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section, the FDIC may seek enforcement of the provisions of section 38 or subpart H of part 324 of this chapter through any other judicial or administrative proceeding authorized by law.


Subpart R – Submission and Review of Safety and Soundness Compliance Plans and Issuance of Orders To Correct Safety and Soundness Deficiencies


Source:80 FR 65906, Oct. 28,2015, unless otherwise noted.

§ 308.300 Scope.

The rules and procedures set forth in this subpart apply to insured state nonmember banks, to state-licensed insured branches of foreign banks, that are subject to the provisions of section 39 of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act (section 39) (12 U.S.C. 1831p-1), and to state savings associations (in aggregate, bank or banks and state savings association or state savings associations).


§ 308.301 Purpose.

Section 39 of the FDI Act requires the FDIC to establish safety and soundness standards. Pursuant to section 39, a bank or savings association may be required to submit a compliance plan if it is not in compliance with a safety and soundness standard established by guideline under section 39(a) or (b). An enforceable order under section 8 of the FDI Act may be issued if, after being notified that it is in violation of a safety and soundness standard established under section 39, the bank or savings association fails to submit an acceptable compliance plan or fails in any material respect to implement an accepted plan. This subpart establishes procedures for requiring submission of a compliance plan and issuing an enforceable order pursuant to section 39.


§ 308.302 Determination and notification of failure to meet a safety and soundness standard and request for compliance plan.

(a) Determination. The FDIC may, based upon an examination, inspection or any other information that becomes available to the FDIC, determine that a bank or state savings association has failed to satisfy the safety and soundness standards set out in part 364 of this chapter and in the Interagency Guidelines Establishing Standards for Safety and Soundness in appendix A and the Interagency Guidelines Establishing Information Security Standards in appendix B to part 364 of this chapter.


(b) Request for compliance plan. If the FDIC determines that a bank or state savings association has failed a safety and soundness standard pursuant to paragraph (a) of this section, the FDIC may request, by letter or through a report of examination, the submission of a compliance plan and the bank or state savings association shall be deemed to have notice of the request three days after mailing of the letter by the FDIC or delivery of the report of examination.


§ 308.303 Filing of safety and soundness compliance plan.

(a) Schedule for filing compliance plan – (1) In general. A bank or state savings association shall file a written safety and soundness compliance plan with the FDIC within 30 days of receiving a request for a compliance plan pursuant to § 308.302(b), unless the FDIC notifies the bank or state savings association in writing that the plan is to be filed within a different period.


(2) Other plans. If a bank or state savings association is obligated to file, or is currently operating under, a capital restoration plan submitted pursuant to section 38 of the FDI Act (12 U.S.C. 1831o), a cease-and-desist order entered into pursuant to section 8 of the FDI Act, a formal or informal agreement, or a response to a report of examination or report of inspection, it may, with the permission of the FDIC, submit a compliance plan under this section as part of that plan, order, agreement, or response, subject to the deadline provided in paragraph (a)(1) of this section.


(b) Contents of plan. The compliance plan shall include a description of the steps the bank or state savings association will take to correct the deficiency and the time within which those steps will be taken.


(c) Review of safety and soundness compliance plans. Within 30 days after receiving a safety and soundness compliance plan under this subpart, the FDIC shall provide written notice to the bank or state savings association of whether the plan has been approved or seek additional information from the bank or state savings association regarding the plan. The FDIC may extend the time within which notice regarding approval of a plan will be provided.


(d) Failure to submit or implement a compliance plan – (1) Supervisory actions. If a bank or state savings association fails to submit an acceptable plan within the time specified by the FDIC or fails in any material respect to implement a compliance plan, then the FDIC shall, by order, require the bank or state savings association to correct the deficiency and may take further actions provided in section 39(e)(2)(B). Pursuant to section 39(e)(3), the FDIC may be required to take certain actions if the bank or state savings association commenced operations or experienced a change in control within the previous 24-month period, or the bank or state savings association experienced extraordinary growth during the previous 18-month period.


(2) Extraordinary growth. For purposes of paragraph (d)(1) of this section, extraordinary growth means an increase in assets of more than 7.5 percent during any quarter within the 18-month period preceding the issuance of a request for submission of a compliance plan, by a bank or state savings association that is not well capitalized for purposes of section 38 of the FDI Act. For purposes of calculating an increase in assets, assets acquired through merger or acquisition approved pursuant to the Bank Merger Act (12 U.S.C. 1828(c)) will be excluded.


(e) Amendment of compliance plan. A bank or state savings association that has filed an approved compliance plan may, after prior written notice to and approval by the FDIC, amend the plan to reflect a change in circumstance. Until such time as a proposed amendment has been approved, the bank or state savings association shall implement the compliance plan as previously approved.


§ 308.304 Issuance of orders to correct deficiencies and to take or refrain from taking other actions.

(a) Notice of intent to issue order – (1) In general. The FDIC shall provide a bank or state savings association prior written notice of the FDIC’s intention to issue an order requiring the bank or state savings association to correct a safety and soundness deficiency or to take or refrain from taking other actions pursuant to section 39 of the FDI Act. The bank or state savings association shall have such time to respond to a proposed order as provided by the FDIC under paragraph (c) of this section.


(2) Immediate issuance of final order. If the FDIC finds it necessary in order to carry out the purposes of section 39 of the FDI Act, the FDIC may, without providing the notice prescribed in paragraph (a)(1) of this section, issue an order requiring a bank or state savings association immediately to take actions to correct a safety and soundness deficiency or take or refrain from taking other actions pursuant to section 39. A bank or state savings association that is subject to such an immediately effective order may submit a written appeal of the order to the FDIC. Such an appeal must be received by the FDIC within 14 calendar days of the issuance of the order, unless the FDIC permits a longer period. The FDIC shall consider any such appeal, if filed in a timely matter, within 60 days of receiving the appeal. During such period of review, the order shall remain in effect unless the FDIC, in its sole discretion, stays the effectiveness of the order.


(b) Contents of notice. A notice of intent to issue an order shall include:


(1) A statement of the safety and soundness deficiency or deficiencies that have been identified at the bank or state savings association;


(2) A description of any restrictions, prohibitions, or affirmative actions that the FDIC proposes to impose or require;


(3) The proposed date when such restrictions or prohibitions would be effective or the proposed date for completion of any required action; and


(4) The date by which the bank or state savings association subject to the order may file with the FDIC a written response to the notice.


(c) Response to notice – (1) Time for response. A bank or state savings association may file a written response to a notice of intent to issue an order within the time period set by the FDIC. Such a response must be received by the FDIC within 14 calendar days from the date of the notice unless the FDIC determines that a different period is appropriate in light of the safety and soundness of the bank or state savings association or other relevant circumstances.


(2) Contents of response. The response should include:


(i) An explanation why the action proposed by the FDIC is not an appropriate exercise of discretion under section 39;


(ii) Any recommended modification of the proposed order; and


(iii) Any other relevant information, mitigating circumstances, documentation, or other evidence in support of the position of the bank or state savings association regarding the proposed order.


(d) Agency consideration of response. After considering the response, the FDIC may:


(1) Issue the order as proposed or in modified form;


(2) Determine not to issue the order and so notify the bank or state savings association; or


(3) Seek additional information or clarification of the response from the bank or state savings association, or any other relevant source.


(e) Failure to file response. Failure by a bank or state savings association to file with the FDIC, within the specified time period, a written response to a proposed order shall constitute a waiver of the opportunity to respond and shall constitute consent to the issuance of the order.


(f) Request for modification of rescission of order. Any bank or state savings association that is subject to an order under this subpart may, upon a change in circumstances, request in writing that the FDIC reconsider the terms of the order, and may propose that the order be rescinded or modified. Unless otherwise ordered by the FDIC, the order shall continue in place while such request is pending before the FDIC.


§ 308.305 Enforcement of orders.

(a) Judicial remedies. Whenever a bank or state savings association fails to comply with an order issued under section 39, the FDIC may seek enforcement of the order in the appropriate United States district court pursuant to section 8(i)(1) of the FDI Act.


(b) Failure to comply with order. Pursuant to section 8(i)(2)(A) of the FDI Act, the FDIC may assess a civil money penalty against any bank or state savings association that violates or otherwise fails to comply with any final order issued under section 39 and against any institution-affiliated party who participates in such violation or noncompliance.


(c) Other enforcement action. In addition to the actions described in paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section, the FDIC may seek enforcement of the provisions of section 39 or this part through any other judicial or administrative proceeding authorized by law.


Subpart S – Applications for a Stay or Review of Actions of Bank Clearing Agencies


Source:61 FR 48403, Sept. 11, 1996, unless otherwise noted.

§ 308.400 Scope.

This subpart is issued by the Corporation pursuant to sections 17A(b)(3)(g), 17A(b)(5)(C), 19 and 23 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (Exchange Act), as amended (15 U.S.C. 78q-1 (b)(3)(g), (b)(5)(C), 78s, 78w). It applies to applications by banks insured by the Corporation (other than members of the Federal Reserve System) for a stay or review of certain actions by clearing agencies registered under the Exchange Act, for which the Securities and Exchange Commission (Commission) is not the appropriate regulatory agency under section 3(a)(34)(B) of the Exchange Act (bank clearing agencies).


§ 308.401 Applications for stays of disciplinary sanctions or summary suspensions by a bank clearing agency.

Applications to the Corporation for a stay of disciplinary action imposed by registered clearing agencies pursuant to section 17(b)(3)(G) of the Exchange Act, or summary suspension or limitation or prohibition of access under section 17(b)(5)(C) of the Exchange Act shall be made according to the rules adopted by the Commission (17 CFR 240.19d-2). References to the “Commission” in 17 CFR 240.19d-2 are deemed to refer to the “Corporation.”


§ 308.402 Applications for review of final disciplinary sanctions, denials of participation, or prohibitions or limitations of access to services imposed by bank clearing agencies.

Proceedings on an application to the Corporation under section 19(d)(2) of the Exchange Act for review of any final disciplinary sanctions, denials of participation, or prohibitions or limitations of access to services imposed by bank clearing agencies shall be conducted according to the procedures set forth in rules adopted by the Commission (17 CFR 240.19d-3). References to the “Commission” in 17 CFR 240.19d-3 are deemed to refer to the “Corporation.”


Subpart T – Program Fraud Civil Remedies and Procedures


Source:66 FR 9189, Feb. 7, 2001, unless otherwise noted.

§ 308.500 Basis, purpose, and scope.

(a) Basis. This subpart implements the Program Fraud Civil Remedies Act, Pub. L. 99-509, sections 6101-6104, 100 Stat. 1874 (October 21, 1986), codified at 31 U.S.C. 3801-3812, (PFCRA) and made applicable to the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) by section 23 of the Resolution Trust Corporation Completion Act (Pub. L. 103-204, 107 Stat. 2369). 31 U.S.C. 3809 of the statute requires each Authority head to promulgate regulations necessary to implement the provisions of the statute.


(b) Purpose. This subpart:


(1) Establishes administrative procedures for imposing civil penalties and assessments against persons who make, submit, or present or cause to be made, submitted, or presented false, fictitious, or fraudulent claims or written statements to the FDIC or to its agents; and


(2) Specifies the hearing and appeal rights of persons subject to allegations of liability for such penalties and assessments.


(c) Scope. This subpart applies only to persons who make, submit, or present or cause to be made, submitted, or presented false, fictitious, or fraudulent claims or written statements to the FDIC or to its agents acting on behalf of the FDIC in connection with FDIC employment matters, FDIC contracting activities, and the FDIC Asset Purchaser Certification Program. It does not apply to false claims or statements made in connection with programs (other than as set forth in the preceding sentence) related to the FDIC’s regulatory, supervision, enforcement, insurance, receivership or liquidation responsibilities. The FDIC is restricting the scope of applicability of this subpart because other civil and administrative remedies are adequate to redress fraud in the areas not covered.


§ 308.501 Definitions.

For purposes of this subpart:


(a) Administrative Law Judge (ALJ) means the presiding officer appointed by the Office of Financial Institution Adjudication pursuant to 12 U.S.C. 1818 note and 5 U.S.C. 3105.


(b) Authority means the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC).


(c) Authority head or Board means the Board of Directors of the FDIC, which is herein designated by the Chairman of the FDIC to serve as head of the FDIC for PFCRA matters.


(d) Benefit means, in the context of “statement” as defined in 31 U.S.C. 3801(a)(9), any financial assistance received from the FDIC that amounts to $150,000 or less. The term does not include the FDIC’s deposit insurance program.


(e) Claim means any request, demand, or submission:


(1) Made to the FDIC for property, services, or money (including money representing grants, loans, insurance, or benefits);


(2) Made to a recipient of property, services, or money from the FDIC or to a party to a contract with the FDIC;


(i) For property or services if the United States:


(A) Provided such property or services;


(B) Provided any portion of the funds for the purchase of such property or services; or


(C) Will reimburse such recipient or party for the purchase of such property or services;


(ii) For the payment of money (including money representing grants, loans, insurance, or benefits) if the United States:


(A) Provided any portion of the money requested or demanded; or


(B) Will reimburse such recipient or party for any portion of the money paid on such request or demand; or


(3) Made to the FDIC that has the effect of decreasing an obligation to pay or account for property, services, or money.


(f) Complaint means the administrative complaint served by the reviewing official on the defendant under § 308.506 of this subpart.


(g) Corporation means the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation.


(h) Defendant means any person alleged in a complaint under § 308.506 of this subpart to be liable for a civil penalty or assessment under § 308.502 of this subpart.


(i) Government means the United States Government.


(j) Individual means a natural person.


(k) Initial decision means the written decision of the ALJ required by § 308.509 or § 308.536 of this subpart, and includes a revised initial decision issued following a remand or a motion for consideration.


(l) Investigating official means the Inspector General of the FDIC, or an officer or employee of the Inspector General designated by the Inspector General. The investigating official must serve in a position that has a rate of basic pay under the pay scale utilized by the FDIC that is equal to or greater than 120 percent of the minimum rate of basic pay for grade 15 under the federal government’s General Schedule.


(m) Knows or has reason to know, means that a person, with respect to a claim or statement:


(1) Has actual knowledge that the claim or statement is false, fictitious, or fraudulent;


(2) Acts in deliberate ignorance of the truth or falsity of the claim or statement; or


(3) Acts in reckless disregard of the truth or falsity of the claim or statement.


(n) Makes, wherever it appears, includes the terms “presents”, “submits”, and “causes to be made, presented, or submitted.” As the context requires, “making” or “made” likewise includes the corresponding forms of such terms.


(o) Person means any individual, partnership, corporation, association, or private organization, and includes the plural of that term.


(p) Representative means an attorney, who is a member in good standing of the bar of any state, territory, or possession of the United States or of the District of Columbia or the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, and designated by a party in writing.


(q) Reviewing official means the General Counsel of the FDIC or his designee who is:


(1) Not subject to supervision by, or required to report to, the investigating official;


(2) Not employed in the organizational unit of the FDIC in which the investigating official is employed; and


(3) Serving in a position that has a rate of basic pay under the pay scale utilized by the FDIC that is equal to or greater than 120 percent of the minimum rate of basic pay for grade 15 under the federal government’s General Schedule.


(r) Statement means any representation, certification, affirmation, document, record, or accounting or bookkeeping entry made:


(1) With respect to a claim or to obtain the approval or payment of a claim (including relating to eligibility to make a claim); or


(2) With respect to (including relating to eligibility for):


(i) A contract with, or a bid or proposal for a contract with; or


(ii) A grant, loan, or benefit received, directly or indirectly, from the FDIC, or any state, political subdivision of a state, or other party, if the United States government provides any portion of the money or property under such contract or for such grant, loan, or benefit, or if the government will reimburse such state, political subdivision, or party for any portion of the money or property under such contract or for such grant, loan, or benefit.


§ 308.502 Basis for civil penalties and assessments.

(a) Claims. (1) A person who makes a false, fictitious, or fraudulent claim to the FDIC is subject to a civil penalty of up to $5,000 per claim. A claim is false, fictitious, or fraudulent if the person making the claim knows, or has reason to know, that:


(i) The claim is false, fictitious, or fraudulent; or


(ii) The claim includes, or is supported by, a written statement that asserts a material fact which is false, fictitious or fraudulent; or


(iii) The claim includes, or is supported by, a written statement that:


(A) Omits a material fact; and


(B) Is false, fictitious, or fraudulent as a result of that omission; and


(C) Is a statement in which the person making the statement has a duty to include the material fact; or


(iv) The claim seeks payment for providing property or services that the person has not provided as claimed.


(2) Each voucher, invoice, claim form, or other individual request or demand for property, services, or money constitutes a separate claim.


(3) A claim will be considered made to the FDIC, recipient, or party when the claim is actually made to an agent, fiscal intermediary, or other entity, including any state or political subdivision thereof, acting for or on behalf of the FDIC, recipient, or party.


(4) Each claim for property, services, or money that constitutes any one of the elements in paragraph (a)(1) of this section is subject to a civil penalty regardless of whether the property, services, or money is actually delivered or paid.


(5) If the FDIC has made any payment (including transferred property or provided services) on a claim, a person subject to a civil penalty under paragraph (a)(1) of this section will also be subject to an assessment of not more than twice the amount of such claim (or portion of the claim) that is determined to constitute a false, fictitious, or fraudulent claim under paragraph (a)(1) of this section. The assessment will be in lieu of damages sustained by the FDIC because of the claims.


(6) The amount of any penalty assessed under paragraph (a)(1) of this section will be adjusted for inflation in accordance with § 308.132(d).


(7) The penalty specified in paragraph (a)(1) of this section is in addition to any other remedy allowable by law.


(b) Statements. (1) A person who submits to the FDIC a false, fictitious or fraudulent statement is subject to a civil penalty of up to $5,000 per statement. A statement is false, fictitious or fraudulent if the person submitting the statement to the FDIC knows, or has reason to know, that:


(i) The statement asserts a material fact which is false, fictitious, or fraudulent; or


(ii) The statement omits a material fact that the person making the statement has a duty to include in the statement; and


(iii) The statement contains or is accompanied by an express certification or affirmation of the truthfulness and accuracy of the contents of the statement.


(2) Each written representation, certification, or affirmation constitutes a separate statement.


(3) A statement will be considered made to the FDIC when the statement is actually made to an agent, fiscal intermediary, or other entity, including any state or political subdivision thereof, acting for or on behalf of the FDIC.


(4) The amount of any penalty assessed under paragraph (a)(1) of this section will be adjusted for inflation in accordance with § 308.132(d).


(5) The penalty specified in paragraph (a)(1) of this section is in addition to any other remedy allowable by law.


(c) Failure to file declaration/certification. Where, as a prerequisite to conducting business with the FDIC, a person is required by law to file one or more declarations and/or certifications, and the person intentionally fails to file such declaration/certification, the person will be subject to the civil penalties as prescribed by this subpart.


(d) Civil money penalties that are assessed under this subpart are subject to annual adjustments to account for inflation as required by the Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act Improvements Act of 2015 (Pub. L. 114-74, sec. 701, 129 Stat. 584) (see also 12 CFR 308.132(d)(17)).


(e) Liability. (1) In any case in which it is determined that more than one person is liable for making a claim or statement under this section, each such person may be held jointly and severally liable for a civil penalty under this section.


(2) In any case in which it is determined that more than one person is liable for making a claim under this section on which the FDIC has made payment (including transferred property or provided services), an assessment may be imposed against any such person or jointly and severally against any combination of such persons.


[66 FR 9189, Feb. 7, 2001, as amended at 81 FR 42242, June 29, 2016; 83 FR 61115, Nov. 28, 2018]


§ 308.503 Investigations.

(a) If an investigating official concludes that a subpoena pursuant to the authority conferred by 31 U.S.C. 3804(a) is warranted:


(1) The subpoena will identify the person to whom it is addressed and the authority under which the subpoena is issued and will identify the records or documents sought;


(2) The investigating official may designate a person to act on his or her behalf to receive the documents sought; and


(3) The person receiving such subpoena will be required to provide the investigating official or the person designated to receive the documents a certification that the documents sought have been produced, or that such documents are not available, and the reasons therefor, or that such documents, suitably identified, have been withheld based upon the assertion of an identified privilege.


(b) If the investigating official concludes that an action under the PFCRA may be warranted, the investigating official will submit a report containing the findings and conclusions of such investigation to the reviewing official.


(c) Nothing in this section will preclude or limit an investigating official’s discretion to refer allegations directly to the United States Department of Justice (DOJ) for suit under the False Claims Act (31 U.S.C. 3729 et seq.) or other civil relief, or to preclude or limit the investigating official’s discretion to defer or postpone a report or referral to the reviewing official to avoid interference with a criminal investigation or prosecution.


(d) Nothing in this section modifies any responsibility of an investigating official to report violations of criminal law to the Attorney General.


§ 308.504 Review by the reviewing official.

(a) If, based on the report of the investigating official under § 308.503(b) of this subpart, the reviewing official determines that there is adequate evidence to believe that a person is liable under § 308.502 of this subpart, the reviewing official will transmit to the Attorney General a written notice of the reviewing official’s intention to issue a complaint under § 308.506 of this subpart.


(b) Such notice will include:


(1) A statement of the reviewing official’s reasons for issuing a complaint;


(2) A statement specifying the evidence that supports the allegations of liability;


(3) A description of the claims or statements upon which the allegations of liability are based;


(4) An estimate of the amount of money or the value of property, services, or other benefits requested or demanded in violation of § 308.502 of this subpart;


(5) A statement of any exculpatory or mitigating circumstances that may relate to the claims or statements known by the reviewing official or the investigating official; and


(6) A statement that there is a reasonable prospect of collecting an appropriate amount of penalties and assessments. Such a statement may be based upon information then known, or upon an absence of any information indicating that the person may be unable to pay such amount.


§ 308.505 Prerequisites for issuing a complaint.

(a) The reviewing official may issue a complaint under § 308.506 of this subpart only if:


(1) The DOJ approves the issuance of a complaint in a written statement described in 31 U.S.C. 3803(b)(1); and


(2) In the case of allegations of liability under § 308.502(a) of this subpart with respect to a claim (or a group of related claims submitted at the same time as defined in paragraph (b) of this section) the reviewing official determines that the amount of money or the value of property or services demanded or requested does not exceed $150,000.


(b) For the purposes of this section, a group of related claims submitted at the same time will include only those claims arising from the same transaction (e.g., grant, loan, application, or contract) that are submitted simultaneously as part of a single request, demand, or submission.


(c) Nothing in this section will be construed to limit the reviewing official’s authority to join in a single complaint against a person claims that are unrelated or were not submitted simultaneously, regardless of the amount of money, or the value of property or services, demanded or requested.


§ 308.506 Complaint.

(a) On or after the date the DOJ approves the issuance of a complaint in accordance with 31 U.S.C. 3803(b)(1), the reviewing official may serve a complaint on the defendant, as provided in § 308.507 of this subpart.


(b) The complaint will state:


(1) The allegations of liability against the defendant, including the statutory basis for liability, or identification of the claims or statements that are the basis for the alleged liability, and the reasons why liability allegedly arises from such claims or statements;


(2) The maximum amount of penalties and assessments for which the defendant may be held liable;


(3) Instructions for filing an answer and to request a hearing, including a specific statement of the defendant’s right to request a hearing by filing an answer and to be represented by a representative; and


(4) That failure to file an answer within 30 days of service of the complaint will result in the imposition of the maximum amount of penalties and assessments without right to appeal, as provided in § 308.509 of this subpart.


(c) At the same time the reviewing official serves the complaint, he or she will provide the defendant with a copy of this subpart.


§ 308.507 Service of complaint.

(a) Service of a complaint will be made by certified or registered mail or by delivery in any manner authorized by rule 4(c) of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure (28 U.S.C. App.). Service is complete upon receipt.


(b) Proof of service, stating the name and address of the person on whom the complaint was served, and the manner and date of service, may be made by:


(1) Affidavit of the individual serving the complaint by delivery;


(2) A United States Postal Service return receipt card acknowledging receipt; or


(3) Written acknowledgment of receipt by the defendant or his or her representative.


§ 308.508 Answer.

(a) The defendant may request a hearing by filing an answer with the reviewing official within 30 days of service of the complaint. An answer will be deemed to be a request for hearing.


(b) In the answer, the defendant:


(1) Must admit or deny each of the allegations of liability made in the complaint;


(2) Must state any defense on which the defendant intends to rely;


(3) May state any reasons why the defendant contends that the penalties and assessments should be less than the statutory maximum; and


(4) Must state the name, address, and telephone number of the person authorized by the defendant to act as defendant’s representative, if any.


(c) If the defendant is unable to file an answer meeting the requirements of paragraph (b) of this section within the time provided:


(1) The defendant may, before the expiration of 30 days from service of the complaint, file with the reviewing official a general answer denying liability and requesting a hearing, and a request for an extension of time within which to file an answer meeting the requirements of paragraph (b) of this section.


(2) The reviewing official will file promptly with the ALJ the complaint, the general answer denying liability, and the request for an extension of time as provided in § 308.510 of this subpart.


(3) For good cause shown, the ALJ may grant the defendant up to 30 additional days within which to file an answer meeting the requirements of paragraph (b) of this section.


§ 308.509 Default upon failure to file an answer.

(a) If the defendant does not file an answer within the time prescribed in § 308.508(a) of this subpart, the reviewing official may refer the complaint to the ALJ.


(b) Upon the referral of the complaint, the ALJ will promptly serve on defendant in the manner prescribed in § 308.507 of this subpart, a notice that an initial decision will be issued under this section.


(c) If the defendant fails to answer, the ALJ will assume the facts alleged in the complaint to be true, and, if such facts establish liability under § 308.502 of this subpart, the ALJ will issue an initial decision imposing the maximum amount of penalties and assessments allowed under the statute.


(d) Except as otherwise provided in this section, by failing to file a timely answer, the defendant waives any right to further review of the penalties and assessments imposed under paragraph (c) of this section, and the initial decision will become final and binding upon the parties 30 days after it is issued.


(e) If, before such an initial decision becomes final, the defendant files a motion with the ALJ seeking to reopen on the grounds that extraordinary circumstances prevented the defendant from filing an answer, the initial decision will be stayed pending the ALJ’s decision on the motion.


(f) If, in the motion to reopen under paragraph (e) of this section, the defendant can demonstrate extraordinary circumstances excusing the failure to file a timely answer, the ALJ will withdraw the initial decision in paragraph (c) of this section, if such a decision has been issued, and will grant the defendant an opportunity to answer the complaint.


(g) A decision of the ALJ denying a defendant’s motion to reopen under paragraph (e) of this section is not subject to reconsideration under § 308.537 of this subpart.


(h) The decision denying the motion to reopen under paragraph (e) of this section may be appealed by the defendant to the Board by filing a notice of appeal with the Board within 15 days after the ALJ denies the motion. The timely filing of a notice of appeal will stay the initial decision until the Board decides the issue.


(i) If the defendant files a timely notice of appeal with the Board, the ALJ will forward the record of the proceeding to the Board.


(j) The Board will decide whether extraordinary circumstances excuse the defendant’s failure to file a timely answer based solely on the record before the ALJ.


(k) If the Board decides that extraordinary circumstances excuse the defendant’s failure to file a timely answer, the Board will remand the case to the ALJ with instructions to grant the defendant an opportunity to answer.


(l) If the Board decides that the defendant’s failure to file a timely answer is not excused, the Board will reinstate the initial decision of the ALJ, which will become final and binding upon the parties 30 days after the Board issues such decision.


§ 308.510 Referral of complaint and answer to the ALJ.

Upon receipt of an answer, the reviewing official will file the complaint and answer with the ALJ. The reviewing official will include the name, address, and telephone number of a representative of the Corporation.


§ 308.511 Notice of hearing.

(a) When the ALJ receives the complaint and answer, the ALJ will promptly serve a notice of hearing upon the defendant in the manner prescribed by § 308.507 of this subpart. At the same time, the ALJ will send a copy of such notice to the representative of the Corporation.


(b) The notice will include:


(1) The tentative time, date, and place, and the nature of the hearing;


(2) The legal authority and jurisdiction under which the hearing is to be held;


(3) The matters of fact and law to be asserted;


(4) A description of the procedures for the conduct of the hearing;


(5) The name, address, and telephone number of the representative of the Corporation and of the defendant, if any; and


(6) Other matters as the ALJ deems appropriate.


§ 308.512 Parties to the hearing.

(a) The parties to the hearing will be the defendant and the Corporation.


(b) Pursuant to the False Claims Act (31 U.S.C. 3730(c)(5)), a private plaintiff under the False Claims Act may participate in these proceedings to the extent authorized by the provisions of that Act.


§ 308.513 Separation of functions.

(a) The investigating official, the reviewing official, and any employee or agent of the FDIC who takes part in investigating, preparing, or presenting a particular case may not, in such case or a factually related case:


(1) Participate in the hearing as the ALJ;


(2) Participate or advise in the initial decision or the review of the initial decision by the Board, except as a witness or a representative in public proceedings; or


(3) Make the collection of penalties and assessments under 31 U.S.C. 3806.


(b) The ALJ will not be responsible to, or subject to the supervision or direction of, the investigating official or the reviewing official.


(c) Except as provided in paragraph (a) of this section, the representative for the FDIC will be an attorney employed in the FDIC’s Legal Division; however, the representative of the FDIC may not participate or advise in the review of the initial decision by the Board.


§ 308.514 Ex parte contacts.

No party or person (except employees of the ALJ’s office) will communicate in any way with the ALJ on any matter at issue in a case, unless on notice and opportunity for all parties to participate. This provision does not prohibit a person or party from inquiring about the status of a case or asking routine questions concerning administrative functions or procedures.


§ 308.515 Disqualification of reviewing official or ALJ.

(a) A reviewing official or ALJ in a particular case may disqualify himself or herself at any time.


(b) A party may file with the ALJ a motion for disqualification of a reviewing official or an ALJ. An affidavit alleging conflict of interest or other reason for disqualification must accompany the motion.


(c) Such motion and affidavit must be filed promptly upon the party’s discovery of reasons requiring disqualification, or such objections will be deemed waived.


(d) Such affidavit must state specific facts that support the party’s belief that personal bias or other reason for disqualification exists and the time and circumstances of the party’s discovery of such facts. The representative of record must certify that the affidavit is made in good faith and this certification must accompany the affidavit.


(e) Upon the filing of such a motion and affidavit, the ALJ will proceed no further in the case until he or she resolves the matter of disqualification in accordance with paragraph (f) of this section.


(f)(1) If the ALJ determines that a reviewing official is disqualified, the ALJ will dismiss the complaint without prejudice.


(2) If the ALJ disqualifies himself or herself, the case will be reassigned promptly to another ALJ.


(3) If the ALJ denies a motion to disqualify, the Board may determine the matter only as part of the Board’s review of the initial decision upon appeal, if any.


§ 308.516 Rights of parties.

Except as otherwise limited by this subpart, all parties may:


(a) Be accompanied, represented, and advised by a representative;


(b) Participate in any conference held by the ALJ;


(c) Conduct discovery;


(d) Agree to stipulations of fact or law which will be made part of the record;


(e) Present evidence relevant to the issues at the hearing;


(f) Present and cross-examine witnesses;


(g) Present oral arguments at the hearing as permitted by the ALJ; and


(h) Submit written briefs and proposed findings of fact and conclusions of law.


§ 308.517 Authority of the ALJ.

(a) The ALJ will conduct a fair and impartial hearing, avoid delay, maintain order, and assure that a record of the proceeding is made.


(b) The ALJ has the authority to:


(1) Set and change the date, time, and place of the hearing upon reasonable notice to the parties;


(2) Continue or recess the hearing in whole or in part for a reasonable period of time;


(3) Hold conferences to identify or simplify the issues, or to consider other matters that may aid in the expeditious disposition of the proceeding;


(4) Administer oaths and affirmations;


(5) Issue subpoenas requiring the attendance of witnesses and the production of documents at depositions or at hearings;


(6) Rule on motions and other procedural matters;


(7) Regulate the scope and timing of discovery;


(8) Regulate the course of the hearing and the conduct of representatives and parties;


(9) Examine witnesses;


(10) Receive, rule on, exclude, or limit evidence;


(11) Upon motion of a party, take official notice of facts, decide cases, in whole or in part, by summary judgment where there is no disputed issue of material fact;


(12) Conduct any conference, argument, or hearing on motions in person or by telephone; and


(13) Exercise such other authority as is necessary to carry out the responsibilities of the ALJ under this subpart.


(c) The ALJ does not have the authority to make any determinations regarding the validity of federal statutes or regulations or of directives, rules, resolutions, policies, orders or other such general pronouncements issued by the Corporation.


§ 308.518 Prehearing conferences.

(a) The ALJ may schedule prehearing conferences as appropriate.


(b) Upon the motion of any party, the ALJ will schedule at least one prehearing conference at a reasonable time in advance of the hearing.


(c) The ALJ may use prehearing conferences to discuss the following:


(1) Simplification of the issues;


(2) The necessity or desirability of amendments to the pleading, including the need for a more definite statement;


(3) Stipulations and admissions of fact as to the contents and authenticity of documents;


(4) Whether the parties can agree to submission of the case on a stipulated record;


(5) Whether a party chooses (subject to the objection of other parties) to waive appearance at an oral hearing and to submit only documentary evidence and written argument;


(6) Limitation of the number of witnesses;


(7) Scheduling dates for the exchange of witness lists and of proposed exhibits;


(8) Discovery;


(9) The time, date, and place for the hearing; and


(10) Such other matters as may tend to expedite the fair and just disposition of the proceedings.


(d) The ALJ may issue an order containing all matters agreed upon by the parties or ordered by the ALJ at a prehearing conference.


§ 308.519 Disclosure of documents.

(a) Upon written request to the reviewing official, the defendant may review any relevant and material documents, transcripts, records, and other materials that relate to the allegations set out in the complaint and upon which the findings and conclusions of the investigating official under § 308.503(b) of this subpart are based, unless such documents are subject to a privilege under federal law. Upon payment of fees for duplication, the defendant may obtain copies of such documents.


(b) Upon written request to the reviewing official, the defendant also may obtain a copy of all exculpatory information in the possession of the reviewing official or investigating official relating to the allegations in the complaint, even if it is contained in a document that would otherwise be privileged. If the document would otherwise be privileged, only that portion containing exculpatory information must be disclosed.


(c) The notice sent to the Attorney General from the reviewing official as described in § 308.504 of this subpart is not discoverable under any circumstances.


(d) The defendant may file a motion to compel disclosure of the documents subject to the provisions of this section. Such a motion may only be filed with the ALJ following the filing of an answer pursuant to § 308.508 of this subpart.


§ 308.520 Discovery.

(a) The following types of discovery are authorized:


(1) Requests for production of documents for inspection and copying;


(2) Requests for admission of the authenticity of any relevant document or of the truth of any relevant fact;


(3) Written interrogatories; and


(4) Depositions.


(b) For the purpose of this section and §§ 308.521 and 308.522 of this subpart, the term documents includes information, documents, reports, answers, records, accounts, papers, and other data or documentary evidence. Nothing contained in this subpart will be interpreted to require the creation of a document.


(c) Unless mutually agreed to by the parties, discovery is available only as ordered by the ALJ. The ALJ will regulate the timing of discovery.


(d) Motions for discovery. (1) A party seeking discovery may file a motion with the ALJ and a copy of the requested discovery, or in the case of depositions, a summary of the scope of the proposed deposition, must accompany such motions.


(2) Within 10 days of service, a party may file an opposition to the motion and/or a motion for protective order as provided in § 308.523 of this subpart.


(3) The ALJ may grant a motion for discovery only if he or she finds that the discovery sought:


(i) Is necessary for the expeditious, fair, and reasonable consideration of the issues;


(ii) Is not unduly costly or burdensome;


(iii) Will not unduly delay the proceeding; and


(iv) Does not seek privileged information.


(4) The burden of showing that discovery should be allowed is on the party seeking discovery.


(5) The ALJ may grant discovery subject to a protective order under § 308.523 of this subpart.


(e) Dispositions. (1) If a motion for deposition is granted, the ALJ will issue a subpoena for the deponent, which may require the deponent to produce documents. The subpoena will specify the time, date, and place at which the deposition will be held.


(2) The party seeking to depose must serve the subpoena in the manner prescribed in § 308.507 of this subpart.


(3) The deponent may file with the ALJ a motion to quash the subpoena or a motion for a protective order within 10 days of service.


(4) The party seeking to depose must provide for the taking of a verbatim transcript of the deposition, and must make the transcript available to all other parties for inspection and copying.


(f) Each party must bear its own costs of discovery.


§ 308.521 Exchange of witness lists, statements, and exhibits.

(a) At least 15 days before the hearing or at such other time as may be ordered by the ALJ, the parties must exchange witness lists, copies of prior statements of proposed witnesses, and copies of proposed hearing exhibits, including copies of any written statements that the party intends to offer in lieu of live testimony in accordance with § 308.532(b) of this subpart. At the time such documents are exchanged, any party that intends to rely on the transcript of deposition testimony in lieu of live testimony at the hearing, if permitted by the ALJ, must provide each party with a copy of the specific pages of the transcript it intends to introduce into evidence.


(b) If a party objects, the ALJ will not admit into evidence the testimony of any witness whose name does not appear on the witness list or any exhibit not provided to the opposing party as provided in paragraph (a) of this section unless the ALJ finds good cause for the failure or that there is no prejudice to the objecting party.


(c) Unless another party objects within the time set by the ALJ, documents exchanged in accordance with paragraph (a) of this section will be deemed to be authentic for the purpose of admissibility at the hearing.


§ 308.522 Subpoenas for attendance at hearing.

(a) A party wishing to procure the appearance and testimony of any individual at the hearing may request that the ALJ issue a subpoena.


(b) A subpoena requiring the attendance and testimony of an individual may also require the individual to produce documents at the hearing.


(c) A party seeking a subpoena must file a written request not less than 15 days before the date fixed for the hearing unless otherwise allowed by the ALJ for good cause shown. Such request must specify any documents to be produced and must designate the witnesses and describe the address and location thereof with sufficient particularity to permit such witnesses to be found.


(d) The subpoena must specify the time, date, and place at which the witness is to appear and any documents the witness is to produce.


(e) The party seeking the subpoena must serve it in the manner prescribed in § 308.507 of this subpart. A subpoena on a party or upon an individual under the control of a party may be served by first class mail.


(f) A party or the individual to whom the subpoena is directed may file with the ALJ a motion to quash the subpoena within 10 days after service or on or before the time specified in the subpoena for compliance if it is less than 10 days after service.


§ 308.523 Protective order.

(a) A party or a prospective witness or deponent may file a motion for a protective order with respect to discovery sought by an opposing party or with respect to the hearing, seeking to limit the availability or disclosure of evidence.


(b) In issuing a protective order, the ALJ may make any order which justice requires to protect a party or person from annoyance, embarrassment, oppression, or undue burden or expense, including one or more of the following:


(1) That the discovery will not be conducted;


(2) That the discovery will be conducted only on specified terms and conditions, including a designation of the time or place;


(3) That the discovery will be conducted only through a method of discovery other than that requested;


(4) That certain matters not be inquired into, or that the scope of discovery be limited to certain matters;


(5) That discovery be conducted with no one present except persons designated by the ALJ;


(6) That the contents of discovery or evidence be sealed or otherwise kept confidential;


(7) That a deposition after being sealed be opened only by order of the ALJ;


(8) That a trade secret or other confidential research, development, commercial information, or facts pertaining to any criminal investigation, proceeding, or other administrative investigation not be disclosed or be disclosed only in a designated way; or


(9) That the parties simultaneously file specified documents or information enclosed in sealed envelopes to be opened as directed by the ALJ.


§ 308.524 Witness fees.

The party requesting a subpoena must pay the cost of the fees and mileage of any witness subpoenaed in the amounts that would be payable to a witness in a proceeding in United States District Court. A check for witness fees and mileage must accompany the subpoena when served, except that when a subpoena is issued on behalf of the FDIC, a check for witness fees and mileage need not accompany the subpoena.


§ 308.525 Form, filing, and service of papers.

(a) Form. (1) Documents filed with the ALJ must include an original and two copies.


(2) Every pleading and paper filed in the proceeding must contain a caption setting forth the title of the action, the case number assigned by the ALJ, and a designation of the paper (e.g., motion to quash subpoena).


(3) Every pleading and paper must be signed by, and must contain the address and telephone number of the party or the person on whose behalf the paper was filed, or his or her representative.


(4) Papers are considered filed when they are mailed by certified or registered mail. Date of mailing may be established by a certificate from the party or its representative or by proof that the document was sent by certified or registered mail.


(b) Service. A party filing a document with the ALJ must, at the time of filing, serve a copy of such document on every other party. Service upon any party of any document other than those required to be served as prescribed in § 308.507 of this subpart must be made by delivering a copy or by placing a copy of the document in the United States mail, postage prepaid, and addressed to the party’s last known address. When a party is represented by a representative, service must be made upon such representative in lieu of the actual party. The ALJ may authorize facsimile transmission as an acceptable form of service.


(c) Proof of service. A certificate by the individual serving the document by personal delivery or by mail, setting forth the manner of service, will be proof of service.


§ 308.526 Computation of time.

(a) In computing any period of time under this subpart or in an order issued thereunder, the time begins with the day following the act, event, or default, and includes the last day of the period, unless it is a Saturday, Sunday, or legal holiday observed by the federal government, in which event it includes the next business day.


(b) When the period of time allowed is less than 7 days, intermediate Saturdays, Sundays, and legal holidays observed by the federal government will be excluded from the computation.


(c) Where a document has been served or issued by placing it in the mail, an additional 5 days will be added to the time permitted for any response.


§ 308.527 Motions.

(a) Any application to the ALJ for an order or ruling must be by motion. Motions must state the relief sought, the authority relied upon, and the facts alleged, and must be filed with the ALJ and served on all other parties. Motions may include, without limitation, motions for summary judgment.


(b) Except for motions made during a prehearing conference or at the hearing, all motions must be in writing. The ALJ may require that oral motions be reduced to writing.


(c) Within 15 days after a written motion is served, or any other time as may be fixed by the ALJ, any party may file a response to such motion.


(d) The ALJ may not grant a written motion before the time for filing responses thereto has expired, except upon consent of the parties or following a hearing on the motion, but may overrule or deny such motion without awaiting a response.


(e) The ALJ will make a reasonable effort to dispose of all outstanding motions prior to the beginning of the hearing.


§ 308.528 Sanctions.

(a) The ALJ may sanction a person, including any party or representative for:


(1) Failing to comply with an order, rule, or procedure governing the proceeding;


(2) Failing to prosecute or defend an action; or


(3) Engaging in other misconduct that interferes with the speedy, orderly, or fair conduct of the hearing.


(b) Any such sanction, including but not limited to, those listed in paragraphs (c), (d), and (e) of this section, must reasonably relate to the severity and nature of the failure or misconduct.


(c) When a party fails to comply with an order, including an order for taking a deposition, the production of evidence within the party’s control, or a request for admission, the ALJ may:


(1) Draw an inference in favor of the requesting party with regard to the information sought;


(2) In the case of requests for admission, deem each matter of which an admission is requested to be admitted;


(3) Prohibit the party failing to comply with such order from introducing evidence concerning, or otherwise relying upon, testimony relating to the information sought; and


(4) Strike any part of the related pleading or other submissions of the party failing to comply with such request.


(d) If a party fails to prosecute or defend an action under this subpart commenced by service of a notice of hearing, the ALJ may dismiss the action or may issue an initial decision imposing penalties and assessments.


(e) The ALJ may refuse to consider any motion, request, response, brief, or other document which is not filed in a timely fashion.


§ 308.529 The hearing and burden of proof.

(a) The ALJ will conduct a hearing on the record in order to determine whether the defendant is liable for a civil penalty or assessment under § 308.502 of this subpart, and, if so, the appropriate amount of any such civil penalty or assessment considering any aggravating or mitigating factors.


(b) The FDIC must prove defendant’s liability and any aggravating factors by a preponderance of the evidence.


(c) The defendant must prove any affirmative defenses and any mitigating factors by a preponderance of the evidence.


(d) The hearing will be open to the public unless otherwise ordered by the ALJ for good cause shown.


§ 308.530 Determining the amount of penalties and assessments.

(a) In determining an appropriate amount of civil penalties and assessments, the ALJ and the Board, upon appeal, should evaluate any circumstances that mitigate or aggravate the violation and should articulate in their opinions the reasons that support the penalties and assessments they impose. Because of the intangible costs of fraud, the expense of investigating such conduct, and the need to deter others who might be similarly tempted, ordinarily double damages and a significant civil penalty should be imposed.


(b) Although not exhaustive, the following factors are among those that may influence the ALJ and the Board in determining the amount of penalties and assessments to impose with respect to the misconduct (i.e., the false, fictitious, or fraudulent claims or statement) charged in the complaint:


(1) The number of false, fictitious, or fraudulent claims or statements;


(2) The time period over which such claims or statements were made;


(3) The degree of the defendant’s culpability with respect to the misconduct;


(4) The amount of money or the value of the property, services, or benefit falsely claimed;


(5) The value of the government’s actual loss as a result of the misconduct, including foreseeable consequential damages and the costs of investigation;


(6) The relationship of the amount imposed as civil penalties to the amount of the government’s loss;


(7) The potential or actual impact of the misconduct upon national defense, public health or safety, or public confidence in the management of government programs and operations, including particularly the impact on the intended beneficiaries of such programs;


(8) Whether the defendant has engaged in a pattern of the same or similar misconduct;


(9) Whether the defendant attempted to conceal the misconduct;


(10) The degree to which the defendant has involved others in the misconduct or in concealing it;


(11) Where the misconduct of employees or agents is imputed to the defendant, the extent to which the defendant’s practices fostered or attempted to preclude such misconduct;


(12) Whether the defendant cooperated in or obstructed an investigation of the misconduct;


(13) Whether the defendant assisted in identifying and prosecuting other wrongdoers;


(14) The complexity of the program or transaction, and the degree of the defendant’s sophistication with respect to it, including the extent of the defendant’s prior participation in the program or in a similar transaction;


(15) Whether the defendant has been found, in any criminal, civil, or administrative proceeding to have engaged in similar misconduct or to have dealt dishonestly with the Government of the United States or of a state, directly or indirectly; and


(16) The need to deter the defendant and others from engaging in the same or similar misconduct.


(c) Nothing in this section will be construed to limit the ALJ or the Board from considering any other factors that in any given case may mitigate or aggravate the offense for which penalties and assessments are imposed.


(d) Civil money penalties that are assessed under this subpart are subject to annual adjustments to account for inflation as required by the Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act Improvements Act of 2015 (Pub. L. 114-74, sec. 701, 129 Stat. 584) (see also § 308.132(d)).


[66 FR 9189, Feb. 7, 2001, as amended at 83 FR 61115, Nov. 28, 2018]


§ 308.531 Location of hearing.

(a) The hearing may be held:


(1) In any judicial district of the United States in which the defendant resides or transacts business;


(2) In any judicial district of the United States in which the claim or statement at issue was made; or


(3) In such other place as may be agreed upon by the defendant and the ALJ.


(b) Each party will have the opportunity to present argument with respect to the location of the hearing.


(c) The hearing will be held at the place and at the time ordered by the ALJ.


§ 308.532 Witnesses.

(a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, testimony at the hearing will be given orally by witnesses under oath or affirmation.


(b) At the discretion of the ALJ, testimony may be admitted in the form of a written statement or deposition. The party offering a written statement must provide all other parties with a copy of the written statement along with the last known address of the witness. Sufficient time must be allowed for other parties to subpoena the witness for cross-examination at the hearing. Prior written statements and deposition transcripts of witnesses identified to testify at the hearing must be exchanged as provided in § 308.521(a) of this subpart.


(c) The ALJ will exercise reasonable control over the mode and order of interrogating witnesses and presenting evidence so as to:


(1) Make the interrogation and presentation effective for the ascertainment of the truth;


(2) Avoid needless consumption of time; and


(3) Protect witnesses from harassment or undue embarrassment.


(d) The ALJ will permit the parties to conduct such cross-examination as may be required for a full and true disclosure of the facts.


(e) At the discretion of the ALJ, a witness may be cross-examined on matters relevant to the proceeding without regard to the scope of his or her direct examination. To the extent permitted by the ALJ, cross-examination on matters outside the scope of direct examination will be conducted in the manner of direct examination and may proceed by leading questions only if the witness is a hostile witness, an adverse party, or a witness identified with an adverse party.


(f) Upon motion of any party, the ALJ will order witnesses excluded so that they cannot hear the testimony of other witnesses. This rule does not authorize exclusion of:


(1) A party who is an individual;


(2) In the case of a party that is not an individual, an officer or employee of the party appearing for the entity pro se or designated by the party’s representative; or


(3) An individual whose presence is shown by a party to be essential to the presentation of its case, including an individual employed by the Corporation engaged in assisting the representative for the Corporation.


§ 308.533 Evidence.

(a) The ALJ will determine the admissibility of evidence.


(b) Except as provided in this subpart, the ALJ will not be bound by the Federal Rules of Evidence (28 U.S.C. App.). However, the ALJ may apply the Federal Rules of Evidence where appropriate, e.g., to exclude unreliable evidence.


(c) The ALJ will exclude irrelevant and immaterial evidence.


(d) Although relevant, evidence may be excluded if its probative value is substantially outweighed by the danger of unfair prejudice, confusion of the issues, or by considerations of undue delay or needless presentation of cumulative evidence.


(e) Although relevant, evidence may be excluded if it is privileged under federal law.


(f) Evidence concerning offers of compromise or settlement will be inadmissible to the extent provided in rule 408 of the Federal Rules of Evidence.


(g) The ALJ will permit the parties to introduce rebuttal witnesses and evidence.


(h) All documents and other evidence offered or taken for the record must be open to examination by all parties, unless otherwise ordered by the ALJ pursuant to § 308.523 of this subpart.


§ 308.534 The record.

(a) The hearing will be recorded by audio or videotape and transcribed. Transcripts may be obtained following the hearing from the ALJ at a cost not to exceed the actual cost of duplication.


(b) The transcript of testimony, exhibits, and other evidence admitted at the hearing, and all papers and requests filed in the proceeding constitute the record for the decision by the ALJ and the Board.


(c) The record may be inspected and copied (upon payment of a reasonable fee) by anyone, unless otherwise ordered by the ALJ pursuant to § 308.523 of this subpart.


§ 308.535 Post-hearing briefs.

The ALJ may require the parties to file post-hearing briefs. In any event, any party may file a post-hearing brief. The ALJ will fix the time for filing such briefs, not to exceed 60 days from the date the parties receive the transcript of the hearing or, if applicable, the stipulated record. Such briefs may be accompanied by proposed findings of fact and conclusions of law. The ALJ may permit the parties to file reply briefs.


§ 308.536 Initial decision.

(a) The ALJ will issue an initial decision based only on the record, which will contain findings of fact, conclusions of law, and the amount of any penalties and assessments imposed.


(b) The findings of fact will include a finding on each of the following issues:


(1) Whether the claims or statements identified in the complaint, or any portions of such claims or statements, violate § 308.502 of this subpart; and


(2) If the person is liable for penalties or assessments, the appropriate amount of any such penalties or assessments considering any mitigating or aggravating factors that he or she finds in the case, such as those described in § 308.530 of this subpart.


(c) The ALJ will promptly serve the initial decision on all parties within 90 days after the time for submission of post-hearing briefs and reply briefs (if permitted) has expired. The ALJ will at the same time serve all parties with a statement describing the right of any defendant determined to be liable for a civil penalty or assessment to file a motion for reconsideration with the ALJ or a notice of appeal with the Board. If the ALJ fails to meet the deadline contained in this paragraph, he or she will notify the parties of the reason for the delay and will set a new deadline.


(d) Unless the initial decision of the ALJ is timely appealed to the Board, or a motion for reconsideration of the initial decision is timely filed, the initial decision will constitute the final decision of the Board and will be final and binding on the parties 30 days after it is issued by the ALJ.


§ 308.537 Reconsideration of initial decision.

(a) Except as provided in paragraph (d) of this section, any party may file a motion for reconsideration of the initial decision within 20 days of receipt of the initial decision. If service is made by mail, receipt will be presumed to be 5 days from the date of mailing in the absence of proof to the contrary.


(b) Every motion for reconsideration must set forth the matters claimed to have been erroneously decided and the nature of the alleged errors. The motion must be accompanied by a supporting brief.


(c) Responses to the motions will be allowed only upon order of the ALJ.


(d) No party may file a motion for reconsideration of an initial decision that has been revised in response to a previous motion for reconsideration.


(e) The ALJ may dispose of a motion for reconsideration by denying it or by issuing a revised initial decision.


(f) If the ALJ denies a motion for reconsideration, the initial decision will constitute the final decision of the FDIC and will be final and binding on all parties 30 days after the ALJ denies the motion, unless the final decision is timely appealed to the Board in accordance with § 308.538 of this subpart.


(g) If the ALJ issues a revised initial decision, that decision will constitute the final decision of the FDIC and will be final and binding on the parties 30 days after it is issued, unless it is timely appealed to the Board in accordance with § 308.538 of this subpart.


§ 308.538 Appeal to the Board of Directors.

(a) Any defendant who has filed a timely answer and who is determined in an initial decision to be liable for a civil penalty or assessment may appeal such decision to the Board by filing a notice of appeal with the Board in accordance with this section.


(b)(1) No notice of appeal may be filed until the time period for filing a motion for reconsideration under § 308.537 of this subpart has expired.


(2) If a motion for reconsideration is timely filed, a notice of appeal must be filed within 30 days after the ALJ denies the motion or issues a revised initial decision, whichever applies.


(3) If no motion for reconsideration is timely filed, a notice of appeal must be filed within 30 days after the ALJ issues the initial decision.


(4) The Board may extend the initial 30-day period for an additional 30 days if the defendant files with the Board a request for an extension within the initial 30-day period and shows good cause.


(c) If the defendant files a timely notice of appeal with the Board, the ALJ will forward the record of the proceeding to the Board.


(d) A notice of appeal will be accompanied by a written brief specifying exceptions to the initial decision and reasons supporting the exceptions.


(e) The representative for the Corporation may file a brief in opposition to exceptions within 30 days of receiving the notice of appeal and accompanying brief.


(f) There is no right to appear personally before the Board.


(g) There is no right to appeal any interlocutory ruling by the ALJ.


(h) In reviewing the initial decision, the Board will not consider any objection that was not raised before the ALJ unless a demonstration is made of extraordinary circumstances causing the failure to raise the objection.


(i) If any party demonstrates to the satisfaction of the Board that additional evidence not presented at such hearing is material and that there were reasonable grounds for the failure to present such evidence at such hearing, the Board will remand the matter to the ALJ for consideration of such additional evidence.


(j) The Board may affirm, reduce, reverse, compromise, remand, or settle any penalty or assessment determined by the ALJ in any initial decision.


(k) The Board will promptly serve each party to the appeal with a copy of the decision of the Board and a statement describing the right of any person determined to be liable for a penalty or an assessment to seek judicial review.


(l) Unless a petition for review is filed as provided in 31 U.S.C. 3805 after a defendant has exhausted all administrative remedies under this subpart and within 60 days after the date on which the Board serves the defendant with a copy of the Board’s decision, a determination that a defendant is liable under § 308.502 of this subpart is final and is not subject to judicial review.


§ 308.539 Stays ordered by the Department of Justice.

If at any time the Attorney General or an Assistant Attorney General designated by the Attorney General transmits to the Board a written finding that continuation of the administrative process described in this subpart with respect to a claim or statement may adversely affect any pending or potential criminal or civil action related to such claim or statement, the Board will stay the process immediately. The Board may order the process resumed only upon receipt of the written authorization of the Attorney General.


§ 308.540 Stay pending appeal.

(a) An initial decision is stayed automatically pending disposition of a motion for reconsideration or of an appeal to the Board.


(b) No administrative stay is available following a final decision of the Board.


§ 308.541 Judicial review.

Section 3805 of title 31, United States Code, authorizes judicial review by an appropriate United States District Court of a final decision of the Board imposing penalties or assessments under this subpart and specifies the procedures for such review.


§ 308.542 Collection of civil penalties and assessments.

Sections 3806 and 3808(b) of title 31, United States Code, authorize actions for collection of civil penalties and assessments imposed under this subpart and specify the procedures for such actions.


§ 308.543 Right to administrative offset.

The amount of any penalty or assessment which has become final, or for which a judgment has been entered under § 308.541 or § 308.542 of this subpart, or any amount agreed upon in a compromise or settlement under § 308.545 of this subpart, may be collected by administrative offset under 31 U.S.C. 3716, except that an administrative offset may not be made under this section against a refund of an overpayment of federal taxes, then or later owing by the United States to the defendant.


§ 308.544 Deposit in Treasury of United States.

All amounts collected pursuant to this subpart will be deposited as miscellaneous receipts in the Treasury of the United States, except as provided in 31 U.S.C. 3806(g).


§ 308.545 Compromise or settlement.

(a) Parties may make offers of compromise or settlement at any time.


(b) The reviewing official has the exclusive authority to compromise or settle a case under this subpart at any time after the date on which the reviewing official is permitted to issue a complaint and before the date on which the ALJ issues an initial decision.


(c) The Board has exclusive authority to compromise or settle a case under this subpart any time after the date on which the ALJ issues an initial decision, except during the pendency of any review under § 308.541 of this subpart or during the pendency of any action to collect penalties and assessments under § 308.542 of this subpart.


(d) The Attorney General has exclusive authority to compromise or settle a case under this subpart during the pendency of any review under § 308.541 of this subpart or of any action to recover penalties and assessments under 31 U.S.C. 3806.


(e) The investigating official may recommend settlement terms to the reviewing official, the Board, or the Attorney General, as appropriate. The reviewing official may recommend settlement terms to the Board, or the Attorney General, as appropriate.


(f) Any compromise or settlement must be in writing.


§ 308.546 Limitations.

(a) The notice of hearing with respect to a claim or statement will be served in the manner specified in § 308.507 of this subpart within 6 years after the date on which such claim or statement is made.


(b) If the defendant fails to file a timely answer, service of notice under § 308.509(b) of this subpart will be deemed a notice of a hearing for purposes of this section.


(c) The statute of limitations may be extended by agreement of the parties.


Subpart U – Removal, Suspension, and Debarment of Accountants From Performing Audit Services


Source:68 FR 48270, Aug. 13, 2003, unless otherwise noted.

§ 308.600 Scope.

This subpart, which implements section 36(g)(4) of the FDIA (12 U.S.C. 1831m(g)(4)), provides rules and procedures for the removal, suspension, or debarment of independent public accountants and accounting firms from performing independent audit and attestation services required by section 36 of the FDIA (12 U.S.C. 1831m) for insured depository institutions for which the FDIC is the appropriate Federal banking agency.


§ 308.601 Definitions.

As used in this subpart, the following terms shall have the meaning given below unless the context requires otherwise:


(a) Accounting firm means a corporation, proprietorship, partnership, or other business firm providing audit services.


(b) Audit services means any service required to be performed by an independent public accountant by section 36 of the FDIA and 12 CFR part 363, including attestation services.


(c) Independent public accountant (accountant) means any individual who performs or participates in providing audit services.


§ 308.602 Removal, suspension, or debarment.

(a) Good cause for removal, suspension, or debarment – (1) Individuals. The Board of Directors may remove, suspend, or debar an independent public accountant under section 36 of the FDIA from performing audit services for insured depository institutions for which the FDIC is the appropriate Federal banking agency if, after service of a notice of intention and opportunity for hearing in the matter, the Board of Directors finds that the accountant:


(i) Lacks the requisite qualifications to perform audit services;


(ii) Has knowingly or recklessly engaged in conduct that results in a violation of applicable professional standards, including those standards and conflicts of interest provisions applicable to accountants through the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (Pub. L. 107-204, 116 Stat. 745 (2002)) (Sarbanes-Oxley Act) and developed by the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board and the Securities and Exchange Commission;


(iii) Has engaged in negligent conduct in the form of:


(A) A single instance of highly unreasonable conduct that results in a violation of applicable professional standards in circumstances in which an accountant knows, or should know, that heightened scrutiny is warranted; or


(B) Repeated instances of unreasonable conduct, each resulting in a violation of applicable professional standards, that indicate a lack of competence to perform audit services;


(iv) Has knowingly or recklessly given false or misleading information, or knowingly or recklessly participated in any way in the giving of false or misleading information, to the FDIC or any officer or employee of the FDIC;


(v) Has engaged in, or aided and abetted, a material and knowing or reckless violation of any provision of the Federal banking or securities laws or the rules and regulations thereunder, or any other law;


(vi) Has been removed, suspended, or debarred from practice before any Federal or state agency regulating the banking, insurance, or securities industries, other than by an action listed in § 308.603, on grounds relevant to the provision of audit services; or


(vii) Is suspended or debarred for cause from practice as an accountant by any duly constituted licensing authority of any state, possession, commonwealth, or the District of Columbia.


(2) Accounting firms. If the Board of Directors determines that there is good cause for the removal, suspension, or debarment of a member or employee of an accounting firm under paragraph (a)(1) of this section, the Board of Directors also may remove, suspend, or debar such firm or one or more offices of such firm. In considering whether to remove, suspend, or debar an accounting firm or an office thereof, and the term of any sanction against an accounting firm under this section, the Board of Directors may consider, for example:


(i) The gravity, scope, or repetition of the act or failure to act that constitutes good cause for the removal, suspension, or debarment;


(ii) The adequacy of, and adherence to, applicable policies, practices, or procedures for the accounting firm’s conduct of its business and the performance of audit services;


(iii) The selection, training, supervision, and conduct of members or employees of the accounting firm involved in the performance of audit services;


(iv) The extent to which managing partners or senior officers of the accounting firm have participated, directly, or indirectly through oversight or review, in the act or failure to act; and


(v) The extent to which the accounting firm has, since the occurrence of the act or failure to act, implemented corrective internal controls to prevent its recurrence.


(3) Limited scope orders. An order of removal, suspension (including an immediate suspension), or debarment may, at the discretion of the Board of Directors, be made applicable to a limited number of insured depository institutions for which the FDIC is the appropriate Federal banking agency.


(4) Remedies not exclusive. The remedies provided in this subpart are in addition to any other remedies the FDIC may have under any other applicable provision of law, rule, or regulation.


(b) Proceedings to remove, suspend or debar – (1) Initiation of formal removal, suspension, or debarment proceedings. The Board of Directors may initiate a proceeding to remove, suspend, or debar an accountant or accounting firm from performing audit services by issuing a written notice of intention to take such action that names the individual or firm as a respondent and describes the nature of the conduct that constitutes good cause for such action.


(2) Hearings under paragraph (b) of this section. An accountant or firm named as a respondent in the notice issued under paragraph (b)(1) of this section may request a hearing on the allegations contained in the notice. Hearings conducted under this paragraph shall be conducted in the same manner as other hearings under the Uniform Rules of Practice and Procedure (12 CFR part 308, subpart A) (Uniform Rules).


(c) Immediate suspension from performing audit services – (1) In general. If the Board of Directors serves a written notice of intention to remove, suspend, or debar an accountant or accounting firm from performing audit services, the Board of Directors may, with due regard for the public interest and without a preliminary hearing, immediately suspend such accountant or firm from performing audit services for insured depository institutions for which the FDIC is the appropriate Federal banking agency if the Board of Directors:


(i) Has a reasonable basis to believe that the accountant or accounting firm has engaged in conduct (specified in the notice served upon the accountant or accounting firm under paragraph (b)(1) of this section) that would constitute grounds for removal, suspension, or debarment under paragraph (a) of this section;


(ii) Determines that immediate suspension is necessary to avoid immediate harm to an insured depository institution or its depositors or to the depository system as a whole; and


(iii) Serves such respondent with written notice of the immediate suspension.


(2) Procedures. An immediate suspension notice issued under this paragraph will become effective upon service. Such suspension will remain in effect until the date the Board of Directors dismisses the charges contained in the notice of intention, or the effective date of a final order of removal, suspension, or debarment issued by the Board of Directors to the respondent.


(3) Petition to stay. Any accountant or accounting firm immediately suspended from performing audit services in accordance with paragraph (c)(1) of this section may, within 10 calendar days after service of the notice of immediate suspension, file a petition with the Administrative Officer for a stay of such immediate suspension. If no petition is filed within 10 calendar days, the immediate suspension shall remain in effect.


(4) Hearing on petition. Upon receipt of a stay petition, the Administrative Officer will designate a presiding officer who will fix a place and time (not more than 10 calendar days after receipt of the petition, unless extended at the request of petitioner) at which the immediately suspended party may appear, personally or through counsel, to submit written materials and oral argument. Any FDIC employee engaged in investigative or prosecuting functions for the FDIC in a case may not, in that or a factually related case, serve as a presiding officer or participate or advise in the decision of the presiding officer or of the FDIC, except as witness or counsel in the proceeding. In the sole discretion of the presiding officer, upon a specific showing of compelling need, oral testimony of witnesses also may be presented. Enforcement counsel may represent the agency at the hearing. In hearings held pursuant to this paragraph (c)(4) there shall be no discovery, and the provisions of §§ 308.6 through 308.12, 308.16, and 308.21 will apply.


(5) Decision on petition. Within 30 calendar days after the hearing, the presiding officer will issue a decision. The presiding officer will grant a stay upon a demonstration that a substantial likelihood exists of the respondent’s success on the issues raised by the notice of intention and that, absent such relief, the respondent will suffer immediate and irreparable injury, loss, or damage. In the absence of such a demonstration, the presiding officer will notify the parties that the immediate suspension will be continued pending the completion of the administrative proceedings pursuant to the notice of intention. The presiding officer will serve a copy of the decision on, and simultaneously certify the record to, the Administrative Officer.


(6) Review of presiding officer’s decision. The parties may seek review of the presiding officer’s decision by filing a petition for review with the Administrative Officer within 10 calendar days after service of the decision. Replies must be filed within 10 calendar days after the petition filing date. Upon receipt of a petition for review and any reply, the Administrative Officer will promptly certify the entire record to the Board of Directors. Within 60 calendar days of the Administrative Officer’s certification, the Board of Directors will issue an order notifying the affected party whether or not the immediate suspension should be continued or reinstated. The order will state the basis of the Board’s decision.


[68 FR 48270, Aug. 13, 2003, as amended at 86 FR 2251, Jan. 12, 2021]


§ 308.603 Automatic removal, suspension, and debarment.

(a) An independent public accountant or accounting firm may not perform audit services for insured depository institutions for which the FDIC is the appropriate Federal banking agency if the accountant or firm:


(1) Is subject to a final order of removal, suspension, or debarment (other than a limited scope order) issued by the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency, or the Office of Thrift Supervision under section 36 of the FDIA;


(2) Is subject to a temporary suspension or permanent revocation of registration or a temporary or permanent suspension or bar from further association with any registered public accounting firm issued by the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board or the Securities and Exchange Commission under sections 105(c)(4)(A) or (B) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act (15 U.S.C. 7215(c)(4)(A) or (B)); or


(3) Is subject to an order of suspension or denial of the privilege of appearing or practicing before the Securities and Exchange Commission.


(b) Upon written request, the FDIC, for good cause shown, may grant written permission to such accountant or firm to perform audit services for insured depository institutions for which the FDIC is the appropriate Federal banking agency. The written request must comply with the requirements of § 303.3 of this chapter.


§ 308.604 Notice of removal, suspension, or debarment.

(a) Notice to the public. Upon the issuance of a final order for removal, suspension, or debarment of an independent public accountant or accounting firm from providing audit services, the FDIC will make the order publicly available and provide notice of the order to the other Federal banking agencies.


(b) Notice to the FDIC by accountants and firms. An accountant or accounting firm that provides audit services to any insured depository institution for which the FDIC is the appropriate Federal banking agency must provide the FDIC with written notice of:


(1) any currently effective order or other action described in §§ 308.602(a)(1)(vi) through (a)(1)(vii) or §§ 308.603(a)(2) through (a)(3); and


(2) any currently effective action by the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board under sections 105(c)(4)(C) or (G) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act (15 U.S.C. 7215(c)(4)(C) or (G)).


(c) Timing and place of notice. Written notice required by this paragraph shall be given no later than 15 calendar days following the effective date of an order or action, or 15 calendar days before an accountant or accounting firm accepts an engagement to provide audit services, whichever date is earlier. The written notice must be filed by the independent public accountant or accounting firm with the FDIC, Accounting and Securities Disclosure Section, 550 17th Street, NW., Washington, DC 20429.


[68 FR 48270, Aug. 13, 2003, as amended at 74 FR 32245, July 7, 2009; 74 FR 35745, July 20, 2009]


§ 308.605 Application for reinstatement.

(a) Form of petition. Unless otherwise ordered by the Board of Directors, an application for reinstatement by an independent public accountant, an accounting firm, or an office of a firm that was removed, suspended, or debarred under § 308.602 may be made in writing at any time. The application must comply with the requirements of § 303.3 of this chapter.


(b) Procedure. An applicant for reinstatement under this section may, in the sole discretion of the Board of Directors, be afforded a hearing. In reinstatement proceedings, the person seeking reinstatement shall bear the burden of going forward with an application and proving the grounds asserted in support of the application, and the Board of Directors may, in its sole discretion, direct that any reinstatement proceeding be limited to written submissions. The removal, suspension, or debarment shall continue until the Board of Directors, for good cause shown, has reinstated the applicant or until the suspension period has expired. The filing of an application for reinstatement will not stay the effectiveness of the removal, suspension, or debarment of an accountant or firm.


PART 309 – DISCLOSURE OF INFORMATION


Authority:5 U.S.C. 552; 12 U.S.C. 1819 “Seventh” and “Tenth.”


Source:60 FR 61465, Nov. 30, 1995, unless otherwise noted.

§ 309.1 Purpose and scope.

This part sets forth the basic policies of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation regarding information it maintains and the procedures for obtaining access to such information, including disclosure of information transferred to Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation from the Office of Thrift Supervision pursuant to section 312 and 323 of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act, Public Law 111-203. Section 309.2 sets forth definitions applicable to this part 309. Section 309.3 describes the types of information and documents typically published in the Federal Register. Section 309.4 explains how to access public records maintained on the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation’s World Wide Web page and in the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation’s Public Information Center or “PIC,” and describes the categories of records generally found there. Section 309.5 implements the Freedom of Information Act (5 U.S.C. 552). Section 309.6 authorizes the discretionary disclosure of exempt records under certain limited circumstances. Section 309.7 outlines procedures for serving a subpoena or other legal process to obtain information maintained by the FDIC.


[76 FR 35965, June 21, 2011]


§ 309.2 Definitions.

For purposes of this part:


(a) The term depository institution, as used in § 309.6, includes depository institutions that have applied to the Corporation for federal deposit insurance, closed depository institutions, presently operating federally insured depository institutions, foreign banks, branches of foreign banks, and all affiliates of any of the foregoing.


(b) The terms Corporation or FDIC mean the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation.


(c) The words disclose or disclosure, as used in § 309.6, mean to give access to a record, whether by producing the written record or by oral discussion of its contents. Where the Corporation employee authorized to release Corporation documents makes a determination that furnishing copies of the documents is necessary, the words disclose or disclosure include the furnishing of copies of documents or records. In addition, disclose or disclosure as used in § 309.6 is synonymous with the term transfer as used in the Right to Financial Privacy Act of 1978 (12 U.S.C. 3401 et seq.).


(d) The term examination includes, but is not limited to, formal and informal investigations of irregularities involving suspected violations of federal or state civil or criminal laws, or unsafe and unsound practices as well as such other investigations as may be conducted pursuant to law.


(e) The term record means:


(1) Any information that would be an agency record subject to the requirements of this section when maintained by the FDIC in any format, including an electronic format; and


(2) Any information described under paragraph (e)(1) of this section that is maintained for the FDIC by an entity under Government contract, for purposes of records management.


(f) The term report of examination includes, but is not limited to, examination reports resulting from examinations of depository institutions conducted jointly by Corporation examiners and state banking authority examiners or other federal financial institution examiners, as well as reports resulting from examinations conducted solely by Corporation examiners. The term also includes compliance examination reports.


(g) The term customer financial records, as used in § 309.6, means an original of, a copy of, or information known to have been derived from, any record held by a depository institution pertaining to a customer’s relationship with the depository institution but does not include any record that contains information not identified with or identifiable as being derived from the financial records of a particular customer. The term customer as used in § 309.6 refers to individuals or partnerships of five or fewer persons.


(h) The term Director of the Division having primary authority includes Deputies to the Chairman and directors of FDIC Divisions and Offices that create, maintain custody, or otherwise have primary responsibility for the handling of FDIC records or information.


[60 FR 61465, Nov. 30, 1995, as amended at 63 FR 16404, Apr. 3, 1998; 81 FR 83646, Nov. 22, 2016]


§ 309.3 Federal Register publication.

The FDIC publishes the following information in the Federal Register for the guidance of the public:


(a) Descriptions of its central and field organization and the established places at which, the officers from whom, and the methods whereby, the public may secure information, make submittals or requests, or obtain decisions;


(b) Statements of the general course and method by which its functions are channeled and determined, including the nature and requirements of all formal and informal procedures available;


(c) Rules of procedure, descriptions of forms available or the places at which forms may be obtained, and instructions as to the scope and contents of all papers, reports or examinations;


(d) Substantive rules of general applicability adopted as authorized by law, and statements of general policy or interpretations of general applicability formulated and adopted by the FDIC;


(e) Every amendment, revision or repeal of the foregoing; and


(f) General notices of proposed rule-making.


§ 309.4 Publicly available records.

(a) Records available on the FDIC’s World Wide Web page – (1) Discretionary release of documents. The FDIC encourages the public to explore the wealth of resources available on the FDIC’s World Wide Web page, located at: http://www.fdic.gov. The FDIC has elected to publish a broad range of materials on its World Wide Web page, including consumer guides; financial and statistical information of interest to the banking industry; and information concerning the FDIC’s responsibilities and structure.


(2) Documents required to be made available for inspection in an electronic format. (i) The following types of documents created on or after November 1, 1996, and required to be made available for inspection in an electronic format, may be found on the FDIC’s World Wide Web page located at: http://www.fdic.gov:


(A) Final opinions, including concurring and dissenting opinions, as well as final orders and written agreements, made in the adjudication of cases;


(B) Statements of policy and interpretations adopted by the Board of Directors that are not published in the Federal Register;


(C) Administrative staff manuals and instructions to staff that affect the public;


(D) Copies of all records released to any person under § 309.5:


(1) That, because of the nature of their subject matter, the FDIC determines have become or are likely to become the subject of subsequent requests for substantially the same records; or


(2) That have been requested 3 or more times; and


(E) A general index of the records referred to in paragraph (a)(2)(i)(D) of this section.


(ii) To the extent permitted by law, the FDIC may delete identifying details when it makes available or publishes a final opinion, final order, statement of policy, interpretation or staff manual or instruction. If redaction is necessary, the FDIC will, to the extent technically feasible, indicate the amount of material deleted at the place in the record where such deletion is made unless that indication in and of itself will jeopardize the purpose for the redaction.


(b) Public Information Center. The FDIC maintains a Public Information Center or “PIC” that contains Corporate records that the Freedom of Information Act requires be made available for regular inspection and copying, as well as any records or information the FDIC, in its discretion, has regularly made available, to the public. The PIC has extensive materials of interest to the public, including many Reports, Summaries and Manuals used or published by the Corporation that are made available, by appointment, for inspection and copying. The PIC is open from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Monday through Friday, excepting Federal holidays. It is located at 3501 North Fairfax Drive, Room E-1005, Arlington, VA 22226. The PIC may be reached during business hours by calling 1(877) 275-3342 or 1-(703) 562-2200.


(c) Applicable fees. (i) If applicable, fees for furnishing records under this section are as set forth in § 309.5(f) except that all categories of requesters shall be charged duplication costs.


(ii) Information on the FDIC’s World Wide Web page is available to the public without charge. If, however, information available on the FDIC’s World Wide Web page is provided pursuant to a Freedom of Information Act request processed under § 309.5, then fees apply and will be assessed pursuant to § 309.5(f).


[63 FR 16404, Apr. 3, 1998, as amended at 76 FR 35965, June 21, 2011; 81 FR 83646, Nov. 22, 2016]


§ 309.5 Procedures for requesting records.

(a) Definitions. For purposes of this section:


(1) Commercial use request means a request from or on behalf of a requester who seeks records for a use or purpose that furthers the commercial, trade, or profit interests of the requester or the person on whose behalf the request is made. In determining whether a request falls within this category, the FDIC will determine the use to which a requester will put the records requested and seek additional information as it deems necessary.


(2) Direct costs means those expenditures the FDIC actually incurs in searching for, duplicating, and, in the case of commercial requesters, reviewing records in response to a request for records.


(3) Duplication means the process of making a copy of a record necessary to respond to a request for records or for inspection of original records that contain exempt material or that cannot otherwise be directly inspected. Such copies can take the form of paper copy, microfilm, audiovisual records, or machine readable records (e.g., magnetic tape or computer disk).


(4) Educational institution means a preschool, a public or private elementary or secondary school, an institution of undergraduate or graduate higher education, an institution of professional education, and an institution of vocational education, which operates a program or programs of scholarly research.


(5) Noncommercial scientific institution means an institution that is not operated on a commercial basis as that term is defined in paragraph (a)(1) of this section, and which is operated solely for the purpose of conducting scientific research, the results of which are not intended to promote any particular product or industry.


(6) Representative of the news media means any person or entity that gathers information of potential interest to a segment of the public, uses its editorial skills to turn the raw materials into a distinct work, and distributes that work to an audience. The term news means information that is about current events or that would be of current interest to the public. Examples of news-media entities are television or radio stations broadcasting to the public at large and publishers of periodicals (but only if such entities qualify as disseminators of news) who make their products available for purchase by or subscription by or free distribution to the general public. These examples are not all-inclusive. Moreover, as methods of news delivery evolve (for example, the adoption of the electronic dissemination of newspapers through telecommunications services), such alternative media will be considered to be news-media entities. A freelance journalist will be regarded as working for a news-media entity if the journalist can demonstrate a solid basis for expecting publication through that entity, whether or not the journalist is actually employed by that entity. A publication contract would present a solid basis for such an expectation; the FDIC may also consider the past publication record of the requester in making this determination.


(7) Review means the process of examining records located in response to a request for records to determine whether any portion of any record is permitted to be withheld as exempt information. It includes processing any record for disclosure, e.g., doing all that is necessary to excise them or otherwise prepare them for release.


(8) Search includes all time spent looking for material that is responsive to a request, including page-by-page or line-by-line identification of material within records. Searches may be done manually and/or by computer using existing programming.


(b) Making a request for records. (1) The request shall be submitted in writing to the Freedom of Information Act/Privacy Act Group (“FOIA/PA Group”), Legal Division :


(i) By completing the online request form located on the FDIC’s World Wide Web page, found at: http://www.fdic.gov;


(ii) By facsimile clearly marked Freedom of Information Act Request to the FOIA/PA Group: (703) 562-2797; or


(iii) By sending a letter to: Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, Attn: FOIA/PA Group, 550 17th Street, NW., Washington, DC 20429.


(2) The request shall contain the following information:


(i) The name and address of the requester, an electronic mail address, if available, and the telephone number at which the requester may be reached during normal business hours;


(ii) Whether the requester is an educational institution, noncommercial scientific institution, or news media representative;


(iii) A statement agreeing to pay the applicable fees, or a statement identifying a maximum fee that is acceptable to the requester, or a request for a waiver or reduction of fees that satisfies paragraph (f)(1)(x) of this section; and


(iv) The preferred form and format of any responsive information requested, if other than paper copies.


(3) A request for identifiable records shall reasonably describe the records in a way that enables the FDIC’s staff to identify and produce the records with reasonable effort and without unduly burdening or significantly interfering with any of the FDIC’s operations.


(c) Defective requests. The FDIC need not accept or process a request that does not reasonably describe the records requested or that does not otherwise comply with the requirements of this part. The FDIC may return a defective request, specifying the deficiency. The requester may submit a corrected request, which will be treated as a new request.


(d) Processing requests – (1) Receipt of requests. Upon receipt of a request that satisfies paragraph (b) of this section, the FOIA/PA Group will acknowledge receipt of the request in writing to the requester and provide the requester with an individualized tracking number for the request. The date of receipt for such request, including one that is addressed incorrectly or that is referred by another agency, is the date the FOIA/PA Group actually receives the request.


(2) Multitrack processing. (i) The FDIC provides different levels of processing for categories of requests under this part. Requests for records that are readily identifiable by the FOIA/PA Group, and that have already been cleared for public release may qualify for fast-track processing. All other requests shall be handled under normal processing procedures, unless expedited processing has been granted pursuant to paragraph (d)(3) of this section.


(ii) The FDIC will make the determination whether a request qualifies for fast-track processing. A requester may contact the FOIA/PA Group to learn whether a particular request has been assigned to fast-track processing. If the request has not qualified for fast-track processing, the requester will be given an opportunity to refine the request in order to qualify for fast-track processing. Changes made to requests to obtain faster processing must be in writing.


(3) Expedited processing. (i) Where a person requesting expedited access to records has demonstrated a compelling need for the records, or where the FDIC has determined to expedite the response, the FDIC shall process the request as soon as practicable. To show a compelling need for expedited processing, the requester shall provide a statement demonstrating that:


(A) The failure to obtain the records on an expedited basis could reasonably be expected to pose an imminent threat to the life or physical safety of an individual; or


(B) The requester can establish that they are primarily engaged in information dissemination as their main professional occupation or activity, and there is urgency to inform the public of the government activity involved in the request; and


(C) The requester’s statement must be certified to be true and correct to the best of the person’s knowledge and belief and explain in detail the basis for requesting expedited processing.


(ii) The formality of the certification required to obtain expedited treatment may be waived by the FDIC as a matter of administrative discretion.


(4) A requester seeking expedited processing will be notified whether expedited processing has been granted within ten (10) working days of the receipt of the request. If the request for expedited processing is denied, the requester may file an appeal pursuant to the procedures set forth in paragraph (i) of this section, and the FDIC shall respond to the appeal within ten (10) working days after receipt of the appeal.


(5) Priority of responses. Consistent with sound administrative process the FDIC processes requests in the order they are received in the separate processing tracks. However, in the agency’s discretion, or upon a court order in a matter to which the FDIC is a party, a particular request may be processed out of turn.


(6) Checking status of request. A requester may check on the status of a request using the tracking number assigned to the request to obtain information about the request including the date on which the FDIC originally received the request and an estimated date on which the FDIC will complete action on the request. The status of a request may be obtained:


(i) Online at the FDIC’s FOIA Service Center, at http://www.fdic.gov, if the request was submitted electronically using the FDIC’s online FOIA request form; or


(ii) By calling the FDIC’s FOIA Service Center at (202) 898-7021, if the request was submitted by email, facsimile or regular mail.


(7) Notification. (i) The time for response to requests will be twenty (20) working days except:


(A) In the case of expedited treatment under paragraph (d)(3) of this section;


(B) Where the running of such time is suspended for the calculation of a cost estimate for the requester if the FDIC determines that the processing of the request may exceed the requester’s maximum fee provision or if the charges are likely to exceed $250 as provided for in paragraph (f)(1)(v) of this section;


(C) Where the running of such time is suspended for the payment of fees pursuant to the paragraphs (d)(6)(i)(B) and (f)(1) of this section; or


(D) In unusual circumstances, as defined in 5 U.S.C. 552(a)(6)(B) and further described in paragraph (d)(6)(iii) of this section.


(ii) In unusual circumstances as referred to in paragraph (d)(6)(i)(D) of this section, the time limit may be extended for a period of:


(A) Ten (10) working days as provided by written notice to the requester, setting forth the reasons for the extension and the date on which a determination is expected to be dispatched; or


(B) Such alternative time period as agreed to by the requester or as reasonably determined by the FDIC when the FDIC notifies the requester that the request cannot be processed in the specified time limit.


(iii) Unusual circumstances may arise when:


(A) The records are in facilities, such as field offices or storage centers, that are not located at the FDIC’s Washington office;


(B) The records requested are voluminous or are not in close proximity to one another; or


(C) There is a need to consult with another agency or among two or more components of the FDIC having a substantial interest in the determination.


(8) Response to request. In response to a request that satisfies the requirements of paragraph (b) of this section, a search shall be conducted of records maintained by the FDIC in existence on the date of receipt of the request, and a review made of any responsive information located. The FDIC shall notify the requester of:


(i) The FDIC’s determination of the request;


(ii) The reasons for the determination;


(iii) The right of the requester to seek assistance from the FDIC’s FOIA Public Liaison; and


(iv) If the response is a denial of an initial request or if any information is withheld, the FDIC will advise the requester in writing:


(A) If the denial is in part or in whole;


(B) The name and title of each person responsible for the denial (when other than the person signing the notification);


(C) The exemptions relied on for the denial;


(D) The right of the requester to appeal the denial to the FDIC’s General Counsel within 90 calendar days following receipt of the notification, as specified in paragraph (i) of this section; and


(E) The right of the requester to seek dispute resolution services from the FDIC’s FOIA Public Liaison and/or the Office of Government Information Services (OGIS).


(e) Providing responsive records. (1) Copies of requested records shall be sent to the requester by regular U.S. mail to the address indicated in the request, unless the requester elects to take delivery of the documents at the FDIC or makes other acceptable arrangements, or the FDIC deems it appropriate to send the documents by another means.


(2) The FDIC shall provide a copy of the record in any form or format requested if the record is readily reproducible by the FDIC in that form or format, but the FDIC need not provide more than one copy of any record to a requester.


(3) By arrangement with the requester, the FDIC may elect to send the responsive records electronically if a substantial portion of the request is in electronic format. If the information requested is made pursuant to the Privacy Act of 1974, 5 U.S.C. 552a, it will not be sent by electronic means unless reasonable security measures can be provided.


(f) Fees – (1) General rules. (i) Persons requesting records of the FDIC shall be charged for the direct costs of search, duplication, and review as set forth in paragraphs (f)(2) and (f)(3) of this section, unless such costs are less than the FDIC’s cost of processing the requester’s remittance.


(ii) Requesters will be charged for search and review costs even if responsive records are not located or, if located, are determined to be exempt from disclosure.


(iii) Multiple requests seeking similar or related records from the same requester or group of requesters will be aggregated for the purposes of this section.


(iv) If the FDIC determines that the estimated costs of search, duplication, or review of requested records will exceed the dollar amount specified in the request, or if no dollar amount is specified, the FDIC will advise the requester of the estimated costs (if greater than the FDIC’s cost of processing the requester’s remittance). The requester must agree in writing to pay the costs of search, duplication, and review prior to the FDIC initiating any records search.


(v) If the FDIC estimates that its search, duplication, and review costs will exceed $250.00, the requester must pay an amount equal to 20 percent of the estimated costs prior to the FDIC initiating any records search.


(vi) The FDIC shall ordinarily collect all applicable fees under the final invoice before releasing copies of requested records to the requester.


(vii) The FDIC may require any requester who has previously failed to pay the charges under this section within 30 calendar days of mailing of the invoice to pay in advance the total estimated costs of search, duplication, and review. The FDIC may also require a requester who has any charges outstanding in excess of 30 calendar days following mailing of the invoice to pay the full amount due, or demonstrate that the fee has been paid in full, prior to the FDIC initiating any additional records search.


(viii) The FDIC may begin assessing interest charges on unpaid bills on the 31st day following the day on which the invoice was sent. Interest will be at the rate prescribed in section 3717 of title 31 of the United States Code and will accrue from the date of the invoice.


(ix) The time limit for the FDIC to respond to a request will not begin to run until the FDIC has received the requester’s written agreement under paragraph (f)(1)(iv) of this section, and advance payment under paragraph (f)(1)(v) or (vii) of this section, or payment of outstanding charges under paragraph (f)(1)(vii) or (viii) of this section.


(x) As part of the initial request, a requester may ask that the FDIC waive or reduce fees if disclosure of the records is in the public interest because it is likely to contribute significantly to public understanding of the operations or activities of the government and is not primarily in the commercial interest of the requester. Determinations as to a waiver or reduction of fees will be made by the FOIA/PA Group, Legal Division (or designee) and the requester will be notified in writing of his/her determination. A determination not to grant a request for a waiver or reduction of fees under this paragraph may be appealed to the FDIC’s General Counsel (or designee) pursuant to the procedure set forth in paragraph (i) of this section.


(2) Chargeable fees by category of requester. (i) Commercial use requesters shall be charged search, duplication and review costs.


(ii) Educational institutions, non-commercial scientific institutions and news media representatives shall be charged duplication costs, except for the first 100 pages.


(iii) Requesters not described in paragraph (f)(2)(i) or (ii) of this section shall be charged the full reasonable direct cost of search and duplication, except for the first two hours of search time and first 100 pages of duplication.


(3) Fee schedule. The dollar amount of fees which the FDIC may charge to records requesters will be established by the Chief Financial Officer of the FDIC (or designee). The FDIC may charge fees that recoup the full allowable direct costs it incurs. Fees are subject to change as costs change.


(i) Manual searches for records. The FDIC will charge for manual searches for records at the basic rate of pay of the employee making the search plus 16 percent to cover employee benefit costs. Where a single class of personnel (e.g., all clerical, all professional, or all executive) is used exclusively, the FDIC, at its discretion, may establish and charge an average rate for the range of grades typically involved.


(ii) Computer searches for records. The fee for searches of computerized records is the actual direct cost of the search, including computer time, computer runs, and the operator’s time apportioned to the search. The fee for a computer printout is the actual cost. The fees for computer supplies are the actual costs. The FDIC may, at its discretion, establish and charge a fee for computer searches based upon a reasonable FDIC-wide average rate for central processing unit operating costs and the operator’s basic rate of pay plus 16 percent to cover employee benefit costs.


(iii) Duplication of records. (A) The per-page fee for paper copy reproduction of documents is the average FDIC-wide cost based upon the reasonable direct costs of making such copies.


(B) For other methods of reproduction or duplication, the FDIC will charge the actual direct costs of reproducing or duplicating the documents.


(iv) Review of records. The FDIC will charge commercial use requesters for the review of records at the time of processing the initial request to determine whether they are exempt from mandatory disclosure at the basic rate of pay of the employee making the search plus 16 percent to cover employee benefit costs. Where a single class of personnel (e.g., all clerical, all professional, or all executive) is used exclusively, the FDIC, at its discretion, may establish and charge an average rate for the range of grades typically involved. The FDIC will not charge at the administrative appeal level for review of an exemption already applied. When records or portions of records are withheld in full under an exemption which is subsequently determined not to apply, the FDIC may charge for a subsequent review to determine the applicability of other exemptions not previously considered.


(v) Other services. Complying with requests for special services, other than a readily produced electronic form or format, is at the FDIC’s discretion. The FDIC may recover the full costs of providing such services to the requester.


(4) Publication of fee schedule and effective date of changes. (i) The fee schedule is made available on the FDIC’s World Wide Web page, found at http://www.fdic.gov.


(ii) The fee schedule will be set forth in the “Notice of Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation Records Fees” issued in December of each year or in such “Interim Notice of Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation Records Fees” as may be issued. Copies of such notices may be obtained at no charge from the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, FOIA/PA Group, 550 17th Street NW., Washington, DC 20429, and are available on the FDIC’s World Wide Web page as noted in paragraph (f)(4)(i) of this section.


(iii) The fees implemented in the December or Interim Notice will be effective 30 days after issuance.


(5) Use of contractors. The FDIC may contract with independent contractors to locate, reproduce, and/or disseminate records; provided, however, that the FDIC has determined that the ultimate cost to the requester will be no greater than it would be if the FDIC performed these tasks itself. In no case will the FDIC contract out responsibilities which the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) (5 U.S.C. 552) provides that the FDIC alone may discharge, such as determining the applicability of an exemption or whether to waive or reduce fees.


(g) Exempt information. A request for records may be denied if the requested record contains information which falls into one or more of the following categories.
1
If the requested record contains both exempt and nonexempt information, the nonexempt portions which may reasonably be segregated from the exempt portions will be released to the requester. If redaction is necessary, the FDIC will, to the extent technically feasible, indicate the amount of material deleted at the place in the record where such deletion is made unless that indication in and of itself will jeopardize the purpose for the redaction. The categories of exempt records are as follows:




1 Classification of a record as exempt from disclosure under the provisions of this paragraph (g) shall not be construed as authority to withhold the record if it is otherwise subject to disclosure under the Privacy Act of 1974 (5 U.S.C. 552a) or other federal statute, any applicable regulation of FDIC or any other federal agency having jurisdiction thereof, or any directive or order of any court of competent jurisdiction.


(1) Records that are specifically authorized under criteria established by an Executive Order to be kept secret in the interest of national defense or foreign policy and are in fact properly classified pursuant to such Executive Order;


(2) Records related solely to the internal personnel rules and practices of the FDIC;


(3) Records specifically exempted from disclosure by statute, provided that such statute:


(i)(A) Requires that the matters be withheld from the public in such a manner as to leave no discretion on the issue; or


(B) Establishes particular criteria for withholding or refers to particular types of matters to be withheld; and


(ii) if enacted after the date of enactment of the OPEN FOIA Act of 2009, specifically cites to 5 U.S.C. 552(b)(3);


(4) Trade secrets and commercial or financial information obtained from a person that is privileged or confidential;


(5) Interagency or intra-agency memoranda or letters that would not be available by law to a private party in litigation with the FDIC;


(6) Personnel, medical, and similar files (including financial files) the disclosure of which would constitute a clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy;


(7) Records compiled for law enforcement purposes, but only to the extent that the production of such law enforcement records:


(i) Could reasonably be expected to interfere with enforcement proceedings;


(ii) Would deprive a person of a right to a fair trial or an impartial adjudication;


(iii) Could reasonably be expected to constitute an unwarranted invasion of personal privacy;


(iv) Could reasonably be expected to disclose the identity of a confidential source, including a state, local, or foreign agency or authority or any private institution which furnished records on a confidential basis;


(v) Would disclose techniques and procedures for law enforcement investigations or prosecutions, or would disclose guidelines for law enforcement investigations or prosecutions if such disclosure could reasonably be expected to risk circumvention of the law; or


(vi) Could reasonably be expected to endanger the life or physical safety of any individual;


(8) Records that are contained in or related to examination, operating, or condition reports prepared by, on behalf of, or for the use of the FDIC or any agency responsible for the regulation or supervision of financial institutions; or


(9) geological and geophysical information and data, including maps, concerning wells.


(h) Dispute resolution. A requester seeking to engage in dispute resolution may make a request to the FOIA Public Liaison and/or OGIS by following the procedures set forth online in the FDIC’s FOIA Service Center at http://www.fdic.gov.


(i) Appeals. (1) Appeals should be addressed to the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, Attn: FOIA/PA Group, FDIC, 550 17th Street, NW., Washington, DC 20429.


(2) A person whose initial request for records under this section, or whose request for a waiver of fees under paragraph (f)(1)(x) of this section, has been denied, either in part or in whole, has the right to appeal the denial to the FDIC’s General Counsel (or designee) within 90 calendar days after receipt of notification of the denial. Appeals of denials of initial requests or for a waiver of fees must be in writing and include any additional information relevant to consideration of the appeal.


(3) Except in the case of an appeal for expedited treatment under paragraph (d)(3) of this section, the FDIC will notify the appellant in writing within 20 business days after receipt of the appeal and will state:


(i) Whether it is granted or denied in whole or in part;


(ii) The name and title of each person responsible for the denial (if other than the person signing the notification);


(iii) The exemptions relied upon for the denial in the case of initial requests for records; and


(iv) The right to judicial review of the denial under the FOIA.


(4) If a requester is appealing for denial of expedited treatment, the FDIC will notify the appellant within 10 business days after receipt of the appeal of the FDIC’s disposition.


(5) Complete payment of any outstanding fee invoice will be required before an appeal is processed.


(j) Records of another agency. If a requested record is the property of another federal agency or department, and that agency or department, either in writing or by regulation, expressly retains ownership of such record, upon receipt of a request for the record the FDIC will promptly inform the requester of this ownership and immediately shall forward the request to the proprietary agency or department either for processing in accordance with the latter’s regulations or for guidance with respect to disposition.


[63 FR 16404, Apr. 3, 1998, as amended at 67 FR 71071, Nov. 29, 2002; 76 FR 35965, June 21, 2011; 76 FR 63818, Oct. 14, 2011; 81 FR 83647, Nov. 22, 2016]


§ 309.6 Disclosure of exempt records.

(a) Disclosure prohibited. Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section or by 12 CFR part 310,
2
no person shall disclose or permit the disclosure of any exempt records, or information contained therein, to any persons other than those officers, directors, employees, or agents of the Corporation who have a need for such records in the performance of their official duties. In any instance in which any person has possession, custody or control of FDIC exempt records or information contained therein, all copies of such records shall remain the property of the Corporation and under no circumstances shall any person, entity or agency disclose or make public in any manner the exempt records or information without written authorization from the Director of the Corporation’s Division having primary authority over the records or information as provided in this section.




2 The procedures for disclosing records under the Privacy Act are separately set forth in 12 CFR part 310.


(b) Disclosure authorized. Exempt records or information of the Corporation may be disclosed only in accordance with the conditions and requirements set forth in this paragraph (b). Requests for discretionary disclosure of exempt records or information pursuant to this paragraph (b) may be submitted directly to the Division having primary authority over the exempt records or information or to the FOIA/PA Group for forwarding to the appropriate Division having primary authority over the records sought. Such administrative request must clearly state that it seeks discretionary disclosure of exempt records, clearly identify the records sought, provide sufficient information for the Corporation to evaluate whether there is good cause for disclosure, and meet all other conditions set forth in paragraph (b)(1) through (10) of this section. Information regarding the appropriate FDIC Division having primary authority over a particular record or records may be obtained from the FOIA/PA Group. Authority to disclose or authorize disclosure of exempt records of the Corporation is delegated as follows:


(1) Disclosure to depository institutions. The Director of the Corporation’s Division having primary authority over the exempt records, or designee, may disclose to any director or authorized officer, employee or agent of any depository institution, information contained in, or copies of, exempt records pertaining to that depository institution.


(2) Disclosure to state banking agencies. The Director of the Corporation’s Division having primary authority over the exempt records, or designee, may in his or her discretion and for good cause, disclose to any authorized officer or employee of any state banking or securities department or agency, copies of any exempt records to the extent the records pertain to a state-chartered depository institution supervised by the agency or authority, or where the exempt records are requested in writing for a legitimate depository institution supervisory or regulatory purpose.


(3) Disclosure to federal financial institutions supervisory agencies and certain other agencies. The Director of the Corporation’s Division having primary authority over the exempt records, or designee, may in his or her discretion and for good cause, disclose to any authorized officer or employee of any federal financial institution supervisory agency including the Comptroller of the Currency, the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection, the Financial Stability Oversight Council, the Securities and Exchange Commission, the National Credit Union Administration, or any other agency included in section 1101(7) of the Right to Financial Privacy Act of 1978 (12 U.S.C. 3401 et seq.) (RFPA), any exempt records for a legitimate depository institution supervisory or regulatory purpose. The Director, or designee, may in his or her discretion and for good cause, disclose exempt records, including customer financial records, to certain other federal agencies as referenced in section 1113 of the RFPA for the purposes and to the extent permitted therein, or to any foreign bank regulatory or supervisory authority as provided, and to the extent permitted, by section 206 of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation Improvement Act of 1991 (12 U.S.C. 3109). Finally, the Director, or designee, may in his or her discretion and for good cause, disclose reports of examination or other confidential supervisory information concerning any depository institution or other entity examined by the Corporation under authority of Federal law to: Any other Federal or State agency or authority with supervisory or regulatory authority over the depository institution or other entity; any officer, director, or receiver of such depository institution or entity; and any other person that the Corporation determines to be appropriate.


(4) Disclosure to prosecuting or investigatory agencies or authorities. (i) Reports of Apparent Crime pertaining to suspected violations of law, which may contain customer financial records, may be disclosed to federal or state prosecuting or investigatory authorities without giving notice to the customer, as permitted in the relevant exceptions of the RFPA.


(ii) The Director of the Corporation’s Division having primary authority over the exempt records, or designee, may disclose to the proper federal or state prosecuting or investigatory authorities, or to any authorized officer or employee of such authority, copies of exempt records pertaining to irregularities discovered in depository institutions which are believed to constitute violations of any federal or state civil or criminal law, or unsafe or unsound banking practices, provided that customer financial records may be disclosed without giving notice to the customer, only as permitted by the relevant exceptions of the RFPA. Unless such disclosure is initiated by the FDIC, customer financial records shall be disclosed only in response to a written request which:


(A) Is signed by an authorized official of the agency making the request;


(B) Identifies the record or records to which access is requested; and


(C) Gives the reasons for the request.


(iii) When notice to the customer is required to be given under the RFPA, the Director of the Corporation’s Division having primary authority over the exempt records, or designee, may disclose customer financial records to any federal or state prosecuting or investigatory agency or authority, provided, that:


(A) The General Counsel, or designee, has determined that disclosure is authorized or required by law; or


(B) Disclosure is pursuant to a written request that indicates the information is relevant to a legitimate law enforcement inquiry within the jurisdiction of the requesting agency and:


(1) The Director of the Corporation’s Division having primary authority over the exempt records, or designee, certifies pursuant to section 1112(a)
3
of the RFPA that the records are believed relevant to a legitimate law enforcement inquiry within the jurisdiction of the receiving agency; and




3 The form of certification generally is as follows. Additional information may be added:


Pursuant to section 1112(a) of the Right to Financial Privacy Act of 1978 (12 U.S.C. 3412), I, ______ [name and appropriate title] hereby certify that the financial records described below were transferred to (agency or department) in the belief that they were relevant to a legitimate law enforcement inquiry, within the jurisdiction of the receiving agency.


(2) A copy of such certification and the notice required by section 1112(b)
4
of the RFPA is sent within fourteen days of the disclosure to the customer whose records are disclosed.
5




4 The form of notice generally is as follows. Additional information may be added:


Dear Mr./Ms. ______:


Copies of, or information contained in, your financial records lawfully in the possession of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation have been furnished to (agency or department) pursuant to the Right to Financial Privacy Act of 1978 for the following purpose: ______. If you believe that this transfer has not been made to further a legitimate law enforcement inquiry, you may have legal rights under the Right to Financial Privacy Act of 1978 or the Privacy Act of 1974.




5 Whenever the Corporation is subject to a court-ordered delay of the customer notice, the notice shall be sent immediately upon the expiration of the court-ordered delay.


(5) Disclosure to servicers and serviced institutions. The Director of the Corporation’s Division having primary authority over the exempt records, or designee, may disclose copies of any exempt record related to a depository institution data center, service corporation, or any other data center that provides data processing or related services to an insured institution (hereinafter referred to as “data center”) to:


(i) The examined data center;


(ii) Any insured institution that receives data processing or related services from the examined data center;


(iii) Any state agency or authority which exercises general supervision over an institution serviced by the examined data center; and


(iv) Any federal financial institution supervisory agency which exercises general supervision over an institution serviced by the examined data center. The federal supervisory agency may disclose any such examination report received from the Corporation to an insured institution over which it exercises general supervision and which is serviced by the examined data center.


(6) Disclosure to third parties. (i) Except as otherwise provided in paragraphs (c)(1) through (5) of this section, the Director of the Corporation’s Division having primary authority over the exempt records, or designee, may in his or her discretion and for good cause, disclose copies of any exempt records to any third party where requested to do so in writing. Any such written request shall:


(A) Specify, with reasonable particularity, the record or records to which access is requested; and


(B) Give the reasons for the request.


(ii) Either prior to or at the time of any disclosure, the Director or designee shall require such terms and conditions as he deems necessary to protect the confidential nature of the record, the financial integrity of any depository institution to which the record relates, and the legitimate privacy interests of any individual named in such records.


(7) Authorization for disclosure by depository institutions or other third parties. (i) The Director of the Corporation’s Division having primary authority over the exempt records, or designee, may, in his or her discretion and for good cause, authorize any director, officer, employee, or agent of a depository institution to disclose copies of any exempt record in his custody to anyone who is not a director, officer or employee of the depository institution. Such authorization must be in response to a written request from the party seeking the record or from management of the depository institution to which the report or record pertains. Any such request shall specify, with reasonable particularity, the record sought, the party’s interest therein, and the party’s relationship to the depository institution to which the record relates.


(ii) The Director of the Corporation’s Division having primary authority over the exempt records, or designee, may, in his or her discretion and for good cause, authorize any third party, including a federal or state agency, that has received a copy of a Corporation exempt record, to disclose such exempt record to another party or agency. Such authorization must be in response to a written request from the party that has custody of the copy of the exempt record. Any such request shall specify the record sought to be disclosed and the reasons why disclosure is necessary.


(iii) Any subsidiary depository institution of a bank holding company or a savings and loan holding company may reproduce and furnish a copy of any report of examination of the subsidiary depository institution to the parent holding company without prior approval of the Director of the Division having primary authority over the exempt records and any depository institution may reproduce and furnish a copy of any report of examination of the disclosing depository institution to a majority shareholder if the following conditions are met:


(A) The parent holding company or shareholder owns in excess of 50% of the voting stock of the depository institution or subsidiary depository institution;


(B) The board of directors of the depository institution or subsidiary depository institution at least annually by resolution authorizes the reproduction and furnishing of reports of examination (the resolution shall specifically name the shareholder or parent holding company, state the address to which the reports are to be sent, and indicate that all reports furnished pursuant to the resolution remain the property of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation and are not to be disclosed or made public in any manner without the prior written approval of the Director of the Corporation’s Division having primary authority over the exempt records as provided in paragraph (b) of this section;


(C) A copy of the resolution authorizing disclosure of the reports is sent to the shareholder or parent holding company; and


(D) The minutes of the board of directors of the depository institution or subsidiary depository institution for the meeting immediately following disclosure of a report state:


(1) That disclosure was made;


(2) The date of the report which was disclosed;


(3) To whom the report was sent; and


(4) The date the report was disclosed.


(iv) With respect to any disclosure that is authorized under this paragraph (b)(7), the Director of the Corporation’s Division having primary authority over the exempt records, or designee, shall only permit disclosure of records upon determining that good cause exists. If the exempt record contains information derived from depository institution customer financial records, disclosure is to be authorized only upon the condition that the requesting party and the party releasing the records comply with any applicable provision of the RFPA. Before authorizing the disclosure, the Director (or designee) may require that both the party having custody of a copy of a Corporation exempt record and the party seeking access to the record agree to such limitations as the Director (or designee) deems necessary to protect the confidential nature of the record, the financial integrity of any depository institution to which the record relates and the legitimate privacy interests of any persons named in such record.


(8) Disclosure by General Counsel. (i) The Corporation’s General Counsel, or designee, may disclose or authorize the disclosure of any exempt record in response to a valid judicial subpoena, court order, or other legal process, and authorize any current or former officer, director, employee, agent of the Corporation, or third party, to appear and testify regarding an exempt record or any information obtained in the performance of such person’s official duties, at any administrative or judicial hearing or proceeding where such person has been served with a valid subpoena, court order, or other legal process requiring him or her to testify. The General Counsel shall consider the relevancy of such exempt records or testimony to the litigation, and the interests of justice, in determining whether to disclose such records or testimony. Third parties seeking disclosure of exempt records or testimony in litigation to which the FDIC is not a party shall submit a request for discretionary disclosure directly to the General Counsel.
6
Such request shall specify the information sought with reasonable particularity and shall be accompanied by a statement with supporting documentation showing in detail the relevance of such exempt information to the litigation, justifying good cause for disclosure, and a commitment to be bound by a protective order. Failure to exhaust such administrative request prior to service of a subpoena or other legal process may, in the General Counsel’s discretion, serve as a basis for objection to such subpoena or legal process. Customer financial records may not be disclosed to any federal agency that is not a federal financial supervisory agency pursuant to this paragraph unless notice to the customer and certification as required by the RFPA have been given except where disclosure is subject to the relevant exceptions set forth in the RFPA.




6 This administrative requirement does not apply to subpoenas, court orders or other legal process issued for records of depository institutions held by the FDIC as Receiver or Conservator. Subpoenas, court orders or other legal process issued for such records will be processed in accordance with State and Federal law, regulations, rules and privileges applicable to FDIC as Receiver or Conservator.


(ii) The General Counsel, or designee, may in his or her discretion and for good cause, disclose or authorize disclosure of any exempt record or testimony by a current or former officer, director, employee, agent of the Corporation, or third party, sought in connection with any civil or criminal hearing, proceeding or investigation without the service of a judicial subpoena, or other legal process requiring such disclosure or testimony, if he or she determines that the records or testimony are relevant to the hearing, proceeding or investigation and that disclosure is in the best interests of justice and not otherwise prohibited by Federal statute. Customer financial records shall not be disclosed to any federal agency pursuant to this paragraph that is not a federal financial supervisory agency, unless the records are sought under the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure (28 U.S.C. appendix) or the Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure (18 U.S.C. appendix) or comparable rules of other courts and in connection with litigation to which the receiving federal agency, employee, officer, director, or agent, and the customer are parties, or disclosure is otherwise subject to the relevant exceptions in the RFPA. Where the General Counsel or designee authorizes a current or former officer, director, employee or agent of the Corporation to testify or disclose exempt records pursuant to this paragraph (b)(8), he or she may, in his or her discretion, limit the authorization to so much of the record or testimony as is relevant to the issues at such hearing, proceeding or investigation, and he or she shall give authorization only upon fulfillment of such conditions as he or she deems necessary and practicable to protect the confidential nature of such records or testimony.


(9) Authorization for disclosure by the Chairman of the Corporation’s Board of Directors. Except where expressly prohibited by law, the Chairman of the Corporation’s Board of Directors may in his or her discretion, authorize the disclosure of any Corporation records. Except where disclosure is required by law, the Chairman may direct any current or former officer, director, employee or agent of the Corporation to refuse to disclose any record or to give testimony if the Chairman determines, in his or her discretion, that refusal to permit such disclosure is in the public interest.


(10) Limitations on disclosure. All steps practicable shall be taken to protect the confidentiality of exempt records and information. Any disclosure permitted by paragraph (b) of this section is discretionary and nothing in paragraph (b) of this section shall be construed as requiring the disclosure of information. Further, nothing in paragraph (b) of this section shall be construed as restricting, in any manner, the authority of the Board of Directors, the Chairman of the Board of Directors, the Director of the Corporation’s Division having primary authority over the exempt records, the Corporation’s General Counsel, or their designees, or any other Corporation Division or Office head, in their discretion and in light of the facts and circumstances attendant in any given case, to require conditions upon and to limit the form, manner, and extent of any disclosure permitted by this section. Wherever practicable, disclosure of exempt records shall be made pursuant to a protective order and redacted to exclude all irrelevant or non-responsive exempt information.


[60 FR 61465, Nov. 30, 1995, as amended at 63 FR 16408, Apr. 3, 1998; 67 FR 71071, Nov. 29, 2002; 73 FR 2146, Jan. 14, 2008; 76 FR 35965, June 21, 2011]


§ 309.7 Service of process.

(a) Service. Any subpoena or other legal process to obtain information maintained by the FDIC shall be duly issued by a court having jurisdiction over the FDIC, and served upon either the Executive Secretary (or designee), FDIC, 550 17th Street, NW., Washington, DC 20429, or the Regional Director or Regional Manager of the FDIC region where the legal action from which the subpoena or process was issued is pending. A list of the FDIC’s regional offices is available from the Office of Public Affairs, FDIC, 550 17th Street, NW., Washington, DC 20429 (telephone 202-898-6996). Where the FDIC is named as a party, service of process shall be made pursuant to the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, and upon the Executive Secretary (or designee), FDIC, 550 17th Street NW., Washington, DC 20429, or upon the agent designated to receive service of process in the state, territory, or jurisdiction in which any insured depository institution is located. Identification of the designated agent in the state, territory, or jurisdiction may be obtained from the Executive Secretary or from the Office of the General Counsel, FDIC, 550 17th Street NW., Washington, DC 20429. The Executive Secretary (or designee), Regional Director or designated agent shall immediately forward any subpoena, court order or legal process to the General Counsel. The Corporation may require the payment of fees, in accordance with the fee schedule referred to in § 309.5(c)(3), prior to the release of any records requested pursuant to any subpoena or other legal process.


(b) Notification by person served. If any current or former officer, director, employee or agent of the Corporation, or any other person who has custody of records belonging to the FDIC, is served with a subpoena, court order, or other process requiring that person’s attendance as a witness concerning any matter related to official duties, or the production of any exempt record of the Corporation, such person shall promptly advise the General Counsel of such service, of the testimony and records described in the subpoena, and of all relevant facts which may be of assistance to the General Counsel in determining whether the individual in question should be authorized to testify or the records should be produced. Such person should also inform the court or tribunal which issued the process and the attorney for the party upon whose application the process was issued, if known, of the substance of this section.


(c) Appearance by person served. Absent the written authorization of the Corporation’s General Counsel, or designee, to disclose the requested information, any current or former officer, director, employee, or agent of the Corporation, and any other person having custody of records of the Corporation, who is required to respond to a subpoena or other legal process, shall attend at the time and place therein specified and respectfully decline to produce any such record or give any testimony with respect thereto, basing such refusal on this section.


[60 FR 61465, Nov. 30, 1995, as amended at 67 FR 71071, Nov. 29, 2002]


PART 310 – PRIVACY ACT REGULATIONS


Authority:5 U.S.C. 552a.


Source:40 FR 46274, Oct. 6, 1975, unless otherwise noted.

§ 310.1 Purpose and scope.

The purpose of this part is to establish regulations implementing the Privacy Act of 1974, 5 U.S.C. 552a. These regulations delineate the procedures that an individual must follow in exercising his or her access or amendment rights under the Privacy Act to records maintained by the Corporation in systems of records, including information transferred to Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation from the Office of Thrift Supervision pursuant to sections 312 and 323 of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act, Public Law 111-203.


[76 FR 35965, June 21, 2011]


§ 310.2 Definitions.

For purposes of this part:


(a) The term Corporation means the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation;


(b) The term individual means a natural person who is either a citizen of the United States or an alien lawfully admitted for permanent residence;


(c) The term maintain includes maintain, collect, use, disseminate, or control;


(d) The term record means any item, collection or grouping of information about an individual that contains his/her name, or the identifying number, symbol, or other identifying particular assigned to the individual;


(e) The term system of records means a group of any records under the control of the Corporation from which information is retrieved by the name of the individual or some identifying number, symbol or other identifying particular assigned to the individual;


(f) The term designated system of records means a system of records which has been listed and summarized in the Federal Register pursuant to the requirements of 5 U.S.C. 552a(e);


(g) The term routine use means, with respect to disclosure of a record, the use of such record for a purpose which is compatible with the purpose for which it was created;


(h) The terms amend or amendment mean any correction, addition to or deletion from a record; and


(i) The term system manager means the agency official responsible for a designated system of records, as denominated in the Federal Register publication of “Systems of Records Maintained by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation.”


[40 FR 46274, Oct. 6, 1975, as amended at 42 FR 6796, Feb. 4, 1977]


§ 310.3 Procedures for requests pertaining to individual records in a system of records.

(a) Any present or former employee of the Corporation seeking access to, or amendment of, his/her official personnel records maintained by the Corporation shall submit his/her request in such manner as is prescribed by the United States Office of Personnel Management in part 297 of its rules and regulations (5 CFR part 297). For access to, or amendment of, other government-wide records systems maintained by the Corporation, the procedures prescribed in the respective Federal Register Privacy Act system notice shall be followed.


(b) Requests by individuals for access to records pertaining to them and maintained within one of the Corporation’s designated systems of records should be submitted in writing to the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, Attn: FOIA/PA Group, 550 17th Street, NW., Washington, DC 20429. Each such request should contain a reasonable description of the records sought, the system or systems in which such record may be contained, and any additional identifying information, as specified in the Corporation’s Federal Register “Notice of Systems of Records” for that particular system, copies of which are available upon request from the FOIA/PA Group.


[40 FR 46274, Oct. 6, 1975, as amended at 42 FR 6796, Feb. 4, 1977; 61 FR 43419, Aug. 23, 1996; 67 FR 71071, Nov. 29, 2002; 76 FR 35965, June 21, 2011]


§ 310.4 Times, places, and requirements for identification of individuals making requests.

(a) Individuals may request access to records pertaining to themselves by submitting a written request as provided in § 310.3 of these regulations, or by appearing in person on weekdays, other than official holidays, at the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, Attn: FOIA/PA Group, 550 17th Street, NW., Washington, DC 20429, between the hours of 8:30 a.m. and 5 p.m.


(b) Individuals appearing in person at the Corporation seeking access to or amendment of their records shall present two forms of reasonable identification, such as employment identification cards, driver’s licenses, or other identification cards or documents typically used for identification purposes.


(c) Except for records that must be publicly disclosed pursuant to the Freedom of Information Act, 5 U.S.C. 552, where the Corporation determines it to be necessary for the individual’s protection, a certification of a duly commissioned notary public, of any state or territory, attesting to the requesting individual’s identity, or an unsworn declaration subscribed to as true under the penalty of perjury under the laws of the United States of America, at the election of the individual, may be required before a written request seeking access to or amendment of a record will be honored. The Corporation may also require that individuals provide minimal identifying data such as full name, date and place of birth, or other personal information necessary to ensure proper identity before processing requests for records.


[40 FR 46274, Oct. 6, 1975, as amended at 42 FR 6796, Feb. 4, 1977; 61 FR 43419, Aug. 23, 1996; 67 FR 71071, Nov. 29, 2002; 76 FR 35966, June 21, 2011]


§ 310.5 Disclosure of requested information to individuals.

(a) Except to the extent that Corporation records pertaining to an individual:


(1) Are exempt from disclosure under §§ 310.6 and 310.13 of this part, or


(2) Were compiled in reasonable anticipation of a civil action or proceeding, the Corporation will make such records available upon request for purposes of inspection and copying by the individual (after proper identity verification as provided in § 310.4) and, upon the individual’s request and written authorization, by another person of the individual’s own choosing.


(b) The FOIA/PA Group will notify, in writing, the individual making a request, whenever practicable within ten business days following receipt of the request, whether any specified designated system of records maintained by the Corporation contains a record pertaining to the individual. Where such a record does exist, the FOIA/PA Group also will inform the individual of the system manager’s decision whether to grant or deny the request for access. In the event existing records are determined not to be disclosable, the notification will inform the individual of the reasons for which disclosure will not be made and will provide a description of the individual’s right to appeal the denial, as more fully set forth in § 310.9. Where access is to be granted, the notification will specify the procedures for verifying the individual’s identity, as set forth in § 310.4.


(c) Individuals will be granted access to records disclosable under this part 310 as soon as is practicable. The FOIA/PA Group will give written notification of a reasonable period within which individuals may inspect disclosable records pertaining to themselves at the offices of the FOIA/PA Group during normal business hours. Alternatively, individuals granted access to records under this part may request that copies of such records be forwarded to them. Fees for copying such records will be assessed as provided in § 310.11.


[40 FR 46274, Oct. 6, 1975, as amended at 42 FR 6796, Feb. 4, 1977; 67 FR 71071, Nov. 29, 2002]


§ 310.6 Special procedures: Medical records.

Medical records shall be disclosed on request to the individuals to whom they pertain, except, if in the judgment of the Corporation, the transmission of the medical information directly to the requesting individual could have an adverse effect upon such individual. In the event medical information is withheld from a requesting individual due to any possible adverse effect such information may have upon the individual, the Corporation shall transmit such information to a medical doctor named by the requesting individual for release of the patient.


[40 FR 46274, Oct. 6, 1975, as amended at 61 FR 43420, Aug. 23, 1996]


§ 310.7 Request for amendment of record.

The Corporation will maintain all records it uses in making any determination about any individual with such accuracy, relevance, timeliness and completeness as is reasonably necessary to assure fairness to the individual in the determination. An individual may request that the Corporation amend any portion of a record pertaining to that individual which the Corporation maintains in a designated system of records. Such a request should be submitted in writing to the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, Attn: FOIA/PA Group, 550 17th Street, NW., Washington, DC 20429 and should contain the individual’s reason for requesting the amendment and a description of the record (including the name of the appropriate designated system and category thereof) sufficient to enable the Corporation to identify the particular record or portion thereof with respect to which amendment is sought.


[76 FR 35966, June 21, 2011]


§ 310.8 Agency review of request for amendment of record.

(a) Requests by individuals for the amendment of records will be acknowledged by the FOIA/PA Group, and referred to the system manager of the system of records in which the record is contained for determination, within ten business days following receipt of such requests. Promptly thereafter, the FOIA/PA Group will notify the individual of the system manager’s decision to grant or deny the request to amend.


(b) If the system manager denies a request to amend a record, the notification of such denial shall contain the reason for the denial and a description of the individual’s right to appeal the denial as more fully set forth in § 310.9.


[40 FR 46274, Oct. 6, 1975, as amended at 42 FR 6796, Feb. 4, 1977; 67 FR 71071, Nov. 29, 2002; 76 FR 35966, June 21, 2011]


§ 310.9 Appeal of adverse initial agency determination on access or amendment.

(a) A system manager’s denial of an individual’s request for access to or amendment of a record pertaining to him/her may be appealed in writing to the Corporation’s General Counsel (or designee) within 30 business days following receipt of notification of the denial. Such an appeal should be addressed to the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, Attn: FOIA/PA Group, 550 17th Street, NW., Washington, DC 20429, and contain all the information specified for requests for access in § 310.3 or for initial requests to amend in § 310.7, as well as any other additional information the individual deems relevant for the consideration by the General Counsel (or designee) of the appeal.


(b) The General Counsel (or designee) will normally make a final determination with respect to an appeal made under this part within 30 business days following receipt by the Office of the Executive Secretary of the appeal. The General Counsel (or designee) may, however, extend this 30-day time period for good cause. Where such an extension is required, the individual making the appeal will be notified of the reason for the extension and the expected date upon which a final decision will be given.


(c) If the General Counsel (or designee) affirms the initial denial of a request for access or to amend, he or she will inform the individual affected of the decision, the reason therefor, and the right of judicial review of the decision. In addition, as pertains to a request for amendment, the individual may at that point submit to the Corporation a concise statement setting forth his or her reasons for disagreeing with the Corporation’s refusal to amend.


(d) Any statement of disagreement with the Corporation’s refusal to amend, filed with the Corporation by an individual pursuant to § 310.9(c), will be included in the disclosure of any records under the authority of § 310.10(b). The Corporation may in its discretion also include a copy of a concise statement of its reasons for not making the requested amendment.


(e) The General Counsel (or designee) may on his or her own motion refer an appeal to the Board of Directors for a determination, and the Board of Directors on its own motion may consider an appeal.


[52 FR 34209, Sept. 10, 1987, as amended at 61 FR 43420, Aug. 23, 1996; 67 FR 71071, Nov. 29, 2002; 76 FR 35966, June 21, 2011]


§ 310.10 Disclosure of record to person other than the individual to whom it pertains.

(a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, the Corporation will not disclose any record contained in a designated system of records to any person or agency except with the prior written consent of the individual to whom the record pertains.


(b) The restrictions on disclosure in paragraph (a) of this section do not apply to any of the following disclosures:


(1) To those officers and employees of the Corporation who have a need for the record in the performance of their duties;


(2) Which is required under the Freedom of Information Act (5 U.S.C. 552);


(3) For a routine use listed with respect to a designated system of records;


(4) To the Bureau of the Census for purposes of planning or carrying out a census or survey or related activity pursuant to the provisions of title 13 U.S.C.;


(5) To a recipient who has provided the Corporation with advance adequate written assurance that the record will be used solely as a statistical research or reporting record, and the record is to be transferred in a form that is not individually identifiable;


(6) To the National Archives and Records Administration as a record which has sufficient historical or other value to warrant its continued preservation by the United States Government, or for evaluation by the Archivist of the United States or his or her designee to determine whether the record has such value;


(7) To another agency or to an instrumentality of any governmental jurisdiction within or under the control of the United States for a civil or criminal law enforcement activity if the activity is authorized by law, and if the head of the agency or instrumentality has made a written request to the Corporation specifying the particular portion desired and the law enforcement activity for which the record is sought;


(8) To a person pursuant to a showing of compelling circumstances affecting the health or safety of an individual if, upon such disclosure, notification is transmitted to the last known address of such individual;


(9) To either House of Congress, or, to the extent of matter within its jurisdiction, any committee or subcommittee thereof, any joint committee of Congress or subcommittee of any such joint committee;


(10) To the Comptroller General, or any of his or her authorized representatives, in the course of the performance of the duties of the General Accounting Office;


(11) Pursuant to the order of a court of competent jurisdiction.


(12) To a consumer reporting agency in accordance with section 3711(f) of title 31.


(c) The Corporation will adhere to the following procedures in the case of disclosure of any record pursuant to the authority of paragraphs (b)(3) through (b)(12) of this section.


(1) The Corporation will keep a record of the date, nature and purpose of each such disclosure, as well as the name and address of the person or agency to whom such disclosure is made; and


(2) The Corporation will retain and, with the exception of disclosures made pursuant to paragraph (b)(7) of this section, make available to the individual named in the record for the greater of five years or the life of the record all material compiled under paragraph (d)(1) of this section with respect to disclosure of such record.


(d) Whenever a record which has been disclosed by the Corporation under authority of paragraph (b) of this section is, within a reasonable amount of time after such disclosure, either amended by the Corporation or the subject of a statement of disagreement, the Corporation will transmit such additional information to any person or agency to whom the record was disclosed, if such disclosure was subject to the accounting requirements of paragraph (c)(1) of this section.


[40 FR 46274, Oct. 6, 1975, as amended at 61 FR 43420, Aug. 23, 1996]


§ 310.11 Fees.

The Corporation, upon a request for records disclosable pursuant to the Privacy Act of 1974 (5 U.S.C. 552a), shall charge a fee of $0.10 per page for duplicating, except as follows:


(a) If the Corporation determines that it can grant access to a record only by providing a copy of the record, no fee will be charged for providing the first copy of the record or any portion thereof;


(b) Whenever the aggregate fees computed under this section do not exceed $10 for any one request, the fee will be deemed waived by the Corporation; or


(c) Whenever the Corporation determines that a reduction or waiver is warranted, it may reduce or waive any fees imposed for furnishing requested information pursuant to this section.


[40 FR 46274, Oct. 6, 1975, as amended at 61 FR 43420, Aug. 23, 1996]


§ 310.12 Penalties.

Subsection (i)(3) of the Privacy Act of 1974 (5 U.S.C. 552a(i)(3)) imposes criminal penalties for obtaining Corporation records on individuals under false pretenses. The subsection provides as follows:



Any person who knowingly and willfully requests or obtains any record concerning an individual from an agency under false pretenses shall be guilty of a misdemeanor and fined not more than $5,000.


§ 310.13 Exemptions.

The following systems of records are exempt from §§ 310.3 through 310.9 and § 310.10(c)(2) of these rules:


(a) Investigatory material compiled for law enforcement purposes in the following systems of records is exempt from §§ 310.3 through 310.9 and § 310.10(c)(2) of these rules;


Provided, however, That if any individual is denied any right, privilege, or benefit to which he/she would otherwise be entitled under Federal law, or for which he/she would otherwise be eligible, as a result of the maintenance of such material, such material shall be disclosed to such individual, except to the extent that the disclosure of such material would reveal the identity of a source who furnished information to the Government under an express promise that the identity of the source would be held in confidence, or, prior to September 27, 1975, under an implied promise that the identity of the source would be held in confidence:



30-64-0002 – Financial institutions investigative and enforcement records system.


30-64-0010 – Investigative files and records.


(b) Investigatory material compiled solely for the purpose of determining suitability, eligibility, or qualifications for Corporation employment to the extent that disclosure of such material would reveal the identity of a source who furnished information to the Corporation under an express promise that the identity of the source would be held in confidence, or, prior to September 27, 1975, under an implied promise that the identity of the source would be held in confidence, in the following systems of records, is exempt from §§ 310.3 through 310.9 and § 310.10(c)(2) of these rules:



30-64-0001 – Attorney-legal intern applicant system.


30-64-0010 – Investigative files and records.


(c) Testing or examination material used solely to determine or assess individual qualifications for appointment or promotion in the Corporation’s service, the disclosure of which would compromise the objectivity or fairness of the testing, evaluation, or examination process in the following system of records, is exempt from §§ 310.3 through 310.9 and § 310.10(c)(2) of these rules:



30-64-0009 – Examiner training and education records.


[42 FR 6797, Feb. 4, 1977, as amended at 42 FR 33720, July 1, 1977; 54 FR 38507, Sept. 19, 1989; 61 FR 43420, Aug. 23, 1996]


PART 311 – RULES GOVERNING PUBLIC OBSERVATION OF MEETINGS OF THE CORPORATION’S BOARD OF DIRECTORS


Authority:5 U.S.C. 552b and 12 U.S.C. 1819.


Source:42 FR 14675, Mar. 16, 1977, unless otherwise noted.

§ 311.1 Purpose.

This part implements the policy of the “Government in the Sunshine Act”, section 552b of title 5 U.S.C., which is to provide the public with as much information as possible regarding the decision making process of certain Federal agencies, including the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, while preserving the rights of individuals and the ability of the agency to carry out its responsibilities.


§ 311.2 Definitions.

For purposes of this part:


(a) Board means Board of Directors of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation and includes any subdivision of the Board authorized to act on behalf of the Corporation.


(b) Meeting means the deliberations (including those conducted by conference telephone call, or by any other method) of at least three members where such deliberations determine or result in the joint conduct or disposition of agency business but does not include:


(1) Deliberations to determine whether meetings will be open or closed or whether information pertaining to closed meetings will be withheld;


(2) Informal background discussions among Board members and staff which clarify issues and expose varying views;


(3) Decision-making by circulating written material to individual Board members;


(4) Sessions with individuals from outside the Corporation where Board members listen to a presentation and may elicit additional information.


(c) Member means a member of the Board.


(d) Open to public observation and open to the public mean that individuals may witness the meeting, but not participate in the deliberations. The meeting may be recorded, photographed, or otherwise reproduced if the reproduction does not disturb the meeting.


(e) Public announcement and publicly announce mean making reasonable effort under the particular circumstances of each case to fully inform the public. This may include posting notice on the Corporation’s public notice bulletin board maintained in the lobby of its offices located at 550 17th Street, NW., Washington, DC 20429, issuing a press release and employing other methods of notification that may be desirable in a particular situation.


[42 FR 14675, Mar. 16, 1977, as amended at 42 FR 59494, Nov. 18, 1977; 54 FR 38965, Sept. 22, 1989; 61 FR 38357, July 24, 1996]


§ 311.3 Meetings.

(a) Open meetings. Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, every portion of every meeting of the Corporation’s Board will be open to public observation. Board members will not jointly conduct or dispose of Corporation business other than in accordance with this part.


(b) When meetings may be closed and announcements and disclosures withheld. Except where the Board finds that the public interest requires otherwise, a meeting or portion thereof may be closed, and announcements and disclosure pertaining thereto may be withheld when the Board determines that such meeting or portion of the meeting or the disclosure of such information is likely to:


(1) Disclose matters that are: (i) Specifically authorized under criteria established by an Executive order to be kept secret in the interests of national defense or foreign policy and (ii) in fact properly classified pursuant to such Executive order;


(2) Relate solely to the internal personnel rules and practices of the Corporation;


(3) Disclose matters specifically exempted from disclosure by statute (other than the Freedom of Information Act, 5 U.S.C. 552): Provided, That such statute: (i) Requires that the matters be withheld from the public in such a manner as to leave no discretion on the issue, or (ii) establishes particular types of matters to be withheld;


(4) Disclose trade secrets and commercial or financial information obtained from a person and privileged or confidential;


(5) Involve accusing any person of a crime, or formally censuring any person;


(6) Disclose information of a personal nature where disclosure would constitute a clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy;


(7) Disclose investigatory records compiled for law enforcement purposes, or information which if written would be contained in such records, but only to the extent that the production of such records or information would: (i) Interfere with enforcement proceedings, (ii) deprive a person of a right to a fair trial or an impartial adjudication, (iii) constitute an unwarranted invasion of personal privacy, (iv) disclose the identity of a confidential source, (v) disclose investigative techniques and procedures, or (vi) endanger the life or physical safety of law enforcement personnel;


(8) Disclose information contained in or related to examination, operating, or condition reports prepared by, on behalf of, or for the use of the Corporation or any other agency responsible for the supervision of financial institutions;


(9) Disclose information the premature disclosure of which would be likely to:


(i)(A) Lead to significant financial speculation in currencies, securities, or commodities, or


(B) Significantly endanger the stability of any financial institution; or


(ii) Significantly frustrate implementation of a proposed Corporation action, except that this paragraph (b)(9)(ii) shall not apply in any instance where the Corporation has already disclosed to the public the content or nature of its proposed action, or where the Corporation is required by law to make such disclosure on its own initiative prior to taking final action on such proposal; or


(10) Specifically concern the Corporation’s issuance of a subpoena, or the Corporation’s participation in a civil action or proceeding, an action in a foreign court or international tribunal, or an arbitration, or the initiation, conduct, or disposition by the Corporation of a particular case of formal agency adjudication pursuant to the procedures in 5 U.S.C. 554 or otherwise involving a determination on the record after opportunity for a hearing.


§ 311.4 Procedures for announcing meetings.

(a) Scope. Except to the extent that such announcements are exempt from disclosure under § 311.3(b), announcements relating to open meetings, and meetings closed under the regular closing procedures of § 311.5, will be made in the manner set forth in this section.


(b) Time and content of announcement. The Corporation will make public announcement at least seven days before the meeting of the time, place, and subject matter of the meeting, whether it is to be open or closed to the public, and the name and telephone number of the official designated by the Corporation to respond to requests for information about the meeting. This announcement will be made unless a majority of the Board determines by a recorded vote that Corporation business requires that a meeting be called on lesser notice. In such cases, the Corporation will make public announcement of the time, place, and subject matter of the meeting, and whether it is open or closed to the public, at the earliest practicable time, which may be later than the commencement of the meeting.


(c) Changing time or place of meeting. The time or place of a meeting may be changed following the public announcement required by paragraph (b) of this section only if the Corporation publicly announces the change at the earliest practicable time, which may be later than the commencement of the meeting.


(d) Changing subject matter or nature of meeting. The subject matter of a meeting, or the determination to open or close a meeting or a portion of a meeting, may be changed following the public announcement only if:


(1) A majority of the entire Board determines by recorded vote that agency business so requires and that no earlier announcement of the change was possible; and,


(2) The Corporation publicly announces the change and the vote of each member upon such change at the earliest practicable time, which may be later than the commencement of the meeting.


(e) Publication of announcements in Federal Register. Immediately following each public announcement under this section, such announcement will be submitted for publication in the Federal Register by the Executive Secretary.


[42 FR 14675, Mar. 16, 1977, as amended at 67 FR 71071, Nov. 29, 2002]


§ 311.5 Regular procedure for closing meetings.

(a) Scope. Unless § 311.6 is applicable, the procedures for closing meetings will be those set forth in this section.


(b) Procedure. (1) A decision to close a meeting or portion of a meeting will be taken only when a majority of the entire Board votes to take such action. In deciding whether to close a meeting or portion of a meeting, the Board will consider whether the public interest requires an open meeting. A separate vote of the Board will be taken with respect to each meeting which is proposed to be closed in whole or in part to the public. A single vote may be taken with respect to a series of meetings which are proposed to be closed in whole or in part to the public, or with respect to any information concerning such series of meetings, so long as each meeting in the series involves the same particular matters and is scheduled to be held no more than thirty days after the initial meeting in the series. The vote of each Board member will be recorded and no proxies will be allowed.


(2) Any individual whose interests may be directly affected may request that the Corporation close any portion of a meeting for any of the reasons referred to in paragraph (b)(5), (6), or (b)(7) of § 311.3. Requests should be directed to the Executive Secretary, Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, 550 17th Street, NW., Washington, DC 20429. After receiving notice that an individual desires a portion of a meeting to be closed, the Board, upon request of any one of its members, will vote by recorded vote whether to close the relevant portion of the meeting. This procedure will apply even if the individual’s request is made subsequent to the announcement of a decision to hold an open meeting.


(3) The Corporation’s General Counsel will make the public certification required by § 311.7.


(4) Within 1 day after any vote taken pursuant to paragraphs (b)(1) or (2) of this section, the Corporation will make publicly available a written copy of the vote, reflecting the vote of each Board member. Except to the extent that such information is exempt from disclosure, if a meeting or portion of a meeting is to be closed to the public, the Corporation will make publicly available within 1 day after the required vote a full written explanation of its action, together with a list of all persons expected to attend the meeting and their affiliation.


(5) The Corporation will publicly announce the time, place, and subject matter of the meeting, with determinations as to open and closed portions, in the manner and within the time limits prescribed in § 311.4.


[42 FR 14675, Mar. 16, 1977; 42 FR 16616, Mar. 29, 1977, as amended at 42 FR 59494, Nov. 18, 1977; 67 FR 71071, Nov. 29, 2002]


§ 311.6 Expedited procedure for announcing and closing certain meetings.

(a) Scope. Since a majority of its meetings may properly be closed pursuant to paragraph (b)(4), (8), (9)(i), or (b)(10) of § 311.3, subsection (d)(4) of the Government in the Sunshine Act (5 U.S.C. 552b) allows the Corporation to use expedited procedures in closing meetings under these four subparagraphs. Absent a compelling public interest to the contrary, meetings or portions of meetings that can be expected to be closed using these procedures include, but are not limited to: Administrative enforcement proceedings under section 8 of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act (12 U.S.C. 1818); appointment of the Corporation as conservator of a depository institution, or as receiver, liquidator or liquidating agent of a closed depository institution or a depository institution in danger of closing; and certain management and liquidation activities pursuant to such appointments; possible financial assistance by the Corporation under section 13 of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act (12 U.S.C. 1823); certain depository institution applications including applications to establish or move branches, applications to merge, and applications for insurance; and investigatory activity under section 10(c) of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act (12 U.S.C. 1820(c)). In announcing and closing meetings or portions of meetings under this section, the following procedures will be observed.


(b) Announcement. Except to the extent that such information is exempt from disclosure under the provisions of § 311.3(b) the Corporation will make public announcement of the time, place and subject matter of the meeting and of each portion thereof at the earliest practicable time. This announcement will be published in the Federal Register if publication can be effected at least 1 day prior to the scheduled date of the meeting.


(c) Procedure for closing. (1) The Corporation’s General Counsel will make the public certification required by § 311.7.


(2) At the beginning of a meeting or portion of a meeting to be closed under this section, a recorded vote of the Board will be taken. The Board will determine by its vote whether to proceed with the closing. If a majority of the entire Board votes to close, the meeting will be closed to public observation. Even though a meeting or portion thereof could properly be closed under this section, a majority of the entire Board may find that the public interest requires an open session and vote, reflecting the vote of each Board member, will be made available to the public.


[42 FR 14675, Mar. 16, 1977; 42 FR 16616, Mar. 29, 1977, as amended at 54 FR 38965, Sept. 22, 1989]


§ 311.7 General Counsel certification.

For every meeting or portion thereof closed under § 311.5 or § 311.6, the Corporation’s General Counsel will publicly certify that, in the opinion of such General Counsel, the meeting may be closed to the public and will state each relevant exemptive provision. In the absence of the General Counsel, the next ranking official in the Legal Division may perform the certification. If the General Counsel and such next ranking official in the Legal Division are both absent, the official in the Legal Division who is then next in rank may provide the required certification. A copy of this certification, together with a statement from the presiding officer of the meeting setting forth the time and place of the meeting, and the persons present, will be retained in the Board’s permanent files.


[42 FR 14675, Mar. 16, 1977, as amended at 61 FR 38357, July 24, 1996]


§ 311.8 Transcripts and minutes of meetings.

(a) When required. The Corporation will maintain a complete transcript, identifying each speaker, to record fully the proceedings of each meeting or portion of a meeting closed to the public, except that in the case of a meeting or portions of a meeting closed to the public pursuant to paragraph (b)(8), (9)(i), or (10) of § 311.3, the Corporation may, in lieu of a transcript, maintain a set of minutes.


(b) Content of minutes. If minutes are maintained, they will fully and clearly describe all matters discussed and will provide a full and accurate summary of any actions taken, and the reasons for taking such action. Minutes will also include a description of each of the views expressed by each person in attendance on any item and the record of any roll call vote, reflecting the vote of each member. All documents considered in connection with any action will be identified in the minutes.


(c) Available material. The Corporation will maintain a complete verbatim copy of the transcript or minutes of each meeting or portion of a meeting closed to the public for a period of at least 2 years after the meeting, or until 1 year after the conclusion of any proceeding with respect to which the meeting or portion was held, whichever occurs later. The Corporation will make promptly available to the public the transcript, identifying each speaker, or minutes of items on the agenda or testimony of any witness received at the closed meeting except that in cases where the Privacy Act of 1974 (5 U.S.C. 552a) does not apply, the Corporation may withhold information exempt from disclosure under § 311.3(b). For the convenience of members of the public who may be unable to attend open meetings of the Board, the Corporation will maintain for at least 2 years a set of minutes of each meeting of the Board or portion thereof open to public observation.


(d) Procedures for inspecting or copying available material. (1) An individual may inspect materials made available under paragraph (c) of this section at the offices of the Executive Secretary, Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, 550 17th Street, NW., Washington, DC 20429, during normal business hours. If the individual desires a copy of such material, the Corporation will furnish copies at a cost of 10 cents per page. Whenever the Corporation determines that in the public interest a reduction or waiver is warranted, it may reduce or waive any fees imposed under this section.


(2) An individual may also submit a written request for transcripts or minutes, reasonably identifying the records sought, to the Executive Secretary, Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, 550 17th Street, NW., Washington, DC 20429.


(e) Procedures for obtaining documents identified in minutes. Copies of documents identified in minutes or considered by the Board in connection with any action identified in the minutes may be made available to the public upon request, to the extent permitted by the Freedom of Information Act, under the provisions of 12 CFR part 309, Disclosure of Information.


[42 FR 14675, Mar. 16, 1977, as amended at 61 FR 38357, July 24, 1996; 67 FR 71071, Nov. 29, 2002]


PART 312 [RESERVED]

PART 313 – PROCEDURES FOR COLLECTION OF CORPORATE DEBT, CRIMINAL RESTITUTION DEBT, AND CIVIL MONEY PENALTY DEBT


Authority:5 U.S.C. 5514; 12 U.S.C. 1818(i), 1819(a); Pub. L. 104-134, 110 Stat. 1321 (31 U.S.C. 3701, 3711, 3716).


Source:67 FR 48527, July 25, 2002, unless otherwise noted.

Subpart A – Scope, Purpose, Definitions and Delegations of Authority


Source:86 FR 1742, Jan. 11, 2021, unless otherwise noted.

§ 313.1 Scope.

This part establishes the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) procedures for the collection of certain debts owed to the United States.


(a) This part applies to collections by the FDIC from:


(1) Federal employees who are indebted to the FDIC;


(2) Employees of the FDIC who are indebted to other agencies;


(3) Other persons, organizations, or entities that are indebted to the FDIC, except those excluded in paragraph (b)(3) of this section; and


(4) Civil money penalty debtors assessed civil money penalties by the FDIC.


(b) This part does not apply:


(1) To debts or claims arising under the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 (Title 26, U.S. Code), the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. 301 et seq.), or the tariff laws of the United States;


(2) To a situation to which the Contract Disputes Act (41 U.S.C. 601 et seq.) applies; or


(3) In any case where collection of a debt is explicitly provided for or prohibited by another statute.


(c) This part applies only to:


(1) Debts owed to and payments made by the FDIC acting in its corporate capacity, that is, in connection with employee matters such as travel-related claims and erroneous overpayments, contracting activities involving corporate operations, debts related to requests to the FDIC for documents under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), or where a request for an offset is received by the FDIC from another Federal agency;


(2) Criminal restitution debt owed to the FDIC in either its corporate capacity or its receivership capacity; and


(3) Civil money penalties arising out of the FDIC’s activities in its supervision or enforcement capacities.


(4) With the exception of criminal restitution debt noted in paragraph (c)(2) of this section and civil money penalty debt noted in paragraph (c)(3) of this section, this part does not apply to debts owed to or payments made by the FDIC in connection with the FDIC’s liquidation, supervision, enforcement, or insurance responsibilities, nor does it limit or affect the FDIC’s authority with respect to debts or claims under 12 U.S.C. 1819(a) and 1820(a).


(d) Subparts B through G of this part do not apply to the collection of civil money penalty debt.


(e) Nothing in this part precludes the compromise, suspension, or termination of collection actions, where appropriate, under: Standards implementing the Debt Collection Improvement Act (DCIA) (31 U.S.C. 3711 et seq.); the Federal Claims Collection Standards (FCCS) (31 CFR chapter IX); or any other applicable law.


§ 313.2 Purpose.

(a) The purpose of this part is to implement Federal statutes and regulatory standards authorizing the FDIC to collect debts owed to the United States. This part is consistent with the following Federal statutes and regulations:


(1) DCIA at 31 U.S.C. 3711 (collection and compromise of claims); section 3716 (administrative offset), section 3717 (interest and penalty on claims), and section 3718 (contracts for collection services);


(2) 5 U.S.C. 5514 (salary offset);


(3) 5 U.S.C. 5584 (waiver of claims for overpayment);


(4) 31 CFR chapter IX (Federal Claims Collection Standards);


(5) 5 CFR part 550, subpart K (salary offset);


(6) 31 U.S.C. 3720D and 31 CFR 285.11 (administrative wage garnishment);


(7) 26 U.S.C. 6402(d), 31 U.S.C. 3720A, and 31 CFR 285.2 (tax refund offset); and


(8) 5 CFR 831.1801 through 1808 (U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM) offset).


(b) Collectively, the statutes and regulations in paragraph (a) of this section prescribe the manner in which Federal agencies should proceed to establish the existence and validity of debts owed to the Federal Government and describe the remedies available to agencies to offset valid debts.


§ 313.3 Definitions.

Except where the context clearly indicates otherwise or where the term is defined elsewhere in this subpart, the following definitions shall apply to this subpart.


(a) Agency means a department, agency, court, court administrative office, or instrumentality in the executive, judicial, or legislative branch of Government, including Government corporations.


(b) Board means the Board of Directors of the FDIC.


(c) Centralized administrative offset means the mandatory referral to the Secretary of the Treasury by a creditor agency of a past due debt which is more than 180 days delinquent, for the purpose of collection under the Treasury’s centralized offset program.


(d) Certification means a written statement transmitted from a creditor agency to a paying agency for purposes of administrative or salary offset, to Treasury’s Bureau of the Fiscal Service for offset or to the Secretary of the Treasury for centralized administrative offset. The certification confirms the existence and amount of the debt and verifies that required procedural protections have been afforded the debtor. Where the debtor requests a hearing on a claimed debt, the decision by a hearing official or administrative law judge constitutes a certification.


(e) Chairman means the Chairman of the FDIC.


(f) Compromise means the settlement or forgiveness of a debt under 31 U.S.C. 3711 or 12 U.S.C. 1818(i)(2)(F) (for civil money penalties), in accordance with standards set forth in the FCCS and applicable Federal law.


(g) Creditor agency means an agency of the Federal Government to which the debt is owed, or a debt collection center when acting on behalf of a creditor agency to collect a debt.


(h) Debt means an amount owed to the United States from loans insured or guaranteed by the United States and all other amounts due the United States from fees, leases, rents, royalties, services, sales of real or personal property, overpayments, penalties, damages, interest, restitution, fines and forfeitures, and all other similar sources. For purposes of this part, a debt owed to the FDIC constitutes a debt owed to the United States.


(i) Debt collection center means the Department of the Treasury or other Government agency or division designated by the Secretary of the Treasury with authority to collect debts on behalf of creditor agencies in accordance with 31 U.S.C. 3711(g).


(j) Director means the Director of the Division of Finance (DOF), the Director of the Division of Administration (DOA), the Director of the Division of Resolutions and Receiverships (DRR), the Director of the Division of Risk Management Supervision (RMS), the Director of the Division of Depositor and Consumer Protection (DCP), or the Director of the Division of Complex Institution Supervision and Resolution (CISR), as applicable, or the applicable Director’s designee.


(k) Disposable pay means that part of current adjusted basic pay, special pay, incentive pay, retired pay, retainer pay, and, in the case of an employee not entitled to adjusted basic pay, other authorized pay, remaining for each pay period after the deduction of any amount required by law to be withheld. The FDIC shall allow the following deductions in determining the amount of disposable pay that is subject to salary offset:


(1) Federal employment taxes;


(2) Federal, state, or local income taxes to the extent authorized or required by law, but no greater than would be the case if the employee claimed all dependents to which he or she is entitled and such additional amounts for which the employee presents evidence of a tax obligation supporting the additional withholding;


(3) Medicare deductions;


(4) Health insurance premiums;


(5) Normal retirement contributions, including employee contributions to the Thrift Savings Plan or the FDIC 401(k) Plan;


(6) Normal life insurance premiums (e.g., Serviceman’s Group Life Insurance and “Basic Life” Federal Employee’s Group Life Insurance premiums), not including amounts deducted for supplementary coverage;


(7) Amounts mandatorily withheld for the United States Soldiers’ and Airmen’s Home; and


(8) Fines and forfeiture ordered by a court-martial or by a commanding officer.


(l) Division of Administration (DOA) means the Division of Administration of the FDIC, or any successor division of the FDIC.


(m) Division of Complex Institution Supervision and Resolution (CISR) means the Division of Complex Institution Supervision and Resolution of the FDIC, or any successor division of the FDIC.


(n) Division of Depositor and Consumer Protection (DCP) means the Division of Depositor and Consumer Protection of the FDIC, or any successor division of the FDIC.


(o) Division of Finance (DOF) means the Division of Finance of the FDIC, or any successor division of the FDIC.


(p) Division of Resolutions and Receiverships (DRR) means the Division of Resolutions and Receiverships of the FDIC, or any successor division of the FDIC.


(q) Division of Risk Management Supervision (RMS) means the Division of Risk Management Supervision of the FDIC, or any successor division of the FDIC.


(r) Federal Claims Collection Standards (FCCS) means standards published at 31 CFR chapter IX.


(s) Garnishment means the process of withholding amounts from the disposable pay of a person employed outside the Federal Government, and the paying of those amounts to a creditor in satisfaction of a withholding order.


(t) Hearing official means an administrative law judge or other individual authorized to conduct a hearing and issue a final decision in response to a debtor’s request for hearing. A hearing official may not be under the supervision or control of the Chairman or FDIC Board when the FDIC is the creditor agency.


(u) Notice of Intent to Offset or Notice of Intent means a written notice from a creditor agency to an employee, organization, entity, restitution debtor, or civil money penalty debtor that claims a debt and informs the debtor that the creditor agency intends to collect the debt by administrative offset. The notice also informs the debtor of certain procedural rights with respect to the claimed debt and offset.


(v) Notice of Salary Offset means a written notice from a paying agency to its employee informing the employee that salary offset to collect a debt due to the creditor agency will begin at the next officially established pay interval. The paying agency transmits this notice to its employee after receiving a certification from the creditor agency.


(w) Paying agency means the agency of the Federal Government that employs the individual who owes a debt to an agency of the Federal Government. The same agency may be both the creditor agency and the paying agency.


(x) Salary offset means an administrative offset to collect a debt under 5 U.S.C. 5514 by deduction(s) at one or more officially established pay intervals from the current pay account of an employee without his or her consent.


(y) Waiver means the cancellation, remission, forgiveness or non-recovery of a debt allegedly owed by an employee to an agency, as authorized or required by 5 U.S.C. 5584 or any other law.


(z) Withholding order means any order for withholding or garnishment of pay issued by an agency, or judicial or administrative body. For purposes of administrative wage garnishment, the terms “wage garnishment order” and “garnishment order” have the same meaning as “withholding order.”


§ 313.4 Delegations of authority.

Authority to conduct the following activities is delegated as follows: Authority to collect debt, other than criminal restitution debt and civil money penalty debt, on behalf of the FDIC in its corporate capacity is delegated to the Director of DOA or Director of DOF, as applicable, or to the applicable Director’s designee; and authority to collect criminal restitution debt on behalf of the FDIC in either its receivership or corporate capacity is delegated to the Director of DRR, or to her or his designee. These individuals, under the delegations in this section, may do the following:


(a) Initiate and carry out the debt collection process on behalf of the FDIC, in accordance with the FCCS;


(b) Accept or reject compromise offers and suspend or terminate collection actions to the full extent of the FDIC’s legal authority under 12 U.S.C. 1819(a) and 1820(a), 31 U.S.C. 3711(a)(2), and any other applicable statute or regulation, provided, however, that no such claim shall be compromised or collection action terminated, except upon the concurrence of the FDIC General Counsel or his or her designee;


(c) Report to consumer reporting agencies certain data pertaining to delinquent debts, where appropriate;


(d) Use administrative offset procedures, including salary offset, to collect debts; and


(e) Take any other action necessary to promptly and effectively collect debts owed to the United States in accordance with the policies contained herein and as otherwise provided by law.


§§ 313.5-313.19 [Reserved]

Subpart B – Administrative Offset

§ 313.20 Applicability and scope.

The provisions of this subpart apply to the collection of debts owed to the United States arising from transactions with the FDIC. Administrative offset is authorized under the DCIA. This subpart is consistent with the FCCS on administrative offset issued by the Department of Justice.


§ 313.21 Definitions.

(a) Administrative offset means withholding funds payable by the United States to, or held by the United States for, a person to satisfy a debt.


(b) Person includes a natural person or persons, profit or nonprofit corporation, partnership, association, trust, estate, consortium, or other entity which is capable of owing a debt to the United States Government except that agencies of the United States, or any state or local government shall be excluded.


§ 313.22 Collection.

(a) The Director may collect a claim from a person by administrative offset of monies payable by the Government only after:


(1) Providing the debtor with due process required under this part; and


(2) Providing the paying agency with written certification that the debtor owes the debt in the amount stated and that the FDIC, as creditor agency, has complied with this part.


(b) Prior to initiating collection by administrative offset, the Director should determine that the proposed offset is within the scope of this remedy, as set forth in 31 CFR 901.3(a). Administrative offset under 31 U.S.C. 3716 may not be used to collect debts more than 10 years after the federal government’s right to collect the debt first accrued, except as otherwise provided by law. In addition, administrative offset may not be used when a statute explicitly prohibits its use to collect the claim or type of claim involved.


(c) Unless otherwise provided, debts or payments not subject to administrative offset under 31 U.S.C. 3716 may be collected by administrative offset under common law, or any other applicable statutory authority.


§ 313.23 Offset prior to completion of procedures.

The FDIC may collect a debt by administrative offset prior to the completion of the procedures described in § 313.25, if:


(a) Failure to offset a payment would substantially prejudice the FDIC’s ability to collect the debt; and


(b) The time before the payment is to be made does not reasonably permit completion of the procedures described in § 313.25. Such prior offsetting shall be followed promptly by the completion of the procedures described in § 313.25.


§ 313.24 Omission of procedures.

The FDIC shall not be required to follow the procedures described in § 313.25 where:


(a) The offset is in the nature of a recoupment (i.e., the FDIC may offset a payment due to the debtor when both the payment due to the debtor and the debt owed to the FDIC arose from the same transaction); or


(b) The debt arises under a contract as set forth in Cecile Industries, Inc. v. Cheney, 995 F.2d 1052 (Fed. Cir. 1993), which provides that procedural protections under administrative offset do not supplant or restrict established procedures for contractual offsets accommodated by the Contracts Disputes Act; or


(c) In the case of non-centralized administrative offsets, the FDIC first learns of the existence of a debt due when there would be insufficient time to afford the debtor due process under these procedures before the paying agency makes payment to the debtor; in such cases, the Director shall give the debtor notice and an opportunity for review as soon as practical and shall refund any money ultimately found not to be due to the U.S. Government.


§ 313.25 Debtor’s rights.

Unless the procedures described in § 313.23 are used, prior to collecting any claim by administrative offset or referring such claim to another agency for collection through administrative offset, the Director shall provide the debtor with the following:


(a) Written notification of the nature and amount of the claim, the intention of the Director to collect the claim through administrative offset, and a statement of the rights of the debtor under this paragraph;


(b) An opportunity to inspect and copy the records of the FDIC with respect to the claim, unless such records are exempt from disclosure;


(c) An opportunity to have the FDIC’s determination of indebtedness reviewed by the Director:


(1) Any request by the debtor for such review shall be in writing and shall be submitted to the FDIC within 30 calendar days of the date of the notice of the offset. The Director may waive the time limit for requesting review for good cause shown by the debtor;


(2) Upon acceptance of a request for review by the debtor, the FDIC shall provide the debtor with a reasonable opportunity for an oral hearing when the determination turns on an issue of credibility or veracity, or the Director determines that the question of the indebtedness cannot be resolved by review of the documentary evidence alone. Unless otherwise required by law, an oral hearing under this section is not required to be a formal evidentiary hearing, although the Director shall document all significant matters discussed at the hearing. In cases where an oral hearing is not required by this section, the Director shall make his determination based on a documentary hearing consisting of a review of the written record; and


(d) An opportunity to enter into a written agreement for the voluntary repayment of the amount of the claim at the discretion of the Director.


§ 313.26 Interest.

Pursuant to 31 U.S.C. 3717, the FDIC shall assess interest, penalties and administrative costs on debts owed to the United States. The FDIC is authorized to assess interest and related charges on debts that are not subject to 31 U.S.C. 3717 to the extent authorized under the common law or other applicable statutory authority.


§ 313.27 Refunds.

Amounts recovered by administrative offset but later found not to be owed to the Government shall be promptly refunded. Unless required by law or contract, such refunds shall not bear interest.


§ 313.28 No requirement for duplicate notice.

Where the Director has previously given a debtor any of the required notice and review opportunities with respect to a particular debt, the Director is not required to duplicate such notice and review opportunities prior to initiating administrative offset.


§ 313.29 Requests for offset to other federal agencies.

The Director may request that a debt owed to the FDIC be administratively offset against funds due and payable to a debtor by another federal agency. In requesting administrative offset, the FDIC, as the creditor agency, will certify in writing to the federal agency holding funds payable to the debtor:


(a) That the debtor owes the debt;


(b) The amount and basis of the debt; and


(c) That the FDIC has complied with the requirements of its own administrative offset regulations and the applicable provisions of 31 U.S.C. 3716 with respect to providing the debtor with due process, unless otherwise provided.


§ 313.30 Requests for offset from other federal agencies.

Any federal agency may request that funds due and payable to its debtor by the FDIC be administratively offset by the FDIC in order to collect a debt owed to such agency by the debtor. The FDIC shall initiate the requested offset only upon:


(a) Receipt of written certification from the creditor agency stating:


(1) That the debtor owes the debt;


(2) The amount and basis of the debt; and


(3) That the agency has complied with its own administrative offset regulations and with the applicable provisions of 31 CFR 901.3, including providing any required hearing or review.


(b) A determination by the creditor agency that collection by offset against funds payable by the FDIC would be in the best interest of the United States and that such offset would not otherwise be contrary to law.


§§ 313.31-313.39 [Reserved]

Subpart C – Salary Offset

§ 313.40 Scope.

These salary offset regulations are issued in compliance with 5 U.S.C. 5514 and 5 CFR part 550, subpart K, and apply to the collection of debts owed by employees of the FDIC or other federal agencies. These salary offset procedures do not apply where an employee consents to the recovery of a debt from his current pay account. These procedures do not apply to debts arising under the Internal Revenue Code, the tariff laws of the United States or to any case where collection of a debt by salary offset is explicitly provided for or prohibited by another statute (e.g., travel advances under 5 U.S.C. 5705 and employee training expenses under 5 U.S.C. 4108). These procedures do not preclude an employee from requesting waiver of an erroneous payment under 5 U.S.C. 5584, or in any way questioning the amount or validity of a debt, in the manner specified by law or these agency regulations. This section also does not preclude an employee from requesting waiver of the collection of a debt under any other applicable statutory authority. When possible, salary offset through centralized administrative offset procedures should be attempted before seeking salary offset from a paying agency different than the creditor agency.


§ 313.41 Notice requirement where FDIC is creditor agency.

Where the FDIC seeks salary offset under 5 U.S.C. 5514 as the creditor agency, the FDIC shall first provide the employee with a written Notice of Intent to Offset at least 30 calendar days before salary offset is to commence. The Notice of Intent to Offset shall include the following information and statements:


(a) That the Director has determined that a debt is owed to the FDIC and intends to collect the debt by means of deduction from the employee’s current disposable pay account until the debt and all accumulated interest is paid in full or otherwise resolved;


(b) The amount of the debt and the factual basis for the debt;


(c) A salary offset schedule stating the frequency and amount of each deduction, stated as a fixed dollar amount or percentage of disposable pay (not to exceed 15%);


(d) That in lieu of salary offset, the employee may propose a voluntary repayment plan to satisfy the debt on terms acceptable to the FDIC, which must be documented in writing, signed by the employee and the Director or the Director’s designee, and documented in the FDIC’s files;


(e) The FDIC’s policy concerning interest, penalties, and administrative costs, and a statement that such assessments must be made, unless excused in accordance with the FCCS;


(f) That the employee has the right to inspect and copy FDIC records not exempt from disclosure relating to the debt claimed, or to receive copies of such records if the employee or the employee’s representative is unable personally to inspect the records, due to geographical or other constraints:


(1) That such requests be made in writing, and identify by name and address the Director or other designated individual to whom the request should be sent; and


(2) That upon receipt of such a request, the Director or the Director’s designee shall notify the employee of the time and location where the records may be inspected and copied;


(g) That the employee has a right to request a hearing regarding the existence and amount of the debt claimed or the salary offset schedule proposed by the FDIC, provided that the employee files a request for such a hearing with the FDIC in accordance with § 313.42 that such a hearing will be conducted by an impartial official who is an administrative law judge or other hearing official not under the supervision or control of the Board;


(h) The procedure and deadline for requesting a hearing, including the name, address, and telephone number of the Director or other designated individual to whom a request for hearing must be sent;


(i) That a request for hearing must be received by the FDIC on or before the 30th calendar day following receipt of the Notice of Intent, and that filing of a request for hearing will stay the collection proceedings;


(j) That the FDIC will initiate salary offset procedures not less than 30 days from the date of the employee’s receipt of the Notice of Intent to Offset, unless the employee files a timely request for a hearing;


(k) That if a hearing is held, the administrative law judge or other hearing official will issue a decision at the earliest practical date, but not later than 60 days after the filing of the request for the hearing, unless the employee requests a delay in the proceedings which is granted by the hearing official;


(l) That any knowingly false or frivolous statements, representations, or evidence may subject the employee to:


(1) Disciplinary procedures appropriate under 5 U.S.C. chapter 75, 5 CFR part 752, or any other applicable statutes or regulations;


(2) Penalties under the False Claims Act, 31 U.S.C. 3729 through 3731, or under any other applicable statutory authority; or


(3) Criminal penalties under 18 U.S.C. 286, 287, 1001, and 1002 or under any other applicable statutory authority;


(m) That the employee also has the right to request waiver of overpayment pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 5584, and may exercise any other rights and remedies available under statutes or regulations governing the program for which the collection is being made; and


(n) That amounts paid on or deducted from debts that are later waived or found not to be owed to the United States will be promptly refunded to the employee, unless there are applicable contractual or statutory provisions to the contrary.


§ 313.42 Procedures to request a hearing.

(a) To request a hearing, an employee must send a written request to the Director. The request must be received by the Director within 30 calendar days after the employee’s receipt of the Notice of Intent.


(b) The request must be signed by the employee and must fully identify and explain with reasonable specificity all the facts, evidence, and witnesses, if any, that the employee believes support his or her position. The request for hearing must state whether the employee is requesting an oral or documentary hearing. If an oral hearing is requested, the request shall explain why the matter cannot be resolved by a review of documentary evidence alone.


§ 313.43 Failure to timely submit request for hearing.

If the Director does not receive an employee’s request for hearing within the 30-day period set forth in § 313.42(a), the employee shall not be entitled to a hearing. However, the Director may accept an untimely request for hearing if the employee can show that the delay was the result of circumstances beyond his or her control or that he or she failed to receive actual notice of the filing deadline.


§ 313.44 Procedure for hearing.

(a) Obtaining the services of a hearing official. When the FDIC is the creditor agency and the debtor is an FDIC employee, the FDIC shall designate an administrative law judge or contact any agent of another agency designated in appendix A to 5 CFR part 581 to arrange for a hearing official. When the FDIC is the creditor agency and the debtor is not an FDIC employee (i.e., the debtor is employed by another federal agency, also known as the paying agency), and the FDIC cannot provide a prompt and appropriate hearing before an administrative law judge or a hearing official furnished pursuant to a lawful arrangement, the FDIC may contact an agent of the paying agency designated in appendix A to 5 CFR part 581 to arrange for a hearing official. The paying agency must cooperate with the FDIC to provide a hearing official, as required by the FCCS.


(b) Notice and format of hearing – (1) Notice. The hearing official shall determine whether the hearing shall be oral or documentary and shall notify the employee of the form of the hearing. If the hearing will be oral, the notice shall set forth the date, time, and location of the hearing, which must be held within 30 calendar days after the request is received, unless the employee requests that the hearing be delayed. If the hearing will be documentary, the employee shall be notified to submit evidence and written arguments in support of his or her case to the hearing official within 30 calendar days.


(2) Oral hearing. The hearing official may grant a request for an oral hearing if he or she determines that the issues raised by the employee cannot be resolved by review of documentary evidence alone (e.g., where credibility or veracity are at issue). An oral hearing is not required to be an adversarial adjudication, and the hearing official is not required to apply rules of evidence. Witnesses who testify in oral hearings shall do so under oath or affirmation. Oral hearings may take the form of, but are not limited to:


(i) Informal conferences with the hearing official in which the employee and agency representative are given full opportunity to present evidence, witnesses, and argument;


(ii) Informal meetings in which the hearing examiner interviews the employee; or


(iii) Formal written submissions followed by an opportunity for oral presentation.


(3) Documentary hearing. If the hearing official determines that an oral hearing is not necessary, he or she shall decide the issues raised by the employee based upon a review of the written record.


(4) Record. The hearing official shall maintain a summary record of any hearing conducted under this section.


(c) Rescheduling of the hearing date. The hearing official shall reschedule a hearing if requested to do so by both parties, who shall be given reasonable notice of the time and place of this new hearing.


(d) Failure to appear. In the absence of good cause, an employee who fails to appear at a hearing shall be deemed, for the purpose of this subpart, to admit the existence and amount of the debt as described in the Notice of Intent. If the representative of the creditor agency fails to appear, the hearing official shall proceed with the hearing as scheduled, and issue a decision based upon the oral testimony presented and the documentation submitted by both parties.


(e) Date of decision. The hearing official shall issue a written decision based upon the evidence and information developed at the hearing, as soon as practicable after the hearing, but not later than 60 calendar days after the date on which the request for hearing was received by the FDIC, unless the hearing was delayed at the request of the employee. In the event of such a delay, the 60-day decision period shall be extended by the number of days by which the hearing was postponed. The decision of the hearing official shall be final.


(f) Content of decision. The written decision shall include:


(1) A summary of the facts concerning the origin, nature, and amount of the debt;


(2) The hearing official’s findings, analysis, and conclusions; and


(3) The terms of the repayment schedule, if applicable.


(g) Official certification of debt. The hearing official’s decision shall constitute an official certification regarding the existence and amount of the debt for purposes of executing salary offset under 5 U.S.C. 5514. Where the FDIC is the creditor agency but not the current paying agency, the FDIC may make a certification regarding the existence and amount of the debt owed to the FDIC, based on the hearing official’s certification. The FDIC may make this certification to: the Secretary of the Treasury so that Treasury may offset the employee’s current pay account by means of centralized administrative offset (5 CFR 550.1108); or to the current paying agency (5 CFR 550.1109). If the hearing official determines that a debt may not be collected through salary offset but the FDIC as the creditor agency determines that the debt is still valid, the FDIC may seek collection of the debt through other means, including administrative offset of other federal payments or litigation.


§ 313.45 Certification of debt by FDIC as creditor agency.

The Director may also issue a certification of the debt where there has not been a hearing, if the employee has admitted the debt, or failed to contest the existence and amount of the debt in a timely manner (e.g., by failing to request a hearing). The certification shall be in writing and shall state:


(a) The amount and basis of the debt owed by the employee;


(b) The date the FDIC’s right to collect the debt first accrued;


(c) That the FDIC’s debt collection regulations have been approved by OPM pursuant to 5 CFR part 550, subpart K;


(d) If the collection is to be made by lump-sum payment, the amount and date such payment will be collected;


(e) If the collection is to be made in installments through salary offset, the number of installments to be collected, the amount of each installment, and the date of the first installment, if a date other than the next officially established pay period; and


(f) The date the employee was notified of the debt, the action(s) taken pursuant to the FDIC’s regulations, and the dates such actions were taken.


§ 313.46 Notice of salary offset where FDIC is the paying agency.

(a) Upon issuance of a proper certification by the Director for debts owed to the FDIC, or upon receipt of a proper certification from a creditor agency, the Director shall send the employee a written notice of salary offset. Such notice shall advise the employee:


(1) That certification has been issued by the Director or received from another creditor agency;


(2) Of the amount of the debt and of the deductions to be made; and


(3) Of the initiation of salary offset at the next officially established pay interval or as otherwise provided for in the certification.


(b) Where appropriate, the Director shall provide a copy of the notice to the creditor agency and advise such agency of the dollar amount to be offset and the pay period when the offset will begin.


§ 313.47 Voluntary repayment agreements as alternative to salary offset where the FDIC is the creditor agency.

(a) In response to a Notice of Intent, an employee may propose to voluntarily repay the debt through scheduled voluntary payments, in lieu of salary offset. An employee who wishes to repay a debt in this manner shall submit to the Director a written agreement proposing a repayment schedule. This proposal must be received by the Director within 30 calendar days after receipt of the Notice of Intent.


(b) The Director shall notify the employee whether the employee’s proposed voluntary repayment agreement is acceptable. It is within the discretion of the Director whether to accept or reject the debtor’s proposal, or whether to propose to the debtor a modification of the proposed repayment agreement:


(1) If the Director decides that the proposed repayment agreement is unacceptable, he or she shall notify the employee and the employee shall have 30 calendar days from the date he or she received notice of the decision in which to file a request for a hearing on the proposed repayment agreement, as provided in § 313.42; or


(2) If the Director decides that the proposed repayment agreement is acceptable or the debtor agrees to a modification proposed by the Director, the agreement shall be put in writing and signed by both the employee and the Director.


§ 313.48 Special review of repayment agreement or salary offset due to changed circumstances.

(a) An employee subject to a voluntary repayment agreement or salary offset payable to the FDIC as creditor agency may request a special review by the Director of the amount of the salary offset or voluntary repayment, based on materially changed circumstances, including, but not limited to, catastrophic illness, divorce, death, or disability. A request for special review may be made at any time.


(b) In support of a request for special review, the employee shall submit to the Director a detailed statement and supporting documents for the employee, his or her spouse, and dependents indicating:


(1) Income from all sources;


(2) Assets;


(3) Liabilities;


(4) Number of dependents;


(5) Monthly expenses for food, housing, clothing, and transportation;


(6) Medical expenses; and


(7) Exceptional expenses, if any.


(c) The employee shall also file an alternative proposed offset or payment schedule and a statement, with supporting documents, showing why the current salary offset or payments result in extreme financial hardship to the employee.


(d) The Director shall evaluate the statement and supporting documents and determine whether the original salary offset or repayment schedule imposes extreme financial hardship on the employee, for example, by preventing the employee from meeting essential subsistence expenses such as food, housing, clothing, transportation, and medical care. The Director shall notify the employee in writing within 30 calendar days of his or her determination.


(e) If the special review results in a revised salary offset or repayment schedule, the Director shall provide a new certification to the paying agency.


§ 313.49 Coordinating salary offset with other agencies.

(a) Responsibility of the FDIC as the creditor agency. Upon completion of the procedures established in § 313.40 through § 313.45, the Director shall take the following actions:


(1) Submit a debt claim to the paying agency, containing the information described in paragraphs (a)(2) and (a)(3) of this section, together with the certification of debt or an installment agreement (or other instruction regarding the payment schedule, if applicable).


(2) If the collection must be made in installments, inform the paying agency of the amount or percentage of disposable pay to be collected in each installment. The Director may also inform the paying agency of the commencement date and number of installments to be paid, if a date other than the next officially established pay period is required.


(3) Unless the employee has consented to the salary offset in writing or has signed a statement acknowledging receipt of the required procedures and the written consent or statement is forwarded to the paying agency, the Director must also advise the paying agency of the actions the FDIC has taken under 5 U.S.C. 5514 and state the dates such action was taken.


(4) If the employee is in the process of separating from employment, the Director shall submit the debt claim to the employee’s paying agency for collection by lump-sum deduction from the employee’s final check. The paying agency shall certify the total amount of its collection and furnish a copy of the certification to the FDIC and to the employee.


(5) If the employee is already separated and all payments due from his or her former paying agency have been paid, the Director may, unless otherwise prohibited, request that money due and payable to the employee from the federal government, including payments from the Civil Service Retirement and Disability Fund (5 CFR 831.1801), be administratively offset to collect the debt.


(6) In the event an employee transfers to another paying agency, the Director shall not repeat the procedures described in § 313.40 through § 313.45 in order to resume collecting the debt. Instead, the FDIC shall review the debt upon receiving the former paying agency’s notice of the employee’s transfer and shall ensure that collection is resumed by the new paying agency. The FDIC must submit a properly certified claim to the new paying agency before collection can be resumed.


(b) Responsibility of the FDIC as the paying agency – (1) Complete claim. When the FDIC receives a properly certified claim from a creditor agency, the employee shall be given written notice of the certification, the date salary offset will begin, and the amount of the periodic deductions. The FDIC shall schedule deductions to begin at the next officially established pay interval or as otherwise provided for in the certification.


(2) Incomplete claim. When the FDIC receives an incomplete certification of debt from a creditor agency, the FDIC shall return the debt claim with notice that procedures under 5 U.S.C. 5514 and 5 CFR 550.1104 must be followed and that a properly certified debt claim must be received before action will be taken to collect from the employee’s current pay account.


(3) Review. The FDIC is not authorized to review the merits of the creditor agency’s determination with respect to the amount or validity of the debt certified by the creditor agency.


(4) Employees who transfer from one paying agency to another agency. If, after the creditor agency has submitted the debt claim to the FDIC, the employee transfers to a different paying agency before the debt is collected in full, the FDIC must certify the total amount collected on the debt. One copy of the certification shall be furnished to the employee, and one copy shall be sent to the creditor agency along with notice of the employee’s transfer. If the FDIC is aware that the employee is entitled to payments from the Civil Service Retirement and Disability Fund, or other similar payments, it must provide written notification to the agency responsible for making such payments that the debtor owes a debt (including the amount) and that the requirements set forth herein and in the OPM’s regulation (5 CFR part 550, subpart K) have been fully met.


§ 313.50 Interest, penalties, and administrative costs.

Where the FDIC is the creditor agency, it shall assess interest, penalties, and administrative costs pursuant to 31 U.S.C. 3717 and 31 CFR parts 900 through 904.


§ 313.51 Refunds.

(a) Where the FDIC is the creditor agency, it shall promptly refund any amount deducted under the authority of 5 U.S.C. 5514 when the debt is compromised or otherwise found not to be owing to the United States, or when an administrative or judicial order directs the FDIC to make a refund.


(b) Unless required by law or contract, such refunds shall not bear interest.


§ 313.52 Request from a creditor agency for services of a hearing official.

(a) The FDIC may provide a hearing official upon request of the creditor agency when the debtor is employed by the FDIC and the creditor agency cannot provide a prompt and appropriate hearing before a hearing official furnished pursuant to another lawful arrangement.


(b) The FDIC may provide a hearing official upon request of a creditor agency when the debtor works for the creditor agency and that agency cannot arrange for a hearing official.


(c) The Director shall arrange for qualified personnel to serve as hearing officials.


(d) Services rendered under paragraph (a) of this section shall be provided on a fully reimbursable basis pursuant to 31 U.S.C. 1535.


§ 313.53 Non-waiver of rights by payments.

A debtor’s payment, whether voluntary or involuntary, of all or any portion of a debt being collected pursuant to this section shall not be construed as a waiver of any rights that the debtor may have under any statute, regulation, or contract except as otherwise provided by law or contract.


§ 313.54 Exception to due process procedures.

(a) The procedures set forth in this subpart shall not apply to routine intra-agency salary adjustments of pay, including the following:


(1) Any adjustment to pay arising out of an employee’s election of coverage or a change in coverage under a federal benefits program requiring periodic deductions from pay, if the amount to be recovered was accumulated over four pay periods or less;


(2) A routine adjustment of pay that is made to correct an overpayment attributable to clerical or administrative errors or delays in processing pay documents, if the overpayment occurred within the four pay periods preceding the adjustment and, at the time of such adjustment or as soon thereafter as is practical, the individual is provided written notice of the nature and amount of the adjustment and the point of contact for contesting such adjustment; or


(3) Any adjustment to collect a debt amount to $50 or less, if, at the time of such adjustment, or as soon thereafter as is practical, the individual is provided written notice of the nature and amount of the adjustment and the point of contact for contesting such adjustment.


(b) The procedure for notice to the employee and collection of such adjustments is set forth in § 313.55.


§ 313.55 Salary adjustments.

Any negative adjustment to pay arising out of an employee’s election of coverage, or a change in coverage, under a federal benefits program requiring periodic deductions from pay shall not be considered collection of a “debt” for the purposes of this section if the amount to be recovered was accumulated over four pay periods or less. In such cases, the FDIC shall not apply this subpart C, but will provide a clear and concise statement in the employee’s earnings statement advising the employee of the previous overpayment at the time the adjustment is made.


§§ 313.56-313.79 [Reserved]

Subpart D – Administrative Wage Garnishment

§ 313.80 Scope and purpose.

(a) These administrative wage garnishment regulations are issued in compliance with 31 U.S.C. 3720D and 31 CFR 285.11(f). The subpart provides procedures for the FDIC to collect money from a debtor’s disposable pay by means of administrative wage garnishment. The receipt of payments pursuant to this subpart does not preclude the FDIC from pursuing other debt collection remedies, including the offset of federal payments. The FDIC may pursue such debt collection remedies separately or in conjunction with administrative wage garnishment. This subpart does not apply to the collection of delinquent debts from the wages of federal employees from their federal employment. Federal pay is subject to the federal salary offset procedures set forth in 5 U.S.C. 5514 and other applicable laws.


§ 313.81 Notice.

At least 30 days before the initiation of garnishment proceedings, the Director will send, by first class mail to the debtor’s last known address, a written notice informing the debtor of:


(a) The nature and amount of the debt;


(b) The FDIC’s intention to initiate proceedings to collect the debt through deductions from the debtor’s pay until the debt and all accumulated interest penalties and administrative costs are paid in full;


(c) An explanation of the debtor’s rights as set forth in § 313.82(c); and


(d) The time frame within which the debtor may exercise these rights. The FDIC shall retain a stamped copy of the notice indicating the date the notice was mailed.


§ 313.82 Debtor’s rights.

The FDIC shall afford the debtor the opportunity:


(a) To inspect and copy records related to the debt;


(b) To enter into a written repayment agreement with the FDIC, under terms agreeable to the FDIC; and


(c) To the extent that a debt owed has not been established by judicial or administrative order, to request a hearing concerning the existence or amount of the debt or the terms of the repayment schedule. With respect to debts established by a judicial or administrative order, a debtor may request a hearing concerning the payment or other discharge of the debt. The debtor is not entitled to a hearing concerning the terms of the proposed repayment schedule if these terms have been established by written agreement.


§ 313.83 Form of hearing.

(a) If the debtor submits a timely written request for a hearing as provided in § 313.82(c), the FDIC will afford the debtor a hearing, which at the FDIC’s option may be oral or written. The FDIC will provide the debtor with a reasonable opportunity for an oral hearing when the Director determines that the issues in dispute cannot be resolved by review of the documentary evidence, for example, when the validity of the claim turns on the issue of credibility or veracity.


(b) If the FDIC determines that an oral hearing is appropriate, the time and location of the hearing shall be established by the FDIC. An oral hearing may, at the debtor’s option, be conducted either in person or by telephone conference. All travel expenses incurred by the debtor in connection with an in-person hearing will be borne by the debtor. All telephonic charges incurred during the hearing will be the responsibility of the agency.


(c) In cases when it is determined that an oral hearing is not required by this section, the FDIC will accord the debtor a “paper hearing,” that is, the FDIC will decide the issues in dispute based upon a review of the written record.


§ 313.84 Effect of timely request.

If the FDIC receives a debtor’s written request for hearing within 15 business days of the date the FDIC mailed its notice of intent to seek garnishment, the FDIC shall not issue a withholding order until the debtor has been provided the requested hearing, and a decision in accordance with § 313.88 and § 313.89 has been rendered.


§ 313.85 Failure to timely request a hearing.

If the FDIC receives a debtor’s written request for hearing after 15 business days of the date the FDIC mailed its notice of intent to seek garnishment, the FDIC shall provide a hearing to the debtor. However, the FDIC will not delay issuance of a withholding order unless it determines that the untimely filing of the request was caused by factors over which the debtor had no control, or the FDIC receives information that the FDIC believes justifies a delay or cancellation of the withholding order.


§ 313.86 Hearing official.

A hearing official may be any qualified individual, as determined by the FDIC, including an administrative law judge.


§ 313.87 Procedure.

After the debtor requests a hearing, the hearing official shall notify the debtor of:


(a) The date and time of a telephonic hearing;


(b) The date, time, and location of an in-person oral hearing; or


(c) The deadline for the submission of evidence for a written hearing.


§ 313.88 Format of hearing.

The FDIC will have the burden of proof to establish the existence or amount of the debt. Thereafter, if the debtor disputes the existence or amount of the debt, the debtor must prove by a preponderance of the evidence that no debt exists, or that the amount of the debt is incorrect. In addition, the debtor may present evidence that the terms of the repayment schedule are unlawful, would cause a financial hardship to the debtor, or that collection of the debt may not be pursued due to operation of law. The hearing official shall maintain a record of any hearing held under this section. Hearings are not required to be formal, and evidence may be offered without regard to formal rules of evidence. Witnesses who testify in oral hearings shall do so under oath or affirmation.


§ 313.89 Date of decision.

The hearing official shall issue a written opinion stating his or her decision as soon as practicable, but not later than sixty (60) days after the date on which the request for such hearing was received by the FDIC. If the FDIC is unable to provide the debtor with a hearing and decision within sixty (60) days after the receipt of the request for such hearing:


(a) The FDIC may not issue a withholding order until the hearing is held and a decision rendered; or


(b) If the FDIC had previously issued a withholding order to the debtor’s employer, the withholding order will be suspended beginning on the 61st day after the date the FDIC received the hearing request and continuing until a hearing is held and a decision is rendered.


§ 313.90 Content of decision.

The written decision shall include:


(a) A summary of the facts presented;


(b) The hearing official’s findings, analysis and conclusions; and


(c) The terms of any repayment schedule, if applicable.


§ 313.91 Finality of agency action.

Unless the FDIC on its own initiative orders review of a decision by a hearing official pursuant to 17 CFR 201.431(c), a decision by a hearing official shall become the final decision of the FDIC for the purpose of judicial review under the Administrative Procedure Act.


§ 313.92 Failure to appear.

In the absence of good cause shown, a debtor who fails to appear at a scheduled hearing will be deemed as not having timely filed a request for a hearing.


§ 313.93 Wage garnishment order.

(a) Unless the FDIC receives information that it believes justifies a delay or cancellation of the withholding order, the FDIC will send by first class mail a withholding order to the debtor’s employer within 30 days after the debtor fails to make a timely request for a hearing (i.e., within 15 business days after the mailing of the notice of the FDIC’s intent to seek garnishment) or, if a timely request for a hearing is made by the debtor, within 30 days after a decision to issue a withholding order becomes final.


(b) The withholding order sent to the employer will be in the form prescribed by the Secretary of the Treasury, on the FDIC’s letterhead, and signed by the head of the agency or delegate. The order will contain all information necessary for the employer to comply with the withholding order, including the debtor’s name, address, and social security number, as well as instructions for withholding and information as to where payments should be sent.


(c) The FDIC will keep a stamped copy of the order indicating the date it was mailed.


§ 313.94 Certification by employer.

Along with the withholding order, the FDIC will send to the employer a certification in a form prescribed by the Secretary of the Treasury. The employer shall complete and return the certification to the FDIC within the time frame prescribed in the instructions to the form. The certification will address matters such as information about the debtor’s employment status and disposable pay available for withholding.


§ 313.95 Amounts withheld.

(a) Upon receipt of the garnishment order issued under this section, the employer shall deduct from all disposable pay paid to the debtor during each pay period the amount of garnishment described in paragraphs (b) through (d) of this section.


(b) Subject to the provisions of paragraphs (c) and (d) of this section, the amount of garnishment shall be the lesser of:


(1) The amount indicated on the garnishment order up to 15% of the debtor’s disposable pay; or


(2) The amount set forth in 15 U.S.C. 1673(a)(2). The amount set forth at 15 U.S.C. 1673(a)(2) is the amount by which the debtor’s disposable pay exceeds an amount equivalent to thirty times the minimum wage. See 29 CFR 870.10.


(c) When a debtor’s pay is subject to withholding orders with priority, the following shall apply:


(1) Unless otherwise provided by federal law, withholding orders issued under this section shall be paid in the amounts set forth under paragraph (b) of this section and shall have priority over other withholding orders which are served later in time. However, withholding orders for family support shall have priority over withholding orders issued under this section.


(2) If amounts are being withheld from a debtor’s pay pursuant to a withholding order served on an employer before a withholding order issued pursuant to this section, or if a withholding order for family support is served on an employer at any time, the amounts withheld pursuant to the withholding order issued under this section shall be the lesser of:


(i) The amount calculated under paragraph (b) of this section; or


(ii) An amount equal to 25% of the debtor’s disposable pay less the amount(s) withheld under the withholding order(s) with priority.


(3) If a debtor owes more than one debt to the FDIC, the FDIC may issue multiple withholding orders. The total amount garnished from the debtor’s pay for such orders will not exceed the amount set forth in paragraph (b) of this section.


(d) An amount greater than that set forth in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section may be withheld upon the written consent of the debtor.


(e) The employer shall promptly pay to the FDIC all amounts withheld in accordance with the withholding order issued pursuant to this section.


(f) An employer shall not be required to vary its normal pay and disbursement cycles in order to comply with the withholding order.


(g) Any assignment or allotment by the employee of the employee’s earnings shall be void to the extent it interferes with or prohibits execution of the withholding order under this section, except for any assignment or allotment made pursuant to a family support judgment or order.


(h) The employer shall withhold the appropriate amount from the debtor’s wages for each pay period until the employer receives notification from the FDIC to discontinue wage withholding. The garnishment order shall indicate a reasonable period of time within which the employer is required to commence wage withholding.


§ 313.96 Exclusions from garnishment.

The FDIC will not garnish the wages of a debtor it knows has been involuntarily separated from employment until the debtor has been re-employed continuously for at least 12 months. The debtor has the burden of informing the FDIC of the circumstances surrounding an involuntary separation from employment.


§ 313.97 Financial hardship.

(a) A debtor whose wages are subject to a wage withholding order under this section, may, at any time, request a review by the FDIC of the amount garnished, based on materially changed circumstances such as disability, divorce, or catastrophic illness which result in financial hardship.


(b) A debtor requesting a review under this section shall submit the basis for claiming that the current amount of garnishment results in a financial hardship to the debtor, along with supporting documentation.


(c) If a financial hardship is found, the FDIC will downwardly adjust, by an amount and for a period of time agreeable to the FDIC, the amount garnished to reflect the debtor’s financial condition. The FDIC will notify the employer of any adjustments to the amounts to be withheld.


§ 313.98 Ending garnishment.

(a) Once the FDIC has fully recovered the amounts owed by the debtor, including interest, penalties, and administrative costs consistent with the FCCS, the FDIC will send the debtor’s employer notification to discontinue wage withholding.


(b) At least annually, the FDIC will review its debtors’ accounts to ensure that garnishment has been terminated for accounts that have been paid in full.


§ 313.99 Prohibited actions by employer.

The DCIA prohibits an employer from discharging, refusing to employ, or taking disciplinary action against the debtor due to the issuance of a withholding order under this subpart.


§ 313.100 Refunds.

(a) If a hearing official determines that a debt is not legally due and owing to the United States, the FDIC shall promptly refund any amount collected by means of administrative wage garnishment.


(b) Unless required by federal law or contract, refunds under this section shall not bear interest.


§ 313.101 Right of action.

The FDIC may sue any employer for any amount that the employer fails to withhold from wages owed and payable to its employee in accordance with this subpart. However, a suit will not be filed before the termination of the collection action involving a particular debtor, unless earlier filing is necessary to avoid expiration of any applicable statute of limitations. For purposes of this subpart, “termination of the collection action” occurs when the agency has terminated collection action in accordance with the FCCS (31 CFR 903.1 through 903.5) or other applicable standards. In any event, termination of the collection action will have been deemed to occur if the FDIC has not received any payments to satisfy the debt from the particular debtor whose wages were subject to garnishment, in whole or in part, for a period of one (1) year.


§§ 313.102-313.119 [Reserved]

Subpart E – Tax Refund Offset

§ 313.120 Scope.

The provisions of 26 U.S.C. 6402(d) and 31 U.S.C. 3720A authorize the Secretary of the Treasury to offset a delinquent debt owed to the United States Government from the tax refund due a taxpayer when other collection efforts have failed to recover the amount due. In addition, the FDIC is authorized to collect debts by means of administrative offset under 31 U.S.C. 3716 and, as part of the debt collection process, to notify the Financial Management Service (FMS), a bureau of the Department of the Treasury, of the amount of such debt for collection by tax refund offset.


§ 313.121 Definitions.

For purposes of this subpart E:


(a) Debt or claim means an amount of money, funds or property which has been determined by the FDIC to be due to the United States from any person, organization, or entity, except another federal agency.


(b) Debtor means a person who owes a debt or a claim. The term “person” includes any individual, organization or entity, except another federal agency.


(c) Tax refund offset means withholding or reducing a tax refund payment by an amount necessary to satisfy a debt owed by the payee(s) of a tax refund payment.


(d) Tax refund payment means any overpayment of federal taxes to be refunded to the person making the overpayment after the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) makes the appropriate credits.


§ 313.122 Notification of debt to FMS.

The FDIC shall notify FMS of the amount of any past due, legally enforceable non-tax debt owed to it by a person, for the purpose of collecting such debt by tax refund offset. Notification and referral to FMS of such debts does not preclude FDIC’s use of any other debt collection procedures, such as wage garnishment, either separately or in conjunction with tax refund offset.


§ 313.123 Certification and referral of debt.

When the FDIC refers a past-due, legally enforceable debt to FMS for tax refund offset, it will certify to FMS that:


(a) The debt is past due and legally enforceable in the amount submitted to FMS and that the FDIC will ensure that collections are properly credited to the debt;


(b) Except in the case of a judgment debt or as otherwise allowed by law, the debt is referred for offset within ten years after the FDIC’s right of action accrues;


(c) The FDIC has made reasonable efforts to obtain payment of the debt, in that it has:


(1) Submitted the debt to FMS for collection by administrative offset and complied with the provisions of 31 U.S.C. 3716(a) and related regulations;


(2) Notified, or has made a reasonable attempt to notify, the debtor that the debt is past-due, and unless repaid within 60 days after the date of the notice, will be referred to FMS for tax refund offset;


(3) Given the debtor at least 60 days to present evidence that all or part of the debt is not past-due or legally enforceable, considered any evidence presented by the debtor, and determined that the debt is past-due and legally enforceable; and


(4) Provided the debtor with an opportunity to make a written agreement to repay the debt; and


(d) The debt is at least $25.


§ 313.124 Pre-offset notice and consideration of evidence.

(a) For purposes of § 313.123(c)(2), the FDIC has made a reasonable effort to notify the debtor if it uses the current address information contained in its records related to the debt. The FDIC may, but is not required to, obtain address information from the IRS pursuant to 26 U.S.C. 6103(m)(2), (4), (5).


(b) For purposes of § 313.123(c)(3), if evidence presented by a debtor is considered by an agent of the FDIC, or other entities or persons acting on behalf of the FDIC, the debtor must be accorded at least 30 days from the date the agent or other entity or person determines that all or part of the debt is past-due and legally enforceable to request review by an officer or employee of the FDIC of any unresolved dispute. The FDIC must then notify the debtor of its decision.


§ 313.125 No requirement for duplicate notice.

Where the director has previously given a debtor any of the required notice and review opportunities with respect to a particular debt, the Director is not required to duplicate such notice and review opportunities prior to initiating tax refund offset.


[71 FR 75661, Dec. 18, 2006]


§ 313.126 Referral of past-due, legally enforceable debt.

The FDIC shall submit past-due, legally enforceable debt information for tax refund offset to FMS, as prescribed by FMS. For each debt, the FDIC will include the following information:


(a) The name and taxpayer identification number (as defined in 26 U.S.C. 6109) of the debtor;


(b) The amount of the past-due and legally enforceable debt;


(c) The date on which the debt became past-due; and


(d) The designation of FDIC as the agency referring the debt.


[67 FR 48527, July 25, 2002. Redesignated at 71 FR 75661, Dec. 18, 2006]


§ 313.127 Correcting and updating referral.

If, after referring a past-due legally enforceable debt to FMS as provided in § 313.125, the FDIC determines that an error has been made with respect to the information transmitted to FMS, or if the FDIC receives a payment or credits a payment to the account of the debtor referred to FMS for offset, or if the debt amount is otherwise incorrect, the FDIC shall promptly notify FMS and make the appropriate correction of the FDIC’s records. FDIC will provide certification as required under § 313.123 for any increases to amounts owed. In the event FMS rejects an FDIC certification for failure to comply with § 323.123, the FDIC may resubmit the debt with a corrected certification.


[67 FR 48527, July 25, 2002. Redesignated at 71 FR 75661, Dec. 18, 2006]


§ 313.128 Disposition of amounts collected.

FMS will transmit amounts collected for past-due, legally enforceable debts, less fees charged under this section, to the FDIC’s account. The FDIC will reimburse FMS and the IRS for the cost of administering the tax refund offset program. FMS will deduct the fees from amounts collected prior to disposition and transmit a portion of the fees deducted to reimburse the IRS for its share of the cost of administering the tax refund offset program. To the extent allowed by law, the FDIC may add the offset fees to the debt.


[67 FR 48527, July 25, 2002. Redesignated at 71 FR 75661, Dec. 18, 2006]


§§ 313.129-313.139 [Reserved]

Subpart F – Civil Service Retirement and Disability Fund Offset

§ 313.140 Future benefits.

Unless otherwise prohibited by law, the FDIC may request that a debtor’s anticipated or future benefit payments under the Civil Service Retirement and Disability Fund (Fund) be administratively offset in accordance with regulations at 5 CFR 831.1801 through 831.1808.


§ 313.141 Notification to OPM.

When making a request for administrative offset under § 313.140, the FDIC shall provide OPM with a written certification that:


(a) The debtor owes the FDIC a debt, including the amount of the debt;


(b) The FDIC has complied with the applicable statutes, regulations, and procedures of OPM; and


(c) The FDIC has complied with the requirements of 31 CFR parts 900 through 904, including any required hearing or review.


§ 313.142 Request for administrative offset.

The Director shall request administrative offset under § 313.140, as soon as practical after completion of the applicable procedures in order to help ensure that offset be initiated prior to expiration of the applicable statute of limitations. At such time as the debtor makes a claim for payments from the Fund, if at least a year has elapsed since the offset request was originally made, the debtor shall be permitted to offer a satisfactory repayment plan in lieu of offset upon establishing that changed financial circumstances would render the offset unjust.


§ 313.143 Cancellation of deduction.

If the FDIC collects part or all of the debt by other means before deductions are made or completed pursuant to § 313.140, the FDIC shall act promptly to modify or terminate its request for such offset.


Subpart G – Mandatory Centralized Administrative Offset

§ 313.160 Treasury notification.

(a) In accordance with 31 U.S.C. 3716, the FDIC as a creditor agency must notify the Secretary of the Treasury of all debts that are delinquent (over 180 days past due), as defined in the FCCS, to enable the Secretary to seek collection by centralized administrative offset. This includes debts the FDIC seeks to recover from the pay account of an employee of another agency by means of salary offset.


(b) For purposes of centralized administrative offset, a claim or debt is not delinquent if:


(1) It is in litigation or foreclosure;


(2) It will be disposed of under an asset sale program within one year after becoming eligible for sale;


(3) It has been referred to a private collection contractor for collection;


(4) It has been referred to a debt collection center;


(5) It will be collected under internal offset, if such offset is sufficient to collect the claim within three years after the date the debt or claim is first delinquent; and


(6) It is within a specific class of claims or debts which the Secretary of the Treasury has determined to be exempt, at the request of an agency.


§ 313.161 Certification of debt.

Prior to referring a delinquent debt to the Secretary of the Treasury, the Director must have complied with the requirements of 5 U.S.C. 5514, and 5 CFR part 550, subpart K, governing salary offset, and the FDIC regulations. The Director shall certify, in a form acceptable to the Secretary, that:


(a) The debt is past due and legally enforceable; and


(b) The FDIC has complied with all due process requirements under 31 U.S.C. 3716 and the FDIC’s administrative offset regulations.


§ 313.162 Compliance with 31 CFR part 285.

The Director shall also comply with applicable procedures for referring a delinquent debt for purposes of centralized offset which are set forth at 31 CFR part 285 and the FCCS.


§ 313.163 Notification of debts of 180 days or less.

The Director, in his discretion, may also notify the Secretary of the Treasury of debts that have been delinquent for 180 days or less, including debts the FDIC seeks to recover by means of salary offset.


§§ 313.164-313.180 [Reserved]

Subpart H – Civil Money Penalty Debt


Source:86 FR 1744, Jan. 11, 2021, unless otherwise noted.

§ 313.181 Scope.

This subpart establishes FDIC procedures for the collection of civil money penalty debt.


§ 313.182 Purpose.

The purpose of this subpart is to implement Federal statutes and regulatory standards authorizing the FDIC to collect delinquent civil money penalties.


§ 313.183 Definitions.

Except where the context clearly indicates otherwise or where the term is defined elsewhere in this subpart, the definitions provided at § 313.3 apply to this subpart.


§ 313.184 Collection of civil money penalty debt.

(a) The FDIC will follow Department of Treasury regulations set forth at 31 CFR part 285, as applicable and consistent with this subpart, for the collection of civil money penalty debt, including centralized offset of Federal payments to collect non-tax debts that may be owed to the FDIC, under 31 CFR 285.5.


(b) Nothing in this subpart shall be construed to require the FDIC to provide duplicate notice or other procedural protections that have already been provided or afforded to a civil money penalty debtor in the course of administrative or judicial litigation or otherwise.


(c) For civil money penalty debtors, and for purposes of 31 U.S.C. 3716(b)(1), the FDIC adopts without change the regulations on collection by administrative offset set forth at 31 CFR 901.3 and other relevant sections of the Federal Claims Collection Standards applicable to such offset, to the extent those regulations are consistent with this subpart.


(d) Nothing in this subpart precludes the collection of debts through any other available means or precludes the FDIC from engaging in litigation or the compromise of debt as provided under 12 U.S.C. 1818(i) or any other applicable law or regulation.


§§ 313.185-313.190 [Reserved]

SUBCHAPTER B – REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY

PART 323 – APPRAISALS


Authority:12 U.S.C. 1818, 1819(a)(“Seventh” and “Tenth”), 1831p-1 and 3331 et seq.



Source:55 FR 33888, Aug. 20, 1990, unless otherwise noted.

Subpart A – Appraisals Generally

§ 323.1 Authority, purpose, and scope.

(a) Authority. This subpart is issued under 12 U.S.C. 1818, 1819(a)(Seventh and Tenth), 1831p-1 and title XI of the Financial Institutions Reform, Recovery, and Enforcement Act of 1989 (FIRREA) (Pub. L. 101-73, 103 Stat. 183, 12 U.S.C. 3331 et seq. (1989)).


(b) Purpose and scope. (1) title XI provides protection for federal financial and public policy interests in real estate related transactions by requiring real estate appraisals used in connection with federally related transactions to be performed in writing, in accordance with uniform standards, by appraisers whose competency has been demonstrated and whose professional conduct will be subject to effective supervision. This subpart implements the requirements of title XI and applies to all federally related transactions entered into by the FDIC or by institutions regulated by the FDIC (regulated institutions).


(2) This subpart: (i) Identifies which real estate-related financial transactions require the services of an appraiser;


(ii) Prescribes which categories of federally related transactions shall be appraised by a State certified appraiser and which by a State licensed appraiser; and


(iii) Prescribes minimum standards for the performance of real estate appraisals in connection with federally related transactions under the jurisdiction of the FDIC.


[55 FR 33888, Aug. 20, 1990, as amended at 80 FR 32684, June 9, 2015; 83 FR 15036, Apr. 9, 2018]


§ 323.2 Definitions.

(a) Appraisal means a written statement independently and impartially prepared by a qualified appraiser setting forth an opinion as to the market value of an adequately described property as of a specific date(s), supported by the presentation and analysis of relevant market information.


(b) Appraisal Foundation means the Appraisal Foundation established on November 30, 1987, as a not-for-profit corporation under the laws of Illinois.


(c) Appraisal Subcommittee means the Appraisal Subcommittee of the Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council.


(d) Business loan means a loan or extension of credit to any corporation, general or limited partnership, business trust, joint venture, pool, syndicate, sole proprietorship, or other business entity.


(e) Commercial real estate transaction means a real estate-related financial transaction that is not secured by a single 1-to-4 family residential property.


(f) Complex appraisal for a residential real estate transaction means one in which the property to be appraised, the form of ownership, or market conditions are atypical.


(g) Federally related transaction means any real estate-related financial transactions entered into after the effective date hereof that:


(1) The FDIC or any regulated institution engages in or contracts for; and


(2) Requires the services of an appraiser.


(h) Market value means the most probable price which a property should bring in a competitive and open market under all conditions requisite to a fair sale, the buyer and seller each acting prudently and knowledgeably, and assuming the price is not affected by undue stimulus. Implicit in this definition is the consummation of a sale as of a specified date and the passing of title from seller to buyer under conditions whereby:


(1) Buyer and seller are typically motivated;


(2) Both parties are well informed or well advised, and acting in what they consider their own best interests;


(3) A reasonable time is allowed for exposure in the open market;


(4) Payment is made in terms of cash in U.S. dollars or in terms of financial arrangements comparable thereto; and


(5) The price represents the normal consideration for the property sold unaffected by special or creative financing or sales concessions granted by anyone associated with the sale.


(i) Real estate or real property means an identified parcel or tract of land, with improvements, and includes easements, rights of way, undivided or future interests and similar rights in a tract of land, but does not include mineral rights, timber rights, growing crops, water rights and similar interests severable from the land when the transaction does not involve the associated parcel or tract of land.


(j) Real estate-related financial transaction means any transaction involving:


(1) The sale, lease, purchase, investment in or exchange of real property, including interests in property, or the financing thereof; or


(2) The refinancing of real property or interests in real property; or


(3) The use of real property or interests in property as security for a loan or investment, including mortgage-backed securities.


(k) Residential real estate transaction means a real estate-related financial transaction that is secured by a single 1-to-4 family residential property.


(l) State certified appraiser mea