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Title 12 – Banks and Banking–Volume 6

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Title 12 – Banks and Banking–Volume 6


Part


chapter iii – Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (Continued)

347


chapter iv – Export-Import Bank of the United States

400


chapter v [Reserved]

CHAPTER III – FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION (CONTINUED)

SUBCHAPTER B – REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY (CONTINUED)

PART 347 – INTERNATIONAL BANKING


Authority:12 U.S.C. 1813, 1815, 1817, 1819, 1820, 1828, 3103, 3104, 3105, 3108, 3109; Pub L. No. 111-203, section 939A, 124 Stat. 1376, 1887 (July 21, 2010) (codified 15 U.S.C. 78o-7 note).


Source:70 FR 17560, Apr. 6, 2005, unless otherwise noted.

§ 347.101 Authority, purpose, and scope.

(a) This subpart is issued pursuant to section 18(d) and (l) of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act (12 U.S.C. 1828(d), 1828(l)).


(b) The rules in subpart A address the FDIC’s requirements for insured state nonmember bank investments in foreign organizations, permissible foreign financial activities, loans or extensions of credit to or for the account of foreign organizations, and the FDIC’s recordkeeping, supervision, and approval requirements. The rules also address the permissible activities for foreign branches of insured state nonmember banks, as well as the FDIC’s requirements for establishing, operating, relocating and closing of branches in foreign countries.


§ 347.102 Definitions.

For the purposes of this subpart:


(a) An affiliate of an insured state nonmember bank means:


(1) Any entity of which the insured state nonmember bank is a direct or indirect subsidiary or which otherwise controls the insured state nonmember bank;


(2) Any organization which is a direct or indirect subsidiary of such entity or which is otherwise controlled by such entity; or


(3) Any other organization that is a direct or indirect subsidiary of the insured state nonmember bank or is otherwise controlled by the insured state nonmember bank.


(b) Control means the ability to control in any manner the election of a majority of an organization’s directors or trustees; or the ability to exercise a controlling influence over the management and policies of an organization. An insured state nonmember bank is deemed to control an organization of which it is a general partner or its affiliate is a general partner.


(c) Domestic means United States.


(d) Eligible insured state nonmember bank means an eligible depository institution as defined in § 303.2(r) of this chapter.


(e) Equity interest means any ownership interest or rights in an organization, whether through an equity security, contribution to capital, general or limited partnership interest, debt or warrants convertible into ownership interests or rights, loans providing profit participation, binding commitments to acquire any such items, or some other form of business transaction.


(f) Equity security means voting or nonvoting shares, stock, investment contracts, or other interests representing ownership or participation in a company or similar enterprise, as well as any instrument convertible to any such interest at the option of the holder without payment of substantial additional consideration.


(g) FRB means the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System.


(h) Foreign bank means an organization that is organized under the laws of a foreign country, a territory of the United States, Puerto Rico, Guam, American Samoa, or the Virgin Islands that:


(1) Is recognized as a bank by the bank supervisory or monetary authority of the country of its organization or the country in which its principal banking operations are located;


(2) Receives deposits to a substantial extent in the regular course of its business; and


(3) Has the power to accept demand deposits.


(i) Foreign banking organization means a foreign organization that is formed for the sole purpose of either holding shares of a foreign bank or performing nominee, fiduciary, or other banking services incidental to the activities of a foreign branch or foreign bank affiliate of the insured state nonmember bank.


(j) Foreign branch means an office or place of business located outside the United States, its territories, Puerto Rico, Guam, American Samoa, the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands, or the Virgin Islands, at which banking operations are conducted, but does not include a representative office.


(k) Foreign country means any country other than the United States and includes any territory, dependency, or possession of any such country or of the United States.


(l) Foreign organization means an organization that is organized under the laws of a foreign country.


(m) Insured state nonmember bank or bank means a state bank, as defined by § 3(a)(2) of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act (12 U.S.C. 1813(a)(2)), whose deposits are insured by the FDIC and that is not a member of the Federal Reserve System.


(n) Indirectly means investments held or activities conducted by a subsidiary of an organization.


(o) Investment grade means a security issued by an entity that has adequate capacity to meet financial commitments for the projected life of the exposure. Such an entity has adequate capacity to meet financial commitments if the risk of its default is low and the full and timely repayment of principal and interest is expected.


(p) Loan or extension of credit means all direct and indirect advances of funds to a person, government, or entity made on the basis of any obligation of that person, government, or entity to repay funds.


(q) Organization or entity means a corporation, partnership, association, bank, or other similar entity.


(r) NRSRO means a nationally recognized statistical rating organization as designated by the Securities and Exchange Commission.


(s) Representative office means an office that engages solely in representative functions such as soliciting new business for its home office or acting as liaison between the home office and local customers, but which has no authority to make business or contracting decisions other than those relating to the personnel and premises of the representative office.


(t) Subsidiary means any organization more than 50 percent of the voting equity interests of which are directly or indirectly held by another organization.


(u) Tier 1 capital means Tier 1 capital as defined in § 324.2 of this chapter.


(v) Well capitalized means well capitalized as defined in § 324.403 of this chapter.


[70 FR 17560, Apr. 6, 2005, as amended at 78 FR 55595, Sept. 10, 2013; 83 FR 9143, Mar. 5, 2018; 83 FR 17741, Apr. 24, 2018]


§ 347.103 Effect of state law on actions taken under this subpart.

A bank may acquire and retain equity interests in a foreign organization or establish a foreign branch, subject to the requirements of this subpart, if it is authorized to do so by the law of the state in which the bank is chartered.


§ 347.104 Insured state nonmember bank investments in foreign organizations.

(a) Investment in foreign banks or foreign banking organizations. A bank may directly or indirectly acquire and retain equity interests in a foreign bank or foreign banking organization.


(b) Investment in other foreign organizations. A bank may only:


(1) acquire and retain equity interests in foreign organizations, other than foreign banks or foreign banking organizations in amounts of 50 percent or less of the foreign organization’s voting equity interests, if the equity interest is held through a domestic or foreign subsidiary; and


(2) The bank meets its minimum capital requirements.


§ 347.105 Permissible financial activities outside the United States.

(a) Limitation on authorized activities. A bank may not directly or indirectly acquire or hold equity interests in a foreign organization that will result in the bank and its affiliates:


(1) Holding more than 50 percent, in the aggregate, of the voting equity interest in such foreign organization; or


(2) Controlling such foreign organization, unless the activities of a foreign organization are limited to those authorized under paragraph (b) of this section.


(b) Authorized activities. The following financial activities are authorized outside the United States:


(1) Commercial and other banking activities.


(2) Financing, including commercial financing, consumer financing, mortgage banking, and factoring, subject to compliance with any attendant restrictions contained in 12 CFR 225.28(b).


(3) Leasing real or personal property, acting as agent, broker or advisor in leasing real or personal property, subject to compliance with any attendant restrictions in 12 CFR 225.28(b).


(4) Acting as a fiduciary, subject to compliance with any attendant restrictions in 12 CFR 225.28(b).


(5) Underwriting credit life, credit accident and credit health insurance.


(6) Performing services for other direct or indirect operations of a domestic banking organization, including representative functions, sale of long-term debt, name saving, liquidating assets acquired to prevent loss on a debt previously contracted in good faith, and other activities that are permissible for a bank holding company under sections 4(a)(2)(A) and 4(c)(1)(C) of the Bank Holding Company Act.


(7) Holding the premises of a branch of an Edge corporation or insured state nonmember bank or the premises of a direct or indirect subsidiary, or holding or leasing the residence of an officer or employee of a branch or a subsidiary.


(8) Providing investment, financial, or economic services, subject to compliance with any attendant restrictions in 12 CFR 225.28(b).


(9) General insurance agency and brokerage.


(10) Data processing.


(11) Organizing, sponsoring, and managing a mutual fund if the fund’s shares are not sold or distributed in the United States or to U.S. residents and the fund does not exercise management control over the firms in which it invests.


(12) Performing management consulting services, provided that such services when rendered with respect to the domestic market must be restricted to the initial entry.


(13) Underwriting, distributing, and dealing in debt securities outside the United States.


(14) With the prior approval of the FDIC under section 347.119(d), underwriting, distributing, and dealing in equity securities outside the United States.


(15) Operating a travel agency in connection with financial services offered outside the United States by the bank or others.


(16) Providing futures commission merchant services, subject to compliance with any attendant restrictions in 12 CFR 225.28(b).


(17) Engaging in activities that the FRB has determined in Regulation Y (12 CFR 225.28(b)) are closely related to banking under section 4(c)(8) of the Bank Holding Company Act.


(18) Engaging in other activities, with the prior approval of the FDIC.


(c) Limitation on activities authorized under Regulation Y. If a bank relies solely on the cross-reference to Regulation Y contained in paragraph (b)(17) of this section as authority to engage in an activity, compliance with any attendant restrictions on the activity that are contained in 12 CFR 225.28(b) is required.


(d) Approval of other activities. Activities that are not specifically authorized by this section, but that are authorized by 12 CFR 211.10 or FRB interpretations of activities authorized by that section, may be authorized by specific consent of the FDIC on an individual basis and upon such terms and conditions as the FDIC may consider appropriate. Activities that will be engaged in as principal (defined by reference to section 362.1(b) of this chapter), and that are not authorized by 12 CFR 211.10 or FRB interpretations of activities authorized under that section, must satisfy the requirements of part 362 of this chapter and be approved by the FDIC under this part as well as part 362 of this chapter.


§ 347.106 Going concerns.

Going concerns. If a bank acquires an equity interest in a foreign organization that is a going concern, no more than 5 percent of either the consolidated assets or revenues of the foreign organization may be attributable to activities that are not permissible under § 347.105(b).


§ 347.107 Joint ventures.

(a) Joint ventures. If a bank, directly or indirectly, acquires or holds an equity interest in a foreign organization that is a joint venture, and the bank or its affiliates do not control the foreign organization, no more than 10 percent of either the consolidated assets or revenues of the foreign organization may be attributable to activities that are not permissible under § 347.105(b).


(b) Joint venture defined. For purposes of this section, the term “joint venture” means any organization in which 20 percent or more but not in excess of 50 percent of the voting equity interests, in the aggregate, are directly or indirectly held by a bank or its affiliates.


§ 347.108 Portfolio investments.

(a) Portfolio investments. If a bank, directly or indirectly, acquires or holds an equity interest in a foreign organization as a portfolio investment and the foreign organization is not controlled, directly or indirectly, by the bank or its affiliates:


(1) No more than 10 percent of either the consolidated assets or revenues of the foreign organization may be attributable to activities that are not permissible under § 347.105(b); and


(2) Any loans or extensions of credit made by the bank and its affiliates to the foreign organization must be on substantially the same terms, including interest rates and collateral, as those prevailing at the same time for comparable transactions between the bank or its affiliates and nonaffiliated organizations.


(b) Portfolio investment defined. For purposes of this section, the term “portfolio investment” means an investment in an organization in which less than 20 percent of the voting equity interests, in the aggregate, are directly or indirectly held by a bank or its affiliates.


§ 347.109 Limitations on indirect investments in nonfinancial foreign organizations.

(a) A bank may, through a subsidiary authorized by §§ 347.105 or 347.106, or an Edge corporation if also authorized by the FRB, acquire and hold equity interests in foreign organizations that are not foreign banks or foreign banking organizations and that engage generally in activities beyond those listed in § 347.105(b), subject to the following:


(1) The amount of the investment does not exceed 15 percent of the bank’s Tier 1 capital;


(2) The aggregate holding of voting equity interests of one foreign organization by the bank and its affiliates must be less than:


(i) 20 percent of the foreign organization’s voting equity interests; and


(ii) 40 percent of the foreign organization’s voting and nonvoting equity interests;


(b) The bank or its affiliates must not otherwise control the foreign organization; and


(c) Loans or extensions of credit made by the bank and its affiliates to the foreign organization must be on substantially the same terms, including interest rates and collateral, as those prevailing at the same time for comparable transactions between the bank or its affiliates and nonaffiliated organizations.


§ 347.110 Affiliate holdings.

References in §§ 347.107, 347.108, and 347.109 to equity interests of foreign organizations held by an affiliate of a bank include equity interests held in connection with an underwriting or for distribution or dealing by an affiliate permitted to do so by §§ 362.8 or 362.18 of this chapter or section 4(c)(8) of the Bank Holding Company Act (12 U.S.C. 1843(c)(8)).


§ 347.111 Underwriting and dealing limits applicable to foreign organizations held by insured state nonmember banks.

A bank that holds an equity interest in one or more foreign organizations which underwrite, deal, or distribute equity securities outside the United States as authorized by § 347.105(b)(14) is subject to the following limitations:


(a) Underwriting commitment limits. (1) The aggregate underwriting commitments by the foreign organizations for the equity securities of a single entity, taken together with underwriting commitments by any affiliate of the bank under the authority of 12 CFR 211.10(b), may not exceed the lesser of $60 million or 25 percent of the bank’s Tier 1 capital, except as otherwise provided in this paragraph.


(2) Underwriting commitments in excess of this limit must be either:


(i) Covered by binding commitments from subunderwriters or purchasers; or


(ii) Deducted from the capital of the bank, with at least 50 percent of the deduction being taken from Tier 1 capital, with the bank remaining well capitalized after this deduction.


(b) Distribution and dealing limits. The equity securities of any single entity held for distribution or dealing by the foreign organizations, taken together with equity securities held for distribution or dealing by any affiliate of the bank under the authority of 12 CFR 211.10:


(1) May not exceed the lesser of $30 million or 5 percent of the bank’s Tier 1 capital, subject to the following:


(i) Any equity securities acquired pursuant to any underwriting commitment extending up to 90 days after the payment date for the underwriting may be excluded from this limit;


(ii) Any equity securities of the entity held under the authority of §§ 347.105 through 347.109 or 12 CFR 211.10 for purposes other than distribution or dealing must be included in this limit; and


(iii) Up to 75 percent of the position in an equity security may be reduced by netting long and short positions in the same security, or offsetting cash positions against derivative instruments referenced to the same security so long as the derivatives are part of a prudent hedging strategy; and


(2) Must be included in calculating the general consent limits under § 347.117(b)(3) if the bank relies on the general consent provisions as authority to acquire equity interests of the same foreign entity for investment or trading.


(c) Additional distribution and dealing limits. With the exception of equity securities acquired pursuant to any underwriting commitment extending up to 90 days after the payment date for the underwriting, equity securities of a single entity held for distribution or dealing by all affiliates of the bank (this includes shares held in connection with an underwriting or for distribution or dealing by an affiliate permitted to do so by §§ 362.8 or 362.18 of this chapter or section 4(c)(8) of the Bank Holding Company Act), combined with any equity interests held for investment or trading purposes by all affiliates of the bank, must conform to the limits of §§ 347.105 through 347.109.


(d) Combined limits. The aggregate of the following may not exceed 25 percent of the bank’s Tier 1 capital:


(1) All equity interests of foreign organizations held for investment or trading under § 347.109 or by an affiliate of the bank under the corresponding paragraph of 12 CFR 211.10.


(2) All underwriting commitments under paragraph (a) of this section, taken together with all underwriting commitments by any affiliate of the bank under the authority of 12 CFR 211.10, after excluding the amount of any underwriting commitment:


(i) Covered by binding commitments from subunderwriters or purchasers under paragraph (a)(1) of this section or the comparable provision of 12 CFR 211.10; or


(ii) Already deducted from the bank’s capital under paragraph (a)(2) of this section, or the appropriate affiliate’s capital under the comparable provisions of 12 CFR 211.10; and


(3) All equity securities held for distribution or dealing under paragraph (b) of this section, taken together with all equity securities held for distribution or dealing by any affiliate of the bank under the authority of 12 CFR 211.10, after reducing by up to 75 percent the position in any equity security by netting and offset, as permitted by paragraph (b)(1)(iii) of this section or the comparable provision of 12 CFR 211.10.


§ 347.112 Restrictions applicable to foreign organizations that act as futures commission merchants.

(a) If a bank acquires or retains an equity interest in a foreign organization that acts as a futures commission merchant pursuant to § 347.105(b)(16), the foreign organization may not be a member of an exchange or clearing association that requires members to guarantee or otherwise contract to cover losses suffered by other members unless the:


(1) Foreign organization’s liability does not exceed two percent of the bank’s Tier 1 capital, or


(2) Bank has obtained the prior approval of the FDIC under § 347.120(d).


(b) [Reserved]


§ 347.113 Restrictions applicable to activities by a foreign organization in the United States.

(a) A bank, acting under the authority provided in this subpart, may not directly or indirectly hold:


(1) Equity interests of any foreign organization that engages in the general business of buying or selling goods, wares, merchandise, or commodities in the United States; or


(2) More than 5 percent of the equity interests of any foreign organization that engages in activities in the United States unless any activities in which the foreign organization engages in the United States are incidental to its international or foreign business.


(b) For purposes of this section:


(1) A foreign organization is not engaged in any business or activities in the United States unless it maintains an office in the United States other than a representative office.


(2) The following activities are incidental to international or foreign business:


(i) Activities that are permissible for an Edge corporation in the United States under 12 CFR 211.6; or


(ii) Other activities approved by the FDIC.


§ 347.114 Extensions of credit to foreign organizations held by insured state nonmember banks; shares of foreign organizations held in connection with debts previously contracted.

(a) Loans or extensions of credit. A bank that directly or indirectly holds equity interests in a foreign organization pursuant to the authority of this subpart may make loans or extensions of credit to or for the accounts of the organization without regard to the provisions of section 18(j) of the FDI Act (12 U.S.C. 1828(j)).


(b) Debts previously contracted. Equity interests acquired to prevent a loss upon a debt previously contracted in good faith are not subject to the limitations or procedures of this subpart; however, they must be disposed of promptly but in no event later than two years after their acquisition, unless the FDIC authorizes retention for a longer period.


§ 347.115 Permissible activities for a foreign branch of an insured state nonmember bank.

In addition to its general banking powers and if permitted by the law of the state in which the bank is chartered, a foreign branch of a bank may conduct the following activities to the extent that they are consistent with banking practices in a foreign country where the bank maintains a branch:


(a) Guarantees. Guarantee debts, or otherwise agree to make payments on the occurrence of readily ascertainable events including, without limitation, nonpayment of taxes, rentals, customs duties, or costs of transport and loss or nonconformance of shipping documents, if:


(1) The guarantee or agreement specifies a maximum monetary liability; and


(2) To the extent the guarantee or agreement is not subject to a separate amount limit under state or federal law, the amount of the guarantee or agreement is combined with loans and other obligations for purposes of applying any legal lending limits.


(b) Government obligations. Engage in the following types of transactions with respect to the obligations of foreign countries, so long as aggregate investments, securities held in connection with distribution and dealing, and underwriting commitments do not exceed ten percent of the bank’s Tier 1 capital:


(1) Underwrite, distribute and deal, invest in, or trade obligations of:


(i) The national government of the country in which the branch is located or its political subdivisions; and


(ii) An agency or instrumentality of such national government if supported by the taxing authority, guarantee, or full faith and credit of the national government.


(2) Underwrite, distribute and deal, invest in or trade obligations
1
rated as investment grade of:




1 If the obligation is an equity interest, it must be held through a subsidiary of the foreign branch and the insured state nonmember bank must meet its minimum capital requirements.


(i) The national government of any foreign country or its political subdivisions, to the extent permissible under the law of the issuing foreign country; and


(ii) An agency or instrumentality of the national government of any foreign country to the extent permissible under the law of the issuing foreign country, if supported by the taxing authority, guarantee, or full faith and credit of the national government.


(c) Local investments. (1) Acquire and hold local investments in:


(i) Equity securities of the central bank, clearinghouses, governmental entities, and government sponsored development banks of the country in which the branch is located;


(ii) Other debt securities eligible to meet local reserve or similar requirements; and


(iii) Shares of automated electronic payment networks, professional societies, schools, and similar entities necessary to the business of the branch.


(2) Aggregate local investments (other than those required by the law of the foreign country or permissible under section 5136 of the Revised Statutes (12 U.S.C. 24 (Seventh)) by all the bank’s branches in a single foreign country must not exceed 1 percent of the total deposits in all the bank’s branches in that country as reported in the preceding year-end Report of Income and Condition (Call Report):
2




2 If a branch has recently been acquired by the bank and the branch was not previously required to file a Call Report, branch deposits as of the acquisition date must be used.


(d) Insurance. Act as an insurance agent or broker.


(e) Employee benefits program. Pay to an employee of a branch, as part of an employee benefits program, a greater rate of interest than that paid to other depositors of the branch.


(f) Repurchase agreements. Engage in repurchase agreements involving securities and commodities that are the functional equivalents of extensions of credit.


(g) Other activities. Engage in other activities, with the prior approval of the FDIC.


(h) Approval of other activities. Activities that are not specifically authorized by this section, but that are authorized by 12 CFR 211.4 or FRB interpretations of activities authorized by that section, may be authorized by specific consent of the FDIC on an individual basis and upon such terms and conditions as the FDIC may consider appropriate. Activities that will be engaged in as principal (defined by reference to section 362.1(b) of this chapter), and that are not authorized by 12 CFR 211.4 or FRB interpretations of activities authorized under that section, must satisfy the requirements of part 362 of this chapter and be approved by the FDIC under this part as well as part 362 of this chapter.


§ 347.116 Recordkeeping and supervision of foreign activities of insured state nonmember banks.

(a) Records, controls and reports. A bank with any foreign branch, any investment in a foreign organization of 20 percent or more of the organization’s voting equity interests, or control of a foreign organization must maintain a system of records, controls and reports that, at minimum, provide for the following:


(1) Risk assets. To permit assessment of exposure to loss, information furnished or available to the main office should be sufficient to permit periodic and systematic appraisals of the quality of risk assets, including loans and other extensions of credit. Coverage should extend to a substantial proportion of the risk assets in the branch or foreign organization, and include the status of all large credit lines and of credits to customers also borrowing from other offices or affiliates of the bank. Appropriate information on risk assets may include:


(i) A recent financial statement of the borrower or obligee and current information on the borrower’s or obligee’s financial condition;


(ii) Terms, conditions, and collateral;


(iii) Data on any guarantors;


(iv) Payment history; and


(v) Status of corrective measures employed.


(2) Liquidity. To enable assessment of local management’s ability to meet its obligations from available resources, reports should identify the general sources and character of the deposits, borrowing, and other funding sources employed in the branch or foreign organization with special reference to their terms and volatility. Information should be available on sources of liquidity – cash, balances with banks, marketable securities, and repayment flows – such as will reveal their accessibility in time and any risk elements involved.


(3) Contingencies. Data on the volume and nature of contingent items such as loan commitments and guarantees or their equivalents that permit analysis of potential risk exposure and liquidity requirements.


(4) Controls. Reports on the internal and external audits of the branch or foreign organization in sufficient detail to permit determination of conformance to auditing guidelines. Appropriate audit reports may include coverage of:


(i) Verification and identification of entries on financial statements;


(ii) Income and expense accounts, including descriptions of significant chargeoffs and recoveries;


(iii) Operations and dual-control procedures and other internal controls;


(iv) Conformance to head office guidelines on loans, deposits, foreign exchange activities, accounting procedures in compliance with applicable accounting standards, and discretionary authority of local management;


(v) Compliance with local laws and regulations; and


(vi) Compliance with applicable U.S. laws and regulations.


(b) Availability of information to examiners; reports. (1) Information about foreign branches or foreign organizations must be made available to the FDIC by the bank for examination and other supervisory purposes.


(2) The FDIC may from time to time require a bank to make and submit such reports and information as may be necessary to implement and enforce the provisions of this subpart, and the bank shall submit an annual report of condition for each foreign branch pursuant to instructions provided by the FDIC.


§ 347.117 General consent.

(a) General consent to establish or relocate a foreign branch. General consent of the FDIC is granted, subject to the written notification requirement contained in section 303.182(a) and consistent with the requirements of this subpart, for an:


(1) Eligible bank to establish a foreign branch conducting activities authorized by section 347.115 of this section in any foreign country in which:


(i) The bank already operates one or more foreign branches or foreign bank subsidiaries;


(ii) The bank’s holding company operates a foreign bank subsidiary; or


(iii) An affiliated bank or Edge or Agreement corporation operates one or more foreign branches or foreign bank subsidiaries.


(2) Insured state nonmember bank to relocate an existing foreign branch within a foreign country.


(b) General consent to invest in a foreign organization. General consent of the FDIC is granted, subject to the written notification requirement contained in section 303.183(a) (unless no notification is required because the investment is acquired for trading purposes) and consistent with the requirements of this subpart, for an eligible bank to make investments in foreign organizations, directly or indirectly, if:


(1) The bank operates at least one foreign bank subsidiary or foreign branch, an affiliated bank or Edge or Agreement corporation operates at least one foreign bank subsidiary or foreign branch, or the bank’s holding company operates at least one foreign bank subsidiary in the country where the foreign organization will be located;


(2) In any instance where the bank and its affiliates will hold 20 percent or more of the foreign organization’s voting equity interests or control the foreign organization, at least one state nonmember bank has a foreign bank subsidiary or foreign branch (other than a shell branch) in the country where the foreign organization will be located;
3
and




3 A list of these countries can be obtained from the FDIC’s Internet Web Site at http://www.fdic.gov.


(3) The investment is within one of the following limits:


(i) The investment is acquired at net asset value from an affiliate;


(ii) The investment is a reinvestment of cash dividends received from the same foreign organization during the preceding 12 months; or


(iii) The total investment, directly or indirectly, in a single foreign organization in any transaction or series of transactions during a twelve-month period does not exceed 2 percent of the bank’s Tier 1 capital, and such investments in all foreign organizations in the aggregate do not exceed:


(A) 5 percent of the bank’s Tier 1 capital during a 12-month period; and


(B) Up to an additional 5 percent of the bank’s Tier 1 capital if the investments are acquired for trading purposes.


§ 347.118 Expedited processing.

(a) Expedited processing of branch applications. An eligible bank may establish a foreign branch conducting activities authorized by § 347.115 in an additional foreign country, after complying with the expedited processing requirements contained in § 303.182(b) and (c)(1), if any of the following are located in two or more foreign countries:


(1) Foreign branches or foreign bank subsidiaries of the eligible bank;


(2) Foreign branches or foreign bank subsidiaries of banks and Edge or Agreement corporations affiliated with the eligible bank; and


(3) Foreign bank subsidiaries of the eligible bank’s holding company.


(b) Expedited processing of applications for investment in foreign organizations. An investment that does not qualify for general consent but is otherwise in conformity with the limits and requirements of this subpart may be made 45 days after an eligible bank files a substantially complete application with the FDIC in compliance with the expedited processing requirements contained in § 303.183(b) and (c)(1), or within such earlier time as authorized by the FDIC.


§ 347.119 Specific consent.

General consent and expedited processing under this subpart do not apply in the following circumstances:


(a) Limitation on access to supervisory information in foreign country. (1) Applicable law or practice in the foreign country where the foreign organization or foreign branch would be located would limit the FDIC’s access to information for supervisory purposes; and


(i) A bank would hold 20 percent or more of the voting equity interests of a foreign organization or control such organization as a result of a foreign investment; or


(ii) A bank would be establishing a foreign branch.


(b) Modification or suspension of general consent or expedited processing. The FDIC at any time notifies the bank that the FDIC is modifying or suspending its general consent or expedited processing procedure.


(c) Specific consent. Direct or indirect investments in or activities of foreign organizations by banks, the establishment of foreign branches or issues regarding the types or amounts of activity that can be engaged in by foreign branches, which are not authorized under §§ 347.117 or 347.118 require prior review and specific consent of the FDIC.


[70 FR 17560, Apr. 6, 2005, as amended at 85 FR 72555, Nov. 13, 2020]


§ 347.120 Computation of investment amounts.

In computing the amount that may be invested in any foreign organization under §§ 347.117 through 347.119, any investments held by an affiliate of a bank must be included.


§ 347.121 Requirements for insured state nonmember bank to close a foreign branch.

A bank must comply with the written notification requirement contained in § 303.182(d) when it closes a foreign branch.


§ 347.122 Limitations applicable to the authority provided in this subpart.

The FDIC may impose such conditions on authority granted in this subpart as it considers appropriate. If a bank is unable or fails to comply with the requirements of this subpart or any conditions imposed by the FDIC regarding transactions under this subpart, the FDIC may require termination of any activities or divestiture of investments permitted under this subpart after giving the bank notice and a reasonable opportunity to be heard on the matter.


Subpart B – Foreign Banks

§ 347.201 Authority, purpose, and scope.

(a) This subpart is issued pursuant to sections 5(c) and 10(b)(4) of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act (FDI Act)(12 U.S.C. 1815(c) and 1820(b)(4)) and sections 6, 7, and 15 of the International Banking Act of 1978 (IBA)(12 U.S.C. 3104, 3105, and 3109).


(b) This subpart implements the insured branch asset pledge and examination commitment requirement for foreign banks in the FDI Act. It also implements the deposit insurance, permissible activity, and cross-border cooperation provisions of the IBA regarding the FDIC. Sections 347.203-347.211 apply to state and federal branches whose deposits are insured. Sections 347.204 and 347.207 are applicable to depository institution subsidiaries of a foreign bank. Section 347.212 applies to insured state branches and §§ 347.213-347.216 apply to state branches whose deposits are not insured by the FDIC.


§ 347.202 Definitions.

For the purposes of this subpart:


(a) Affiliate means any entity that controls, is controlled by, or is under common control with another entity. An entity shall be deemed to “control” another entity if the entity directly or indirectly owns, controls, or has the power to vote 25 percent or more of any class of voting securities of the other entity or controls in any manner the election of a majority of the directors or trustees of the other entity.


(b) Agency means any office or any place of business of a foreign bank located in any State of the United States at which credit balances are maintained incidental to or arising out of the exercise of banking powers, checks are paid, or money is lent but at which deposits may not be accepted from citizens or residents of the United States.


(c) Branch means any office or place of business of a foreign bank located in any state of the United States at which deposits are received. The term does not include any office or place of business deemed by the state licensing authority or the Comptroller of the Currency to be an agency.


(d) Deposit has the same meaning as that term in section 3(l) of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act (12 U.S.C. 1813(l)).


(e) Depository means any insured state bank, national bank, or insured branch.


(f) Domestic retail deposit activity means the acceptance by a Federal or State branch of any initial deposit of less than an amount equal to the standard maximum deposit insurance amount (“SMDIA”).


(g) Federal branch means a branch of a foreign bank established and operating under the provisions of section 4 of the International Banking Act of 1978 (12 U.S.C. 3102).


(h) Foreign bank means any company organized under the laws of a foreign country, any territory of the United States, Puerto Rico, Guam, American Samoa, the Northern Mariana Islands, or the Virgin Islands, which engages in the business of banking. The term includes foreign commercial banks, foreign merchant banks and other foreign institutions that engage in banking activities usual in connection with the business of banking in the countries where such foreign institutions are organized and operating. Except as otherwise specifically provided by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, banks organized under the laws of a foreign country, any territory of the United States, Puerto Rico, Guam, American Samoa, the Northern Mariana Islands, or the Virgin Islands which are insured banks other than by reason of having an insured branch are not considered to be foreign banks for purposes of §§ 347.204, 347.205, 347.209, and 347.210.


(i) Foreign business means any entity including, but not limited to, a corporation, partnership, sole proprietorship, association, foundation or trust, which is organized under the laws of a foreign country or any United States entity which is owned or controlled by an entity which is organized under the laws of a foreign country or a foreign national.


(j) Foreign country means any country other than the United States and includes any colony, dependency or possession of any such country.


(k) FRB means the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System.


(l) Highly liquid means, with respect to a security, that the security has low credit and market risk; is traded in an active secondary two-way market that has committed market makers and independent bona fide offers to buy and sell so that a price reasonably related to the last sales price or current bona fide competitive bid and offer quotations can be determined within one day and settled at that price within a reasonable time period conforming with trade custom; is a type of asset that investors historically have purchased in periods of financial market distress during which market liquidity has been impaired.


(m) Home state of a foreign bank means the state so determined by the election of the foreign bank, or in default of such election, by the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System.


(n) Immediate family member of a natural person means the spouse, father, mother, brother, sister, son or daughter of that natural person.


(o) Initial deposit means the first deposit transaction between a depositor and the branch where there is no existing deposit relationship. The initial deposit may be placed into different deposit accounts or into different kinds of deposit accounts, such as demand, savings or time. Deposit accounts that are held by a depositor in the same right and capacity may be added together for the purposes of determining the dollar amount of the initial deposit.


(p) Insured bank means any bank, including a foreign bank with an insured branch, the deposits of which are insured in accordance with the provisions of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act.


(q) Insured branch means a branch of a foreign bank any deposits of which branch are insured in accordance with the provisions of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act.


(r) Investment grade means a security issued by an entity that has adequate capacity to meet financial commitments for the projected life of the exposure. Such an entity has adequate capacity to meet financial commitments if the risk of its default is low and the full and timely repayment of principal and interest is expected.


(s) Large United States business means any entity including, but not limited to, a corporation, partnership, sole proprietorship, association, foundation or trust which is organized under the laws of the United States or any state thereof, and:


(1) Whose securities are registered on a national securities exchange or quoted on the National Association of Securities Dealers Automated Quotation System; or


(2) Has annual gross revenues in excess of $1,000,000 for the fiscal year immediately preceding the initial deposit.


(t) A majority owned subsidiary means a company the voting stock of which is more than 50 percent owned or controlled by another company.


(u) Noninsured branch means a branch of a foreign bank deposits of which branch are not insured in accordance with the provisions of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act.


(v) OCC means the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency.


(w) Person means an individual, bank, corporation, partnership, trust, association, foundation, joint venture, pool, syndicate, sole proprietorship, unincorporated organization, or any other form of entity.


(x) Significant risk to the deposit insurance fund shall be understood to be present whenever there is a high probability that the Deposit Insurance Fund administered by the FDIC may suffer a loss.


(y) Standard maximum deposit insurance amount, referred to as the “SMDIA” hereafter, means $250,000 adjusted pursuant to subparagraph (F) of section 11(a)(1) of the FDI Act (12 U.S.C. 1821(a)(1)(F)).


(z) State means any state of the United States or the District of Columbia.


(aa) State branch means a branch of a foreign bank established and operating under the laws of any state.


(bb) Wholly owned subsidiary means a company the voting stock of which is 100 percent owned or controlled by another company except for a nominal number of directors’ shares.


[70 FR 17560, Apr. 6, 2005; 70 FR 20704, Apr. 21, 2005, as amended at 71 FR 20527, Apr. 21, 2006; 74 FR 47718, Sept. 17, 2009; 75 FR 49365, Aug. 13, 2010; 83 FR 9143, Mar. 5, 2018]


§ 347.203 Deposit insurance required for all branches of foreign banks engaged in domestic retail deposit activity in the same State.

The FDIC will not insure deposits in any branch of a foreign bank unless the foreign bank agrees that every branch established or operated by the foreign bank in the same state that engages in domestic retail deposit activity will be an insured branch.


§ 347.204 Commitment to be examined and provide information.

(a) In connection with an application for deposit insurance for a U.S. branch or depository institution subsidiary of a foreign bank that has been determined to be subject to comprehensive consolidated supervision by the appropriate Federal banking agency, as defined in section 3(q) of the FDI Act (12 U.S.C. 1813(q)), the foreign bank shall provide binding written commitments (including a consent to U.S. jurisdiction and designation of agent for service, acceptable to the FDIC) to the following terms:


(1) The FDIC will be provided with any information about the foreign bank and its affiliates located outside of the United States that the FDIC requests to determine:


(i) The relationship between the U.S. branch or depository institution subsidiary and its affiliates; and


(ii) The effect of such relationship on such U.S. branch or depository institution subsidiary;


(2) The FDIC will be allowed to examine the affairs of any office, agency, branch or affiliate of the foreign bank located in the United States and will be provided any information requested to determine:


(i) The relationship between the U.S. branch or depository institution subsidiary and such offices, agencies, branches or affiliates; and


(ii) The effect of such relationship on such U.S. branch or depository institution subsidiary.


(3) The FDIC will not process a deposit insurance application for any U.S. branch or depository institution subsidiary of a foreign bank if the foreign bank fails to provide the written commitments, consent to U.S. jurisdiction, and designation of agent for service required by this section.


(b) The FDIC will consider the existence and extent of any prohibition or restrictions, if any, on its ability to utilize the commitments, consent to U.S. jurisdiction, and designation of agent for service required by this section, in determining whether to grant or deny a deposit insurance application for the U.S. branch or depository institution subsidiary of the foreign bank. In addition, the FDIC may consider any additional assurances or commitments provided by the foreign bank, including that it will cooperate and assist the FDIC, without limitation, by seeking to obtain waivers and exemptions from applicable confidentiality or secrecy restrictions or requirements to enable the foreign bank or its affiliates to make information about the foreign bank and its affiliates located outside of the United States available to the FDIC for review.


(c) The foreign bank’s commitments, consent to U.S. jurisdiction, and designation of agent for service shall be signed by an officer of the foreign bank who has been so authorized by the foreign bank’s board of directors and in all instances will be executed in a manner acceptable to the FDIC and shall be included with the branch or depository institution application for insurance. Any documents that are not in English shall be accompanied by an English translation.


§ 347.205 Record maintenance.

The records of each insured branch shall be kept as though it were a separate entity, with its assets and liabilities separate from the other operations of the head office, other branches or agencies of the foreign bank and its subsidiaries or affiliates. Each insured branch must keep a set of accounts and records in the words and figures of the English language that accurately reflects the business transactions of the insured branch on a daily basis. A foreign bank that has more than one insured branch in a state may treat such insured branches as one entity for record-keeping purposes and may designate one branch to maintain records for all the branches in the state.


§ 347.206 Domestic retail deposit activity requiring deposit insurance by U.S. branch of a foreign bank.

(a) Domestic retail deposit activity. To initiate or conduct domestic retail deposit activity requiring deposit insurance protection in any state after December 19, 1991, a foreign bank must establish one or more insured U.S. bank subsidiaries for that purpose.


(b) Exception. Paragraph (a) of this section does not apply to any bank organized under the laws of any territory of the United States, Puerto Rico, Guam, American Samoa, or the Virgin Islands the deposits of which are insured by the FDIC pursuant to the Federal Deposit Insurance Act.


(c) Grandfathered insured branches. Domestic retail accounts with balances of less than an amount equal to the SMDIA that require deposit insurance protection may be accepted or maintained in an insured branch of a foreign bank only if such branch was an insured branch on December 19, 1991


(d) Change in ownership of grandfathered insured branch. The grandfathered status of an insured branch may not be transferred, except in certain merger and acquisition transactions that the FDIC determines are not designed, or motivated by the desire, to avoid compliance with section 6(d)(1) of the International Banking Act (12 U.S.C. 3104(d)(1)).


[70 FR 17560, Apr. 6, 2005, as amended at 74 FR 47718, Sept. 17, 2009]


§ 347.207 Disclosure of supervisory information to foreign supervisors.

(a) Disclosure by the FDIC. The FDIC may disclose information obtained in the course of exercising its supervisory or examination authority to a foreign bank regulatory or supervisory authority, if the FDIC determines that disclosure is appropriate for bank supervisory or regulatory purposes and will not prejudice the interests of the United States.


(b) Confidentiality. Before making any disclosure of information pursuant to paragraph (a) of this section, the FDIC will obtain, to the extent necessary, the agreement of the foreign bank regulatory or supervisory authority to maintain the confidentiality of such information to the extent possible under applicable law. The disclosure or transfer of information to a foreign bank regulatory or supervisory authority under this section will not waive any privilege applicable to the information that is disclosed or transferred.


§ 347.208 Assessment base deductions by insured branch.

Deposits in an insured branch to the credit of the foreign bank or any of its offices, branches, agencies, or wholly owned subsidiaries may be deducted from the assessment base of the insured branch.


§ 347.209 Pledge of assets.

(a) Purpose. A foreign bank that has an insured branch must pledge assets for the benefit of the FDIC or its designee(s). Whenever the FDIC is obligated under section 11(f) of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act (12 U.S.C. 1821(f)) to pay the insured deposits of an insured branch, the assets pledged under this section must become the property of the FDIC and be used to the extent necessary to protect the Deposit Insurance Fund.


(b) Amount of assets to be pledged. (1) For a newly insured branch, a foreign bank must pledge assets equal to at least 5 percent of the liabilities of the branch, based on the branch’s projection of its liabilities at the end of each of the first three years of operations. For all other insured branches, a foreign bank must pledge assets equal to the appropriate percentage applicable to the insured branch, as determined by reference to the risk-based assessment schedule contained in this paragraph, of the insured branch’s average liabilities for the last 30 days of the most recent calendar quarter.
4




4 This average must be computed by using the sum of the close of business figures for the 30 calendar days of the most recent calendar quarter, ending with and including the last day of the calendar quarter, divided by 30. For days on which the branch is closed, however, balances from the previous business day are to be used in determining its average liabilities. In determining its average liabilities, the insured branch may exclude liabilities to other offices, agencies, branches, and wholly owned subsidiaries of the foreign bank. The value of the pledged assets must be computed based on the lesser of the principal amount (par value) or market value of such assets at the time of the original pledge and thereafter as of the last day of the most recent calendar quarter.


(2) Risk-based assessment schedule. The risk-based asset pledge required by paragraph (b)(1) will be determined by utilizing the following risk-based assessment schedule:


Asset maintenance level
Supervisory risk subgroup
A (%)
B (%)
C (%)
Equal to or greater than 108%234
Equal to or greater than 106%456
Less than 106%678

The appropriate asset pledge percentage will be determined based on the supervisory risk subgroup and asset maintenance level applicable to the insured branch.


(3) Supervisory risk factors. For purposes of this section, within each asset maintenance group, each institution will be assigned to one of three subgroups based on consideration by the FDIC of supervisory evaluations provided by the primary federal regulator for the insured branch. The supervisory evaluations include the results of examination findings by the primary federal regulator, as well as other information the primary federal regulator determines to be relevant. In addition, the FDIC will take into consideration such other information (such as state examination findings, if appropriate) as it determines to be relevant to the financial condition and the risk posed to the Deposit Insurance Fund. The three supervisory subgroups are:


(i) Subgroup “A”. This subgroup consists of financially sound institutions with only a few minor weaknesses;


(ii) Subgroup “B”. This subgroup consists of institutions that demonstrate weaknesses which, if not corrected, could result in significant deterioration of the institution and increased risk of loss to the deposit insurance fund; and


(iii) Subgroup “C”. This subgroup consists of institutions that pose a substantial probability of loss to the deposit insurance fund.


(4) The FDIC may require a foreign bank to pledge additional assets or to compute its pledge on a daily basis whenever the FDIC determines that the condition of the foreign bank or the insured branch is such that the assets pledged under this section will not adequately protect the deposit insurance fund. In requiring a foreign bank to pledge additional assets, the FDIC will consult with the primary regulator for the insured branch. Among the factors to be considered in imposing these requirements are the concentration of risk to any one borrower or group of related borrowers, the concentration of transfer risk related to any one country, including the country in which the foreign bank’s head office is located or any other factor the FDIC determines is relevant.


(5) Each insured branch must separately comply with the requirements of this section. A foreign bank which has more than one insured branch in a state may, however, treat all of its insured branches in the same state as one entity and will designate one insured branch to be responsible for compliance with this section.


(c) Depository. A foreign bank must place pledged assets for safekeeping at any depository which is located in any state. However, a depository may not be an affiliate of the foreign bank whose insured branch is seeking to use the depository. A foreign bank must obtain the FDIC’s prior written approval of the depository selected, and such approval may be revoked and dismissal of the depository required whenever the depository does not fulfill any one of its obligations under the pledge agreement. A foreign bank shall appoint and constitute the depository as its attorney in fact for the sole purpose of transferring title to pledged assets to the FDIC as may be required to effectuate the provisions of paragraph (a) of this section.


(d) Assets that may be pledged. (1) This paragraph sets forth the kinds of assets that may be pledged to satisfy the requirements of this section. A foreign bank shall be deemed to have pledged any such assets for the benefit of the FDIC or its designee at such time as any such asset is placed with the depository. The FDIC reserves the right to require the substitution of pledged assets with other assets deemed acceptable to the FDIC.


(2) A foreign bank may pledge the kinds of assets set forth in this paragraph (d)(2), provided that: Such assets are denominated in United States dollars; such assets are investment grade, as that term is defined in § 347.202(r); and such assets are highly liquid, as that term is defined in § 347.202(l). Furthermore, for the purposes of calculating the amount of assets required to be pledged under paragraph (b) of this section, the assets that are eligible for pledging under this paragraph (d)(2) must be discounted at the rates set forth in Table 1 to § 347.209.


(i) Cash;


(ii) Treasury bills, interest bearing bonds, notes, debentures, or other direct obligations of or obligations fully guaranteed as to principal and interest by the United States or any agency thereof;


(iii) Obligations of United States government-sponsored enterprises;


(iv) Negotiable certificates of deposit that are payable in the United States and that are issued by any state bank, national bank, state or federal savings association, or branch of a foreign bank which has executed a valid waiver of offset agreement or similar debt instruments that are payable in the United States and that are issued by any agency of a foreign bank which has executed a valid waiver of offset agreement; provided, that the maturity of any certificate or issuance is not greater than one year; and provided further, that the issuing branch or agency of a foreign bank is not an affiliate of the pledging bank or from the same country as the pledging bank’s domicile;


(v) Obligations of the African Development Bank, Asian Development Bank, Inter-American Development Bank, and the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development;


(vi) Commercial paper;


(vii) Notes issued by bank and savings and loan holding companies, banks, or savings associations organized under the laws of the United States or any state thereof or notes issued by branches or agencies of foreign banks, provided that the notes are payable in the United States, and provided further, that the issuing branch or agency of a foreign bank is not an affiliate of the pledging bank or from the same country as the pledging bank’s domicile;


(viii) Banker’s acceptances that are payable in the United States and that are issued by any state bank, national bank, state or federal savings association, or branch or agency of a foreign bank; provided, that the maturity of any acceptance is not greater than 180 days; and provided further, that the branch or agency issuing the acceptance is not an affiliate of the pledging bank or from the same country as the pledging bank’s domicile;


(ix) General obligations of any state of the United States, or any county or municipality of any state of the United States, or any agency, instrumentality, or political subdivision of the foregoing or any obligation guaranteed by a state of the United States or any county or municipality of any state of the United States;


(x) Any other asset determined by the FDIC to be acceptable.


(e) Pledge agreement. A foreign bank shall not pledge any assets unless a pledge agreement in form and substance satisfactory to the FDIC has been executed by the foreign bank and the depository. The agreement, in addition to other terms not inconsistent with this paragraph (e), shall give effect to the following terms:


(1) Original pledge. The foreign bank shall place with the depository assets of the kind described in paragraph (d) of this section, having an aggregate value in the amount as required pursuant to paragraph (b) of this section.


(2) Additional assets required to be pledged. Whenever the foreign bank is required to pledge additional assets for the benefit of the FDIC or its designees pursuant to paragraph (b)(4) of this section, it shall deliver (within two business days after the last day of the most recent calendar quarter, unless otherwise ordered) additional assets of the kind described in paragraph (d) of this section, having an aggregate value in the amount required by the FDIC.


(3) Substitution of assets. The foreign bank, at any time, may substitute any assets for pledged assets, and, upon such substitution, the depository shall promptly release any such assets to the foreign bank; provided, that:


(i) The foreign bank pledges assets of the kind described in paragraph (d) of this section having an aggregate value not less than the value of the pledged assets for which they are substituted and certified as such by the foreign bank; and


(ii) The FDIC has not by written notification to the foreign bank, a copy of which shall be provided to the depository, suspended or terminated the foreign bank’s right of substitution.


(4) Delivery of other documents. Concurrently with the pledge of any assets, the foreign bank will deliver to the depository all documents and instruments necessary or advisable to effectuate the transfer of title to any such assets and thereafter, from time to time, at the request of the FDIC, deliver to the depository any such additional documents or instruments. The foreign bank shall provide copies of all such documents described in this paragraph (e)(4) to the appropriate regional director concurrently with their delivery to the depository.


(5) Acceptance and safekeeping responsibilities of the depository. (i) The depository will accept and hold any assets pledged by the foreign bank pursuant to the pledge agreement for safekeeping free and clear of any lien, charge, right of offset, credit, or preference in connection with any claim the depository may assert against the foreign bank and shall designate any such assets as a special pledge for the benefit of the FDIC or its designee. The depository shall not accept the pledge of any such assets unless, concurrently with such pledge, the foreign bank delivers to the depository the documents and instruments necessary for the transfer of title thereto as provided in this part.


(ii) The depository shall hold any such assets separate from all other assets of the foreign bank or the depository. Such assets may be held in book-entry form but must at all times be segregated on the records of the depository and clearly identified as assets subject to the pledge agreement.


(6) Reporting requirements of the insured branch and the depository – (i) Initial reports. Upon the original pledge of assets as provided in paragraph (e)(1) of this section:


(A) The depository shall provide to the foreign bank and to the appropriate FDIC regional director a written report in the form of a receipt identifying each asset pledged and specifying in reasonable detail with respect to each such asset the complete title, interest rate, series, serial number (if any), principal amount (par value), maturity date and call date; and


(B) The foreign bank shall provide to the appropriate regional director a written report certified as correct by the foreign bank which sets forth the value of each pledged asset and the aggregate value of all such assets, and which states that the aggregate value of all such assets is at least equal to the amount required pursuant to paragraph (b) of this section and that all such assets are of the kind described in paragraph (d) of this section.


(ii) Quarterly reports. Within ten calendar days after the end of the most recent calendar quarter:


(A) The depository shall provide to the appropriate regional director a written report specifying in reasonable detail with respect to each asset currently pledged (including any asset pledged to satisfy the requirements of paragraph (b)(4) of this section and identified as such), as of two business days after the end of the most recent calendar quarter, the complete title, interest rate, series, serial number (if any), principal amount (par value), maturity date, and call date, provided, that if no substitution of any asset has occurred during the reporting period, the reporting need only specify that no substitution of assets has occurred; and


(B) The foreign bank shall provide as of two business days after the end of the most recent calendar quarter to the appropriate regional director a written report certified as correct by the foreign bank which sets forth the value of each pledged asset and the aggregate value of all such assets, which states that the aggregate value of all such assets is at least equal to the amount required pursuant to paragraph (b) of this section and that all such assets are of the kind described in paragraph (d) of this section, and which states the average of the liabilities of each insured branch of the foreign bank computed in the manner and for the period prescribed in paragraph (b) of this section.


(iii) Additional reports. The foreign bank shall, from time to time, as may be required, provide to the appropriate regional director a written report in the form specified containing the information requested with respect to any asset then currently pledged.


(7) Access to assets. With respect to any asset pledged pursuant to the pledge agreement, the depository will provide representatives of the FDIC or the foreign bank with access (during regular business hours of the depository and at the location where any such asset is held, without other limitation or qualification) to all original instruments, documents, books, and records evidencing or pertaining to any such asset.


(8) Release upon the order of the FDIC. The depository shall release to the foreign bank any pledged assets, as specified in a written notification of the appropriate regional director, upon the terms and conditions provided in such notification, including without limitation the waiver of any requirement that any assets be pledged by the foreign bank in substitution of any released assets.


(9) Release to the FDIC. Whenever the FDIC is obligated under section 11(f) of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act to pay insured deposits of an insured branch, the FDIC by written certification shall so inform the depository; and the depository, upon receipt of such certification, shall thereupon promptly release and transfer title to any pledged assets to the FDIC or release such assets to the foreign bank, as specified in the certification. Upon release and transfer of title to all pledged assets specified in the certification, the depository shall be discharged from any further obligation under the pledge agreement.


(10) Interest earned on assets. The foreign bank may retain any interest earned with respect to the assets currently pledged unless the FDIC by written notice prohibits retention of interest by the foreign bank, in which case the notice shall specify the disposition of any such interest.


(11) Expenses of agreement. The FDIC shall not be required to pay any fees, costs, or expenses for services provided by the depository to the foreign bank pursuant to, or in connection with, the pledge agreement.


(12) Substitution of depository. The depository may resign, or the foreign bank may discharge the depository, from its duties and obligations under the pledge agreement by giving at least 60 days’ written notice thereof to the other party and to the appropriate regional director. The FDIC, upon 30 days’ written notice to the foreign bank and the depository, may require the foreign bank to dismiss the depository if the FDIC in its discretion determines that the depository is in breach of the pledge agreement. The depository shall continue to function as such until the appointment of a successor depository becomes effective and the depository has released to the successor depository the pledged assets and documents and instruments to effectuate transfer of title in accordance with the written instructions of the foreign bank as approved by the FDIC. The appointment by the foreign bank of a successor depository shall not be effective until:


(i) The FDIC has approved in writing the successor depository; and


(ii) A pledge agreement in form and substance satisfactory to the FDIC has been executed.


(13) Waiver of terms. The FDIC may by written order waive compliance by the foreign bank or the depository with any term or condition of the pledge agreement.


Table 1 to § 347.209 – Supervisory Haircuts for Assets Pledged Under § 347.209(d)

Remaining maturity
Haircut % assigned based on maturity and risk weight
Risk weight (%) by issuer as specified in part 324.32
0%
20%
50%
100%
≤to 1 Year01.02.04.0
>1 Year but ≤5 Years04.06.08.0
>5 years08.012.016.0

[70 FR 17560, Apr. 6, 2005; 70 FR 20704, Apr. 21, 2005, as amended at 71 FR 20527, Apr. 21, 2006; 83 FR 9143, Mar. 5, 2018]


§ 347.210 Asset maintenance.

(a) An insured branch of a foreign bank shall maintain on a daily basis eligible assets in an amount not less than 106 percent of the preceding quarter’s average book value of the insured branch’s liabilities or, in the case of a newly-established insured branch, the estimated book value of its liabilities at the end of the first full quarter of operation, exclusive of liabilities due to the foreign bank’s head office, other branches, agencies, offices, or wholly owned subsidiaries. The Director of the Division of Supervision and Consumer Protection or his designee may impose a computation of total liabilities on a daily basis in those instances where it is found necessary for supervisory purposes. The FDIC Board of Directors, after consulting with the insured branch’s primary regulator, may require that a higher ratio of eligible assets be maintained if the financial condition of the insured branch warrants such action. Among the factors which will be considered in requiring a higher ratio of eligible assets are the concentration of risk to any one borrower or group of related borrowers, the concentration of transfer risk to any one country, including the country in which the foreign bank’s head office is located or any other factor the FDIC determines is relevant. Eligible assets shall be payable in United States dollars.


(b) In determining eligible assets for the purposes of compliance with paragraph (a) of this section, the insured branch shall exclude the following:


(1) Any asset due from the foreign bank’s head office, or its other branches, agencies, offices or affiliates;


(2) Any asset classified “Value Impaired,” to the extent of the required Allocated Transfer Risk Reserves or equivalent write down, or “Loss” in the most recent state or federal examination report;


(3) Any deposit of the insured branch in a bank unless the bank has executed a valid waiver of offset agreement;


(4) Any asset not supported by sufficient credit information to allow a review of the asset’s credit quality, as determined at the most recent state or federal examination, as follows:


(i) Whether an asset has sufficient credit information will be a function of the size of the borrower and the location within the foreign bank of the responsibility for authorizing and monitoring extensions of credit to the borrower. For large, well known companies, when credit responsibility is located in an office of the foreign bank outside the insured branch, the insured branch must have adequate documentation to show that the asset is of good quality and is being supervised adequately by the foreign bank. In such cases, copies of periodic memoranda that include an analysis of the borrower’s recent financial statements and a report on recent developments in the borrower’s operations and borrowing relationships with the foreign bank generally would constitute sufficient information. For other borrowers, periodic memoranda must be supplemented by information such as copies of recent financial statements, recent correspondence concerning the borrower’s financial condition and repayment history, credit terms and collateral, data on any guarantors, and where necessary, the status of any corrective measures being employed;


(ii) Subsequent to the determination that an asset lacks sufficient credit information, an insured branch may not include the amount of that asset among eligible assets until the FDIC determines that sufficient documentation exists. Such a determination may be made either at the next federal examination, or upon request of the insured branch, by the appropriate regional director;


(5) Any asset not in the insured branch’s actual possession unless the insured branch holds title to such asset and the insured branch maintains records sufficient to enable independent verification of the insured branch’s ownership of the asset, as determined at the most recent state or federal examination;


(6) Any intangible asset;


(7) Any other asset not considered bankable by the FDIC.


(c) A foreign bank which has more than one insured branch in a state may treat all of its insured branches in the same state as one entity for purposes of compliance with paragraph (a) of this section and shall designate one insured branch to be responsible for maintaining the records of the insured branches’ compliance with this section.


(d) The average book value of the insured branch’s liabilities for a quarter shall be, at the insured branch’s option, either an average of the balances as of the close of business for each day of the quarter or an average of the balances as of the close of business on each Wednesday during the quarter. Quarters end on March 31, June 30, September 30, and December 31 of any given year. For days on which the insured branch is closed, balances from the previous business day are to be used. Calculations of the average book value of the insured branch’s liabilities for a quarter shall be retained by the insured branch until the next federal examination.


§ 347.211 Examination of branches of foreign banks.

(a) Frequency of on-site examination. Each branch or agency of a foreign bank shall be examined on-site at least once during each 12-month period (beginning on the date the most recent examination of the office ended) by:


(1) The FRB;


(2) The FDIC, if an insured branch;


(3) The OCC, if the branch or agency of the foreign bank is licensed by the OCC; or


(4) The state supervisor, if the office of the foreign bank is licensed or chartered by the state.


(b) 18-month cycle for certain small institutions – (1) Mandatory standards. The FDIC may conduct a full-scope, on-site examination at least once during each 18-month period, rather than each 12-month period as provided in paragraph (a) of this section, if the insured branch:


(i) Has total assets of less than $3 billion;


(ii) Has received a composite ROCA supervisory rating (which rates risk management, operational controls, compliance, and asset quality) of 1 or 2 at its most recent examination;


(iii) Satisfies the requirement of either the following paragraph (b)(iii)(A) or (B):


(A) The foreign bank’s most recently reported capital adequacy position consists of, or is equivalent to, Tier 1 and total risk-based capital ratios of at least 6 percent and 10 percent, respectively, on a consolidated basis; or


(B) The insured branch has maintained on a daily basis, over the past three quarters, eligible assets in an amount not less than 108 percent of the preceding quarter’s average third party liabilities (determined consistent with applicable federal and state law) and sufficient liquidity is currently available to meet its obligations to third parties;


(iv) Is not subject to a formal enforcement action or order by the FRB, FDIC, or the OCC; and


(v) Has not experienced a change in control during the preceding 12-month period in which a full-scope, on-site examination would have been required but for this section.


(2) Discretionary standards. In determining whether an insured branch that meets the standards of paragraph (b)(1) of this section should not be eligible for an 18-month examination cycle pursuant to this paragraph (b), the FDIC may consider additional factors, including whether:


(i) Any of the individual components of the ROCA supervisory rating of an insured branch is rated “3” or worse;


(ii) The results of any off-site monitoring indicate a deterioration in the condition of the insured branch;


(iii) The size, relative importance, and role of a particular insured branch when reviewed in the context of the foreign bank’s entire U.S. operations otherwise necessitate an annual examination; and


(iv) The condition of the parent foreign bank gives rise to such a need.


(c) Authority to conduct more frequent examinations. Nothing in paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section limits the authority of the FDIC to examine any insured branch as frequently as it deems necessary.


(d) From December 2, 2020, through December 31, 2021, for purposes of determining eligibility for the extended examination cycle described in paragraph (b) of this section, the total assets of an insured branch shall be determined based on the lesser of:


(1) The assets of the insured branch as of December 31, 2019; and


(2) The assets of the insured branch as of the end of the most recent calendar quarter.


[70 FR 17560, Apr. 6, 2005; 70 FR 20704, Apr. 21, 2005, as amended at 72 FR 17803, Apr. 10, 2007; 81 FR 10070, Feb. 29, 2016; 83 FR 43965, Aug. 29, 2018; 85 FR 77364, Dec. 2, 2020]


§ 347.212 FDIC approval to conduct activities that are not permissible for federal branches.

(a) Scope. A foreign bank operating an insured state branch which desires to engage in or continue to engage in any type of activity that is not permissible for a federal branch, pursuant to the National Bank Act (12 U.S.C. 21 et seq.) or any other federal statute, regulation, official bulletin or circular, written order or interpretation, or decision of a court of competent jurisdiction, must file a written application for permission to conduct such activity with the FDIC.


(b) Exceptions. If the FDIC has already determined, pursuant to part 362 of this chapter, “Activities and Investment of Insured State Banks,” that an activity does not present a significant risk to the Deposit Insurance Fund, no application is required under paragraph (a) of this section for a foreign bank operating an insured branch to engage or continue to engage in the same activity.


(c) Agency activities. A foreign bank operating an insured state branch is not required to submit an application pursuant to paragraph (a) of this section to engage in or continue engaging in an activity conducted as agent if the activity is:


(1) permissible agency activity for a state-chartered bank located in the state which the state-licensed insured branch of the foreign bank is located;


(2) permissible agency activity for a state-licensed branch of a foreign bank located in that state; and


(3) permissible pursuant to any other applicable federal law or regulation.


(d) Conditions of approval. (1) Approval of such an application required by paragraph (a) of this section may be conditioned on the agreement by the foreign bank and its insured state branch to conduct the activity subject to specific limitations, which may include pledging of assets in excess of the asset pledge and asset maintenance requirements contained in §§ 347.209 and 347.210.


(2) In the case of an application to initially engage in an activity, as opposed to an application to continue to conduct an activity, the insured state branch shall not commence the activity until it has been approved in writing by the FDIC pursuant to this part and the FRB, and any and all conditions imposed in such approvals have been satisfied.


(e) Divestiture or cessation. (1) If an application for permission to continue to conduct an activity is not approved by the FDIC or the FRB, the applicant shall submit a plan of divestiture or cessation of the activity to the appropriate regional director.


(2) A foreign bank operating an insured state branch which elects not to apply to the FDIC for permission to continue to conduct an activity which is rendered impermissible by any change in statute, regulation, official bulletin or circular, written order or interpretation, or decision of a court of competent jurisdiction shall submit a plan of divestiture or cessation to the appropriate regional director.


(3) All plans of divestitures or cessation required by this paragraph must be completed within one year from the date of the disapproval, or within such shorter period as the FDIC may direct.


(f) Procedures. Procedures for applications under this section are set out in section 303.187.


[70 FR 17560, Apr. 6, 2005; 70 FR 20704, Apr. 21, 2005, as amended at 71 FR 20527, Apr. 21, 2006]


§ 347.213 Establishment or operation of noninsured foreign branch.

(a) A foreign bank may establish or operate a state branch, as provided by state law, without federal deposit insurance whenever:


(1) The branch only accepts initial deposits in an amount equal to the SMDIA or greater; or


(2) The branch meets the criteria set forth in § 347.214 or § 347.215.


(b) [Reserved]


[70 FR 17560, Apr. 6, 2005, as amended at 74 FR 47718, Sept. 17, 2009]


§ 347.214 Branch established under section 5 of the International Banking Act.

A foreign bank may operate any state branch as a noninsured branch whenever the foreign bank has entered into an agreement with the FRB to accept at that branch only those deposits as would be permissible for a corporation organized under section 25(a) of the Federal Reserve Act (12 U.S.C. 611 et seq.) and implementing rules and regulations administered by the FRB (12 CFR 211).


§ 347.215 Exemptions from deposit insurance requirement.

(a) Deposit activities not requiring insurance. A State branch will not be considered to be engaged in domestic retail deposit activity that requires the foreign bank parent to establish an insured U.S. bank subsidiary if the State branch accepts initial deposits only in an amount of less than an amount equal to the SMDIA that are derived solely from the following:


(1) Individuals who are not citizens or residents of the United States at the time of the initial deposit;


(2) Individuals who:


(i) Are not citizens of the United States;


(ii) Are residents of the United States; and


(iii) Are employed by a foreign bank, foreign business, foreign government, or recognized international organization;


(3) Persons (including immediate family members of natural persons) to whom the branch or foreign bank (including any affiliate thereof) has extended credit or provided other nondeposit banking services within the past twelve months or has entered into a written agreement to provide such services within the next twelve months;


(4) Foreign businesses, large United States businesses, and persons from whom an Edge or agreement corporation may accept deposits under 12 CFR 211.6(a)(1);


(5) Any governmental unit, including the United States government, any state government, any foreign government and any political subdivision or agency of any of the foregoing, and recognized international organizations;


(6) Persons who are depositing funds in connection with the issuance of a financial instrument by the branch for the transmission of funds or the transmission of such funds by any electronic means; and


(7) Any other depositor, but only if:


(i) The branch’s average deposits under this paragraph (a)(7) do not exceed one percent of the branch’s average total deposits, as calculated under paragraph (a)(7)(ii) if this section (de minimis exception).


(ii) For purposes of calculating this exception:


(A) The branch’s average deposits under this paragraph and the average total deposits must be computed by summing the close of business figures for each of the last 30 calendar days, ending with and including the last day of the calendar quarter, and dividing the resulting sum by 30;


(B) For days on which the branch is closed, balances from the last previous business day are to be used;


(C) The branch may exclude deposits in the branch of other offices, branches, agencies or wholly owned subsidiaries of the bank to determine its average deposits;


(D) The branch must not solicit deposits from the general public by advertising, display of signs, or similar activity designed to attract the attention of the general public; and


(E) A foreign bank that has more than one state branch in the same state may aggregate deposits in such branches (excluding deposits of other branches, agencies or wholly owned subsidiaries of the bank) for the purpose of this paragraph (a)(7).


(b) Application for an exemption. (1) Whenever a foreign bank proposes to accept at a State branch initial deposits of less than an amount equal to the SMDIA and such deposits are not otherwise exempted under paragraph (a) of this section, the foreign bank may apply to the FDIC for consent to operate the branch as a noninsured branch. The Board of Directors may exempt the branch from the insurance requirement if the branch is not engaged in domestic retail deposit activities requiring insurance protection. The Board of Directors will consider the size and nature of depositors and deposit accounts, the importance of maintaining and improving the availability of credit to all sectors of the United States economy, including the international trade finance sector of the United States economy, whether the exemption would give the foreign bank an unfair competitive advantage over United States banking organizations, and any other relevant factors in making this determination.


(2) Procedures for applications under this section are set out in § 303.186.


(c) Transition period. A noninsured state branch may maintain a retail deposit lawfully accepted prior to April 1, 1996 pursuant to regulations in effect prior to July 1, 1998:


(1) If the deposit qualifies pursuant to paragraph (a) or (b) of this section; or


(2) If the deposit does not qualify pursuant to paragraph (a) or (b) of this section, in the case of a time deposit, no later than the first maturity date of the time deposit after April 1, 1996.


[70 FR 17560, Apr. 6, 2005, as amended at 74 FR 47718, Sept. 17, 2009]


§ 347.216 Depositor notification.

Any state branch that is exempt from the insurance requirement pursuant to § 347.215 shall:


(a) Display conspicuously at each window or place where deposits are usually accepted a sign stating that deposits are not insured by the FDIC; and


(b) Include in bold face conspicuous type on each signature card, passbook, and instrument evidencing a deposit the statement “This deposit is not insured by the FDIC”; or require each depositor to execute a statement which acknowledges that the initial deposit and all future deposits at the branch are not insured by the FDIC. This acknowledgment shall be retained by the branch so long as the depositor maintains any deposit with the branch. This provision applies to any negotiable certificates of deposit made in a branch on or after July 6, 1989, as well as to any renewals of such deposits which become effective on or after July 6, 1989.


Subpart C – International Lending


Source:70 FR 17560, Apr. 6, 2005; 70 FR 20704, Apr. 21, 2005, unless otherwise noted.

§ 347.301 Purpose, authority, and scope.

Under the International Lending Supervision Act of 1983 (Title IX, Pub. L. 98-181, 97 Stat. 1153) (12 U.S.C. 3901 et seq.) (ILSA), the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation prescribes the regulations in this subpart relating to international lending activities of banks.


§ 347.302 Definitions.

For the purposes of this subpart:


(a) Administrative cost means those costs which are specifically identified with negotiating, processing and consummating the loan. These costs include, but are not necessarily limited to: legal fees; costs of preparing and processing loan documents; and an allocable portion of salaries and related benefits of employees engaged in the international lending function. No portion of supervisory and administrative expenses or other indirect expenses such as occupancy and other similar overhead costs shall be included.


(b) Banking institution means an insured state nonmember bank.


(c) Federal banking agencies means the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency, and the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation.


(d) International assets means those assets required to be included in banking institutions’ “Country Exposure Report” form (FFIEC No. 009).


(e) International loan means a loan as defined in the instructions to the “Report of Condition and Income” for the respective banking institution (FFIEC Nos. 031, 032, 033 and 034) and made to a foreign government, or to an individual, a corporation, or other entity not a citizen of, resident in, or organized or incorporated in the United States.


(f) Restructured international loan means a loan that meets the following criteria:


(1) The borrower is unable to service the existing loan according to its terms and is a resident of a foreign country in which there is a generalized inability of public and private sector obligors to meet their external debt obligations on a timely basis because of a lack of, or restraints on the availability of, needed foreign exchange in the country; and


(2) Either:


(i) The terms of the existing loan are amended to reduce stated interest or extend the schedule of payments; or


(ii) A new loan is made to, or for the benefit of, the borrower, enabling the borrower to service or refinance the existing debt.


(g) Transfer risk means the possibility that an asset cannot be serviced in the currency of payment because of a lack of, or restraints on the availability of, needed foreign exchange in the country of the obligor.


§ 347.303 Allocated transfer risk reserve.

(a) Establishment of Allocated Transfer Risk Reserve. A banking institution shall establish an allocated transfer risk reserve (ATRR) for specified international assets when required by the FDIC in accordance with this section.


(b) Procedures and standards – (1) Joint agency determination. At least annually, the federal banking agencies shall determine jointly, based on the standards set forth in paragraph (b)(2) of this section, the following:


(i) Which international assets subject to transfer risk warrant establishment of an ATRR;


(ii) The amount of the ATRR for the specified assets; and


(iii) Whether an ATRR established for specified assets may be reduced.


(2) Standards for requiring ATRR – (i) Evaluation of assets. The federal banking agencies shall apply the following criteria in determining whether an ATRR is required for particular international assets:


(A) Whether the quality of a banking institution’s assets has been impaired by a protracted inability of public or private obligors in a foreign country to make payments on their external indebtedness as indicated by such factors, among others, as whether:


(1) Such obligors have failed to make full interest payments on external indebtedness; or


(2) Such obligors have failed to comply with the terms of any restructured indebtedness; or


(3) A foreign country has failed to comply with any International Monetary Fund or other suitable adjustment program; or


(B) Whether no definite prospects exist for the orderly restoration of debt service.


(ii) Determination of amount of ATRR. (A) In determining the amount of the ATRR, the federal banking agencies shall consider:


(1) The length of time the quality of the asset has been impaired;


(2) Recent actions taken to restore debt service capability;


(3) Prospects for restored asset quality; and


(4) Such other factors as the federal banking agencies may consider relevant to the quality of the asset.


(B) The initial year’s provision for the ATRR shall be ten percent of the principal amount of each specified international asset, or such greater or lesser percentage determined by the federal banking agencies. Additional provision, if any, for the ATRR in subsequent years shall be fifteen percent of the principal amount of each specified international asset, or such greater or lesser percentage determined by the federal banking agencies.


(3) FDIC notification. Based on the joint agency determinations under paragraph (b)(1) of this section, the FDIC shall notify each banking institution holding assets subject to an ATRR:


(i) Of the amount of the ATRR to be established by the institution for specified international assets; and


(ii) That an ATRR established for specified assets may be reduced.


(c) Accounting treatment of ATRR – (1) Charge to current income. A banking institution shall establish an ATRR by a charge to current income and the amounts so charged shall not be included in the banking institution’s capital or surplus.


(2) Separate accounting. A banking institution shall account for an ATRR separately from the Allowance for Loan and Lease Losses or allowance for credit losses, as applicable, and shall deduct the ATRR from “gross loans and leases” to arrive at “net loans and lease.” The ATRR must be established for each asset subject to the ATRR in the percentage amount specified.


(3) Consolidation. A banking institution shall establish an ATRR, as required, on a consolidated basis. For banks, consolidation should be in accordance with the procedures and tests of significance set forth in the instructions for preparation of Consolidated Reports of Condition and Income (FFIEC Nos. 031, 032, 033 and 034).


(4) Alternative accounting treatment. A banking institution need not establish an ATRR if it writes down in the period in which the ATRR is required, or has written down in prior periods, the value of the specified international assets in the requisite amount for each such asset. For purposes of this paragraph (c)(4), international assets may be written down by a charge to the Allowance for Loan and Lease Losses or allowance for credit losses, as applicable, or a reduction in the principal amount of the asset by application of interest payments or other collections on the asset; provided, that only those international assets that may be charged to the Allowance for Loan and Lease Losses or allowance for credit losses, as applicable, pursuant to U.S. generally accepted accounting principles may be written down by a charge to the Allowance for Loan and Lease Losses or allowance for credit losses, as applicable. However, the Allowance for Loan and Lease Losses or allowance for credit losses, as applicable, must be replenished in such amount necessary to restore it to a level which adequately provides for the estimated losses inherent in the banking institution’s loan and lease portfolio.


(5) Reduction of ATRR. A banking institution may reduce an ATRR when notified by the FDIC or, at any time, by writing down such amount of the international asset for which the ATRR was established.


[70 FR 17560, Apr. 6, 2005; 70 FR 20704, Apr. 21, 2005, as amended at 84 FR 4249, Feb. 14, 2019]


§ 347.304 Accounting for fees on international loans.

(a) Restrictions on fees for restructured international loans. No banking institution shall charge, in connection with the restructuring of an international loan, any fee exceeding the administrative cost of the restructuring unless it amortizes the amount of the fee exceeding the administrative cost over the effective life of the loan.


(b) Accounting treatment. Subject to paragraph (a) of this section, banking institutions shall account for fees on international loans in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles.


§ 347.305 Reporting and disclosure of international assets.

(a) Requirements. (1) Pursuant to section 907(a) of ILSA, a banking institution shall submit to the FDIC, at least quarterly, information regarding the amounts and composition of its holdings of international assets.


(2) Pursuant to section 907(b) of ILSA, a banking institution shall submit to the FDIC information regarding concentrations in its holdings of international assets that are material in relation to total assets and to capital of the institution, such information to be made publicly available by the FDIC on request.


(b) Procedures. The format, content and reporting and filing dates of the reports required under paragraph (a) of this section shall be determined jointly by the federal banking agencies. The requirements to be prescribed by the federal banking agencies may include changes to existing forms (such as revisions to the Country Exposure Report, Form FFIEC No. 009) or such other requirements as the federal banking agencies deem appropriate. The federal banking agencies also may determine to exempt from the requirements of paragraph (a) of this section banking institutions that, in the federal banking agencies’ judgment, have de minimis holdings of international assets.


(c) Reservation of Authority. Nothing contained in this subpart shall preclude the FDIC from requiring from a banking institution such additional or more frequent information on the institution’s holdings of international assets as the agency may consider necessary.


PART 348 – MANAGEMENT OFFICIAL INTERLOCKS


Authority:12 U.S.C. 3207, 12 U.S.C. 1823(k).


Source:80 FR 79252, Dec. 21, 2015, unless otherwise noted.

§ 348.1 Purpose and scope.

(a) Authority. This part is issued under the provisions of the Depository Institution Management Interlocks Act (Interlocks Act) (12 U.S.C. 3201 et seq.), as amended.


(b) Purpose. The purpose of the Interlocks Act and this part is to foster competition by generally prohibiting a management official from serving two nonaffiliated depository organizations in situations where the management interlock likely would have an anticompetitive effect.


(c) Scope. This part applies to management officials of FDIC-supervised institutions and their affiliates.


§ 348.2 Other definitions and rules of construction.

For purposes of this part, the following definitions apply:


(a) Affiliate. (1) The term affiliate has the meaning given in section 202 of the Interlocks Act (12 U.S.C. 3201). For purposes of section 202, shares held by an individual include shares held by members of his or her immediate family. “Immediate family” means spouse, mother, father, child, grandchild, sister, brother or any of their spouses, whether or not any of their shares are held in trust.


(2) For purposes of section 202(3)(B) of the Interlocks Act (12 U.S.C. 3201(3)(B)), an affiliate relationship involving an FDIC-supervised institution based on common ownership does not exist if the FDIC determines, after giving the affected persons the opportunity to respond, that the asserted affiliation was established in order to avoid the prohibitions of the Interlocks Act and does not represent a true commonality of interest between the depository organizations. In making this determination, the FDIC considers, among other things, whether a person, including members of his or her immediate family whose shares are necessary to constitute the group, owns a nominal percentage of the shares of one of the organizations and the percentage is substantially disproportionate to that person’s ownership of shares in the other organization.


(b) Area median income means:


(1) The median family income for the metropolitan statistical area (MSA), if a depository organization is located in an MSA; or


(2) The statewide nonmetropolitan median family income, if a depository organization is located outside an MSA.


(c) Community means a city, town, or village, and contiguous or adjacent cities, towns, or villages.


(d) Contiguous or adjacent cities, towns, or villages means cities, towns, or villages whose borders touch each other or whose borders are within 10 road miles of each other at their closest points. The property line of an office located in an unincorporated city, town, or village is the boundary line of that city, town, or village for the purpose of this definition.


(e) Depository holding company means a bank holding company or a savings and loan holding company (as more fully defined in section 202 of the Interlocks Act (12 U.S.C. 3201)) having its principal office located in the United States.


(f) Depository institution means a commercial bank (including a private bank), a savings bank, a trust company, a savings and loan association, a building and loan association, a homestead association, a cooperative bank, an industrial bank, or a credit union, chartered under the laws of the United States and having a principal office located in the United States. Additionally, a United States office, including a branch or agency, of a foreign commercial bank is a depository institution.


(g) Depository institution affiliate means a depository institution that is an affiliate of a depository organization.


(h) Depository organization means a depository institution or a depository holding company.


(i) FDIC-supervised institution means either an insured state nonmember bank or a State savings association.


(j) Low- and moderate-income areas means census tracts (or, if an area is not in a census tract, block numbering areas delineated by the United States Bureau of the Census) where the median family income is less than 100 percent of the area median income.


(k) Management official. (1) The term management official means:


(i) A director;


(ii) An advisory or honorary director of a depository institution with total assets of $100 million or more;


(iii) A senior executive officer as that term is defined in 12 CFR 303.101(b).


(iv) A branch manager;


(v) A trustee of a depository organization under the control of trustees; and


(vi) Any person who has a representative or nominee serving in any of the capacities in this paragraph (j)(1).


(2) The term management official does not include:


(i) A person whose management functions relate exclusively to the business of retail merchandising or manufacturing;


(ii) A person whose management functions relate principally to the business outside the United States of a foreign commercial bank; or


(iii) A person described in the provisos of section 202(4) of the Interlocks Act (12 U.S.C. 3201(4)) (referring to an officer of a State-chartered savings bank, cooperative bank, or trust company that neither makes real estate mortgage loans nor accepts savings).


(l) Office means a principal or branch office of a depository institution located in the United States. Office does not include a representative office of a foreign commercial bank, an electronic terminal, or a loan production office.


(m) Person means a natural person, corporation, or other business entity.


(n) Relevant metropolitan statistical area (RMSA) means an MSA, a primary MSA, or a consolidated MSA that is not comprised of designated Primary MSAs to the extent that these terms are defined and applied by the Office of Management and Budget.


(o) Representative or nominee means a natural person who serves as a management official and has an obligation to act on behalf of another person with respect to management responsibilities. The FDIC will find that a person has an obligation to act on behalf of another person only if the first person has an agreement, express or implied, to act on behalf of the second person with respect to management responsibilities. The FDIC will determine, after giving the affected persons an opportunity to respond, whether a person is a representative or nominee.


(p) State savings association has the same meaning as in section (3)(b)(3) of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act, 12 U.S.C. 1813(b)(3).


(q) Total assets. (1) The term total assets includes assets measured on a consolidated basis and reported in the most recent fiscal year-end Consolidated Report of Condition and Income.


(2) The term total assets does not include:


(i) Assets of a diversified savings and loan holding company as defined by section 10(a)(1)(F) of the Home Owners’ Loan Act (12 U.S.C. 1467a(a)(1)(F)) other than the assets of its depository institution affiliate;


(ii) Assets of a bank holding company that are exempt from the prohibitions of section 4 of the Bank Holding Company Act of 1956 pursuant to an order issued under section 4(d) of that Act (12 U.S.C. 1843(d)) other than the assets of its depository institution affiliate; or


(iii) Assets of offices of a foreign commercial bank other than the assets of its United States branch or agency.


(3)(i) Temporary relief for 2020 and 2021. Notwithstanding paragraph (q)(1) of this section, from December 2, 2020, through December 31, 2021, except as provided in paragraph (q)(3)(ii) of this section, the term total assets, with respect to a depository organization, means the lesser of assets of the depository organization reported on a consolidated basis as of December 31, 2019, and assets reported on a consolidated basis as of December 31, 2020.


(ii) Reservation of authority. The temporary relief provided under this paragraph (q)(3)(i) of this section does not apply to an FDIC-supervised institution if the FDIC determines that permitting the FDIC-supervised institution to determine its assets in accordance with that paragraph would not be commensurate with the risk posed by the institution. When making this determination, the FDIC will consider all relevant factors, including the extent of asset growth of the FDIC-supervised institution since December 31, 2019; the causes of such growth, including whether growth occurred as a result of mergers or acquisitions; whether such growth is likely to be temporary or permanent; whether the FDIC-supervised institution has become involved in any additional activities since December 31, 2019; and the type of assets held by the FDIC-supervised institution.


(r) United States means the United States of America, any State or territory of the United States of America, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, Guam, American Samoa, and the Virgin Islands.


[80 FR 79252, Dec. 21, 2015, as amended at 85 FR 77364, Dec. 2, 2020]


§ 348.3 Prohibitions.

(a) Community. A management official of a depository organization may not serve at the same time as a management official of an unaffiliated depository organization if the depository organizations in question (or a depository institution affiliate thereof) have offices in the same community.


(b) RMSA. A management official of a depository organization may not serve at the same time as a management official of an unaffiliated depository organization if the depository organizations in question (or a depository institution affiliate thereof) have offices in the same RMSA and each depository organization has total assets of $50 million or more.


(c) Major assets. A management official of a depository organization with total assets exceeding $10 billion (or any affiliate of such an organization) may not serve at the same time as a management official of an unaffiliated depository organization with total assets exceeding $10 billion (or any affiliate of such an organization), regardless of the location of the two depository organizations. The FDIC will adjust these thresholds, as necessary, based on the year-to-year change in the average of the Consumer Price Index for the Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers, not seasonally adjusted, with rounding to the nearest $100 million. The FDIC will announce the revised thresholds by publishing a final rule without notice and comment in the Federal Register.


[80 FR 79252, Dec. 21, 2015, as amended at 84 FR 54472, Oct. 10, 2019]


§ 348.4 Interlocking relationships permitted by statute.

The prohibitions of § 348.3 do not apply in the case of any one or more of the following organizations or to a subsidiary thereof:


(a) A depository organization that has been placed formally in liquidation, or which is in the hands of a receiver, conservator, or other official exercising a similar function;


(b) A corporation operating under section 25 or section 25A of the Federal Reserve Act (12 U.S.C. 601 et seq. and 12 U.S.C. 611 et seq., respectively) (Edge Corporations and Agreement Corporations);


(c) A credit union being served by a management official of another credit union;


(d) A depository organization that does not do business within the United States except as an incident to its activities outside the United States;


(e) A State-chartered savings and loan guaranty corporation;


(f) A Federal Home Loan bank or any other bank organized solely to serve depository institutions (a bankers’ bank) or solely for the purpose of providing securities clearing services and services related thereto for depository institutions and securities companies;


(g) A depository organization that is closed or is in danger of closing as determined by the appropriate Federal depository institutions regulatory agency and is acquired by another depository organization. This exemption lasts for five years, beginning on the date the depository organization is acquired;


(h) A savings association whose acquisition has been authorized on an emergency basis in accordance with section 13(k) of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act (12 U.S.C. 1823(k)) with resulting dual service by a management official that would otherwise be prohibited under the Interlocks Act which may continue for up to 10 years from the date of the acquisition provided that the FDIC has given its approval for the continuation of such service;


(i)(1) A diversified savings and loan holding company (as defined in section 10(a)(1)(F) of the Home Owners’ Loan Act (12 U.S.C. 1467a(a)(1)(F))) with respect to the service of a director of such company who is also a director of an unaffiliated depository organization if:


(i) Both the diversified savings and loan holding company and the unaffiliated depository organization notify their appropriate Federal depository institutions regulatory agency at least 60 days before the dual service is proposed to begin; and


(ii) The appropriate regulatory agency does not disapprove the dual service before the end of the 60-day period.


(2) The FDIC may disapprove a notice of proposed service if it finds that:


(i) The service cannot be structured or limited so as to preclude an anticompetitive effect in financial services in any part of the United States;


(ii) The service would lead to substantial conflicts of interest or unsafe or unsound practices; or


(iii) The notificant failed to furnish all the information required by the FDIC.


(3) The FDIC may require that any interlock permitted under this paragraph (i) be terminated if a change in circumstances occurs with respect to one of the interlocked depository organizations that would have provided a basis for disapproval of the interlock during the notice period.


(j) Any FDIC-supervised institution which is a State savings association that has issued stock in connection with a qualified stock issuance pursuant to section 10(q) of the Home Owners’ Loan Act, except that this paragraph (j) shall apply only with regard to service as a single management official of such State savings association or any subsidiary of such State savings association by a single management official of a savings and loan holding company which purchased the stock issued in connection with such qualified stock issuance, and shall apply only when the FDIC has determined that such service is consistent with the purposes of the Interlocks Act and the Home Owners’ Loan Act.


[80 FR 79252, Dec. 21, 2015, as amended at 84 FR 2706, Feb. 8, 2019]


§ 348.5 Small market share exemption.

(a) Exemption. A management interlock that is prohibited by § 348.3 is permissible, if:


(1) The interlock is not prohibited by § 348.3(c); and


(2) The depository organizations (and their depository institution affiliates) hold, in the aggregate, no more than 20 percent of the deposits in each RMSA or community in which both depository organizations (or their depository institution affiliates) have offices. The amount of deposits shall be determined by reference to the most recent annual Summary of Deposits published by the FDIC for the RMSA or community.


(b) Confirmation and records. Each depository organization must maintain records sufficient to support its determination of eligibility for the exemption under paragraph (a) of this section, and must reconfirm that determination on an annual basis.


§ 348.6 General exemption.

(a) Exemption. The FDIC may by agency order exempt an interlock from the prohibitions in § 348.3 if the FDIC finds that the interlock would not result in a monopoly or substantial lessening of competition and would not present safety and soundness concerns.


(b) Presumptions. In reviewing an application for an exemption under this section, the FDIC will apply a rebuttable presumption that an interlock will not result in a monopoly or substantial lessening of competition if the depository organization seeking to add a management official:


(1) Primarily serves low- and moderate-income areas;


(2) Is controlled or managed by persons who are members of a minority group, or women;


(3) Is a depository institution that has been chartered for less than two years; or


(4) Is deemed to be in “troubled condition” as defined in § 303.101(c).


(c) Duration. Unless a shorter expiration period is provided in the FDIC approval, an exemption permitted by paragraph (a) of this section may continue so long as it does not result in a monopoly or substantial lessening of competition, or is unsafe or unsound. If the FDIC grants an interlock exemption in reliance upon a presumption under paragraph (b) of this section, the interlock may continue for three years, unless otherwise provided by the FDIC in writing.


(d) Procedures. Procedures for applying for an exemption under this section are set forth in 12 CFR 303.249.


§ 348.7 Change in circumstances.

(a) Termination. A management official shall terminate his or her service or apply for an exemption if a change in circumstances causes the service to become prohibited. A change in circumstances may include an increase in asset size of an organization, a change in the delineation of the RMSA or community, the establishment of an office, an increase in the aggregate deposits of the depository organization, or an acquisition, merger, consolidation, or reorganization of the ownership structure of a depository organization that causes a previously permissible interlock to become prohibited.


(b) Transition period. A management official described in paragraph (a) of this section may continue to serve the FDIC-supervised institution involved in the interlock for 15 months following the date of the change in circumstances. The FDIC may shorten this period under appropriate circumstances.


§ 348.8 Enforcement.

Except as provided in this section, the FDIC administers and enforces the Interlocks Act with respect to FDIC-supervised institutions and their affiliates and may refer any case of a prohibited interlocking relationship involving these entities to the Attorney General of the United States to enforce compliance with the Interlocks Act and this part. If an affiliate of an FDIC-supervised institution is subject to the primary regulation of another federal depository organization supervisory agency, then the FDIC does not administer and enforce the Interlocks Act with respect to that affiliate.


PART 349 – DERIVATIVES


Source:76 FR 40789, July 12, 2011, unless otherwise noted.

Subpart A – Margin and Capital Requirements for Covered Swap Entities


Authority:7 U.S.C. 6s(e), 15 U.S.C. 78o-10(e), and 12 U.S.C. 1818 and 12 U.S.C. 1819(a)(Tenth), 12 U.S.C.1813(q), 1818, 1819, and 3108.


Source:80 FR 74912, Nov. 30, 2015, unless otherwise noted.

§ 349.1 Authority, purpose, scope, exemptions and compliance dates.

(a) Authority. This subpart is issued by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) under section 4s(e) of the Commodity Exchange Act (7 U.S.C. 6s(e)), section 15F(e) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (15 U.S.C. 78o-10(e)), and section 8 of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act (12 U.S.C. 1818).


(b) Purpose. Section 4s of the Commodity Exchange Act (7 U.S.C. 6s) and section 15F of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (15 U.S.C. 78o-10) require the FDIC to establish capital and margin requirements for any FDIC-insured state-chartered bank that is not a member of the Federal Reserve System or FDIC-insured state-chartered savings association that is registered as a swap dealer, major swap participant, security-based swap dealer, or major security-based swap participant with respect to all non-cleared swaps and non-cleared security-based swaps. This subpart implements section 4s of the Commodity Exchange Act and section 15F of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 by defining terms used in the statutes and related terms, establishing capital and margin requirements, and explaining the statutes’ requirements.


(c) Scope. This subpart establishes minimum capital and margin requirements for each covered swap entity subject to this subpart with respect to all non-cleared swaps and non-cleared security-based swaps. This subpart applies to any non-cleared swap or non-cleared security-based swap entered into by a covered swap entity on or after the relevant compliance date set forth in paragraph (e) of this section. Nothing in this subpart is intended to prevent a covered swap entity from collecting margin in amounts greater than are required under this subpart.


(d) Exemptions – (1) Swaps. The requirements of this part (except for § 45.12) shall not apply to a non-cleared swap if the counterparty:


(i) Qualifies for an exception from clearing under section 2(h)(7)(A) of the Commodity Exchange Act of 1936 (7 U.S.C. 2(h)(7)(A)) and implementing regulations;


(ii) Qualifies for an exemption from clearing under a rule, regulation, or order that the Commodity Futures Trading Commission issued pursuant to its authority under section 4(c)(1) of the Commodity Exchange Act of 1936 (7 U.S.C. 6(c)(1)) concerning cooperative entities that would otherwise be subject to the requirements of section 2(h)(1)(A) of the Commodity Exchange Act of 1936 (7 U.S.C. 2(h)(1)(A)); or


(iii) Satisfies the criteria in section 2(h)(7)(D) of the Commodity Exchange Act of 1936 (7 U.S.C. 2(h)(7)(D)) and implementing regulations.


(2) Security-based swaps. The requirements of this part (except for § 349.12) shall not apply to a non-cleared security-based swap if the counterparty:


(i) Qualifies for an exception from clearing under section 3C(g)(1) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (15 U.S.C. 78c-3(g)(1)) and implementing regulations; or


(ii) Satisfies the criteria in section 3C(g)(4) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (15 U.S.C. 78c-3(g)(4)) and implementing regulations.


(e) Compliance dates. Covered swap entities shall comply with the minimum margin requirements of this subpart on or before the following dates for non-cleared swaps and non-cleared security-based swaps entered into on or after the following dates:


(1) September 1, 2016 with respect to the requirements in § 349.3 for initial margin and § 349.4 for variation margin for any non-cleared swaps and non-cleared security-based swaps, where both:


(i) The covered swap entity combined with all its affiliates; and


(ii) Its counterparty combined with all its affiliates, have an average daily aggregate notional amount of non-cleared swaps, non-cleared security-based swaps, foreign exchange forwards and foreign exchange swaps for March, April and May 2016 that exceeds $3 trillion, where such amounts are calculated only for business days; and


(iii) In calculating the amounts in paragraphs (e)(1)(i) and (ii) of this section, an entity shall count the average daily aggregate notional amount of a non-cleared swap, a non-cleared security-based swap, a foreign exchange forward or a foreign exchange swap between the entity and an affiliate only one time, and shall not count a swap or security-based swap that is exempt pursuant to paragraph (d) of this section.


(2) March 1, 2017 with respect to the requirements in § 349.4 for variation margin for any other covered swap entity with respect to non-cleared swaps and non-cleared security-based swaps entered into with any other counterparty.


(3) September 1, 2017 with respect to the requirements in § 349.3 for initial margin for any non-cleared swaps and non-cleared security-based swaps, where both:


(i) The covered swap entity combined with all its affiliates; and


(ii) Its counterparty combined with all its affiliates, have an average daily aggregate notional amount of non-cleared swaps, non-cleared security-based swaps, foreign exchange forwards and foreign exchange swaps for March, April and May 2017 that exceeds $2.25 trillion, where such amounts are calculated only for business days; and


(iii) In calculating the amounts in paragraphs (e)(3)(i) and (ii) of this section, an entity shall count the average daily aggregate notional amount of a non-cleared swap, a non-cleared security-based swap, a foreign exchange forward or a foreign exchange swap between the entity and an affiliate only one time, and shall not count a swap or security-based swap that is exempt pursuant to paragraph (d) of this section.


(4) September 1, 2018 with respect to the requirements in § 349.3 for initial margin for any non-cleared swaps and non-cleared security-based swaps, where both:


(i) The covered swap entity combined with all its affiliates; and


(ii) Its counterparty combined with all its affiliates, have an average daily aggregate notional amount of non-cleared swaps, non-cleared security-based swaps, foreign exchange forwards and foreign exchange swaps for March, April and May 2018 that exceeds $1.5 trillion, where such amounts are calculated only for business days; and


(iii) In calculating the amounts in paragraphs (e)(4)(i) and (ii) of this section, an entity shall count the average daily aggregate notional amount of a non-cleared swap, a non-cleared security-based swap, a foreign exchange forward or a foreign exchange swap between the entity and an affiliate only one time, and shall not count a swap or security-based swap that is exempt pursuant to paragraph (d) of this section.


(5) September 1, 2019 with respect to the requirements in § 349.3 for initial margin for any non-cleared swaps and non-cleared security-based swaps, where both:


(i) The covered swap entity combined with all its affiliates; and


(ii) Its counterparty combined with all its affiliates, have an average daily aggregate notional amount of non-cleared swaps, non-cleared security-based swaps, foreign exchange forwards and foreign exchange swaps for March, April and May 2019 that exceeds $0.75 trillion, where such amounts are calculated only for business days; and


(iii) In calculating the amounts in paragraphs (e)(5)(i) and (ii) of this section, an entity shall count the average daily aggregate notional amount of a non-cleared swap, a non-cleared security-based swap, a foreign exchange forward or a foreign exchange swap between the entity and an affiliate only one time, and shall not count a swap or security-based swap that is exempt pursuant to paragraph (d) of this section.


(6) September 1, 2021 with respect to requirements in § 349.3 for initial margin for any non-cleared swaps and non-cleared security-based swaps, where both:


(i) The covered swap entity combined with all its affiliates; and


(ii) Its counterparty combined with all its affiliates, have an average daily aggregate notional amount of non-cleared swaps, foreign exchange forwards and foreign exchange swaps for March, April and May 2021 that exceeds $50 billion, where such amounts are calculated only for business days; and


(iii) In calculating the amounts in paragraphs (e)(6)(i) and (ii) of this section, an entity shall count the average daily aggregate notional amount of a non-cleared swap, a non-cleared security-based swap, a foreign exchange forward or a foreign exchange swap between the entity and an affiliate only one time, and shall not count a swap or security-based swap that is exempt pursuant to paragraph (d) of this section.


(7) September 1, 2022 with respect to requirements in § 349.3 for initial margin for any other covered swap entity with respect to non-cleared swaps and non-cleared security-based swaps entered into with any other counterparty.


(f) Once a covered swap entity must comply with the margin requirements for non-cleared swaps and non-cleared security-based swaps with respect to a particular counterparty based on the compliance dates in paragraph (e) of this section, the covered swap entity shall remain subject to the requirements of this subpart with respect to that counterparty.


(g)(1) If a covered swap entity’s counterparty changes its status such that a non-cleared swap or non-cleared security-based swap with that counterparty becomes subject to stricter margin requirements under this subpart (such as if the counterparty’s status changes from a financial end user without material swaps exposure to a financial end user with material swaps exposure), then the covered swap entity shall comply with the stricter margin requirements for any non-cleared swap or non-cleared security-based swap entered into with that counterparty after the counterparty changes its status.


(2) If a covered swap entity’s counterparty changes its status such that a non-cleared swap or non-cleared security-based swap with that counterparty becomes subject to less strict margin requirements under this subpart (such as if the counterparty’s status changes from a financial end user with material swaps exposure to a financial end user without material swaps exposure), then the covered swap entity may comply with the less strict margin requirements for any non-cleared swap or non-cleared security-based swap entered into with that counterparty after the counterparty changes its status as well as for any outstanding non-cleared swap or non-cleared security-based swap entered into after the applicable compliance date in paragraph (e) of this section and before the counterparty changed its status.


(h) Legacy swaps. Covered swaps entities are required to comply with the requirements of this subpart for non-cleared swaps and non-cleared security-based swaps entered into on or after the relevant compliance dates for variation margin and for initial margin established in paragraph (e) of this section. Any non-cleared swap or non-cleared security-based swap entered into before such relevant date shall remain outside the scope of this subpart if amendments are made to the non-cleared swap or non-cleared security-based swap by method of adherence to a protocol, other amendment of a contract or confirmation, or execution of a new contract or confirmation in replacement of and immediately upon termination of an existing contract or confirmation, as follows:


(1) Amendments to the non-cleared swap or non-cleared security-based swap solely to comply with the requirements of 12 CFR part 47, 12 CFR part 252 subpart I, or 12 CFR part 382, as applicable;


(2) The non-cleared swap or non-cleared security based swap was amended under the following conditions:


(i) The swap was originally entered into, booked at, or otherwise held at, an entity located in the United Kingdom before the relevant compliance date established in paragraph (e) of this section and one party to the swap booked it at, or otherwise held it at, an entity (including a branch or other authorized form of establishment) located in the United Kingdom;


(ii) The entity in the United Kingdom subsequently arranged to amend the swap, solely for the purpose of transferring it to an affiliate, or a branch or other authorized form of establishment, located in any European Union member state or the United States, in connection with the entity’s planning for or response to the event described in paragraph (h)(2)(iii) of this section, and the transferee is:


(A) A covered swap entity, or


(B) A covered swap entity’s counterparty to the swap, and the counterparty represents to the covered swap entity that the counterparty performed the transfer in compliance with the requirements of paragraphs (h)(2)(i) and (ii) of this section; subject to the following conditions:


(iii) The law of the European Union ceases to apply [to] the United Kingdom pursuant to Article 50(3) of the Treaty on European Union, without conclusion of a Withdrawal Agreement between the United Kingdom and the European Union pursuant to Article 50(2);


(iv) The amendments do not modify any of the following: The payment amount calculation methods, the maturity date, or the notional amount of the swap or non-cleared swap;


(v) The amendments cause the transfer to take effect on or after the date of the event described in paragraph (h)(2)(iii) of this section transpires; and


(vi) The amendments cause the transfer to take effect by the later of:


(A) The date that is one year after the date of the event described in paragraph (h)(2)(iii) of this section; or


(B) Such other date permitted by transitional provisions under Article 35 of Commission Delegated Regulation (E.U.) No. 2016/2251, as amended.


(3)(i) Amendments to the non-cleared swap or non-cleared security-based swap that are made solely to accommodate the replacement of:


(A) An interbank offered rate (IBOR) including, but not limited to, the London Interbank Offered Rate (LIBOR), the Tokyo Interbank Offered Rate (TIBOR), the Bank Bill Swap Rate (BBSW), the Singapore Interbank Offered Rate (SIBOR), the Canadian Dollar Offered Rate (CDOR), Euro Interbank Offered Rate (EURIBOR), and the Hong Kong Interbank Offered Rate (HIBOR);


(B) Any other interest rate that a covered swap entity reasonably expects to be replaced or discontinued or reasonably determines has lost its relevance as a reliable benchmark due to a significant impairment; or


(C) Any other interest rate that succeeds a rate referenced in paragraph (h)(3)(i)(A) or (B) of this section. An amendment made under this paragraph (h)(3)(i)(C) could be one of multiple amendments made under this paragraph (h)(3)(i)(C). For example, an amendment could replace an IBOR with a temporary interest rate and later replace the temporary interest rate with a permanent interest rate.


(ii) Amendments to accommodate replacement of an interest rate described in paragraph (h)(3)(i) of this section may also incorporate spreads or other adjustments to the replacement interest rate and make other necessary technical changes to operationalize the determination of payments or other exchanges of economic value using the replacement interest rate, including changes to determination dates, calculation agents, and payment dates. The changes may not have a longer maturity or increase the total effective notional amount of the non-cleared swap or non-cleared security-based swap beyond what is necessary to accommodate the differences between market conventions for an outgoing interest rate and its replacement.


(iii) Amendments to accommodate replacement of an interest rate described in paragraph (h)(3)(i) of this section may also be effectuated through portfolio compression between or among covered swap entities and their counterparties. Portfolio compression under this paragraph is not subject to the limitations in paragraph (h)(4) of this section, but any non-cleared swap[s] or non-cleared security-based swaps resulting from the portfolio compression may not extend the maturity or increase the total effective notional amount more than what is necessary to accommodate the differences between market conventions for an outgoing interest rate and its replacement.


(4) Amendments solely to reduce risk or remain risk-neutral through portfolio compression between or among covered swap entities and their counterparties, as long as any non-cleared swaps or non-cleared security-based swaps resulting from the portfolio compression do not:


(i) Exceed the sum of the total effective notional amounts of all of the swaps that were submitted to the compression exercise that had the same or longer remaining maturity as the resulting swap; or


(ii) Exceed the longest remaining maturity of all the swaps submitted to the compression exercise.


(5) The non-cleared swap or non-cleared security-based swap was amended solely for one of the following reasons:


(i) To reflect technical changes, such as addresses, identities of parties for delivery of formal notices, and other administrative or operational provisions as long as they do not alter the non-cleared swap’s or non-cleared security-based swap’s underlying asset or reference, the remaining maturity, or the total effective notional amount; or


(ii) To reduce the notional amount, so long as:


(A) All payment obligations attached to the total effective notional amount being eliminated as a result of the amendment are fully terminated; or


(B) All payment obligations attached to the total effective notional amount being eliminated as a result of the amendment are fully novated to a third party, who complies with applicable margin rules for the novated portion upon the transfer.


[80 FR 74912, Nov. 30, 2015, as amended at 83 FR 50812, Oct. 10, 2018; 84 FR 9949, Mar. 19, 2019; 85 FR 39469, 39775, July 1, 2020]


§ 349.2 Definitions.

Affiliate. A company is an affiliate of another company if:


(1) Either company consolidates the other on financial statements prepared in accordance with U.S. Generally Accepted Accounting Principles, the International Financial Reporting Standards, or other similar standards;


(2) Both companies are consolidated with a third company on a financial statement prepared in accordance with such principles or standards;


(3) For a company that is not subject to such principles or standards, if consolidation as described in paragraph (1) or (2) of this definition would have occurred if such principles or standards had applied; or


(4) The FDIC has determined that a company is an affiliate of another company, based on FDIC’s conclusion that either company provides significant support to, or is materially subject to the risks or losses of, the other company.


Bank holding company has the meaning specified in section 2 of the Bank Holding Company Act of 1956 (12 U.S.C. 1841).


Broker has the meaning specified in section 3(a)(4) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (15 U.S.C. 78c(a)(4)).


Business day means any day other than a Saturday, Sunday, or legal holiday.


Clearing agency has the meaning specified in section 3(a)(23) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (15 U.S.C. 78c(a)(23)).


Company means a corporation, partnership, limited liability company, business trust, special purpose entity, association, or similar organization.


Counterparty means, with respect to any non-cleared swap or non-cleared security-based swap to which a person is a party, each other party to such non-cleared swap or non-cleared security-based swap.


Covered swap entity means any FDIC-insured state-chartered bank that is not a member of the Federal Reserve System or FDIC-insured state-chartered savings association that is a swap entity, or any other entity that the FDIC determines.


Cross-currency swap means a swap in which one party exchanges with another party principal and interest rate payments in one currency for principal and interest rate payments in another currency, and the exchange of principal occurs on the date the swap is entered into, with a reversal of the exchange of principal at a later date that is agreed upon when the swap is entered into.


Currency of settlement means a currency in which a party has agreed to discharge payment obligations related to a non-cleared swap, a non-cleared security-based swap, a group of non-cleared swaps, or a group of non-cleared security-based swaps subject to a master agreement at the regularly occurring dates on which such payments are due in the ordinary course.


Day of execution means the calendar day at the time the parties enter into a non-cleared swap or non-cleared security-based swap, provided:


(1) If each party is in a different calendar day at the time the parties enter into the non-cleared swap or non-cleared security-based swap, the day of execution is deemed the latter of the two dates; and


(2) If a non-cleared swap or non-cleared security-based swap is:


(i) Entered into after 4:00 p.m. in the location of a party; or


(ii) Entered into on a day that is not a business day in the location of a party, then the non-cleared swap or non-cleared security-based swap is deemed to have been entered into on the immediately succeeding day that is a business day for both parties, and both parties shall determine the day of execution with reference to that business day.


Dealer has the meaning specified in section 3(a)(5) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (15 U.S.C. 78c(a)(5)).


Depository institution has the meaning specified in section 3(c) of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act (12 U.S.C. 1813(c)).


Derivatives clearing organization has the meaning specified in section 1a(15) of the Commodity Exchange Act of 1936 (7 U.S.C. 1a(15)).


Eligible collateral means collateral described in § 349.6.


Eligible master netting agreement means a written, legally enforceable agreement provided that:


(1) The agreement creates a single legal obligation for all individual transactions covered by the agreement upon an event of default following any stay permitted by paragraph (2) of this definition, including upon an event of receivership, conservatorship, insolvency, liquidation, or similar proceeding, of the counterparty;


(2) The agreement provides the covered swap entity the right to accelerate, terminate, and close-out on a net basis all transactions under the agreement and to liquidate or set-off collateral promptly upon an event of default, including upon an event of receivership, conservatorship, insolvency, liquidation, or similar proceeding, of the counterparty, provided that, in any such case,


(i) Any exercise of rights under the agreement will not be stayed or avoided under applicable law in the relevant jurisdictions, other than:


(A) In receivership, conservatorship, or resolution under the Federal Deposit Insurance Act (12 U.S.C. 1811 et seq.), Title II of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (12 U.S.C. 5381 et seq.), the Federal Housing Enterprises Financial Safety and Soundness Act of 1992, as amended (12 U.S.C. 4617), or the Farm Credit Act of 1971, as amended (12 U.S.C. 2183 and 2279cc), or laws of foreign jurisdictions that are substantially similar to the U.S. laws referenced in this paragraph (2)(i)(A) in order to facilitate the orderly resolution of the defaulting counterparty; or


(B) Where the agreement is subject by its terms to, or incorporates, any of the laws referenced in paragraph (2)(i)(A) of this definition; and


(ii) The agreement may limit the right to accelerate, terminate, and close-out on a net basis all transactions under the agreement and to liquidate or set-off collateral promptly upon an event of default of the counterparty to the extent necessary for the counterparty to comply with the requirements of part 47, Subpart I of part 252 or part 382 of Title 12, as applicable;


(3) The agreement does not contain a walkaway clause (that is, a provision that permits a non-defaulting counterparty to make a lower payment than it otherwise would make under the agreement, or no payment at all, to a defaulter or the estate of a defaulter, even if the defaulter or the estate of the defaulter is a net creditor under the agreement); and


(4) A covered swap entity that relies on the agreement for purposes of calculating the margin required by this part must:


(i) Conduct sufficient legal review to conclude with a well-founded basis (and maintain sufficient written documentation of that legal review) that:


(A) The agreement meets the requirements of paragraph (2) of this definition; and


(B) In the event of a legal challenge (including one resulting from default or from receivership, conservatorship, insolvency, liquidation, or similar proceeding), the relevant court and administrative authorities would find the agreement to be legal, valid, binding, and enforceable under the law of the relevant jurisdictions; and


(ii) Establish and maintain written procedures to monitor possible changes in relevant law and to ensure that the agreement continues to satisfy the requirements of this definition.


Financial end user means:


(1) Any counterparty that is not a swap entity and that is:


(i) A bank holding company or an affiliate thereof; a savings and loan holding company; a U.S. intermediate holding company established or designated for purposes of compliance with 12 CFR 252.153; or a nonbank financial institution supervised by the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System under Title I of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (12 U.S.C. 5323);


(ii) A depository institution; a foreign bank; a Federal credit union or State credit union as defined in section 2 of the Federal Credit Union Act (12 U.S.C. 1752(1) & (6)); an institution that functions solely in a trust or fiduciary capacity as described in section 2(c)(2)(D) of the Bank Holding Company Act (12 U.S.C. 1841(c)(2)(D)); an industrial loan company, an industrial bank, or other similar institution described in section 2(c)(2)(H) of the Bank Holding Company Act (12 U.S.C. 1841(c)(2)(H));


(iii) An entity that is state-licensed or registered as:


(A) A credit or lending entity, including a finance company; money lender; installment lender; consumer lender or lending company; mortgage lender, broker, or bank; motor vehicle title pledge lender; payday or deferred deposit lender; premium finance company; commercial finance or lending company; or commercial mortgage company; except entities registered or licensed solely on account of financing the entity’s direct sales of goods or services to customers;


(B) A money services business, including a check casher; money transmitter; currency dealer or exchange; or money order or traveler’s check issuer;


(iv) A regulated entity as defined in section 1303(20) of the Federal Housing Enterprises Financial Safety and Soundness Act of 1992, as amended (12 U.S.C. 4502(20)) or any entity for which the Federal Housing Finance Agency or its successor is the primary federal regulator;


(v) Any institution chartered in accordance with the Farm Credit Act of 1971, as amended, 12 U.S.C. 2001 et seq., that is regulated by the Farm Credit Administration;


(vi) A securities holding company; a broker or dealer; an investment adviser as defined in section 202(a) of the Investment Advisers Act of 1940 (15 U.S.C. 80b-2(a)); an investment company registered with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission under the Investment Company Act of 1940 (15 U.S.C. 80a-1 et seq.); or a company that has elected to be regulated as a business development company pursuant to section 54(a) of the Investment Company Act of 1940 (15 U.S.C. 80a-53(a));


(vii) A private fund as defined in section 202(a) of the Investment Advisers Act of 1940 (15 U.S.C. 80-b-2(a)); an entity that would be an investment company under section 3 of the Investment Company Act of 1940 (15 U.S.C. 80a-3) but for section 3(c)(5)(C); or an entity that is deemed not to be an investment company under section 3 of the Investment Company Act of 1940 pursuant to Investment Company Act Rule 3a-7 (17 CFR 270.3a-7) of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission;


(viii) A commodity pool, a commodity pool operator, or a commodity trading advisor as defined, respectively, in section 1a(10), 1a(11), and 1a(12) of the Commodity Exchange Act of 1936 (7 U.S.C. 1a(10), 1a(11), and 1a(12)); a floor broker, a floor trader, or introducing broker as defined, respectively, in 1a(22), 1a(23) and 1a(31) of the Commodity Exchange Act of 1936 (7 U.S.C. 1a(22), 1a(23), and 1a(31)); or a futures commission merchant as defined in 1a(28) of the Commodity Exchange Act of 1936 (7 U.S.C. 1a(28));


(ix) An employee benefit plan as defined in paragraphs (3) and (32) of section 3 of the Employee Retirement Income and Security Act of 1974 (29 U.S.C. 1002);


(x) An entity that is organized as an insurance company, primarily engaged in writing insurance or reinsuring risks underwritten by insurance companies, or is subject to supervision as such by a State insurance regulator or foreign insurance regulator;


(xi) An entity, person or arrangement that is, or holds itself out as being, an entity, person, or arrangement that raises money from investors, accepts money from clients, or uses its own money primarily for the purpose of investing or trading or facilitating the investing or trading in loans, securities, swaps, funds or other assets for resale or other disposition or otherwise trading in loans, securities, swaps, funds or other assets; or


(xii) An entity that would be a financial end user described in paragraph (1) of this definition or a swap entity, if it were organized under the laws of the United States or any State thereof.


(2) The term “financial end user” does not include any counterparty that is:


(i) A sovereign entity;


(ii) A multilateral development bank;


(iii) The Bank for International Settlements;


(iv) An entity that is exempt from the definition of financial entity pursuant to section 2(h)(7)(C)(iii) of the Commodity Exchange Act of 1936 (7 U.S.C. 2(h)(7)(C)(iii)) and implementing regulations; or


(v) An affiliate that qualifies for the exemption from clearing pursuant to section 2(h)(7)(D) of the Commodity Exchange Act of 1936 (7 U.S.C. 2(h)(7)(D)) or section 3C(g)(4) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (15 U.S.C. 78c-3(g)(4)) and implementing regulations.


Foreign bank means an organization that is organized under the laws of a foreign country and that engages directly in the business of banking outside the United States.


Foreign exchange forward has the meaning specified in section 1a(24) of the Commodity Exchange Act of 1936 (7 U.S.C. 1a(24)).


Foreign exchange swap has the meaning specified in section 1a(25) of the Commodity Exchange Act of 1936 (7 U.S.C. 1a(25)).


Initial margin means the collateral as calculated in accordance with § 349.8 that is posted or collected in connection with a non-cleared swap or non-cleared security-based swap.


Initial margin collection amount means:


(1) In the case of a covered swap entity that does not use an initial margin model, the amount of initial margin with respect to a non-cleared swap or non-cleared security-based swap that is required under appendix A of this subpart; and


(2) In the case of a covered swap entity that uses an initial margin model pursuant to § 349.8, the amount of initial margin with respect to a non-cleared swap or non-cleared security-based swap that is required under the initial margin model.


Initial margin model means an internal risk management model that:


(1) Has been developed and designed to identify an appropriate, risk-based amount of initial margin that the covered swap entity must collect with respect to one or more non-cleared swaps or non-cleared security-based swaps to which the covered swap entity is a party; and


(2) Has been approved by the FDIC pursuant to § 349.8.


Initial margin threshold amount means an aggregate credit exposure of $50 million resulting from all non-cleared swaps and non-cleared security-based swaps between a covered swap entity and its affiliates, and a counterparty and its affiliates. For purposes of this calculation, an entity shall not count a swap or security-based swap that is exempt pursuant to § 349.1(d).


Major currency means:


(1) United States Dollar (USD);


(2) Canadian Dollar (CAD);


(3) Euro (EUR);


(4) United Kingdom Pound (GBP);


(5) Japanese Yen (JPY);


(6) Swiss Franc (CHF);


(7) New Zealand Dollar (NZD);


(8) Australian Dollar (AUD);


(9) Swedish Kronor (SEK);


(10) Danish Kroner (DKK);


(11) Norwegian Krone (NOK); or


(12) Any other currency as determined by the FDIC.


Margin means initial margin and variation margin.


Market intermediary means a securities holding company; a broker or dealer; a futures commission merchant as defined in 1a(28) of the Commodity Exchange Act of 1936 (7 U.S.C. 1a(28)); a swap dealer as defined in section 1a(49) of the Commodity Exchange Act of 1936 (7 U.S.C. 1a(49)); or a security-based swap dealer as defined in section 3(a)(71) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (15 U.S.C. 78c(a)(71)).


Material swaps exposure for an entity means that an entity and its affiliates have an average daily aggregate notional amount of non-cleared swaps, non-cleared security-based swaps, foreign exchange forwards, and foreign exchange swaps with all counterparties for June, July, and August of the previous calendar year that exceeds $8 billion, where such amount is calculated only for business days. An entity shall count the average daily aggregate notional amount of a non-cleared swap, a non-cleared security-based swap, a foreign exchange forward or a foreign exchange swap between the entity and an affiliate only one time. For purposes of this calculation, an entity shall not count a swap or security-based swap that is exempt pursuant to § 349.1(d).


Multilateral development bank means the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development, the Multilateral Investment Guarantee Agency, the International Finance Corporation, the Inter-American Development Bank, the Asian Development Bank, the African Development Bank, the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, the European Investment Bank, the European Investment Fund, the Nordic Investment Bank, the Caribbean Development Bank, the Islamic Development Bank, the Council of Europe Development Bank, and any other entity that provides financing for national or regional development in which the U.S. government is a shareholder or contributing member or which the FDIC determines poses comparable credit risk.


Non-cleared swap means a swap that is not cleared by a derivatives clearing organization registered with the Commodity Futures Trading Commission pursuant to section 5b(a) of the Commodity Exchange Act of 1936 (7 U.S.C. 7a-1(a)) or by a clearing organization that the Commodity Futures Trading Commission has exempted from registration by rule or order pursuant to section 5b(h) of the Commodity Exchange Act of 1936 (7 U.S.C. 7a-1(h)).


Non-cleared security-based swap means a security-based swap that is not, directly or indirectly, submitted to and cleared by a clearing agency registered with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission pursuant to section 17A of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (15 U.S.C. 78q-1) or by a clearing agency that the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission has exempted from registration by rule or order pursuant to section 17A of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (15 U.S.C. 78q-1).


Prudential regulator has the meaning specified in section 1a(39) of the Commodity Exchange Act of 1936 (7 U.S.C. 1a(39)).


Savings and loan holding company has the meaning specified in section 10(n) of the Home Owners’ Loan Act (12 U.S.C. 1467a(n)).


Securities holding company has the meaning specified in section 618 of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (12 U.S.C. 1850a).


Security-based swap has the meaning specified in section 3(a)(68) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (15 U.S.C. 78c(a)(68)).


Sovereign entity means a central government (including the U.S. government) or an agency, department, ministry, or central bank of a central government.


State means any State, commonwealth, territory, or possession of the United States, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, American Samoa, Guam, or the United States Virgin Islands.


Subsidiary. A company is a subsidiary of another company if:


(1) The company is consolidated by the other company on financial statements prepared in accordance with U.S. Generally Accepted Accounting Principles, the International Financial Reporting Standards, or other similar standards;


(2) For a company that is not subject to such principles or standards, if consolidation as described in paragraph (1) of this definition would have occurred if such principles or standards had applied; or


(3) The FDIC has determined that the company is a subsidiary of another company, based on FDIC’s conclusion that either company provides significant support to, or is materially subject to the risks of loss of, the other company.


Swap has the meaning specified in section 1a(47) of the Commodity Exchange Act of 1936 (7 U.S.C. 1a(47)).


Swap entity means a person that is registered with the Commodity Futures Trading Commission as a swap dealer or major swap participant pursuant to the Commodity Exchange Act of 1936 (7 U.S.C. 1 et seq.), or a person that is registered with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission as a security-based swap dealer or a major security-based swap participant pursuant to the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (15 U.S.C. 78a et seq.).


U.S. Government-sponsored enterprise means an entity established or chartered by the U.S. government to serve public purposes specified by federal statute but whose debt obligations are not explicitly guaranteed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government.


Variation margin means collateral provided by one party to its counterparty to meet the performance of its obligations under one or more non-cleared swaps or non-cleared security-based swaps between the parties as a result of a change in value of such obligations since the last time such collateral was provided.


Variation margin amount means the cumulative mark-to-market change in value to a covered swap entity of a non-cleared swap or non-cleared security-based swap, as measured from the date it is entered into (or, in the case of a non-cleared swap or non-cleared security-based swap that has a positive or negative value to a covered swap entity on the date it is entered into, such positive or negative value plus any cumulative mark-to-market change in value to the covered swap entity of a non-cleared swap or non-cleared security-based swap after such date), less the value of all variation margin previously collected, plus the value of all variation margin previously posted with respect to such non-cleared swap or non-cleared security-based swap.


[80 FR 74912, Nov. 30, 2015, as amended at 83 FR 50812, Oct. 10, 2018]


§ 349.3 Initial margin.

(a) Collection of margin. A covered swap entity shall collect initial margin with respect to any non-cleared swap or non-cleared security-based swap from a counterparty that is a financial end user with material swaps exposure or that is a swap entity in an amount that is no less than the greater of:


(1) Zero; or


(2) The initial margin collection amount for such non-cleared swap or non-cleared security-based swap less the initial margin threshold amount (not including any portion of the initial margin threshold amount already applied by the covered swap entity or its affiliates to other non-cleared swaps or non-cleared security-based swaps with the counterparty or its affiliates), as applicable.


(b) Posting of margin. A covered swap entity shall post initial margin with respect to any non-cleared swap or non-cleared security-based swap to a counterparty that is a financial end user with material swaps exposure. Such initial margin shall be in an amount at least as large as the covered swap entity would be required to collect under paragraph (a) of this section if it were in the place of the counterparty.


(c) Timing. A covered swap entity shall comply with the initial margin requirements described in paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section on each business day, for a period beginning on or before the business day following the day of execution and ending on the date the non-cleared swap or non-cleared security-based swap terminates or expires.


(d) Other counterparties. A covered swap entity is not required to collect or post initial margin with respect to any non-cleared swap or non-cleared security-based swap described in § 349.1(d). For any other non-cleared swap or non-cleared security-based swap between a covered swap entity and a counterparty that is neither a financial end user with a material swaps exposure nor a swap entity, the covered swap entity shall collect initial margin at such times and in such forms and such amounts (if any), that the covered swap entity determines appropriately addresses the credit risk posed by the counterparty and the risks of such non-cleared swap or non-cleared security-based swap.


§ 349.4 Variation margin.

(a) General. After the date on which a covered swap entity enters into a non-cleared swap or non-cleared security-based swap with a swap entity or financial end user, the covered swap entity shall collect variation margin equal to the variation margin amount from the counterparty to such non-cleared swap or non-cleared security-based swap when the amount is positive and post variation margin equal to the variation margin amount to the counterparty to such non-cleared swap or non-cleared security-based swap when the amount is negative.


(b) Timing. A covered swap entity shall comply with the variation margin requirements described in paragraph (a) of this section on each business day, for a period beginning on or before the business day following the day of execution and ending on the date the non-cleared swap or non-cleared security based swap terminates or expires.


(c) Other counterparties. A covered swap entity is not required to collect or post variation margin with respect to any non-cleared swap or non-cleared security-based swap described in § 349.1(d). For any other non-cleared swap or non-cleared security-based swap between a covered swap entity and a counterparty that is neither a financial end user nor a swap entity, the covered swap entity shall collect variation margin at such times and in such forms and such amounts (if any), that the covered swap entity determines appropriately addresses the credit risk posed by the counterparty and the risks of such non-cleared swap or non-cleared security-based swap.


§ 349.5 Netting arrangements, minimum transfer amount, and satisfaction of collecting and posting requirements.

(a) Netting arrangements. (1) For purposes of calculating and complying with the initial margin requirements of § 349.3 using an initial margin model as described in § 349.8, or with the variation margin requirements of § 349.4, a covered swap entity may net non-cleared swaps or non-cleared security-based swaps in accordance with this subsection.


(2) To the extent that one or more non-cleared swaps or non-cleared security-based swaps are executed pursuant to an eligible master netting agreement between a covered swap entity and its counterparty that is a swap entity or financial end user, a covered swap entity may calculate and comply with the applicable requirements of this subpart on an aggregate net basis with respect to all non-cleared swaps and non-cleared security-based swaps governed by such agreement, subject to paragraph (a)(3) of this section.


(3)(i) Except as permitted in paragraph (a)(3)(ii) of this section, if an eligible master netting agreement covers non-cleared swaps and non-cleared security-based swaps entered into on or after the applicable compliance date set forth in § 349.1(e) or (g), all the non-cleared swaps and non-cleared security-based swaps covered by that agreement are subject to the requirements of this subpart and included in the aggregate netting portfolio for the purposes of calculating and complying with the margin requirements of this subpart.


(ii) An eligible master netting agreement may identify one or more separate netting portfolios that independently meet the requirements in paragraph (1) of the definition of “Eligible master netting agreement” in § 349.2 and to which collection and posting of margin applies on an aggregate net basis separate from and exclusive of any other non-cleared swaps or non-cleared security-based swaps covered by the eligible master netting agreement. Any such netting portfolio that contains any non-cleared swap or non-cleared security-based swap entered into on or after the applicable compliance date set forth in § 349.1(e) or (g) is subject to the requirements of this subpart. Any such netting portfolio that contains only non-cleared swaps or non-cleared security-based swaps entered into before the applicable compliance date is not subject to the requirements of this subpart.


(4) If a covered swap entity cannot conclude after sufficient legal review with a well-founded basis that the netting agreement described in this section meets the definition of eligible master netting agreement set forth in § 349.2, the covered swap entity must treat the non-cleared swaps and non-cleared security based swaps covered by the agreement on a gross basis for the purposes of calculating and complying with the requirements of this subpart to collect margin, but the covered swap entity may net those non-cleared swaps and non-cleared security-based swaps in accordance with paragraphs (a)(1) through (3) of this section for the purposes of calculating and complying with the requirements of this subpart to post margin.


(b) Minimum transfer amount. Notwithstanding § 349.3 or § 349.4, a covered swap entity is not required to collect or post margin pursuant to this subpart with respect to a particular counterparty unless and until the combined amount of initial margin and variation margin that is required pursuant to this subpart to be collected or posted and that has not yet been collected or posted with respect to the counterparty is greater than $500,000.


(c) Satisfaction of collecting and posting requirements. A covered swap entity shall not be deemed to have violated its obligation to collect or post margin from or to a counterparty under § 349.3, § 349.4, or § 349.6(e) if:


(1) The counterparty has refused or otherwise failed to provide or accept the required margin to or from the covered swap entity; and


(2) The covered swap entity has:


(i) Made the necessary efforts to collect or post the required margin, including the timely initiation and continued pursuit of formal dispute resolution mechanisms, or has otherwise demonstrated upon request to the satisfaction of the FDIC that it has made appropriate efforts to collect or post the required margin; or


(ii) Commenced termination of the non-cleared swap or non-cleared security-based swap with the counterparty promptly following the applicable cure period and notification requirements.


§ 349.6 Eligible collateral.

(a) Non-cleared swaps and non-cleared security-based swaps with a swap entity. For a non-cleared swap or non-cleared security-based swap with a swap entity, a covered swap entity shall collect initial margin and variation margin required pursuant to this subpart solely in the form of the following types of collateral:


(1) Immediately available cash funds that are denominated in:


(i) U.S. dollars or another major currency; or


(ii) The currency of settlement for the non-cleared swap or non-cleared security-based swap;


(2) With respect to initial margin only:


(i) A security that is issued by, or unconditionally guaranteed as to the timely payment of principal and interest by, the U.S. Department of the Treasury;


(ii) A security that is issued by, or unconditionally guaranteed as to the timely payment of principal and interest by, a U.S. government agency (other than the U.S. Department of Treasury) whose obligations are fully guaranteed by the full faith and credit of the United States government;


(iii) A security that is issued by, or fully guaranteed as to the payment of principal and interest by, the European Central Bank or a sovereign entity that is assigned no higher than a 20 percent risk weight under the capital rules applicable to the covered swap entity as set forth in § 349.12;


(iv) A publicly traded debt security issued by, or an asset-backed security fully guaranteed as to the payment of principal and interest by, a U.S. Government-sponsored enterprise that is operating with capital support or another form of direct financial assistance received from the U.S. government that enables the repayments of the U.S. Government-sponsored enterprise’s eligible securities;


(v) A publicly traded debt security that meets the terms of 12 CFR 1.2(d) and is issued by a U.S. Government-sponsored enterprise not operating with capital support or another form of direct financial assistance from the U.S. government, and is not an asset-backed security;


(vi) A security that is issued by, or fully guaranteed as to the payment of principal and interest by, the Bank for International Settlements, the International Monetary Fund, or a multilateral development bank;


(vii) A security solely in the form of:


(A) Publicly traded debt not otherwise described in paragraph (a)(2) of this section that meets the terms of 12 CFR 1.2(d) and is not an asset-backed security;


(B) Publicly traded common equity that is included in:


(1) The Standard & Poor’s Composite 1500 Index or any other similar index of liquid and readily marketable equity securities as determined by the FDIC; or


(2) An index that a covered swap entity’s supervisor in a foreign jurisdiction recognizes for purposes of including publicly traded common equity as initial margin under applicable regulatory policy, if held in that foreign jurisdiction;


(viii) Securities in the form of redeemable securities in a pooled investment fund representing the security-holder’s proportional interest in the fund’s net assets and that are issued and redeemed only on the basis of the market value of the fund’s net assets prepared each business day after the security-holder makes its investment commitment or redemption request to the fund, if:


(A) The fund’s investments are limited to the following:


(1) Securities that are issued by, or unconditionally guaranteed as to the timely payment of principal and interest by, the U.S. Department of the Treasury, and immediately-available cash funds denominated in U.S. dollars; or


(2) Securities denominated in a common currency and issued by, or fully guaranteed as to the payment of principal and interest by, the European Central Bank or a sovereign entity that is assigned no higher than a 20 percent risk weight under the capital rules applicable to the covered swap entity as set forth in § 349.12, and immediately-available cash funds denominated in the same currency; and


(B) Assets of the fund may not be transferred through securities lending, securities borrowing, repurchase agreements, reverse repurchase agreements, or other means that involve the fund having rights to acquire the same or similar assets from the transferee; or


(ix) Gold.


(b) Non-cleared swaps and non-cleared security-based swaps with a financial end user. For a non-cleared swap or non-cleared security-based swap with a financial end user, a covered swap entity shall collect and post initial margin and variation margin required pursuant to this subpart solely in the form of the following types of collateral:


(1) Immediately available cash funds that are denominated in:


(i) U.S. dollars or another major currency; or


(ii) The currency of settlement for the non-cleared swap or non-cleared security-based swap;


(2) A security that is issued by, or unconditionally guaranteed as to the timely payment of principal and interest by, the U.S. Department of the Treasury;


(3) A security that is issued by, or unconditionally guaranteed as to the timely payment of principal and interest by, a U.S. government agency (other than the U.S. Department of Treasury) whose obligations are fully guaranteed by the full faith and credit of the United States government;


(4) A security that is issued by, or fully guaranteed as to the payment of principal and interest by, the European Central Bank or a sovereign entity that is assigned no higher than a 20 percent risk weight under the capital rules applicable to the covered swap entity as set forth in § 349.12;


(5) A publicly traded debt security issued by, or an asset-backed security fully guaranteed as to the payment of principal and interest by, a U.S. Government-sponsored enterprise that is operating with capital support or another form of direct financial assistance received from the U.S. government that enables the repayments of the U.S. Government-sponsored enterprise’s eligible securities;


(6) A publicly traded debt security that meets the terms of 12 CFR 1.2(d) and is issued by a U.S. Government-sponsored enterprise not operating with capital support or another form of direct financial assistance from the U.S. government, and is not an asset-backed security;


(7) A security that is issued by, or fully guaranteed as to the payment of principal and interest by, the Bank for International Settlements, the International Monetary Fund, or a multilateral development bank;


(8) A security solely in the form of:


(i) Publicly traded debt not otherwise described in this paragraph (b) that meets the terms of 12 CFR 1.2(d) and is not an asset-backed security;


(ii) Publicly traded common equity that is included in:


(A) The Standard & Poor’s Composite 1500 Index or any other similar index of liquid and readily marketable equity securities as determined by the FDIC; or


(B) An index that a covered swap entity’s supervisor in a foreign jurisdiction recognizes for purposes of including publicly traded common equity as initial margin under applicable regulatory policy, if held in that foreign jurisdiction;


(9) Securities in the form of redeemable securities in a pooled investment fund representing the security-holder’s proportional interest in the fund’s net assets and that are issued and redeemed only on the basis of the market value of the fund’s net assets prepared each business day after the security-holder makes its investment commitment or redemption request to the fund, if:


(i) The fund’s investments are limited to the following:


(A) Securities that are issued by, or unconditionally guaranteed as to the timely payment of principal and interest by, the U.S. Department of the Treasury, and immediately-available cash funds denominated in U.S. dollars; or


(B) Securities denominated in a common currency and issued by, or fully guaranteed as to the payment of principal and interest by, the European Central Bank or a sovereign entity that is assigned no higher than a 20 percent risk weight under the capital rules applicable to the covered swap entity as set forth in § 349.12, and immediately-available cash funds denominated in the same currency; and


(ii) Assets of the fund may not be transferred through securities lending, securities borrowing, repurchase agreements, reverse repurchase agreements, or other means that involve the fund having rights to acquire the same or similar assets from the transferee; or


(10) Gold.


(c)(1) The value of any eligible collateral collected or posted to satisfy margin requirements pursuant to this subpart is subject to the sum of the following discounts, as applicable:


(i) An 8 percent discount for variation margin collateral denominated in a currency that is not the currency of settlement for the non-cleared swap or non-cleared security-based swap, except for immediately available cash funds denominated in U.S. dollars or another major currency;


(ii) An 8 percent discount for initial margin collateral denominated in a currency that is not the currency of settlement for the non-cleared swap or non-cleared security-based swap, except for eligible types of collateral denominated in a single termination currency designated as payable to the non-posting counterparty as part of the eligible master netting agreement; and


(iii) For variation and initial margin non-cash collateral, the discounts described in appendix B of this subpart.


(2) The value of variation margin or initial margin collateral is computed as the product of the cash or market value of the eligible collateral asset times one minus the applicable discounts pursuant to paragraph (c)(1) of this section expressed in percentage terms. The total value of all variation margin or initial margin collateral is calculated as the sum of those values for each eligible collateral asset.


(d) Notwithstanding paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section, eligible collateral for initial margin and variation margin required by this subpart does not include a security issued by:


(1) The party or an affiliate of the party pledging such collateral;


(2) A bank holding company, a savings and loan holding company, a U.S. intermediate holding company established or designated for purposes of compliance with 12 CFR 252.153, a foreign bank, a depository institution, a market intermediary, a company that would be any of the foregoing if it were organized under the laws of the United States or any State, or an affiliate of any of the foregoing institutions; or


(3) A nonbank financial institution supervised by the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System under Title I of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (12 U.S.C. 5323).


(e) A covered swap entity shall monitor the market value and eligibility of all collateral collected and posted to satisfy the minimum initial margin and minimum variation margin requirements of this subpart. To the extent that the market value of such collateral has declined, the covered swap entity shall promptly collect or post such additional eligible collateral as is necessary to maintain compliance with the margin requirements of this subpart. To the extent that the collateral is no longer eligible, the covered swap entity shall promptly collect or post sufficient eligible replacement collateral to comply with the margin requirements of this subpart.


(f) A covered swap entity may collect or post initial margin and variation margin that is required by § 349.3(d) or § 349.4(c) or that is not required pursuant to this subpart in any form of collateral.


[80 FR 74912, Nov. 30, 2015]


§ 349.7 Segregation of collateral.

(a) A covered swap entity that posts any collateral other than for variation margin with respect to a non-cleared swap or a non-cleared security-based swap shall require that all funds or other property other than variation margin provided by the covered swap entity be held by one or more custodians that are not the covered swap entity or counterparty and not affiliates of the covered swap entity or the counterparty.


(b) A covered swap entity that collects initial margin required by § 349.3(a) with respect to a non-cleared swap or a non-cleared security-based swap shall require that such initial margin be held by one or more custodians that are not the covered swap entity or counterparty and not affiliates of the covered swap entity or the counterparty.


(c) For purposes of paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section, the custodian must act pursuant to a custody agreement that:


(1) Prohibits the custodian from rehypothecating, repledging, reusing, or otherwise transferring (through securities lending, securities borrowing, repurchase agreement, reverse repurchase agreement or other means) the collateral held by the custodian, except that cash collateral may be held in a general deposit account with the custodian if the funds in the account are used to purchase an asset described in § 349.6(a)(2) or (b), such asset is held in compliance with this § 349.7, and such purchase takes place within a time period reasonably necessary to consummate such purchase after the cash collateral is posted as initial margin; and


(2) Is a legal, valid, binding, and enforceable agreement under the laws of all relevant jurisdictions, including in the event of bankruptcy, insolvency, or a similar proceeding.


(d) Notwithstanding paragraph (c)(1) of this section, a custody agreement may permit the posting party to substitute or direct any reinvestment of posted collateral held by the custodian, provided that, with respect to collateral collected by a covered swap entity pursuant to § 349.3(a) or posted by a covered swap entity pursuant to § 349.3(b), the agreement requires the posting party to:


(1) Substitute only funds or other property that would qualify as eligible collateral under § 349.6, and for which the amount net of applicable discounts described in appendix B of this subpart would be sufficient to meet the requirements of § 349.3; and


(2) Direct reinvestment of funds only in assets that would qualify as eligible collateral under § 349.6, and for which the amount net of applicable discounts described in appendix B of this subpart would be sufficient to meet the requirements of § 349.3.


§ 349.8 Initial margin models and standardized amounts.

(a) Standardized amounts. Unless a covered swap entity’s initial margin model conforms to the requirements of this section, the covered swap entity shall calculate the amount of initial margin required to be collected or posted for one or more non-cleared swaps or non-cleared security-based swaps with a given counterparty pursuant to § 349.3 on a daily basis pursuant to appendix A of this subpart.


(b) Use of initial margin models. A covered swap entity may calculate the amount of initial margin required to be collected or posted for one or more non-cleared swaps or non-cleared security-based swaps with a given counterparty pursuant to § 349.3 on a daily basis using an initial margin model only if the initial margin model meets the requirements of this section.


(c) Requirements for initial margin model. (1) A covered swap entity must obtain the prior written approval of the FDIC before using any initial margin model to calculate the initial margin required in this subpart.


(2) A covered swap entity must demonstrate that the initial margin model satisfies all of the requirements of this section on an ongoing basis.


(3) A covered swap entity must notify the FDIC in writing 60 days prior to:


(i) Extending the use of an initial margin model that the FDIC has approved under this section to an additional product type;


(ii) Making any change to any initial margin model approved by the FDIC under this section that would result in a material change in the covered swap entity’s assessment of initial margin requirements; or


(iii) Making any material change to modeling assumptions used by the initial margin model.


(4) The FDIC may rescind its approval of the use of any initial margin model, in whole or in part, or may impose additional conditions or requirements if the FDIC determines, in its sole discretion, that the initial margin model no longer complies with this section.


(d) Quantitative requirements. (1) The covered swap entity’s initial margin model must calculate an amount of initial margin that is equal to the potential future exposure of the non-cleared swap, non-cleared security-based swap or netting portfolio of non-cleared swaps or non-cleared security-based swaps covered by an eligible master netting agreement. Potential future exposure is an estimate of the one-tailed 99 percent confidence interval for an increase in the value of the non-cleared swap, non-cleared security-based swap or netting portfolio of non-cleared swaps or non-cleared security-based swaps due to an instantaneous price shock that is equivalent to a movement in all material underlying risk factors, including prices, rates, and spreads, over a holding period equal to the shorter of ten business days or the maturity of the non-cleared swap, non-cleared security-based swap or netting portfolio.


(2) All data used to calibrate the initial margin model must be based on an equally weighted historical observation period of at least one year and not more than five years and must incorporate a period of significant financial stress for each broad asset class that is appropriate to the non-cleared swaps and non-cleared security-based swaps to which the initial margin model is applied.


(3) The covered swap entity’s initial margin model must use risk factors sufficient to measure all material price risks inherent in the transactions for which initial margin is being calculated. The risk categories must include, but should not be limited to, foreign exchange or interest rate risk, credit risk, equity risk, and commodity risk, as appropriate. For material exposures in significant currencies and markets, modeling techniques must capture spread and basis risk and must incorporate a sufficient number of segments of the yield curve to capture differences in volatility and imperfect correlation of rates along the yield curve.


(4) In the case of a non-cleared cross-currency swap, the covered swap entity’s initial margin model need not recognize any risks or risk factors associated with the fixed, physically-settled foreign exchange transaction associated with the exchange of principal embedded in the non-cleared cross-currency swap. The initial margin model must recognize all material risks and risk factors associated with all other payments and cash flows that occur during the life of the non-cleared cross-currency swap.


(5) The initial margin model may calculate initial margin for a non-cleared swap or non-cleared security-based swap or a netting portfolio of non-cleared swaps or non-cleared security-based swaps covered by an eligible master netting agreement. It may reflect offsetting exposures, diversification, and other hedging benefits for non-cleared swaps and non-cleared security-based swaps that are governed by the same eligible master netting agreement by incorporating empirical correlations within the following broad risk categories, provided the covered swap entity validates and demonstrates the reasonableness of its process for modeling and measuring hedging benefits: Commodity, credit, equity, and foreign exchange or interest rate. Empirical correlations under an eligible master netting agreement may be recognized by the initial margin model within each broad risk category, but not across broad risk categories.


(6) If the initial margin model does not explicitly reflect offsetting exposures, diversification, and hedging benefits between subsets of non-cleared swaps or non-cleared security-based swaps within a broad risk category, the covered swap entity must calculate an amount of initial margin separately for each subset within which such relationships are explicitly recognized by the initial margin model. The sum of the initial margin amounts calculated for each subset of non-cleared swaps and non-cleared security-based swaps within a broad risk category will be used to determine the aggregate initial margin due from the counterparty for the portfolio of non-cleared swaps and non-cleared security-based swaps within the broad risk category.


(7) The sum of the initial margin amounts calculated for each broad risk category will be used to determine the aggregate initial margin due from the counterparty.


(8) The initial margin model may not permit the calculation of any initial margin collection amount to be offset by, or otherwise take into account, any initial margin that may be owed or otherwise payable by the covered swap entity to the counterparty.


(9) The initial margin model must include all material risks arising from the nonlinear price characteristics of option positions or positions with embedded optionality and the sensitivity of the market value of the positions to changes in the volatility of the underlying rates, prices, or other material risk factors.


(10) The covered swap entity may not omit any risk factor from the calculation of its initial margin that the covered swap entity uses in its initial margin model unless it has first demonstrated to the satisfaction of the FDIC that such omission is appropriate.


(11) The covered swap entity may not incorporate any proxy or approximation used to capture the risks of the covered swap entity’s non-cleared swaps or non-cleared security-based swaps unless it has first demonstrated to the satisfaction of the FDIC that such proxy or approximation is appropriate.


(12) The covered swap entity must have a rigorous and well-defined process for re-estimating, re-evaluating, and updating its internal margin model to ensure continued applicability and relevance.


(13) The covered swap entity must review and, as necessary, revise the data used to calibrate the initial margin model at least annually, and more frequently as market conditions warrant, to ensure that the data incorporate a period of significant financial stress appropriate to the non-cleared swaps and non-cleared security-based swaps to which the initial margin model is applied.


(14) The level of sophistication of the initial margin model must be commensurate with the complexity of the non-cleared swaps and non-cleared security-based swaps to which it is applied. In calculating an initial margin collection amount, the initial margin model may make use of any of the generally accepted approaches for modeling the risk of a single instrument or portfolio of instruments.


(15) The FDIC may in its sole discretion require a covered swap entity using an initial margin model to collect a greater amount of initial margin than that determined by the covered swap entity’s initial margin model if the FDIC determines that the additional collateral is appropriate due to the nature, structure, or characteristics of the covered swap entity’s transaction(s), or is commensurate with the risks associated with the transaction(s).


(e) Periodic review. A covered swap entity must periodically, but no less frequently than annually, review its initial margin model in light of developments in financial markets and modeling technologies, and enhance the initial margin model as appropriate to ensure that the initial margin model continues to meet the requirements for approval in this section.


(f) Control, oversight, and validation mechanisms. (1) The covered swap entity must maintain a risk control unit that reports directly to senior management and is independent from the business trading units.


(2) The covered swap entity’s risk control unit must validate its initial margin model prior to implementation and on an ongoing basis. The covered swap entity’s validation process must be independent of the development, implementation, and operation of the initial margin model, or the validation process must be subject to an independent review of its adequacy and effectiveness. The validation process must include:


(i) An evaluation of the conceptual soundness of (including developmental evidence supporting) the initial margin model;


(ii) An ongoing monitoring process that includes verification of processes and benchmarking by comparing the covered swap entity’s initial margin model outputs (estimation of initial margin) with relevant alternative internal and external data sources or estimation techniques. The benchmark(s) must address the chosen model’s limitations. When applicable, the covered swap entity should consider benchmarks that allow for non-normal distributions such as historical and Monte Carlo simulations. When applicable, validation shall include benchmarking against observable margin standards to ensure that the initial margin required is not less than what a derivatives clearing organization or a clearing agency would require for similar cleared transactions; and


(iii) An outcomes analysis process that includes backtesting the initial margin model. This analysis must recognize and compensate for the challenges inherent in back-testing over periods that do not contain significant financial stress.


(3) If the validation process reveals any material problems with the initial margin model, the covered swap entity must promptly notify the FDIC of the problems, describe to the FDIC any remedial actions being taken, and adjust the initial margin model to ensure an appropriately conservative amount of required initial margin is being calculated.


(4) The covered swap entity must have an internal audit function independent of business-line management and the risk control unit that at least annually assesses the effectiveness of the controls supporting the covered swap entity’s initial margin model measurement systems, including the activities of the business trading units and risk control unit, compliance with policies and procedures, and calculation of the covered swap entity’s initial margin requirements under this subpart. At least annually, the internal audit function must report its findings to the covered swap entity’s board of directors or a committee thereof.


(g) Documentation. The covered swap entity must adequately document all material aspects of its initial margin model, including the management and valuation of the non-cleared swaps and non-cleared security-based swaps to which it applies, the control, oversight, and validation of the initial margin model, any review processes and the results of such processes.


(h) Escalation procedures. The covered swap entity must adequately document internal authorization procedures, including escalation procedures, that require review and approval of any change to the initial margin calculation under the initial margin model, demonstrable analysis that any basis for any such change is consistent with the requirements of this section, and independent review of such demonstrable analysis and approval.


§ 349.9 Cross-border application of margin requirements.

(a) Transactions to which this rule does not apply. The requirements of §§ 349.3 through 349.8 and §§ 349.10 through 349.12 shall not apply to any foreign non-cleared swap or foreign non-cleared security-based swap of a foreign covered swap entity.


(b) For purposes of this section, a foreign non-cleared swap or foreign non-cleared security-based swap is any non-cleared swap or non-cleared security-based swap with respect to which neither the counterparty to the foreign covered swap entity nor any party that provides a guarantee of either party’s obligations under the non-cleared swap or non-cleared security-based swap is:


(1) An entity organized under the laws of the United States or any State (including a U.S. branch, agency, or subsidiary of a foreign bank) or a natural person who is a resident of the United States;


(2) A branch or office of an entity organized under the laws of the United States or any State; or


(3) A swap entity that is a subsidiary of an entity that is organized under the laws of the United States or any State.


(c) For purposes of this section, a foreign covered swap entity is any covered swap entity that is not:


(1) An entity organized under the laws of the United States or any State, including a U.S. branch, agency, or subsidiary of a foreign bank;


(2) A branch or office of an entity organized under the laws of the United States or any State; or


(3) An entity that is a subsidiary of an entity that is organized under the laws of the United States or any State.


(d) Transactions for which substituted compliance determination may apply – (1) Determinations and reliance. For non-cleared swaps and non-cleared security-based swaps entered into by covered swap entities described in paragraph (d)(3) of this section, a covered swap entity may satisfy the provisions of this subpart by complying with the foreign regulatory framework for non-cleared swaps and non-cleared security-based swaps that the prudential regulators jointly, conditionally or unconditionally, determine by public order satisfy the corresponding requirements of §§ 349.3 through 349.8 and §§ 349.10 through 349.12.


(2) Standard. In determining whether to make a determination under paragraph (d)(1) of this section, the prudential regulators will consider whether the requirements of such foreign regulatory framework for non-cleared swaps and non-cleared security-based swaps applicable to such covered swap entities are comparable to the otherwise applicable requirements of this subpart and appropriate for the safe and sound operation of the covered swap entity, taking into account the risks associated with non-cleared swaps and non-cleared security-based swaps.


(3) Covered swap entities eligible for substituted compliance. A covered swap entity may rely on a determination under paragraph (d)(1) of this section only if:


(i) The covered swap entity’s obligations under the non-cleared swap or non-cleared security-based swap do not have a guarantee from:


(A) An entity organized under the laws of the United States or any State (other than a U.S. branch or agency of a foreign bank) or a natural person who is a resident of the United States; or


(B) A branch or office of an entity organized under the laws of the United States or any State; and


(ii) The covered swap entity is:


(A) A foreign covered swap entity;


(B) A U.S. branch or agency of a foreign bank; or


(C) An entity that is not organized under the laws of the United States or any State and is a subsidiary of a depository institution, Edge corporation, or agreement corporation.


(4) Compliance with foreign margin collection requirement. A covered swap entity satisfies its requirement to post initial margin under § 349.3(b) by posting to its counterparty initial margin in the form and amount, and at such times, that its counterparty is required to collect pursuant to a foreign regulatory framework, provided that the counterparty is subject to the foreign regulatory framework and the prudential regulators have made a determination under paragraph (d)(1) of this section, unless otherwise stated in that determination, and the counterparty’s obligations under the non-cleared swap or non-cleared security-based swap do not have a guarantee from:


(i) An entity organized under the laws of the United States or any State (including a U.S. branch, agency, or subsidiary of a foreign bank) or a natural person who is a resident of the United States; or


(ii) A branch or office of an entity organized under the laws of the United States or any State.


(e) Requests for determinations. (1) A covered swap entity described in paragraph (d)(3) of this section may request that the prudential regulators make a determination pursuant to this section. A request for a determination must include a description of:


(i) The scope and objectives of the foreign regulatory framework for non-cleared swaps and non-cleared security-based swaps;


(ii) The specific provisions of the foreign regulatory framework for non-cleared swaps and non-cleared security-based swaps that govern:


(A) The scope of transactions covered;


(B) The determination of the amount of initial margin and variation margin required and how that amount is calculated;


(C) The timing of margin requirements;


(D) Any documentation requirements;


(E) The forms of eligible collateral;


(F) Any segregation and rehypothecation requirements; and


(G) The approval process and standards for models used in calculating initial margin and variation margin;


(iii) The supervisory compliance program and enforcement authority exercised by a foreign financial regulatory authority or authorities in such system to support its oversight of the application of the non-cleared swap or non-cleared security-based swap regulatory framework and how that framework applies to the non-cleared swaps or non-cleared security-based swaps of the covered swap entity; and


(iv) Any other descriptions and documentation that the prudential regulators determine are appropriate.


(2) A covered swap entity described in paragraph (d)(3) of this section may make a request under this section only if the non-cleared swap or non-cleared security-based swap activities of the covered swap entity are directly supervised by the authorities administering the foreign regulatory framework for non-cleared swaps and non-cleared security-based swaps.


(f) Segregation unavailable. Sections ____.3(b) and ____.7 do not apply to a non-cleared swap or non-cleared security-based swap entered into by:


(1) A foreign branch of a covered swap entity that is a depository institution; or


(2) A covered swap entity that is not organized under the laws of the United States or any State and is a subsidiary of a depository institution, Edge corporation, or agreement corporation, if:


(i) Inherent limitations in the legal or operational infrastructure in the foreign jurisdiction make it impracticable for the covered swap entity and the counterparty to post any form of eligible initial margin collateral recognized pursuant to § 349.6(b) in compliance with the segregation requirements of § 349.7;


(ii) The covered swap entity is subject to foreign regulatory restrictions that require the covered swap entity to transact in the non-cleared swap or non-cleared security-based swap with the counterparty through an establishment within the foreign jurisdiction and do not accommodate the posting of collateral for the non-cleared swap or non-cleared security-based swap outside the jurisdiction;


(iii) The counterparty to the non-cleared swap or non-cleared security-based swap is not, and the counterparty’s obligations under the non-cleared swap or non-cleared security-based swap do not have a guarantee from:


(A) An entity organized under the laws of the United States or any State (including a U.S. branch, agency, or subsidiary of a foreign bank) or a natural person who is a resident of the United States; or


(B) A branch or office of an entity organized under the laws of the United States or any State;


(iv) The covered swap entity collects initial margin for the non-cleared swap or non-cleared security-based swap in accordance with § 349.3(a) in the form of cash pursuant to § 349.6(b)(1), and posts and collects variation margin in accordance with § 349.4(a) in the form of cash pursuant to § 349.6(b)(1); and


(v) The FDIC provides the covered swap entity with prior written approval for the covered swap entity’s reliance on this paragraph (f) for the foreign jurisdiction.


(g) Guarantee means an arrangement pursuant to which one party to a non-cleared swap or non-cleared security-based swap has rights of recourse against a third-party guarantor, with respect to its counterparty’s obligations under the non-cleared swap or non-cleared security-based swap. For these purposes, a party to a non-cleared swap or non-cleared security-based swap has rights of recourse against a guarantor if the party has a conditional or unconditional legally enforceable right to receive or otherwise collect, in whole or in part, payments from the guarantor with respect to its counterparty’s obligations under the non-cleared swap or non-cleared security-based swap. In addition, any arrangement pursuant to which the guarantor has a conditional or unconditional legally enforceable right to receive or otherwise collect, in whole or in part, payments from any other third party guarantor with respect to the counterparty’s obligations under the non-cleared swap or non-cleared security-based swap, such arrangement will be deemed a guarantee of the counterparty’s obligations under the non-cleared swap or non-cleared security-based swap by the other guarantor.


(h)(1) A covered swap entity described in paragraphs (d)(3)(i) and (ii) is not subject to the requirements of § 349.3(a) or § 349.11 for any non-cleared swap or non-cleared security-based swap executed with an affiliate of the covered swap entity; and


(2) For purposes of paragraph (h)(1) of this section, “affiliate” has the same meaning provided in § 349.11(d).


[80 FR 74912, Nov. 30, 2015, as amended at 85 FR 39775, July 1, 2020]


§ 349.10 Documentation of margin matters.

A covered swap entity shall execute trading documentation with each counterparty that is either a swap entity or financial end user regarding credit support arrangements that:


(a) Provides the covered swap entity and its counterparty with the contractual right to collect and post initial margin and variation margin in such amounts, in such form, and under such circumstances as are required by this subpart, and at such time as initial margin or variation margin is required to be collected or posted under § 349.3 or § 349.4, as applicable; and


(b) Specifies:


(1) The methods, procedures, rules, and inputs for determining the value of each non-cleared swap or non-cleared security-based swap for purposes of calculating variation margin requirements; and


(2) The procedures by which any disputes concerning the valuation of non-cleared swaps or non-cleared security-based swaps, or the valuation of assets collected or posted as initial margin or variation margin, may be resolved; and


(c) Describes the methods, procedures, rules, and inputs used to calculate initial margin for non-cleared swaps and non-cleared security based swaps entered into between the covered swap entity and the counterparty.


[80 FR 74912, Nov. 30, 2015, as amended at 85 FR 39775, July 1, 2020]


§ 349.11 Special rules for affiliates.

(a)(1) A covered swap entity shall calculate on each business day an initial margin collection amount for each counterparty that is a swap entity or financial end user with a material swaps exposure and an affiliate of the covered swap entity.


(2) If the aggregate of all initial margin collection amounts calculated under paragraph (a)(1) of this section does not exceed 15 percent of the covered swap entity’s tier 1 capital, the requirements for a covered swap entity to collect initial margin under § 349.3(a) do not apply with respect to any non-cleared swap or non-cleared security-based swap with a counterparty that is an affiliate.


(3) On each business day that the aggregate of all initial margin collection amounts calculated under paragraph (a)(1) of this section exceeds 15 percent of the covered swap entity’s tier 1 capital:


(i) The covered swap entity shall collect initial margin under § 349.3(a) for each additional non-cleared swap and non-cleared security-based swap executed that business day with a counterparty that is a swap entity or financial end user with a material swaps exposure and an affiliate of the covered swap entity, commencing on the day after execution and continuing on a daily basis as required under § 45.3(c), until the earlier of:


(A) The termination date of such non-cleared swap or non-cleared security-based swap, or


(B) The business day on which the aggregate of all initial margin collection amounts calculated under paragraph (a)(1) of this section falls below 15 percent of the covered swap entity’s tier 1 capital;


(ii) Notwithstanding § 349.7(b), to the extent the covered swap entity collects initial margin pursuant to paragraph (a)(3)(i) of this section in the form of collateral other than cash collateral, the custodian for such collateral may be the covered swap entity or an affiliate of the covered swap entity;


(4) For purposes of this paragraph (a), “tier 1 capital” means the sum of common equity tier 1 capital as defined in 12 CFR 324.20(b) and additional tier 1 capital as defined in 12 CFR 324.20(c), as reported in the institution’s most recent Consolidated Reports of Income and Condition (Call Report); and


(5) If any subsidiary of the covered swap entity (including a subsidiary described in § 349.9(h)) executes any non-cleared swap or non-cleared security-based swap with any counterparty that is a swap entity or financial end user with a material swaps exposure and an affiliate of the covered swap entity:


(i) The covered swap entity shall treat such non-cleared swap or security-based swap as its own for purposes of this paragraph (a); and


(ii) If the subsidiary is itself a covered swap entity, the compliance by its parent covered swap entity with this paragraph (a)(5) shall be deemed to establish the subsidiary’s compliance with the requirements of this paragraph (a) and to exempt the subsidiary from the requirements for a covered swap entity to collect initial margin under § 349.3(a) from an affiliate.


(b) The requirement for a covered swap entity to post initial margin under § 349.3(b) does not apply with respect to any non-cleared swap or non-cleared security-based swap with a counterparty that is an affiliate.


(c) Section 349.3(d) shall apply to a counterparty that is an affiliate in the same manner as it applies to any counterparty that is neither a financial end user without a material swap exposure nor a swap entity.


(d) For purposes of this section:


(1) An affiliate means:


(i) An affiliate as defined in § 349.2; or


(ii) Any company that controls, is controlled by, or is under common control with the covered swap entity through the direct or indirect exercise of controlling influence over the management or policies of the controlled company.


(2) A subsidiary means:


(i) A subsidiary as defined in § 349.2; or


(ii) Any company that is controlled by the covered swap entity through the direct or indirect exercise of controlling influence over the management or policies of the controlled company.


[85 FR 39776, July 1, 2020]


§ 349.12 Capital.

A covered swap entity shall comply with the capital requirements that are applicable to the covered swap entity under part 324 of this chapter.


[80 FR 74912, Nov. 30, 2015]


Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 349 – Standardized Minimum Initial Margin Requirements for Non-cleared Swaps and Non – cleared Security-based Swaps

Table A – Standardized Minimum Gross Initial Margin Requirements for Non-cleared Swaps and Non-cleared Security-Based Swaps
1

Asset Class
Gross initial margin

(% of notional exposure)
Credit: 0-2 year duration2
Credit: 2-5 year duration5
Credit: 5+ year duration10
Commodity15
Equity15
Foreign Exchange/Currency6
Cross Currency Swaps: 0-2 year duration1
Cross-Currency Swaps: 2-5 year duration2
Cross-Currency Swaps: 5+ year duration4
Interest Rate: 0-2 year duration1
Interest Rate: 2-5 year duration2
Interest Rate: 5+ year duration4
Other15


1 The initial margin amount applicable to multiple non-cleared swaps or non-cleared security-based swaps subject to an eligible master netting agreement that is calculated according to Appendix A will be computed as follows:

Initial Margin=0.4xGross Initial Margin +0.6x NGRxGross Initial Margin

where;

Gross Initial Margin = the sum of the product of each non-cleared swap’s or non-cleared security-based swap’s effective notional amount and the gross initial margin requirement for all non-cleared swaps and non-cleared security-based swaps subject to the eligible master netting agreement;

and

NGR = the net-to-gross ratio (that is, the ratio of the net current replacement cost to the gross current replacement cost). In calculating NGR, the gross current replacement cost equals the sum of the replacement cost for each non-cleared swap and non-cleared security-based swap subject to the eligible master netting agreement for which the cost is positive. The net current replacement cost equals the total replacement cost for all non-cleared swaps and non-cleared security-based swaps subject to the eligible master netting agreement. In cases where the gross replacement cost is zero, the NGR should be set to 1.0.


Appendix B to Subpart A of Part 349 – Margin Values for Eligible Noncash Margin Collateral

Table B – Margin Values for Eligible Noncash Margin Collateral

Asset class
Discount (%)
Eligible government and related (e.g., central bank, multilateral development bank, GSE securities identified in § 349.6(a)(2)(iv) or (b)(5) debt: residual maturity less than one-year0.5
Eligible government and related (e.g., central bank, multilateral development bank, GSE securities identified in § 349.6(a)(2)(iv) or (b)(5) debt: residual maturity between one and five years2.0
Eligible government and related (e.g., central bank, multilateral development bank, GSE securities identified in § 349.6(a)(2)(iv) or (b)(5) debt: residual maturity greater than five years4.0
Eligible GSE debt securities not identified in § 349.6(a)(2)(iv) or (b)(5): residual maturity less than one-year1.0
Eligible GSE debt securities not identified in § 349.6(a)(2)(iv) or (b)(5): residual maturity between one and five years:4.0
Eligible GSE debt securities not identified in § 349.6(a)(2)(iv) or (b)(5): residual maturity greater than five years:8.0
Other eligible publicly traded debt: residual maturity less than one-year1.0
Other eligible publicly traded debt: residual maturity between one and five years4.0
Other eligible publicly traded debt: residual maturity greater than five years8.0
Equities included in S&P 500 or related index15.0
Equities included in S&P 1500 Composite or related index but not S&P 500 or related index25.0
Gold15.0


1 The discount to be applied to an eligible investment fund is the weighted average discount on all assets within the eligible investment fund at the end of the prior month. The weights to be applied in the weighted average should be calculated as a fraction of the fund’s total market value that is invested in each asset with a given discount amount. As an example, an eligible investment fund that is comprised solely of $100 of 91 day Treasury bills and $100 of 3 year US Treasury bonds would receive a discount of (100/200)*0.5+(100/200)*2.0=(0.5)*0.5+(0.5)*2.0=1.25 percent.


Subpart B – Retail Foreign Exchange Transactions


Authority:12 U.S.C.1813(q), 1818, 1819, and 3108; 7 U.S.C. 2(c)(2)(E), 27 et seq.

§ 349.13 Authority, purpose, and scope.

(a) Authority. An FDIC-supervised insured depository institution that engages in retail forex transactions shall comply with the requirements of this part.


(b) Purpose. This part establishes rules applicable to retail forex transactions engaged in by FDIC-supervised insured depository institutions and applies on or after the effective date.


(c) Scope. Except as provided in paragraph (d) of this section, this part applies to FDIC-supervised insured depository institutions.


(d) International applicability. Sections 349.15 and 349.17 through 349.28 do not apply to retail foreign exchange transactions between a foreign branch of an FDIC-supervised IDI and a non-U.S. customer. With respect to those transactions, an FDIC-supervised IDI must comply with any disclosure, recordkeeping, capital, margin, reporting, business conduct, documentation, and other requirements of applicable foreign law.


[76 FR 40789, July 12, 2011. Redesignated and amended at 80 FR 74912, Nov. 30, 2015]


§ 349.14 Definitions.

For purposes of this part –


The following terms have the same meaning as in the Commodity Exchange Act: “Affiliated person of a futures commission merchant”; “Associated person”; “Contract of sale”; “Commodity”; “Eligible contract participant”; “Futures commission merchant”; “Security”; and “Security futures product”.


Affiliate has the same meaning as in § 2(k) of the Bank Holding Company Act of 1956 (12 U.S.C. 1841(k)).


Commodity Exchange Act means the Commodity Exchange Act (7 U.S.C. 1 et seq.).


FDIC-supervised insured depository institution means any insured depository institution for which the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation is the appropriate Federal banking agency pursuant to § 3(q) of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act, 12 U.S.C. 1813(q).


Forex means foreign exchange.


Institution-affiliated party or IAP has the same meaning as in 12 U.S.C. 1813(u)(1), (2), or (3).


Insured depository institution or IDI has the same meaning as in 12 U.S.C. 1813(c)(2).


Introducing broker means any person who solicits or accepts orders from a retail forex customer in connection with retail forex transactions.


Related person, when used in reference to a retail forex counterparty, means:


(1) Any general partner, officer, director, or owner of ten percent or more of the capital stock of the FDIC-supervised insured depository institution;


(2) An associated person or employee of the retail forex counterparty, if the retail forex counterparty is not an FDIC-supervised insured depository institution;


(3) An IAP, if the retail forex counterparty is an FDIC-supervised insured depository institution; and


(4) Any relative or spouse of any of the foregoing persons, or any relative of such spouse, who shares the same home as any of the foregoing persons.


Retail forex account means the account of a retail forex customer, established with an FDIC-supervised insured depository institution, in which retail forex transactions with the FDIC-supervised insured depository institution as counterparty are undertaken, or the account of a retail forex customer that is established in order to enter into such transactions.


Retail forex account agreement means the contractual agreement between an FDIC-supervised insured depository institution and a retail forex customer that contains the terms governing the customer’s retail forex account with the FDIC-supervised insured depository institution.


Retail forex business means engaging in one or more retail forex transactions with the intent to derive income from those transactions, either directly or indirectly.


Retail forex counterparty includes, as appropriate:


(1) An FDIC-supervised insured depository institution;


(2) A retail foreign exchange dealer;


(3) A futures commission merchant; and


(4) An affiliated person of a futures commission merchant.


Retail forex customer means a customer that is not an eligible contract participant, acting on his, her, or its own behalf and engaging in retail forex transactions.


Retail forex obligations means obligations of a retail forex customer with respect to retail forex transactions, including, but not limited to, trading losses, fees, and commissions.


Retail forex proprietary account means: a retail forex account carried on the books of an FDIC-supervised insured depository institution for one of the following persons; a retail forex account of which 10 percent or more is owned by one of the following persons; or a retail forex account of which an aggregate of 10 percent or more of which is owned by more than one of the following persons:


(1) The FDIC-supervised insured depository institution;


(2) An officer, director or owner of ten percent or more of the capital stock of the FDIC-supervised insured depository institution; or


(3) An employee of the FDIC-supervised insured depository institution, whose duties include:


(i) The management of the FDIC-supervised insured depository institution’s business;


(ii) The handling of the FDIC-supervised insured depository institution’s retail forex transactions;


(iii) The keeping of records, including without limitation the software used to make or maintain those records, pertaining to the FDIC-supervised insured depository institution’s retail forex transactions; or


(iv) The signing or co-signing of checks or drafts on behalf of the FDIC-supervised insured depository institution;


(4) A spouse or minor dependent living in the same household as of any of the foregoing persons; or


(5) An affiliate of the FDIC-supervised insured depository institution;


Retail forex transaction means an agreement, contract, or transaction in foreign currency, other than an identified banking product or a part of an identified banking product, that is offered or entered into by FDIC-supervised insured depository institution with a person that is not an eligible contract participant and that is:


(1) A contract of sale of a commodity for future delivery or an option on such a contract;


(2) An option, other than an option executed or traded on a national securities exchange registered pursuant to § 6(a) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (15 U.S.C. 78(f)(a)); or


(3) Offered or entered into on a leveraged or margined basis, or financed by an FDIC-supervised insured depository institution, its affiliate, or any person acting in concert with the FDIC-supervised insured depository institution or its affiliate on a similar basis, other than:


(i) A security that is not a security futures product as defined in § 1a(47) of the Commodity Exchange Act (7 U.S.C. 1a(47)); or


(ii) A contract of sale that –


(A) Results in actual delivery within two days; or


(B) Creates an enforceable obligation to deliver between a seller and buyer that have the ability to deliver and accept delivery, respectively, in connection with their line of business; or


(iii) An agreement, contract, or transaction that the FDIC determines is not functionally or economically similar to:


(A) A contract of sale of a commodity for future delivery or an option on such a contract; or


(B) An option, other than an option executed or traded on a national securities exchange registered pursuant to Section 6(a) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (15 U.S.C. 78(f)(a)).


Retail forex obligations means obligations of a retail forex customer with respect to retail forex transactions, including, but not limited to, trading losses, fees, and commissions.


[76 FR 40789, July 12, 2011. Redesignated at 80 FR 74912, Nov. 30, 2015]


§ 349.15 Prohibited transactions.

(a) Fraudulent conduct prohibited. No FDIC-supervised insured depository institution or its IAPs may, directly or indirectly, in or in connection with any retail forex transaction:


(1) Cheat or defraud or attempt to cheat or defraud any person;


(2) Willfully make or cause to be made to any person any false report or statement or cause to be entered for any person any false record; or


(3) Willfully deceive or attempt to deceive any person by any means whatsoever.


(b) Acting as counterparty and exercising discretion prohibited. If an FDIC-supervised insured depository institution can cause retail forex transactions to be effected for a retail forex customer without the retail forex customer’s specific authorization, then neither the FDIC-supervised insured depository institution nor its affiliates may act as the counterparty for any retail forex transaction with that retail forex customer.


[76 FR 40789, July 12, 2011. Redesignated at 80 FR 74912, Nov. 30, 2015]


§ 349.16 Filing procedures.

(a) General. Before commencing a retail forex business, an FDIC-supervised insured depository institution shall provide the FDIC prior written notice and obtain the FDIC’s prior written consent.


(b) Where to file. A notice required by this section shall be submitted in writing to the appropriate FDIC office.


(c) Contents of filing. A complete letter notice shall include the following information:


(1) Filings generally. (i) A brief description of the FDIC-supervised institution’s proposed retail forex business and the manner in which it will be conducted;


(ii) The amount of the institution’s existing or proposed direct or indirect investment in the retail forex business as well as calculations sufficient to indicate compliance with all capital requirements in § 349.20 and all other applicable capital standards;


(iii) A copy of the FDIC-supervised insured depository institution’s comprehensive business plan that includes a discussion of, among other things, how the operation of the retail forex business is consistent with the institution’s overall strategy;


(iv) A description of the FDIC-supervised insured depository institution’s target customers for its proposed retail forex business and related information, including without limitation credit evaluations, customer appropriateness, and “know your customer” documentation;


(v) A resolution by the FDIC-supervised insured depository institution’s board of directors that the proposed retail forex business is an appropriate activity for the institution and that the institution’s written policies, procedures, and risk measurement and management systems and controls address conducting retail forex business in a safe and sound manner and in compliance with this part;


(vi) Sample risk disclosures sufficient to demonstrate compliance with § 349.18.


(2) Copy of application or notice filed with another agency. If an FDIC-supervised insured depository institution has filed an application or notice with another regulatory authority which contains all of the information required by subparagraph (c)(1) of this part, the institution may submit a copy to the FDIC in lieu of a separate filing.


(3) Additional information. The FDIC may request additional information to complete the processing of the notification.


(d) Treatment of Existing Retail Forex Business. Any FDIC-supervised insured depository institution that is engaged in retail forex business on July 15, 2011 may continue to do so for up to six months, subject to an extension of time by the FDIC, provided that it notifies the FDIC of its retail forex business and requests the FDIC’s written consent in accordance with paragraph (a) of this section.


(e) Compliance with the Commodities Exchange Act. Any FDIC-supervised insured depository institution that is engaged in retail forex business on July 15, 2011 shall be deemed, during the six-month period (including any extension) provided in paragraph (e) of this section, to be acting pursuant to a rule or regulation described in § 2(c)(2)(E)(ii)(I) of the Commodity Exchange Act (7 U.S.C. 2(c)(2)(E)(ii)(I)).


[76 FR 40789, July 12, 2011. Redesignated and amended at 80 FR 74912, Nov. 30, 2015]


§ 349.17 Application and closing out of offsetting long and short positions.

(a) Application of purchases and sales. Any FDIC-supervised insured depository institution that –


(1) Engages in a retail forex transaction involving the purchase of any currency for the account of any retail forex customer when the account of such retail forex customer at the time of such purchase has an open retail forex transaction for the sale of the same currency;


(2) Engages in a retail forex transaction involving the sale of any currency for the account of any retail forex customer when the account of such retail forex customer at the time of such sale has an open retail forex transaction for the purchase of the same currency;


(3) Purchases a put or call option involving foreign currency for the account of any retail forex customer when the account of such retail forex customer at the time of such purchase has a short put or call option position with the same underlying currency, strike price, and expiration date as that purchased; or


(4) Sells a put or call option involving foreign currency for the account of any retail forex customer when the account of such retail forex customer at the time of such sale has a long put or call option position with the same underlying currency, strike price, and expiration date as that sold shall:


(i) Immediately apply such purchase or sale against such previously held opposite transaction; and


(ii) Promptly furnish such retail forex customer with a statement showing the financial result of the transactions involved and the name of any introducing broker to the account.


(b) Close-out against oldest open position. In all instances where the short or long position in a customer’s retail forex account immediately prior to an offsetting purchase or sale is greater than the quantity purchased or sold, the FDIC-supervised insured depository institution shall apply such offsetting purchase or sale to the oldest portion of the previously held short or long position.


(c) Transactions to be applied as directed by customer. Notwithstanding paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section, the offsetting transaction shall be applied as directed by a retail forex customer’s specific instructions. These instructions may not be made by the FDIC-supervised insured depository institution or an IAP.


[76 FR 40789, July 12, 2011. Redesignated at 80 FR 74912, Nov. 30, 2015]


§ 349.18 Disclosure.

(a) Risk disclosure statement required. No FDIC-supervised insured depository institution may open or maintain open an account that will engage in retail forex transactions for a retail forex customer unless the FDIC-supervised insured depository institution has furnished the retail forex customer with a separate written disclosure statement containing only the language set forth in paragraph (d) of this section and the disclosures required by paragraphs (e) and (f) of this section.


(b) Acknowledgement of risk disclosure statement required. The FDIC-supervised insured depository institution must receive from the retail forex customer a written acknowledgement signed and dated by the customer that the customer received and understood the written disclosure statement required by paragraph (a) of this section.


(c) Placement of risk disclosure statement. The disclosure statement may be attached to other documents as the initial page(s) of such documents and as the only material on such page(s).


(d) Content of risk disclosure statement. The language set forth in the written disclosure statement required by paragraph (a) of this section shall be as follows:



Risk Disclosure Statement

Retail forex transactions involve the leveraged trading of contracts denominated in foreign currency with an FDIC-supervised insured depository institution as your counterparty. Because of the leverage and the other risks disclosed here, you can rapidly lose all of the funds or property you give the FDIC-supervised insured depository institution as margin for such trading and you may lose more than you pledge as margin.


Your FDIC-supervised insured depository institution is prohibited from applying losses that you experience on retail forex transactions on any funds or property of yours other than funds or property that you have given or pledged as margin for retail forex transactions.


You should be aware of and carefully consider the following points before determining whether such trading is appropriate for you.


(1) Trading is a not on a regulated market or exchange – your FDIC-supervised insured depository institution is your trading counterparty and has conflicting interests. The retail forex transaction you are entering into is not conducted on an interbank market, nor is it conducted on a futures exchange subject to regulation as a designated contract market by the Commodity Futures Trading Commission. The foreign currency trades you transact are trades with your FDIC-supervised insured depository institution as the counterparty. When you sell, the FDIC-supervised insured depository institution is the buyer. When you buy, the FDIC-supervised insured depository institution is the seller. As a result, when you lose money trading, your FDIC-supervised insured depository institution is making money on such trades, in addition to any fees, commissions, or spreads the FDIC-supervised insured depository institution may charge.


(2) An electronic trading platform for retail foreign currency transactions is not an exchange. It is an electronic connection for accessing your FDIC-supervised insured depository institution. The terms of availability of such a platform are governed only by your contract with your FDIC-supervised insured depository institution. Any trading platform that you may use to enter into off-exchange foreign currency transactions is only connected to your FDIC-supervised insured depository institution. You are accessing that trading platform only to transact with your FDIC-supervised insured depository institution. You are not trading with any other entities or customers of the FDIC-supervised insured depository institution by accessing such platform. The availability and operation of any such platform, including the consequences of the unavailability of the trading platform for any reason, is governed only by the terms of your account agreement with the FDIC-supervised insured depository institution.


(3) You may be able to offset or liquidate any trading positions only through your banking entity because the transactions are not made on an exchange or regulated contract market, and your FDIC-supervised insured depository institution may set its own prices. Your ability to close your transactions or offset positions is limited to what your FDIC-supervised insured depository institution will offer to you, as there is no other market for these transactions. Your FDIC-supervised insured depository institution may offer any prices it wishes, including prices derived from outside sources or not in its discretion. Your FDIC-supervised insured depository institution may establish its prices by offering spreads from third party prices, but it is under no obligation to do so or to continue to do so. Your FDIC-supervised insured depository institution may offer different prices to different customers at any point in time on its own terms. The terms of your account agreement alone govern the obligations your FDIC-supervised insured depository institution has to you to offer prices and offer offset or liquidating transactions in your account and make any payments to you. The prices offered by your FDIC-supervised insured depository institution may or may not reflect prices available elsewhere at any exchange, interbank, or other market for foreign currency.


(4) Paid solicitors may have undisclosed conflicts. The FDIC-supervised insured depository institution may compensate introducing brokers for introducing your account in ways that are not disclosed to you. Such paid solicitors are not required to have, and may not have, any special expertise in trading, and may have conflicts of interest based on the method by which they are compensated. You should thoroughly investigate the manner in which all such solicitors are compensated and be very cautious in granting any person or entity authority to trade on your behalf. You should always consider obtaining dated written confirmation of any information you are relying on from your FDIC-supervised insured depository institution in making any trading or account decisions.


(5) Retail forex transactions are not insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation.


(6) Retail forex transactions are not a deposit in, or guaranteed by, an FDIC-supervised insured depository institution.


(7) Retail forex transactions are subject to investment risks, including possible loss of all amounts invested.


Finally, you should thoroughly investigate any statements by any FDIC-supervised insured depository institution that minimize the importance of, or contradict, any of the terms of this risk disclosure. These statements may indicate sales fraud.


This brief statement cannot, of course, disclose all the risks and other aspects of trading off-exchange foreign currency with an FDIC-supervised insured depository institution.


I hereby acknowledge that I have received and understood this risk disclosure statement.




Date



Signature of Customer

(e)(1) Disclosure of profitable accounts ratio. Immediately following the language set forth in paragraph (d) of this section, the statement required by paragraph (a) of this section shall include, for each of the most recent four calendar quarters during which the FDIC-supervised insured depository institution maintained retail forex customer accounts:


(i) The total number of retail forex customer accounts maintained by the FDIC-supervised insured depository institution over which the FDIC-supervised insured depository institution does not exercise investment discretion;


(ii) The percentage of such accounts that were profitable for retail forex customer accounts during the quarter; and


(iii) The percentage of such accounts that were not profitable for retail forex customer accounts during the quarter.


(2) The FDIC-supervised insured depository institution’s statement of profitable trades shall include the following legend: “Past performance is not necessarily indicative of future results.” Each FDIC-supervised insured depository institution shall provide, upon request, to any retail forex customer or prospective retail forex customer the total number of retail forex accounts maintained by the FDIC-supervised insured depository institution for which the FDIC-supervised insured depository institution does not exercise investment discretion, the percentage of such accounts that were profitable, and the percentage of such accounts that were not profitable for each calendar quarter during the most recent five-year period during which the FDIC-supervised insured depository institution maintained such accounts.


(f) Disclosure of fees and other charges. Immediately following the language required by paragraph (e) of this section, the statement required by paragraph (a) of this section shall include:


(1) The amount of any fee, charge, commission, or spreads that the FDIC-supervised insured depository institution may impose on the retail forex customer in connection with a retail forex account or retail forex transaction;


(2) An explanation of how the FDIC-supervised insured depository institution will determine the amount of such fees, charges, commissions, or spreads; and


(3) The circumstances under which the FDIC-supervised insured depository institution may impose such fees, charges, commissions, or spreads.


(g) Future disclosure requirements. If, with regard to a retail forex customer, the FDIC-supervised insured depository institution changes any fee, charge, commission or spreads required to be disclosed under paragraph (f) of this section, then the FDIC-supervised insured depository institution shall mail or deliver to the retail forex customer a notice of the changes at least 15 days prior to the effective date of the change.


(h) Form of disclosure requirements. The disclosures required by this section shall be clear and conspicuous and designed to call attention to the nature and significance of the information provided.


(i) Other disclosure requirements unaffected. This section does not relieve an FDIC-supervised insured depository institution from any other disclosure obligation it may have under applicable law.


[76 FR 40789, July 12, 2011. Redesignated at 80 FR 74912, Nov. 30, 2015]


§ 349.19 Recordkeeping.

(a) General rule. An FDIC-supervised insured depository institution engaging in retail forex transactions shall keep full, complete and systematic records, together with all pertinent data and memoranda, pertaining to its retail forex business, including:


(1) Retail forex account records. For each retail forex account:


(i) The name and address of the person for whom the account is carried or introduced and the principal occupation or business of the person.


(ii) The name of any other person guaranteeing the account or exercising trading control with respect to the account;


(iii) The establishment or termination of the account; and


(iv) A means to identify the person who has solicited and is responsible for the account or assign account numbers in such a manner as to identify that person.


(v) The funds in the account, net of any commissions and fees;


(vi) The account’s net profits and losses on open trades;


(vii) The funds in the account plus or minus the net profits and losses on open trades, adjusted for the net option value in the case of open options positions;


(viii) Financial ledger records that show separately for each retail forex customer all charges against and credits to such retail forex customer’s account, including deposits, withdrawals, and transfers, and charges or credits resulting from losses or gains on closed transactions; and


(ix) A list of all retail forex transactions executed for the account, with the details specified in paragraph (a)(2) of this section;


(2) Retail forex transaction records. For each retail forex transaction:


(i) The price at which the FDIC-supervised insured depository institution placed the order, or, in the case of an option, the premium that the retail forex customer paid;


(ii) The customer account identification information;


(iii) The currency pair;


(iv) The size or quantity of the order;


(v) Whether the order was a buy or sell order;


(vi) The type of order, if the order was not a market order;


(vii) The size and price at which the order is executed, or in the case of an option, the amount of the premium paid for each option purchased, or the amount credited for each option sold;


(viii) For options, whether the option is a put or call, expiration date, quantity, underlying contract for future delivery or underlying physical, strike price, and details of the purchase price of the option, including premium, mark-up, commission, and fees; and


(ix) For futures, the delivery date; and


(x) If the order was made on a trading platform:


(A) The price quoted on the trading platform when the order was placed, or, in the case of an option, the premium quoted;


(B) The date and time the order was transmitted to the trading platform; and


(C) The date and time the order was executed;


(3) Price changes on a trading platform. If a trading platform is used, daily logs showing each price change on the platform, the time of the change to the nearest second, and the trading volume at that time and price;


(4) Methods or algorithms. Any method or algorithm used to determine the bid or asked price for any retail forex transaction or the prices at which customer orders are executed, including, but not limited to, any markups, fees, commissions or other items which affect the profitability or risk of loss of a retail forex customer’s transaction;


(5) Daily records which show for each business day complete details of:


(i) All retail forex transactions that are futures transactions executed on that day, including the date, price, quantity, market, currency pair, delivery date, and the person for whom such transaction was made;


(ii) All retail forex transactions that are option transactions executed on that day, including the date, whether the transaction involved a put or call, the expiration date, quantity, currency pair, delivery date, strike price, details of the purchase price of the option, including premium, mark-up, commission and fees, and the person for whom the transaction was made;


(iii) All other retail forex transactions executed on that day for such account, including the date, price, quantity, currency and the person for whom such transaction was made; and


(6) Other records. Written acknowledgements of receipt of the risk disclosure statement required by § 349.18(b), records required under paragraph (b) through (f) of this section, trading cards, signature cards, street books, journals, ledgers, payment records, copies of statements of purchase, and all other records, data and memoranda that have been prepared in the course of the FDIC-supervised insured depository institution’s retail forex business.


(b) Ratio of profitable accounts. (1) With respect to its active retail forex customer accounts over which it did not exercise investment discretion and that are not retail forex proprietary accounts open for any period of time during the quarter, an FDIC-supervised insured depository institution shall prepare and maintain on a quarterly basis (calendar quarter):


(i) A calculation of the percentage of such accounts that were profitable;


(ii) A calculation of the percentage of such accounts that were not profitable; and


(iii) Data supporting the calculations described in paragraphs (b)(1)(i) and (b)(1)(ii) of this section.


(2) In calculating whether a retail forex account was profitable or not profitable during the quarter, the FDIC-supervised insured depository institution shall compute the realized and unrealized gains or losses on all retail forex transactions carried in the retail forex account at any time during the quarter, and subtract all fees, commissions, and any other charges posted to the retail forex account during the quarter, and add any interest income and other income or rebates credited to the retail forex account during the quarter. All deposits and withdrawals of funds made by the retail forex customer during the quarter must be excluded from the computation of whether the retail forex account was profitable or not profitable during the quarter. Computations that result in a zero or negative number shall be considered a retail forex account that was not profitable. Computations that result in a positive number shall be considered a retail forex account that was profitable.


(3) A retail forex account shall be considered “active” for purposes of paragraph (b)(1) of this section if and only if, for the relevant calendar quarter, a retail forex transaction was executed in that account or the retail forex account contained an open position resulting from a retail forex transaction.


(c) Records related to possible violations of law. An FDIC-supervised insured depository institution engaging in retail forex transactions shall make a record of all communications, including customer complaints, received by the FDIC-supervised insured depository institution or its IAPs concerning facts giving rise to possible violations of law related to the FDIC-supervised insured depository institution’s retail forex business. The record shall contain: the name of the complainant, if provided; the date of the communication; the relevant agreement, contract, or transaction; the substance of the communication; the name of the person who received the communication, and the final disposition of the matter.


(d) Records for noncash margin. An FDIC-supervised insured depository institution shall maintain a record of all noncash margin collected pursuant to § 349.21. The record shall show separately for each retail forex customer:


(1) A description of the securities or property received;


(2) The name and address of such retail forex customer;


(3) The dates when the securities or property were received;


(4) The identity of the depositories or other places where such securities or property are segregated or held, if applicable;


(5) The dates in which the FDIC-supervised insured depository institution placed or removed such securities or property into or from such depositories; and


(6) The dates of return of such securities or property to such retail forex customer, or other disposition thereof, together with the facts and circumstances of such other disposition.


(e) Order Tickets. (1) Except as provided in paragraph (e)(2) of this section, immediately upon the receipt of a retail forex transaction order, an FDIC-supervised insured depository institution must prepare an order ticket for the order (whether unfulfilled, executed, or canceled). The order ticket must include:


(i) Account identification (account or customer name with which the retail forex transaction was effected);


(ii) Order number;


(iii) Type of order (market order, limit order, or subject to special instructions);


(iv) Date and time, to the nearest minute, the retail forex transaction order was received (as evidenced by timestamp or other timing device);


(v) Time, to the nearest minute, the retail forex transaction order was executed; and


(vi) Price at which the retail forex transaction was executed.


(2) Post-execution allocation of bunched orders. Specific identifiers for retail forex accounts included in bunched orders need not be recorded at time of order placement or upon report of execution as required under paragraph (e)(1) of this section if the following requirements are met:


(i) The FDIC-supervised insured depository institution placing and directing the allocation of an order eligible for post-execution allocation has been granted written investment discretion with regard to participating customer accounts and makes the following information available to retail forex customers upon request:


(A) The general nature of the post-execution allocation methodology the FDIC-supervised insured depository institution will use;


(B) Whether the FDIC-supervised insured depository institution has any interest in accounts which may be included with customer accounts in bunched orders eligible for post-execution allocation; and


(C) Summary or composite data sufficient for that customer to compare its results with those of other comparable customers and, if applicable, any account in which the FDIC-supervised insured depository institution has an interest.


(ii) Post-execution allocations are made as soon as practicable after the entire transaction is executed;


(iii) Post-execution allocations are fair and equitable, with no account or group of accounts receiving consistently favorable or unfavorable treatment; and


(iv) The post-execution allocation methodology is sufficiently objective and specific to permit the FDIC to verify the fairness of the allocations using that methodology.


(f) Record of monthly statements and confirmations. An FDIC-supervised insured depository institution shall retain a copy of each monthly statement and confirmation required by § 349.22.


(g) Manner of maintenance. The records required by this section must clearly and accurately reflect the information required and provide an adequate basis for the audit of the information. Record maintenance may include the use of automated or electronic records provided that the records are easily retrievable, readily available for inspection, and capable of being reproduced in hard copy.


(h) Length of maintenance. An FDIC-supervised insured depository institution shall keep each record required by this section for at least five years from the date the record is created.


[76 FR 40789, July 12, 2011. Redesignated and amended at 80 FR 74912, Nov. 30, 2015]


§ 349.20 Capital requirements.

An FDIC-supervised insured depository institution offering or entering into retail forex transactions must be well capitalized as defined by 12 CFR part 324, unless specifically exempted by the FDIC in writing.


[83 FR 17741, Apr. 24, 2018]


§ 349.21 Margin requirements.

(a) Margin required. An FDIC-supervised insured depository institution engaging, or offering to engage, in retail forex transactions must collect from each retail forex customer an amount of margin not less than:


(1) Two percent of the notional value of the retail forex transaction for major currency pairs and 5 percent of the notional value of the retail forex transaction for all other currency pairs;


(2) For short options, 2 percent for major currency pairs and 5 percent for all other currency pairs of the notional value of the retail forex transaction, plus the premium received by the retail forex customer; or


(3) For long options, the full premium charged and received by the FDIC-supervised insured depository institution.


(b)(1) Form of margin. Margin collected under paragraph (a) of this section or pledged by a retail forex customer for retail forex transactions in excess of the requirements of paragraph (a) of this section must be in the form of cash or the following financial instruments:


(i) Obligations of the United States and obligations fully guaranteed as to principal and interest by the United States;


(ii) General obligations of any State or of any political subdivision thereof;


(iii) General obligations issued or guaranteed by any enterprise, as defined in 12 U.S.C. 4502(10);


(iv) Certificates of deposit issued by an insured depository institution, as defined in § 3(c)(2) of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act (12 U.S.C. 1813(c)(2));


(v) Commercial paper;


(vi) Corporate notes or bonds;


(vii) General obligations of a sovereign nation;


(viii) Interests in money market mutual funds; and


(ix) Such other financial instruments as the FDIC deems appropriate.


(2) Haircuts. An FDIC-supervised insured depository institution shall establish written policies and procedures that include:


(i) Haircuts for noncash margin collected under this section; and


(ii) Annual evaluation, and, if appropriate, modification of the haircuts.


(c) Separate margin account. Margin collected by the FDIC-supervised insured depository institution from a retail forex customer for retail forex transactions or pledged by a retail forex customer for retail forex transactions shall be placed into a separate account containing only such margin.


(d) Margin calls; liquidation of position. For each retail forex customer, at least once per day, an FDIC-supervised insured depository institution shall:


(1) Mark the value of the retail forex customer’s open retail forex positions to market;


(2) Mark the value of the margin collected under this section from the retail forex customer to market;


(3) Determine if, based on the marks in paragraphs (c)(1) and (2) of this section, the FDIC-supervised insured depository institution has collected margin from the retail forex customer sufficient to satisfy the requirements of this section; and


(4) Collect such margin from the retail forex customer as the FDIC-supervised insured depository institution may require to satisfy the requirements of this section, or liquidate the retail forex customer’s retail forex transactions.


(e) Set-off prohibited. An FDIC-supervised insured depository institution may not:


(1) Apply a retail forex customer’s retail forex obligations against any funds or other asset of the retail forex customer other than margin in the separate margin account described in paragraph (c) of this section;


(2) Apply a retail forex customer’s retail forex obligations to increase the amount owed by the retail forex customer to the FDIC-supervised insured depository institution under any loan; or


(3) Collect the margin required under this section by use of any right of set-off.


[76 FR 40789, July 12, 2011. Redesignated at 80 FR 74912, Nov. 30, 2015]


§ 349.22 Required reporting to customers.

(a) Monthly statements. Each FDIC-supervised insured depository institution must promptly furnish to each retail forex customer, as of the close of the last business day of each month or as of any regular monthly date selected, except for accounts in which there are neither open positions at the end of the statement period nor any changes to the account balance since the prior statement period, but in any event not less frequently than once every three months, a statement that clearly shows:


(1) For each retail forex customer:


(i) The open retail forex transactions with prices at which acquired;


(ii) The net unrealized profits or losses in all open retail forex transactions marked to the market;


(iii) Any money, securities or other property in the separate margin account required by § 349.21(c); and


(iv) A detailed accounting of all financial charges and credits to the retail forex customer’s retail forex accounts during the monthly reporting period, including: money, securities, or property received from or disbursed to such customer; realized profits and losses; and fees, charges, commissions, and spreads.


(2) For each retail forex customer engaging in retail forex transactions that are options:


(i) All such options purchased, sold, exercised, or expired during the monthly reporting period, identified by underlying retail forex transaction or underlying currency, strike price, transaction date, and expiration date;


(ii) The open option positions carried for such customer and arising as of the end of the monthly reporting period, identified by underlying retail forex transaction or underlying currency, strike price, transaction date, and expiration date;


(iii) All such option positions marked to the market and the amount each position is in the money, if any;


(iv) Any money, securities or other property in the separate margin account required by § 349.21(c); and


(v) A detailed accounting of all financial charges and credits to the retail forex customer’s retail forex accounts during the monthly reporting period, including: money, securities, or property received from or disbursed to such customer; realized profits and losses; premiums and mark-ups; and fees, charges, and commissions.


(b) Confirmation statement. Each FDIC-supervised insured depository institution must, not later than the next business day after any retail forex transaction, send:


(1) To each retail forex customer, a written confirmation of each retail forex transaction caused to be executed by it for the customer, including offsetting transactions executed during the same business day and the rollover of an open retail forex transaction to the next business day;


(2) To each retail forex customer engaging in forex option transactions, a written confirmation of each forex option transaction, containing at least the following information:


(i) The retail forex customer’s account identification number;


(ii) A separate listing of the actual amount of the premium, as well as each mark-up thereon, if applicable, and all other commissions, costs, fees and other charges incurred in connection with the forex option transaction;


(iii) The strike price;


(iv) The underlying retail forex transaction or underlying currency;


(v) The final exercise date of the forex option purchased or sold; and


(vi) The date the forex option transaction was executed.


(3) To each retail forex customer engaging in forex option transactions, upon the expiration or exercise of any option, a written confirmation statement thereof, which statement shall include the date of such occurrence, a description of the option involved, and, in the case of exercise, the details of the retail forex or physical currency position which resulted therefrom including, if applicable, the final trading date of the retail forex transaction underlying the option.


(c) Notwithstanding the provisions of paragraphs (b)(1) through (3) of this section, a retail forex transaction that is caused to be executed for a pooled investment vehicle that engages in retail forex transactions need be confirmed only to the operator of such pooled investment vehicle.


(d) Controlled accounts. With respect to any account controlled by any person other than the retail forex customer for whom such account is carried, each FDIC-supervised insured depository institution shall promptly furnish in writing to such other person the information required by paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section.


(e) Introduced accounts. Each statement provided pursuant to the provisions of this section must, if applicable, show that the account for which the FDIC-supervised insured depository institution was introduced by an introducing broker and the name of the introducing broker.


[76 FR 40789, July 12, 2011. Redesignated and amended at 80 FR 74912, Nov. 30, 2015]


§ 349.23 Unlawful representations.

(a) No implication or representation of limiting losses. No FDIC-supervised insured depository institution engaged in retail foreign exchange transactions or its IAPs may imply or represent that it will, with respect to any retail customer forex account, for or on behalf of any person:


(1) Guarantee such person or account against loss;


(2) Limit the loss of such person or account; or


(3) Not call for or attempt to collect margin as established for retail forex customers.


(b) No implication of representation of engaging in prohibited acts. No FDIC-supervised insured depository institution or its IAPs may in any way imply or represent that it will engage in any of the acts or practices described in paragraph (a) of this section.


(c) No Federal government endorsement. No FDIC-supervised insured depository institution or its IAPs may represent or imply in any manner whatsoever that any retail forex transaction or retail forex product has been sponsored, recommended, or approved by the FDIC, the Federal government, or any agency thereof.


(d) Assuming or sharing of liability from bank error. This section shall not be construed to prevent an FDIC-supervised insured depository institution from assuming or sharing in the losses resulting from the FDIC-supervised insured depository institution’s error or mishandling of a retail forex transaction.


(e) Certain guaranties unaffected. This section shall not affect any guarantee entered into prior to the effective date of this part, but this section shall apply to any extension, modification or renewal thereof entered into after such date.


[76 FR 40789, July 12, 2011. Redesignated at 80 FR 74912, Nov. 30, 2015]


§ 349.24 Authorization to trade.

(a) Specific authorization required. No FDIC-supervised insured depository institution may directly or indirectly effect a retail forex transaction for the account of any retail forex customer unless, before the transaction occurs, the retail forex customer specifically authorized the FDIC-supervised insured depository institution to effect the retail forex transaction.


(b) Requirements for specific authorization. A retail forex transaction is “specifically authorized” for purposes of this section if the retail forex customer specifies:


(1) The precise retail forex transaction to be effected;


(2) The exact amount of the foreign currency to be purchased or sold; and


(3) In the case of an option, the identity of the foreign currency or contract that underlies the option.


[76 FR 40789, July 12, 2011. Redesignated at 80 FR 74912, Nov. 30, 2015]


§ 349.25 Trading and operational standards.

(a) Internal rules, procedures, and controls required. An FDIC-supervised insured depository institution engaging in retail forex transactions shall establish and implement internal policies, procedures, and controls designed, at a minimum, to:


(1) Ensure, to the extent reasonable, that each order received from a retail forex transaction that is executable at or near the price that the FDIC-supervised insured depository institution has quoted to the retail forex customer is entered for execution before any order in any retail forex transaction for


(i) A any proprietary account;


(ii) An account in which a related person has an interest, or any account for which such a related person may originate orders without the prior specific consent of the account owner if the related person has gained knowledge of the retail forex customer’s order prior to the transmission of an order for a proprietary account;


(iii) an account in which such a related person has an interest, if the related person has gained knowledge of the retail forex customer’s order prior to the transmission of an order for a proprietary account; or


(iv) an account in which such a related person may originate orders without the prior specific consent of the account owner if the related person has gained knowledge of the retail forex customer’s order prior to the transmission of an order for a proprietary account.


(2) Prevent FDIC-supervised insured depository institution related persons from placing orders, directly or indirectly, with another person in a manner designed to circumvent the provisions of paragraph (a)(1) of this section;


(3) Fairly and objectively establish settlement prices for retail forex transactions; and


(b) Disclosure of retail forex transactions. No FDIC-supervised insured depository institution engaging in retail forex transactions may disclose that an order of another person is being held by the FDIC-supervised insured depository institution, unless the disclosure is necessary to the effective execution of such order or the disclosure is made at the request of the FDIC.


(c) Handling of retail forex accounts of related persons of retail forex counterparties. No FDIC-supervised insured depository institution engaging in retail forex transactions may knowingly handle the retail forex account of an employee of another retail forex counterparty’s retail forex business unless the FDIC-supervised insured depository institution:


(1) Receives written authorization from a person designated by the other retail forex counterparty with responsibility for the surveillance over the account pursuant to paragraph (a)(2) of this section;


(2) Prepares immediately upon receipt of an order for the account a written record of the order, including the account identification and order number, and records thereon to the nearest minute, by time-stamp or other timing device, the date and time the order is received; and


(3) Transmits on a regular basis to the other retail forex counterparty copies of all statements for the account and of all written records prepared upon the receipt of orders for such account pursuant to paragraph (a)(2) of this section.


(d) Related person of FDIC-supervised insured depository institution establishing account at another retail forex counterparty. No related person of an FDIC-supervised insured depository institution working in the institution’s retail forex business may have an account, directly or indirectly, with another retail forex counterparty unless the other retail forex counterparty:


(1) Receives written authorization to open and maintain the an account from a person designated by the FDIC-supervised insured depository institution of which it is a related person with responsibility for the surveillance over the account pursuant to paragraph (a)(2) of this section; and


(2) Transmits on a regular basis to the FDIC-supervised insured depository institution copies of all statements for such account and of all written records prepared by the other retail forex counterparty upon receipt of orders for the account pursuant to paragraph (c)(2) of this section are transmitted on a regular basis to the retail forex counterparty of which it is a related person.


(e) Prohibited trading practices. No FDIC-supervised insured depository institution engaging in retail forex transactions may:


(1) Enter into a retail forex transaction, to be executed pursuant to a market or limit order at a price that is not at or near the price at which other retail forex customers, during that same time period, have executed retail forex transactions with the FDIC-supervised insured depository institution;


(2) Adjust or alter prices for a retail forex transaction after the transaction has been confirmed to the retail forex customer;


(3) Provide a retail forex customer a new bid price for a retail forex transaction that is higher than its previous bid without providing a new asked price that is also higher than its previous asked price by a similar amount;


(4) Provide a retail forex customer a new bid price for a retail forex transaction that is lower than its previous bid without providing a new asked price that is also lower than its previous asked price by a similar amount; or


(5) Establish a new position for a retail forex customer (except one that offsets an existing position for that retail forex customer) where the FDIC-supervised insured depository institution holds outstanding orders of other retail forex customers for the same currency pair at a comparable price.


[76 FR 40789, July 12, 2011. Redesignated at 80 FR 74912, Nov. 30, 2015]


§ 349.26 Supervision.

(a) Supervision by the FDIC-supervised insured depository institution. An FDIC-supervised insured depository institution engaging in retail forex transactions shall diligently supervise the handling by its officers, employees, and agents (or persons occupying a similar status or performing a similar function) of all retail forex accounts carried, operated, or advised by at the FDIC-supervised insured depository institution and all activities of its officers, employees, and agents (or persons occupying a similar status or performing a similar function) relating to its retail forex business.


(b) Supervision by officers, employees, or agents. An officer, employee, or agent of an FDIC-supervised insured depository institution must diligently supervise his or her subordinates’ handling of all retail forex accounts at the FDIC-supervised insured depository institution and all the subordinates’ activities relating to the FDIC-supervised insured depository institution’s retail forex business.


[76 FR 40789, July 12, 2011. Redesignated at 80 FR 74912, Nov. 30, 2015]


§ 349.27 Notice of transfers.

(a) Prior notice generally required. Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, an FDIC-supervised insured depository institution must provide a retail forex customer with 30 days’ prior notice of any assignment of any position or transfer of any account of the retail forex customer. The notice must include a statement that the retail forex customer is not required to accept the proposed assignment or transfer and may direct the FDIC-supervised insured depository institution to liquidate the positions of the retail forex customer or transfer the account to a retail forex counterparty of the retail forex customer’s selection.


(b) Exceptions. The requirements of paragraph (a) of this section shall not apply to transfers:


(1) Requested by the retail forex customer;


(2) Made by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation as receiver or conservator under the Federal Deposit Insurance Act; or


(3) Otherwise authorized by applicable law.


(c) Obligations of transferee FDIC-supervised insured depository institution. An FDIC-supervised insured depository institution to which retail forex accounts or positions are assigned or transferred under paragraph (a) of this section must provide to the affected retail forex customers the risk disclosure statements and forms of acknowledgment required by this part and receive the required signed acknowledgments within sixty days of such assignments or transfers. This requirement shall not apply if the FDIC-supervised insured depository institution has clear written evidence that the retail forex customer has received and acknowledged receipt of the required disclosure statements.


[76 FR 40789, July 12, 2011. Redesignated at 80 FR 74912, Nov. 30, 2015]


§ 349.28 Customer dispute resolution.

(a) Voluntary submission of claims to dispute or settlement procedures. No FDIC-supervised insured depository institution may enter into any agreement or understanding with a retail forex customer in which the customer agrees, prior to the time a claim or grievance arises, to submit such claim or grievance to any settlement procedure.


(b) Election of forum. (1) Within ten business days after receipt of notice from the retail forex customer that the customer intends to submit a claim to arbitration, the FDIC-supervised insured depository institution must provide the customer with a list of persons qualified in dispute resolution.


(2) The customer shall, within 45 days after receipt of such list, notify the FDIC-supervised insured depository institution of the person selected. The customer’s failure to provide such notice shall give the FDIC-supervised insured depository institution the right to select a person from the list.


(c) Enforceability. A dispute settlement procedure may require parties using such procedure to agree, under applicable state law, submission agreement or otherwise, to be bound by an award rendered in the procedure, provided that the agreement to submit the claim or grievance to the voluntary procedure under paragraph (a) of this section or that agreement to submit the claim or grievance was made after the claim or grievance arose. Any award so rendered shall be enforceable in accordance with applicable law.


(d) Time limits for submission of claims. The dispute settlement procedure used by the parties shall not include any unreasonably short limitation period foreclosing submission of a customer’s claims or grievances or counterclaims.


(e) Counterclaims. A procedure for the settlement of a retail forex customer’s claims or grievances against an FDIC-supervised insured depository institution or employee thereof may permit the submission of a counterclaim in the procedure by a person against whom a claim or grievance is brought. Such a counterclaim may be permitted where it arises out of the transaction or occurrence that is the subject of the customer’s claim or grievance and does not require for adjudication the presence of essential witnesses, parties, or third persons over which the settlement process lacks jurisdiction.


[76 FR 40789, July 12, 2011. Redesignated at 80 FR 74912, Nov. 30, 2015]


PART 350 [RESERVED]

PART 351 – PROPRIETARY TRADING AND CERTAIN INTERESTS IN AND RELATIONSHIPS WITH COVERED FUNDS


Authority:12 U.S.C. 1851; 1811 et seq.; 3101 et seq.; and 5412.


Source:79 FR 5805, Jan. 31, 2014, unless otherwise noted.

Subpart A – Authority and Definitions

§ 351.1 Authority, purpose, scope, and relationship to other authorities.

(a) Authority. This part is issued by the FDIC under section 13 of the Bank Holding Company Act of 1956, as amended (12 U.S.C. 1851).


(b) Purpose. Section 13 of the Bank Holding Company Act establishes prohibitions and restrictions on proprietary trading and investments in or relationships with covered funds by certain banking entities, including any insured depository institution as defined in section 3(c)(2) of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act (12 U.S.C. 1813(c)(2)) and certain subsidiaries thereof for which the FDIC is the appropriate Federal banking agency as defined in section 3(q) of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act (12 U.S.C. 1813(q)). This part implements section 13 of the Bank Holding Company Act by defining terms used in the statute and related terms, establishing prohibitions and restrictions on proprietary trading and investments in or relationships with covered funds, and explaining the statute’s requirements.


(c) Scope. This part implements section 13 of the Bank Holding Company Act with respect to insured depository institutions for which the FDIC is the appropriate Federal banking agency, as defined in section 3(q) of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act, and certain subsidiaries of the foregoing, but does not include such entities to the extent they are not within the definition of banking entity in § 351.2(c).


(d) Relationship to other authorities. Except as otherwise provided in under section 13 of the Bank Holding Company Act, and notwithstanding any other provision of law, the prohibitions and restrictions under section 13 of Bank Holding Company Act shall apply to the activities and investments of a banking entity, even if such activities and investments are authorized for a banking entity under other applicable provisions of law.


(e) Preservation of authority. Nothing in this part limits in any way the authority of the FDIC to impose on a banking entity identified in paragraph (c) of this section additional requirements or restrictions with respect to any activity, investment, or relationship covered under section 13 of the Bank Holding Company Act or this part, or additional penalties for violation of this part provided under any other applicable provision of law.


[79 FR 5805, Jan. 31, 2014, as amended at 84 FR 35021, July 22, 2019]


§ 351.2 Definitions.

Unless otherwise specified, for purposes of this part:


(a) Affiliate has the same meaning as in section 2(k) of the Bank Holding Company Act of 1956 (12 U.S.C. 1841(k)).


(b) Bank holding company has the same meaning as in section 2 of the Bank Holding Company Act of 1956 (12 U.S.C. 1841).


(c) Banking entity. (1) Except as provided in paragraph (c)(2) of this section, banking entity means:


(i) Any insured depository institution;


(ii) Any company that controls an insured depository institution;


(iii) Any company that is treated as a bank holding company for purposes of section 8 of the International Banking Act of 1978 (12 U.S.C. 3106); and


(iv) Any affiliate or subsidiary of any entity described in paragraph (c)(1)(i), (ii), or (iii) of this section.


(2) Banking entity does not include:


(vii) A covered fund that is not itself a banking entity under paragraph (c)(1)(i), (ii), or (iii) of this section;


(viii) A portfolio company held under the authority contained in section 4(k)(4)(H) or (I) of the BHC Act (12 U.S.C. 1843(k)(4)(H), (I)), or any portfolio concern, as defined under 13 CFR 107.50, that is controlled by a small business investment company, as defined in section 103(3) of the Small Business Investment Act of 1958 (15 U.S.C. 662), so long as the portfolio company or portfolio concern is not itself a banking entity under paragraph (c)(1)(i), (ii), or (iii) of this section; or


(ix) The FDIC acting in its corporate capacity or as conservator or receiver under the Federal Deposit Insurance Act or Title II of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act.


(d) Board means the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System.


(e) CFTC means the Commodity Futures Trading Commission.


(f) Dealer has the same meaning as in section 3(a)(5) of the Exchange Act (15 U.S.C. 78c(a)(5)).


(g) Depository institution has the same meaning as in section 3(c) of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act (12 U.S.C. 1813(c)).


(h) Derivative. (1) Except as provided in paragraph (h)(2) of this section, derivative means:


(i) Any swap, as that term is defined in section 1a(47) of the Commodity Exchange Act (7 U.S.C. 1a(47)), or security-based swap, as that term is defined in section 3(a)(68) of the Exchange Act (15 U.S.C. 78c(a)(68));


(ii) Any purchase or sale of a commodity, that is not an excluded commodity, for deferred shipment or delivery that is intended to be physically settled;


(iii) Any foreign exchange forward (as that term is defined in section 1a(24) of the Commodity Exchange Act (7 U.S.C. 1a(24)) or foreign exchange swap (as that term is defined in section 1a(25) of the Commodity Exchange Act (7 U.S.C. 1a(25));


(iv) Any agreement, contract, or transaction in foreign currency described in section 2(c)(2)(C)(i) of the Commodity Exchange Act (7 U.S.C. 2(c)(2)(C)(i));


(v) Any agreement, contract, or transaction in a commodity other than foreign currency described in section 2(c)(2)(D)(i) of the Commodity Exchange Act (7 U.S.C. 2(c)(2)(D)(i)); and


(vi) Any transaction authorized under section 19 of the Commodity Exchange Act (7 U.S.C. 23(a) or (b));


(2) A derivative does not include:


(i) Any consumer, commercial, or other agreement, contract, or transaction that the CFTC and SEC have further defined by joint regulation, interpretation, or other action as not within the definition of swap, as that term is defined in section 1a(47) of the Commodity Exchange Act (7 U.S.C. 1a(47)), or security-based swap, as that term is defined in section 3(a)(68) of the Exchange Act (15 U.S.C. 78c(a)(68)); or


(ii) Any identified banking product, as defined in section 402(b) of the Legal Certainty for Bank Products Act of 2000 (7 U.S.C. 27(b)), that is subject to section 403(a) of that Act (7 U.S.C. 27a(a)).


(i) Employee includes a member of the immediate family of the employee.


(j) Exchange Act means the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (15 U.S.C. 78a et seq.).


(k) Excluded commodity has the same meaning as in section 1a(19) of the Commodity Exchange Act (7 U.S.C. 1a(19)).


(l) FDIC means the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation.


(m) Federal banking agencies means the Board, the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency, and the FDIC.


(n) Foreign banking organization has the same meaning as in § 211.21(o) of the Board’s Regulation K (12 CFR 211.21(o)), but does not include a foreign bank, as defined in section 1(b)(7) of the International Banking Act of 1978 (12 U.S.C. 3101(7)), that is organized under the laws of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, Guam, American Samoa, the United States Virgin Islands, or the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands.


(o) Foreign insurance regulator means the insurance commissioner, or a similar official or agency, of any country other than the United States that is engaged in the supervision of insurance companies under foreign insurance law.


(p) General account means all of the assets of an insurance company except those allocated to one or more separate accounts.


(q) Insurance company means a company that is organized as an insurance company, primarily and predominantly engaged in writing insurance or reinsuring risks underwritten by insurance companies, subject to supervision as such by a state insurance regulator or a foreign insurance regulator, and not operated for the purpose of evading the provisions of section 13 of the BHC Act (12 U.S.C. 1851).


(r) Insured depository institution has the same meaning as in section 3(c) of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act (12 U.S.C. 1813(c)), but does not include:


(1) An insured depository institution that is described in section 2(c)(2)(D) of the BHC Act (12 U.S.C. 1841(c)(2)(D)); or


(2) An insured depository institution if it has, and if every company that controls it has, total consolidated assets of $10 billion or less and total trading assets and trading liabilities, on a consolidated basis, that are 5 percent or less of total consolidated assets.


(s) Limited trading assets and liabilities means with respect to a banking entity that:


(1)(i) The banking entity has, together with its affiliates and subsidiaries, trading assets and liabilities (excluding trading assets and liabilities attributable to trading activities permitted pursuant to § 351.6(a)(1) and (2) of subpart B) the average gross sum of which over the previous consecutive four quarters, as measured as of the last day of each of the four previous calendar quarters, is less than $1 billion; and


(ii) The FDIC has not determined pursuant to § 351.20(g) or (h) of this part that the banking entity should not be treated as having limited trading assets and liabilities.


(2) With respect to a banking entity other than a banking entity described in paragraph (s)(3) of this section, trading assets and liabilities for purposes of this paragraph (s) means trading assets and liabilities (excluding trading assets and liabilities attributable to trading activities permitted pursuant to § 351.6(a)(1) and (2) of subpart B) on a worldwide consolidated basis.


(3)(i) With respect to a banking entity that is a foreign banking organization or a subsidiary of a foreign banking organization, trading assets and liabilities for purposes of this paragraph (s) means the trading assets and liabilities (excluding trading assets and liabilities attributable to trading activities permitted pursuant to § 351.6(a)(1) and (2) of subpart B) of the combined U.S. operations of the top-tier foreign banking organization (including all subsidiaries, affiliates, branches, and agencies of the foreign banking organization operating, located, or organized in the United States).


(ii) For purposes of paragraph (s)(3)(i) of this section, a U.S. branch, agency, or subsidiary of a banking entity is located in the United States; however, the foreign bank that operates or controls that branch, agency, or subsidiary is not considered to be located in the United States solely by virtue of operating or controlling the U.S. branch, agency, or subsidiary. For purposes of paragraph (s)(3)(i) of this section, all foreign operations of a U.S. agency, branch, or subsidiary of a foreign banking organization are considered to be located in the United States, including branches outside the United States that are managed or controlled by a U.S. branch or agency of the foreign banking organization, for purposes of calculating the banking entity’s U.S. trading assets and liabilities.


(t) Loan means any loan, lease, extension of credit, or secured or unsecured receivable that is not a security or derivative.


(u) Moderate trading assets and liabilities means, with respect to a banking entity, that the banking entity does not have significant trading assets and liabilities or limited trading assets and liabilities.


(v) Primary financial regulatory agency has the same meaning as in section 2(12) of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (12 U.S.C. 5301(12)).


(w) Purchase includes any contract to buy, purchase, or otherwise acquire. For security futures products, purchase includes any contract, agreement, or transaction for future delivery. With respect to a commodity future, purchase includes any contract, agreement, or transaction for future delivery. With respect to a derivative, purchase includes the execution, termination (prior to its scheduled maturity date), assignment, exchange, or similar transfer or conveyance of, or extinguishing of rights or obligations under, a derivative, as the context may require.


(x) Qualifying foreign banking organization means a foreign banking organization that qualifies as such under § 211.23(a), (c) or (e) of the Board’s Regulation K (12 CFR 211.23(a), (c), or (e)).


(y) SEC means the Securities and Exchange Commission.


(z) Sale and sell each include any contract to sell or otherwise dispose of. For security futures products, such terms include any contract, agreement, or transaction for future delivery. With respect to a commodity future, such terms include any contract, agreement, or transaction for future delivery. With respect to a derivative, such terms include the execution, termination (prior to its scheduled maturity date), assignment, exchange, or similar transfer or conveyance of, or extinguishing of rights or obligations under, a derivative, as the context may require.


(aa) Security has the meaning specified in section 3(a)(10) of the Exchange Act (15 U.S.C. 78c(a)(10)).


(bb) Security-based swap dealer has the same meaning as in section 3(a)(71) of the Exchange Act (15 U.S.C. 78c(a)(71)).


(cc) Security future has the meaning specified in section 3(a)(55) of the Exchange Act (15 U.S.C. 78c(a)(55)).


(dd) Separate account means an account established and maintained by an insurance company in connection with one or more insurance contracts to hold assets that are legally segregated from the insurance company’s other assets, under which income, gains, and losses, whether or not realized, from assets allocated to such account, are, in accordance with the applicable contract, credited to or charged against such account without regard to other income, gains, or losses of the insurance company.


(ee) Significant trading assets and liabilities means with respect to a banking entity that:


(1)(i) The banking entity has, together with its affiliates and subsidiaries, trading assets and liabilities the average gross sum of which over the previous consecutive four quarters, as measured as of the last day of each of the four previous calendar quarters, equals or exceeds $20 billion; or


(ii) The FDIC has determined pursuant to § 351.20(h) of this part that the banking entity should be treated as having significant trading assets and liabilities.


(2) With respect to a banking entity, other than a banking entity described in paragraph (ee)(3) of this section, trading assets and liabilities for purposes of this paragraph (ee) means trading assets and liabilities (excluding trading assets and liabilities attributable to trading activities permitted pursuant to § 351.6(a)(1) and (2) of subpart B) on a worldwide consolidated basis.


(3)(i) With respect to a banking entity that is a foreign banking organization or a subsidiary of a foreign banking organization, trading assets and liabilities for purposes of this paragraph (ee) means the trading assets and liabilities (excluding trading assets and liabilities attributable to trading activities permitted pursuant to § 351.6(a)(1) and (2) of subpart B) of the combined U.S. operations of the top-tier foreign banking organization (including all subsidiaries, affiliates, branches, and agencies of the foreign banking organization operating, located, or organized in the United States as well as branches outside the United States that are managed or controlled by a branch or agency of the foreign banking entity operating, located or organized in the United States).


(ii) For purposes of paragraph (ee)(3)(i) of this section, a U.S. branch, agency, or subsidiary of a banking entity is located in the United States; however, the foreign bank that operates or controls that branch, agency, or subsidiary is not considered to be located in the United States solely by virtue of operating or controlling the U.S. branch, agency, or subsidiary. For purposes of paragraph (ee)(3)(i) of this section, all foreign operations of a U.S. agency, branch, or subsidiary of a foreign banking organization are considered to be located in the United States for purposes of calculating the banking entity’s U.S. trading assets and liabilities.


(ff) State means any State, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, Guam, American Samoa, the United States Virgin Islands, and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands.


(gg) Subsidiary has the same meaning as in section 2(d) of the Bank Holding Company Act of 1956 (12 U.S.C. 1841(d)).


(hh) State insurance regulator means the insurance commissioner, or a similar official or agency, of a State that is engaged in the supervision of insurance companies under State insurance law.


(ii) Swap dealer has the same meaning as in section 1(a)(49) of the Commodity Exchange Act (7 U.S.C. 1a(49)).


[84 FR 62165, Nov. 14, 2019]


Subpart B – Proprietary Trading

§ 351.3 Prohibition on proprietary trading.

(a) Prohibition. Except as otherwise provided in this subpart, a banking entity may not engage in proprietary trading. Proprietary trading means engaging as principal for the trading account of the banking entity in any purchase or sale of one or more financial instruments.


(b) Definition of trading account – (1) Trading account. Trading account means:


(i) Any account that is used by a banking entity to purchase or sell one or more financial instruments principally for the purpose of short-term resale, benefitting from actual or expected short-term price movements, realizing short-term arbitrage profits, or hedging one or more of the positions resulting from the purchases or sales of financial instruments described in this paragraph;


(ii) Any account that is used by a banking entity to purchase or sell one or more financial instruments that are both market risk capital rule covered positions and trading positions (or hedges of other market risk capital rule covered positions), if the banking entity, or any affiliate with which the banking entity is consolidated for regulatory reporting purposes, calculates risk-based capital ratios under the market risk capital rule; or


(iii) Any account that is used by a banking entity to purchase or sell one or more financial instruments, if the banking entity:


(A) Is licensed or registered, or is required to be licensed or registered, to engage in the business of a dealer, swap dealer, or security-based swap dealer, to the extent the instrument is purchased or sold in connection with the activities that require the banking entity to be licensed or registered as such; or


(B) Is engaged in the business of a dealer, swap dealer, or security-based swap dealer outside of the United States, to the extent the instrument is purchased or sold in connection with the activities of such business.


(2) Trading account application for certain banking entities. (i) A banking entity that is subject to paragraph (b)(1)(ii) of this section in determining the scope of its trading account is not subject to paragraph (b)(1)(i) of this section.


(ii) A banking entity that does not calculate risk-based capital ratios under the market risk capital rule and is not a consolidated affiliate for regulatory reporting purposes of a banking entity that calculates risk based capital ratios under the market risk capital rule may elect to apply paragraph (b)(1)(ii) of this section in determining the scope of its trading account as if it were subject to that paragraph. A banking entity that elects under this subsection to apply paragraph (b)(1)(ii) of this section in determining the scope of its trading account as if it were subject to that paragraph is not required to apply paragraph (b)(1)(i) of this section.


(3) Consistency of account election for certain banking entities. (i) Any election or change to an election under paragraph (b)(2)(ii) of this section must apply to the electing banking entity and all of its wholly owned subsidiaries. The primary financial regulatory agency of a banking entity that is affiliated with but is not a wholly owned subsidiary of such electing banking entity may require that the banking entity be subject to this uniform application requirement if the primary financial regulatory agency determines that it is necessary to prevent evasion of the requirements of this part after notice and opportunity for response as provided in subpart D of this part.


(ii) A banking entity that does not elect under paragraph (b)(2)(ii) of this section to be subject to the trading account definition in (b)(1)(ii) of this section may continue to apply the trading account definition in paragraph (b)(1)(i) of this section for one year from the date on which it becomes, or becomes a consolidated affiliate for regulatory reporting purposes with, a banking entity that calculates risk-based capital ratios under the market risk capital rule.


(4) Rebuttable presumption for certain purchases and sales. The purchase (or sale) of a financial instrument by a banking entity shall be presumed not to be for the trading account of the banking entity under paragraph (b)(1)(i) of this section if the banking entity holds the financial instrument for sixty days or longer and does not transfer substantially all of the risk of the financial instrument within sixty days of the purchase (or sale).


(c) Financial instrument – (1) Financial instrument means:


(i) A security, including an option on a security;


(ii) A derivative, including an option on a derivative; or


(iii) A contract of sale of a commodity for future delivery, or option on a contract of sale of a commodity for future delivery.


(2) A financial instrument does not include:


(i) A loan;


(ii) A commodity that is not:


(A) An excluded commodity (other than foreign exchange or currency);


(B) A derivative;


(C) A contract of sale of a commodity for future delivery; or


(D) An option on a contract of sale of a commodity for future delivery; or


(iii) Foreign exchange or currency.


(d) Proprietary trading. Proprietary trading does not include:


(1) Any purchase or sale of one or more financial instruments by a banking entity that arises under a repurchase or reverse repurchase agreement pursuant to which the banking entity has simultaneously agreed, in writing, to both purchase and sell a stated asset, at stated prices, and on stated dates or on demand with the same counterparty;


(2) Any purchase or sale of one or more financial instruments by a banking entity that arises under a transaction in which the banking entity lends or borrows a security temporarily to or from another party pursuant to a written securities lending agreement under which the lender retains the economic interests of an owner of such security, and has the right to terminate the transaction and to recall the loaned security on terms agreed by the parties;


(3) Any purchase or sale of a security, foreign exchange forward (as that term is defined in section 1a(24) of the Commodity Exchange Act (7 U.S.C. 1a(24)), foreign exchange swap (as that term is defined in section 1a(25) of the Commodity Exchange Act (7 U.S.C. 1a(25)), or cross-currency swap by a banking entity for the purpose of liquidity management in accordance with a documented liquidity management plan of the banking entity that:


(i) Specifically contemplates and authorizes the particular financial instruments to be used for liquidity management purposes, the amount, types, and risks of these financial instruments that are consistent with liquidity management, and the liquidity circumstances in which the particular financial instruments may or must be used;


(ii) Requires that any purchase or sale of financial instruments contemplated and authorized by the plan be principally for the purpose of managing the liquidity of the banking entity, and not for the purpose of short-term resale, benefitting from actual or expected short-term price movements, realizing short-term arbitrage profits, or hedging a position taken for such short-term purposes;


(iii) Requires that any financial instruments purchased or sold for liquidity management purposes be highly liquid and limited to financial instruments the market, credit, and other risks of which the banking entity does not reasonably expect to give rise to appreciable profits or losses as a result of short-term price movements;


(iv) Limits any financial instruments purchased or sold for liquidity management purposes, together with any other financial instruments purchased or sold for such purposes, to an amount that is consistent with the banking entity’s near-term funding needs, including deviations from normal operations of the banking entity or any affiliate thereof, as estimated and documented pursuant to methods specified in the plan;


(v) Includes written policies and procedures, internal controls, analysis, and independent testing to ensure that the purchase and sale of financial instruments that are not permitted under § 351.6(a) or (b) of this subpart are for the purpose of liquidity management and in accordance with the liquidity management plan described in this paragraph (d)(3); and


(vi) Is consistent with the FDIC’s regulatory requirements regarding liquidity management;


(4) Any purchase or sale of one or more financial instruments by a banking entity that is a derivatives clearing organization or a clearing agency in connection with clearing financial instruments;


(5) Any excluded clearing activities by a banking entity that is a member of a clearing agency, a member of a derivatives clearing organization, or a member of a designated financial market utility;


(6) Any purchase or sale of one or more financial instruments by a banking entity, so long as:


(i) The purchase (or sale) satisfies an existing delivery obligation of the banking entity or its customers, including to prevent or close out a failure to deliver, in connection with delivery, clearing, or settlement activity; or


(ii) The purchase (or sale) satisfies an obligation of the banking entity in connection with a judicial, administrative, self-regulatory organization, or arbitration proceeding;


(7) Any purchase or sale of one or more financial instruments by a banking entity that is acting solely as agent, broker, or custodian;


(8) Any purchase or sale of one or more financial instruments by a banking entity through a deferred compensation, stock-bonus, profit-sharing, or pension plan of the banking entity that is established and administered in accordance with the law of the United States or a foreign sovereign, if the purchase or sale is made directly or indirectly by the banking entity as trustee for the benefit of persons who are or were employees of the banking entity;


(9) Any purchase or sale of one or more financial instruments by a banking entity in the ordinary course of collecting a debt previously contracted in good faith, provided that the banking entity divests the financial instrument as soon as practicable, and in no event may the banking entity retain such instrument for longer than such period permitted by the FDIC;


(10) Any purchase or sale of one or more financial instruments that was made in error by a banking entity in the course of conducting a permitted or excluded activity or is a subsequent transaction to correct such an error;


(11) Contemporaneously entering into a customer-driven swap or customer-driven security-based swap and a matched swap or security-based swap if:


(i) The banking entity retains no more than minimal price risk; and


(ii) The banking entity is not a registered dealer, swap dealer, or security-based swap dealer;


(12) Any purchase or sale of one or more financial instruments that the banking entity uses to hedge mortgage servicing rights or mortgage servicing assets in accordance with a documented hedging strategy; or


(13) Any purchase or sale of a financial instrument that does not meet the definition of trading asset or trading liability under the applicable reporting form for a banking entity as of January 1, 2020.


(e) Definition of other terms related to proprietary trading. For purposes of this subpart:


(1) Anonymous means that each party to a purchase or sale is unaware of the identity of the other party(ies) to the purchase or sale.


(2) Clearing agency has the same meaning as in section 3(a)(23) of the Exchange Act (15 U.S.C. 78c(a)(23)).


(3) Commodity has the same meaning as in section 1a(9) of the Commodity Exchange Act (7 U.S.C. 1a(9)), except that a commodity does not include any security;


(4) Contract of sale of a commodity for future delivery means a contract of sale (as that term is defined in section 1a(13) of the Commodity Exchange Act (7 U.S.C. 1a(13)) for future delivery (as that term is defined in section 1a(27) of the Commodity Exchange Act (7 U.S.C. 1a(27))).


(5) Cross-currency swap means a swap in which one party exchanges with another party principal and interest rate payments in one currency for principal and interest rate payments in another currency, and the exchange of principal occurs on the date the swap is entered into, with a reversal of the exchange of principal at a later date that is agreed upon when the swap is entered into.


(6) Derivatives clearing organization means:


(i) A derivatives clearing organization registered under section 5b of the Commodity Exchange Act (7 U.S.C. 7a-1);


(ii) A derivatives clearing organization that, pursuant to CFTC regulation, is exempt from the registration requirements under section 5b of the Commodity Exchange Act (7 U.S.C. 7a-1); or


(iii) A foreign derivatives clearing organization that, pursuant to CFTC regulation, is permitted to clear for a foreign board of trade that is registered with the CFTC.


(7) Exchange, unless the context otherwise requires, means any designated contract market, swap execution facility, or foreign board of trade registered with the CFTC, or, for purposes of securities or security-based swaps, an exchange, as defined under section 3(a)(1) of the Exchange Act (15 U.S.C. 78c(a)(1)), or security-based swap execution facility, as defined under section 3(a)(77) of the Exchange Act (15 U.S.C. 78c(a)(77)).


(8) Excluded clearing activities means:


(i) With respect to customer transactions cleared on a derivatives clearing organization, a clearing agency, or a designated financial market utility, any purchase or sale necessary to correct trading errors made by or on behalf of a customer provided that such purchase or sale is conducted in accordance with, for transactions cleared on a derivatives clearing organization, the Commodity Exchange Act, CFTC regulations, and the rules or procedures of the derivatives clearing organization, or, for transactions cleared on a clearing agency, the rules or procedures of the clearing agency, or, for transactions cleared on a designated financial market utility that is neither a derivatives clearing organization nor a clearing agency, the rules or procedures of the designated financial market utility;


(ii) Any purchase or sale in connection with and related to the management of a default or threatened imminent default of a customer provided that such purchase or sale is conducted in accordance with, for transactions cleared on a derivatives clearing organization, the Commodity Exchange Act, CFTC regulations, and the rules or procedures of the derivatives clearing organization, or, for transactions cleared on a clearing agency, the rules or procedures of the clearing agency, or, for transactions cleared on a designated financial market utility that is neither a derivatives clearing organization nor a clearing agency, the rules or procedures of the designated financial market utility;


(iii) Any purchase or sale in connection with and related to the management of a default or threatened imminent default of a member of a clearing agency, a member of a derivatives clearing organization, or a member of a designated financial market utility;


(iv) Any purchase or sale in connection with and related to the management of the default or threatened default of a clearing agency, a derivatives clearing organization, or a designated financial market utility; and


(v) Any purchase or sale that is required by the rules or procedures of a clearing agency, a derivatives clearing organization, or a designated financial market utility to mitigate the risk to the clearing agency, derivatives clearing organization, or designated financial market utility that would result from the clearing by a member of security-based swaps that reference the member or an affiliate of the member.


(9) Designated financial market utility has the same meaning as in section 803(4) of the Dodd-Frank Act (12 U.S.C. 5462(4)).


(10) Issuer has the same meaning as in section 2(a)(4) of the Securities Act of 1933 (15 U.S.C. 77b(a)(4)).


(11) Market risk capital rule covered position and trading position means a financial instrument that meets the criteria to be a covered position and a trading position, as those terms are respectively defined, without regard to whether the financial instrument is reported as a covered position or trading position on any applicable regulatory reporting forms:


(i) In the case of a banking entity that is a bank holding company, savings and loan holding company, or insured depository institution, under the market risk capital rule that is applicable to the banking entity; and


(ii) In the case of a banking entity that is affiliated with a bank holding company or savings and loan holding company, other than a banking entity to which a market risk capital rule is applicable, under the market risk capital rule that is applicable to the affiliated bank holding company or savings and loan holding company.


(12) Market risk capital rule means the market risk capital rule that is contained in 12 CFR part 3, subpart F, with respect to a banking entity for which the OCC is the primary financial regulatory agency, 12 CFR part 217 with respect to a banking entity for which the Board is the primary financial regulatory agency, or 12 CFR part 324 with respect to a banking entity for which the FDIC is the primary financial regulatory agency.


(13) Municipal security means a security that is a direct obligation of or issued by, or an obligation guaranteed as to principal or interest by, a State or any political subdivision thereof, or any agency or instrumentality of a State or any political subdivision thereof, or any municipal corporate instrumentality of one or more States or political subdivisions thereof.


(14) Trading desk means a unit of organization of a banking entity that purchases or sells financial instruments for the trading account of the banking entity or an affiliate thereof that is:


(i)(A) Structured by the banking entity to implement a well-defined business strategy;


(B) Organized to ensure appropriate setting, monitoring, and management review of the desk’s trading and hedging limits, current and potential future loss exposures, and strategies; and


(C) Characterized by a clearly defined unit that:


(1) Engages in coordinated trading activity with a unified approach to its key elements;


(2) Operates subject to a common and calibrated set of risk metrics, risk levels, and joint trading limits;


(3) Submits compliance reports and other information as a unit for monitoring by management; and


(4) Books its trades together; or


(ii) For a banking entity that calculates risk-based capital ratios under the market risk capital rule, or a consolidated affiliate for regulatory reporting purposes of a banking entity that calculates risk-based capital ratios under the market risk capital rule, established by the banking entity or its affiliate for purposes of market risk capital calculations under the market risk capital rule.


[79 FR 5805, Jan. 31, 2014, as amended at 84 FR 62167, Nov. 14, 2019]


§ 351.4 Permitted underwriting and market making-related activities.

(a) Underwriting activities – (1) Permitted underwriting activities. The prohibition contained in § 351.3(a) does not apply to a banking entity’s underwriting activities conducted in accordance with this paragraph (a).


(2) Requirements. The underwriting activities of a banking entity are permitted under paragraph (a)(1) of this section only if:


(i) The banking entity is acting as an underwriter for a distribution of securities and the trading desk’s underwriting position is related to such distribution;


(ii)(A) The amount and type of the securities in the trading desk’s underwriting position are designed not to exceed the reasonably expected near term demands of clients, customers, or counterparties, taking into account the liquidity, maturity, and depth of the market for the relevant types of securities; and


(B) Reasonable efforts are made to sell or otherwise reduce the underwriting position within a reasonable period, taking into account the liquidity, maturity, and depth of the market for the relevant types of securities;


(iii) In the case of a banking entity with significant trading assets and liabilities, the banking entity has established and implements, maintains, and enforces an internal compliance program required by subpart D of this part that is reasonably designed to ensure the banking entity’s compliance with the requirements of this paragraph (a), including reasonably designed written policies and procedures, internal controls, analysis and independent testing identifying and addressing:


(A) The products, instruments or exposures each trading desk may purchase, sell, or manage as part of its underwriting activities;


(B) Limits for each trading desk, in accordance with paragraph (a)(2)(ii)(A) of this section;


(C) Written authorization procedures, including escalation procedures that require review and approval of any trade that would exceed a trading desk’s limit(s), demonstrable analysis of the basis for any temporary or permanent increase to a trading desk’s limit(s), and independent review of such demonstrable analysis and approval; and


(D) Internal controls and ongoing monitoring and analysis of each trading desk’s compliance with its limits.


(iv) A banking entity with significant trading assets and liabilities may satisfy the requirements in paragraphs (a)(2)(iii)(B) and (C) of this section by complying with the requirements set forth in paragraph (c) of this section;


(v) The compensation arrangements of persons performing the activities described in this paragraph (a) are designed not to reward or incentivize prohibited proprietary trading; and


(vi) The banking entity is licensed or registered to engage in the activity described in this paragraph (a) in accordance with applicable law.


(3) Definition of distribution. For purposes of this paragraph (a), a distribution of securities means:


(i) An offering of securities, whether or not subject to registration under the Securities Act of 1933, that is distinguished from ordinary trading transactions by the presence of special selling efforts and selling methods; or


(ii) An offering of securities made pursuant to an effective registration statement under the Securities Act of 1933.


(4) Definition of underwriter. For purposes of this paragraph (a), underwriter means:


(i) A person who has agreed with an issuer or selling security holder to:


(A) Purchase securities from the issuer or selling security holder for distribution;


(B) Engage in a distribution of securities for or on behalf of the issuer or selling security holder; or


(C) Manage a distribution of securities for or on behalf of the issuer or selling security holder; or


(ii) A person who has agreed to participate or is participating in a distribution of such securities for or on behalf of the issuer or selling security holder.


(5) Definition of selling security holder. For purposes of this paragraph (a), selling security holder means any person, other than an issuer, on whose behalf a distribution is made.


(6) Definition of underwriting position. For purposes of this section, underwriting position means the long or short positions in one or more securities held by a banking entity or its affiliate, and managed by a particular trading desk, in connection with a particular distribution of securities for which such banking entity or affiliate is acting as an underwriter.


(7) Definition of client, customer, and counterparty. For purposes of this paragraph (a), the terms client, customer, and counterparty, on a collective or individual basis, refer to market participants that may transact with the banking entity in connection with a particular distribution for which the banking entity is acting as underwriter.


(b) Market making-related activities – (1) Permitted market making-related activities. The prohibition contained in § 351.3(a) does not apply to a banking entity’s market making-related activities conducted in accordance with this paragraph (b).


(2) Requirements. The market making-related activities of a banking entity are permitted under paragraph (b)(1) of this section only if:


(i) The trading desk that establishes and manages the financial exposure, routinely stands ready to purchase and sell one or more types of financial instruments related to its financial exposure, and is willing and available to quote, purchase and sell, or otherwise enter into long and short positions in those types of financial instruments for its own account, in commercially reasonable amounts and throughout market cycles on a basis appropriate for the liquidity, maturity, and depth of the market for the relevant types of financial instruments;


(ii) The trading desk’s market-making related activities are designed not to exceed, on an ongoing basis, the reasonably expected near term demands of clients, customers, or counterparties, taking into account the liquidity, maturity, and depth of the market for the relevant types of financial instruments;


(iii) In the case of a banking entity with significant trading assets and liabilities, the banking entity has established and implements, maintains, and enforces an internal compliance program required by subpart D of this part that is reasonably designed to ensure the banking entity’s compliance with the requirements of paragraph (b) of this section, including reasonably designed written policies and procedures, internal controls, analysis and independent testing identifying and addressing:


(A) The financial instruments each trading desk stands ready to purchase and sell in accordance with paragraph (b)(2)(i) of this section;


(B) The actions the trading desk will take to demonstrably reduce or otherwise significantly mitigate promptly the risks of its financial exposure consistent with the limits required under paragraph (b)(2)(iii)(C) of this section; the products, instruments, and exposures each trading desk may use for risk management purposes; the techniques and strategies each trading desk may use to manage the risks of its market making-related activities and positions; and the process, strategies, and personnel responsible for ensuring that the actions taken by the trading desk to mitigate these risks are and continue to be effective;


(C) Limits for each trading desk, in accordance with paragraph (b)(2)(ii) of this section;


(D) Written authorization procedures, including escalation procedures that require review and approval of any trade that would exceed a trading desk’s limit(s), demonstrable analysis of the basis for any temporary or permanent increase to a trading desk’s limit(s), and independent review of such demonstrable analysis and approval; and


(E) Internal controls and ongoing monitoring and analysis of each trading desk’s compliance with its limits; and


(iv) A banking entity with significant trading assets and liabilities may satisfy the requirements in paragraphs (b)(2)(iii)(C) and (D) of this section by complying with the requirements set forth in paragraph (c) of this section;


(v) The compensation arrangements of persons performing the activities described in this paragraph (b) are designed not to reward or incentivize prohibited proprietary trading; and


(vi) The banking entity is licensed or registered to engage in activity described in this paragraph (b) in accordance with applicable law.


(3) Definition of client, customer, and counterparty. For purposes of paragraph (b) of this section, the terms client, customer, and counterparty, on a collective or individual basis refer to market participants that make use of the banking entity’s market making-related services by obtaining such services, responding to quotations, or entering into a continuing relationship with respect to such services, provided that:


(i) A trading desk or other organizational unit of another banking entity is not a client, customer, or counterparty of the trading desk if that other entity has trading assets and liabilities of $50 billion or more as measured in accordance with the methodology described in § 351.2(ee) of this part, unless:


(A) The trading desk documents how and why a particular trading desk or other organizational unit of the entity should be treated as a client, customer, or counterparty of the trading desk for purposes of paragraph (b)(2) of this section; or


(B) The purchase or sale by the trading desk is conducted anonymously on an exchange or similar trading facility that permits trading on behalf of a broad range of market participants.


(ii) [Reserved]


(4) Definition of financial exposure. For purposes of this section, financial exposure means the aggregate risks of one or more financial instruments and any associated loans, commodities, or foreign exchange or currency, held by a banking entity or its affiliate and managed by a particular trading desk as part of the trading desk’s market making-related activities.


(5) Definition of market-maker positions. For the purposes of this section, market-maker positions means all of the positions in the financial instruments for which the trading desk stands ready to make a market in accordance with paragraph (b)(2)(i) of this section, that are managed by the trading desk, including the trading desk’s open positions or exposures arising from open transactions.


(c) Rebuttable presumption of compliance – (1) Internal limits. (i) A banking entity shall be presumed to meet the requirement in paragraph (a)(2)(ii)(A) or (b)(2)(ii) of this section with respect to the purchase or sale of a financial instrument if the banking entity has established and implements, maintains, and enforces the internal limits for the relevant trading desk as described in paragraph (c)(1)(ii) of this section.


(ii)(A) With respect to underwriting activities conducted pursuant to paragraph (a) of this section, the presumption described in paragraph (c)(1)(i) of this section shall be available to each trading desk that establishes, implements, maintains, and enforces internal limits that should take into account the liquidity, maturity, and depth of the market for the relevant types of securities and are designed not to exceed the reasonably expected near term demands of clients, customers, or counterparties, based on the nature and amount of the trading desk’s underwriting activities, on the:


(1) Amount, types, and risk of its underwriting position;


(2) Level of exposures to relevant risk factors arising from its underwriting position; and


(3) Period of time a security may be held.


(B) With respect to market making-related activities conducted pursuant to paragraph (b) of this section, the presumption described in paragraph (c)(1)(i) of this section shall be available to each trading desk that establishes, implements, maintains, and enforces internal limits that should take into account the liquidity, maturity, and depth of the market for the relevant types of financial instruments and are designed not to exceed the reasonably expected near term demands of clients, customers, or counterparties, based on the nature and amount of the trading desk’s market-making related activities, that address the:


(1) Amount, types, and risks of its market-maker positions;


(2) Amount, types, and risks of the products, instruments, and exposures the trading desk may use for risk management purposes;


(3) Level of exposures to relevant risk factors arising from its financial exposure; and


(4) Period of time a financial instrument may be held.


(2) Supervisory review and oversight. The limits described in paragraph (c)(1) of this section shall be subject to supervisory review and oversight by the FDIC on an ongoing basis.


(3) Limit Breaches and Increases. (i) With respect to any limit set pursuant to paragraph (c)(1)(ii)(A) or (B) of this section, a banking entity shall maintain and make available to the FDIC upon request records regarding:


(A) Any limit that is exceeded; and


(B) Any temporary or permanent increase to any limit(s), in each case in the form and manner as directed by the FDIC.


(ii) In the event of a breach or increase of any limit set pursuant to paragraph (c)(1)(ii)(A) or (B) of this section, the presumption described in paragraph (c)(1)(i) of this section shall continue to be available only if the banking entity:


(A) Takes action as promptly as possible after a breach to bring the trading desk into compliance; and


(B) Follows established written authorization procedures, including escalation procedures that require review and approval of any trade that exceeds a trading desk’s limit(s), demonstrable analysis of the basis for any temporary or permanent increase to a trading desk’s limit(s), and independent review of such demonstrable analysis and approval.


(4) Rebutting the presumption. The presumption in paragraph (c)(1)(i) of this section may be rebutted by the FDIC if the FDIC determines, taking into account the liquidity, maturity, and depth of the market for the relevant types of financial instruments and based on all relevant facts and circumstances, that a trading desk is engaging in activity that is not based on the reasonably expected near term demands of clients, customers, or counterparties. The FDIC’s rebuttal of the presumption in paragraph (c)(1)(i) must be made in accordance with the notice and response procedures in subpart D of this part.


[84 FR 62169, Nov. 14, 2019]


§ 351.5 Permitted risk-mitigating hedging activities.

(a) Permitted risk-mitigating hedging activities. The prohibition contained in § 351.3(a) does not apply to the risk-mitigating hedging activities of a banking entity in connection with and related to individual or aggregated positions, contracts, or other holdings of the banking entity and designed to reduce the specific risks to the banking entity in connection with and related to such positions, contracts, or other holdings.


(b) Requirements. (1) The risk-mitigating hedging activities of a banking entity that has significant trading assets and liabilities are permitted under paragraph (a) of this section only if:


(i) The banking entity has established and implements, maintains and enforces an internal compliance program required by subpart D of this part that is reasonably designed to ensure the banking entity’s compliance with the requirements of this section, including:


(A) Reasonably designed written policies and procedures regarding the positions, techniques and strategies that may be used for hedging, including documentation indicating what positions, contracts or other holdings a particular trading desk may use in its risk-mitigating hedging activities, as well as position and aging limits with respect to such positions, contracts or other holdings;


(B) Internal controls and ongoing monitoring, management, and authorization procedures, including relevant escalation procedures; and


(C) The conduct of analysis and independent testing designed to ensure that the positions, techniques and strategies that may be used for hedging may reasonably be expected to reduce or otherwise significantly mitigate the specific, identifiable risk(s) being hedged;


(ii) The risk-mitigating hedging activity:


(A) Is conducted in accordance with the written policies, procedures, and internal controls required under this section;


(B) At the inception of the hedging activity, including, without limitation, any adjustments to the hedging activity, is designed to reduce or otherwise significantly mitigate one or more specific, identifiable risks, including market risk, counterparty or other credit risk, currency or foreign exchange risk, interest rate risk, commodity price risk, basis risk, or similar risks, arising in connection with and related to identified positions, contracts, or other holdings of the banking entity, based upon the facts and circumstances of the identified underlying and hedging positions, contracts or other holdings and the risks and liquidity thereof;


(C) Does not give rise, at the inception of the hedge, to any significant new or additional risk that is not itself hedged contemporaneously in accordance with this section;


(D) Is subject to continuing review, monitoring and management by the banking entity that:


(1) Is consistent with the written hedging policies and procedures required under paragraph (b)(1)(i) of this section;


(2) Is designed to reduce or otherwise significantly mitigate the specific, identifiable risks that develop over time from the risk-mitigating hedging activities undertaken under this section and the underlying positions, contracts, and other holdings of the banking entity, based upon the facts and circumstances of the underlying and hedging positions, contracts and other holdings of the banking entity and the risks and liquidity thereof; and


(3) Requires ongoing recalibration of the hedging activity by the banking entity to ensure that the hedging activity satisfies the requirements set out in paragraph (b)(1)(ii) of this section and is not prohibited proprietary trading; and


(iii) The compensation arrangements of persons performing risk-mitigating hedging activities are designed not to reward or incentivize prohibited proprietary trading.


(2) The risk-mitigating hedging activities of a banking entity that does not have significant trading assets and liabilities are permitted under paragraph (a) of this section only if the risk-mitigating hedging activity:


(i) At the inception of the hedging activity, including, without limitation, any adjustments to the hedging activity, is designed to reduce or otherwise significantly mitigate one or more specific, identifiable risks, including market risk, counterparty or other credit risk, currency or foreign exchange risk, interest rate risk, commodity price risk, basis risk, or similar risks, arising in connection with and related to identified positions, contracts, or other holdings of the banking entity, based upon the facts and circumstances of the identified underlying and hedging positions, contracts or other holdings and the risks and liquidity thereof; and


(ii) Is subject, as appropriate, to ongoing recalibration by the banking entity to ensure that the hedging activity satisfies the requirements set out in paragraph (b)(2) of this section and is not prohibited proprietary trading.


(c) Documentation requirement. (1) A banking entity that has significant trading assets and liabilities must comply with the requirements of paragraphs (c)(2) and (3) of this section, unless the requirements of paragraph (c)(4) of this section are met, with respect to any purchase or sale of financial instruments made in reliance on this section for risk-mitigating hedging purposes that is:


(i) Not established by the specific trading desk establishing or responsible for the underlying positions, contracts, or other holdings the risks of which the hedging activity is designed to reduce;


(ii) Established by the specific trading desk establishing or responsible for the underlying positions, contracts, or other holdings the risks of which the purchases or sales are designed to reduce, but that is effected through a financial instrument, exposure, technique, or strategy that is not specifically identified in the trading desk’s written policies and procedures established under paragraph (b)(1) of this section or under § 351.4(b)(2)(iii)(B) of this subpart as a product, instrument, exposure, technique, or strategy such trading desk may use for hedging; or


(iii) Established to hedge aggregated positions across two or more trading desks.


(2) In connection with any purchase or sale identified in paragraph (c)(1) of this section, a banking entity must, at a minimum, and contemporaneously with the purchase or sale, document:


(i) The specific, identifiable risk(s) of the identified positions, contracts, or other holdings of the banking entity that the purchase or sale is designed to reduce;


(ii) The specific risk-mitigating strategy that the purchase or sale is designed to fulfill; and


(iii) The trading desk or other business unit that is establishing and responsible for the hedge.


(3) A banking entity must create and retain records sufficient to demonstrate compliance with the requirements of this paragraph (c) for a period that is no less than five years in a form that allows the banking entity to promptly produce such records to the FDIC on request, or such longer period as required under other law or this part.


(4) The requirements of paragraphs (c)(2) and (3) of this section do not apply to the purchase or sale of a financial instrument described in paragraph (c)(1) of this section if:


(i) The financial instrument purchased or sold is identified on a written list of pre-approved financial instruments that are commonly used by the trading desk for the specific type of hedging activity for which the financial instrument is being purchased or sold; and


(ii) At the time the financial instrument is purchased or sold, the hedging activity (including the purchase or sale of the financial instrument) complies with written, pre-approved limits for the trading desk purchasing or selling the financial instrument for hedging activities undertaken for one or more other trading desks. The limits shall be appropriate for the:


(A) Size, types, and risks of the hedging activities commonly undertaken by the trading desk;


(B) Financial instruments purchased and sold for hedging activities by the trading desk; and


(C) Levels and duration of the risk exposures being hedged.


[79 FR 5805, Jan. 31, 2014, as amended at 84 FR 62171, Nov. 14, 2019; 84 FR 66063, Dec. 3, 2019]


§ 351.6 Other permitted proprietary trading activities.

(a) Permitted trading in domestic government obligations. The prohibition contained in § 351.3(a) does not apply to the purchase or sale by a banking entity of a financial instrument that is:


(1) An obligation of, or issued or guaranteed by, the United States;


(2) An obligation, participation, or other instrument of, or issued or guaranteed by, an agency of the United States, the Government National Mortgage Association, the Federal National Mortgage Association, the Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation, a Federal Home Loan Bank, the Federal Agricultural Mortgage Corporation or a Farm Credit System institution chartered under and subject to the provisions of the Farm Credit Act of 1971 (12 U.S.C. 2001 et seq.);


(3) An obligation of any State or any political subdivision thereof, including any municipal security; or


(4) An obligation of the FDIC, or any entity formed by or on behalf of the FDIC for purpose of facilitating the disposal of assets acquired or held by the FDIC in its corporate capacity or as conservator or receiver under the Federal Deposit Insurance Act or Title II of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act.


(b) Permitted trading in foreign government obligations – (1) Affiliates of foreign banking entities in the United States. The prohibition contained in § 351.3(a) does not apply to the purchase or sale of a financial instrument that is an obligation of, or issued or guaranteed by, a foreign sovereign (including any multinational central bank of which the foreign sovereign is a member), or any agency or political subdivision of such foreign sovereign, by a banking entity, so long as:


(i) The banking entity is organized under or is directly or indirectly controlled by a banking entity that is organized under the laws of a foreign sovereign and is not directly or indirectly controlled by a top-tier banking entity that is organized under the laws of the United States;


(ii) The financial instrument is an obligation of, or issued or guaranteed by, the foreign sovereign under the laws of which the foreign banking entity referred to in paragraph (b)(1)(i) of this section is organized (including any multinational central bank of which the foreign sovereign is a member), or any agency or political subdivision of that foreign sovereign; and


(iii) The purchase or sale as principal is not made by an insured depository institution.


(2) Foreign affiliates of a U.S. banking entity. The prohibition contained in § 351.3(a) does not apply to the purchase or sale of a financial instrument that is an obligation of, or issued or guaranteed by, a foreign sovereign (including any multinational central bank of which the foreign sovereign is a member), or any agency or political subdivision of that foreign sovereign, by a foreign entity that is owned or controlled by a banking entity organized or established under the laws of the United States or any State, so long as:


(i) The foreign entity is a foreign bank, as defined in section 211.2(j) of the Board’s Regulation K (12 CFR 211.2(j)), or is regulated by the foreign sovereign as a securities dealer;


(ii) The financial instrument is an obligation of, or issued or guaranteed by, the foreign sovereign under the laws of which the foreign entity is organized (including any multinational central bank of which the foreign sovereign is a member), or any agency or political subdivision of that foreign sovereign; and


(iii) The financial instrument is owned by the foreign entity and is not financed by an affiliate that is located in the United States or organized under the laws of the United States or of any State.


(c) Permitted trading on behalf of customers – (1) Fiduciary transactions. The prohibition contained in § 351.3(a) does not apply to the purchase or sale of financial instruments by a banking entity acting as trustee or in a similar fiduciary capacity, so long as:


(i) The transaction is conducted for the account of, or on behalf of, a customer; and


(ii) The banking entity does not have or retain beneficial ownership of the financial instruments.


(2) Riskless principal transactions. The prohibition contained in § 351.3(a) does not apply to the purchase or sale of financial instruments by a banking entity acting as riskless principal in a transaction in which the banking entity, after receiving an order to purchase (or sell) a financial instrument from a customer, purchases (or sells) the financial instrument for its own account to offset a contemporaneous sale to (or purchase from) the customer.


(d) Permitted trading by a regulated insurance company. The prohibition contained in § 351.3(a) does not apply to the purchase or sale of financial instruments by a banking entity that is an insurance company or an affiliate of an insurance company if:


(1) The insurance company or its affiliate purchases or sells the financial instruments solely for:


(i) The general account of the insurance company; or


(ii) A separate account established by the insurance company;


(2) The purchase or sale is conducted in compliance with, and subject to, the insurance company investment laws, regulations, and written guidance of the State or jurisdiction in which such insurance company is domiciled; and


(3) The appropriate Federal banking agencies, after consultation with the Financial Stability Oversight Council and the relevant insurance commissioners of the States and foreign jurisdictions, as appropriate, have not jointly determined, after notice and comment, that a particular law, regulation, or written guidance described in paragraph (d)(2) of this section is insufficient to protect the safety and soundness of the covered banking entity, or the financial stability of the United States.


(e) Permitted trading activities of foreign banking entities. (1) The prohibition contained in § 351.3(a) does not apply to the purchase or sale of financial instruments by a banking entity if:


(i) The banking entity is not organized or directly or indirectly controlled by a banking entity that is organized under the laws of the United States or of any State;


(ii) The purchase or sale by the banking entity is made pursuant to paragraph (9) or (13) of section 4(c) of the BHC Act; and


(iii) The purchase or sale meets the requirements of paragraph (e)(3) of this section.


(2) A purchase or sale of financial instruments by a banking entity is made pursuant to paragraph (9) or (13) of section 4(c) of the BHC Act for purposes of paragraph (e)(1)(ii) of this section only if:


(i) The purchase or sale is conducted in accordance with the requirements of paragraph (e) of this section; and


(ii)(A) With respect to a banking entity that is a foreign banking organization, the banking entity meets the qualifying foreign banking organization requirements of section 211.23(a), (c) or (e) of the Board’s Regulation K (12 CFR 211.23(a), (c) or (e)), as applicable; or


(B) With respect to a banking entity that is not a foreign banking organization, the banking entity is not organized under the laws of the United States or of any State and the banking entity, on a fully-consolidated basis, meets at least two of the following requirements:


(1) Total assets of the banking entity held outside of the United States exceed total assets of the banking entity held in the United States;


(2) Total revenues derived from the business of the banking entity outside of the United States exceed total revenues derived from the business of the banking entity in the United States; or


(3) Total net income derived from the business of the banking entity outside of the United States exceeds total net income derived from the business of the banking entity in the United States.


(3) A purchase or sale by a banking entity is permitted for purposes of this paragraph (e) if:


(i) The banking entity engaging as principal in the purchase or sale (including relevant personnel) is not located in the United States or organized under the laws of the United States or of any State;


(ii) The banking entity (including relevant personnel) that makes the decision to purchase or sell as principal is not located in the United States or organized under the laws of the United States or of any State; and


(iii) The purchase or sale, including any transaction arising from risk-mitigating hedging related to the instruments purchased or sold, is not accounted for as principal directly or on a consolidated basis by any branch or affiliate that is located in the United States or organized under the laws of the United States or of any State.


(4) For purposes of this paragraph (e), a U.S. branch, agency, or subsidiary of a foreign banking entity is considered to be located in the United States; however, the foreign bank that operates or controls that branch, agency, or subsidiary is not considered to be located in the United States solely by virtue of operating or controlling the U.S. branch, agency, or subsidiary.


(f) Permitted trading activities of qualifying foreign excluded funds. The prohibition contained in § 351.3(a) does not apply to the purchase or sale of a financial instrument by a qualifying foreign excluded fund. For purposes of this paragraph (f), a qualifying foreign excluded fund means a banking entity that:


(1) Is organized or established outside the United States, and the ownership interests of which are offered and sold solely outside the United States;


(2)(i) Would be a covered fund if the entity were organized or established in the United States, or


(ii) Is, or holds itself out as being, an entity or arrangement that raises money from investors primarily for the purpose of investing in financial instruments for resale or other disposition or otherwise trading in financial instruments;


(3) Would not otherwise be a banking entity except by virtue of the acquisition or retention of an ownership interest in, sponsorship of, or relationship with the entity, by another banking entity that meets the following:


(i) The banking entity is not organized, or directly or indirectly controlled by a banking entity that is organized, under the laws of the United States or of any State; and


(ii) The banking entity’s acquisition or retention of an ownership interest in or sponsorship of the fund meets the requirements for permitted covered fund activities and investments solely outside the United States, as provided in § 351.13(b);


(4) Is established and operated as part of a bona fide asset management business; and


(5) Is not operated in a manner that enables the banking entity that sponsors or controls the qualifying foreign excluded fund, or any of its affiliates, to evade the requirements of section 13 of the BHC Act or this part.


[79 FR 5805, Jan. 31, 2014, as amended at 84 FR 62172, Nov. 14, 2019; 85 FR 46509, July 31, 2020]


§ 351.7 Limitations on permitted proprietary trading activities.

(a) No transaction, class of transactions, or activity may be deemed permissible under §§ 351.4 through 351.6 if the transaction, class of transactions, or activity would:


(1) Involve or result in a material conflict of interest between the banking entity and its clients, customers, or counterparties;


(2) Result, directly or indirectly, in a material exposure by the banking entity to a high-risk asset or a high-risk trading strategy; or


(3) Pose a threat to the safety and soundness of the banking entity or to the financial stability of the United States.


(b) Definition of material conflict of interest. (1) For purposes of this section, a material conflict of interest between a banking entity and its clients, customers, or counterparties exists if the banking entity engages in any transaction, class of transactions, or activity that would involve or result in the banking entity’s interests being materially adverse to the interests of its client, customer, or counterparty with respect to such transaction, class of transactions, or activity, and the banking entity has not taken at least one of the actions in paragraph (b)(2) of this section.


(2) Prior to effecting the specific transaction or class or type of transactions, or engaging in the specific activity, the banking entity:


(i) Timely and effective disclosure. (A) Has made clear, timely, and effective disclosure of the conflict of interest, together with other necessary information, in reasonable detail and in a manner sufficient to permit a reasonable client, customer, or counterparty to meaningfully understand the conflict of interest; and


(B) Such disclosure is made in a manner that provides the client, customer, or counterparty the opportunity to negate, or substantially mitigate, any materially adverse effect on the client, customer, or counterparty created by the conflict of interest; or


(ii) Information barriers. Has established, maintained, and enforced information barriers that are memorialized in written policies and procedures, such as physical separation of personnel, or functions, or limitations on types of activity, that are reasonably designed, taking into consideration the nature of the banking entity’s business, to prevent the conflict of interest from involving or resulting in a materially adverse effect on a client, customer, or counterparty. A banking entity may not rely on such information barriers if, in the case of any specific transaction, class or type of transactions or activity, the banking entity knows or should reasonably know that, notwithstanding the banking entity’s establishment of information barriers, the conflict of interest may involve or result in a materially adverse effect on a client, customer, or counterparty.


(c) Definition of high-risk asset and high-risk trading strategy. For purposes of this section:


(1) High-risk asset means an asset or group of related assets that would, if held by a banking entity, significantly increase the likelihood that the banking entity would incur a substantial financial loss or would pose a threat to the financial stability of the United States.


(2) High-risk trading strategy means a trading strategy that would, if engaged in by a banking entity, significantly increase the likelihood that the banking entity would incur a substantial financial loss or would pose a threat to the financial stability of the United States.


§§ 351.8-351.9 [Reserved]

Subpart C – Covered Funds Activities and Investments

§ 351.10 Prohibition on acquiring or retaining an ownership interest in and having certain relationships with a covered fund.

(a) Prohibition. (1) Except as otherwise provided in this subpart, a banking entity may not, as principal, directly or indirectly, acquire or retain any ownership interest in or sponsor a covered fund.


(2) Paragraph (a)(1) of this section does not include acquiring or retaining an ownership interest in a covered fund by a banking entity:


(i) Acting solely as agent, broker, or custodian, so long as;


(A) The activity is conducted for the account of, or on behalf of, a customer; and


(B) The banking entity and its affiliates do not have or retain beneficial ownership of such ownership interest;


(ii) Through a deferred compensation, stock-bonus, profit-sharing, or pension plan of the banking entity (or an affiliate thereof) that is established and administered in accordance with the law of the United States or a foreign sovereign, if the ownership interest is held or controlled directly or indirectly by the banking entity as trustee for the benefit of persons who are or were employees of the banking entity (or an affiliate thereof);


(iii) In the ordinary course of collecting a debt previously contracted in good faith, provided that the banking entity divests the ownership interest as soon as practicable, and in no event may the banking entity retain such ownership interest for longer than such period permitted by the FDIC; or


(iv) On behalf of customers as trustee or in a similar fiduciary capacity for a customer that is not a covered fund, so long as:


(A) The activity is conducted for the account of, or on behalf of, the customer; and


(B) The banking entity and its affiliates do not have or retain beneficial ownership of such ownership interest.


(b) Definition of covered fund. (1) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, covered fund means:


(i) An issuer that would be an investment company, as defined in the Investment Company Act of 1940 (15 U.S.C. 80a-1 et seq.), but for section 3(c)(1) or 3(c)(7) of that Act (15 U.S.C. 80a-3(c)(1) or (7));


(ii) Any commodity pool under section 1a(10) of the Commodity Exchange Act (7 U.S.C. 1a(10)) for which:


(A) The commodity pool operator has claimed an exemption under 17 CFR 4.7; or


(B)(1) A commodity pool operator is registered with the CFTC as a commodity pool operator in connection with the operation of the commodity pool;


(2) Substantially all participation units of the commodity pool are owned by qualified eligible persons under 17 CFR 4.7(a)(2) and (3); and


(3) Participation units of the commodity pool have not been publicly offered to persons who are not qualified eligible persons under 17 CFR 4.7(a)(2) and (3); or


(iii) For any banking entity that is, or is controlled directly or indirectly by a banking entity that is, located in or organized under the laws of the United States or of any State, an entity that:


(A) Is organized or established outside the United States and the ownership interests of which are offered and sold solely outside the United States;


(B) Is, or holds itself out as being, an entity or arrangement that raises money from investors primarily for the purpose of investing in securities for resale or other disposition or otherwise trading in securities; and


(C)(1) Has as its sponsor that banking entity (or an affiliate thereof); or


(2) Has issued an ownership interest that is owned directly or indirectly by that banking entity (or an affiliate thereof).


(2) An issuer shall not be deemed to be a covered fund under paragraph (b)(1)(iii) of this section if, were the issuer subject to U.S. securities laws, the issuer could rely on an exclusion or exemption from the definition of “investment company” under the Investment Company Act of 1940 (15 U.S.C. 80a-1 et seq.) other than the exclusions contained in section 3(c)(1) and 3(c)(7) of that Act.


(3) For purposes of paragraph (b)(1)(iii) of this section, a U.S. branch, agency, or subsidiary of a foreign banking entity is located in the United States; however, the foreign bank that operates or controls that branch, agency, or subsidiary is not considered to be located in the United States solely by virtue of operating or controlling the U.S. branch, agency, or subsidiary.


(c) Notwithstanding paragraph (b) of this section, unless the appropriate Federal banking agencies, the SEC, and the CFTC jointly determine otherwise, a covered fund does not include:


(1) Foreign public funds. (i) Subject to paragraphs (c)(1)(ii) and (iii) of this section, an issuer that:


(A) Is organized or established outside of the United States; and


(B) Is authorized to offer and sell ownership interests, and such interests are offered and sold, through one or more public offerings.


(ii) With respect to a banking entity that is, or is controlled directly or indirectly by a banking entity that is, located in or organized under the laws of the United States or of any State and any issuer for which such banking entity acts as sponsor, the sponsoring banking entity may not rely on the exemption in paragraph (c)(1)(i) of this section for such issuer unless more than 75 percent of the ownership interests in the issuer are sold to persons other than:


(A) Such sponsoring banking entity;


(B) Such issuer;


(C) Affiliates of such sponsoring banking entity or such issuer; and


(D) Directors and senior executive officers as defined in § 225.71(c) of the Board’s Regulation Y (12 CFR 225.71(c)) of such entities.


(iii) For purposes of paragraph (c)(1)(i)(B) of this section, the term public offering means a distribution (as defined in § 351.4(a)(3)) of securities in any jurisdiction outside the United States to investors, including retail investors, provided that:


(A) The distribution is subject to substantive disclosure and retail investor protection laws or regulations;


(B) With respect to an issuer for which the banking entity serves as the investment manager, investment adviser, commodity trading advisor, commodity pool operator, or sponsor, the distribution complies with all applicable requirements in the jurisdiction in which such distribution is being made;


(C) The distribution does not restrict availability to investors having a minimum level of net worth or net investment assets; and


(D) The issuer has filed or submitted, with the appropriate regulatory authority in such jurisdiction, offering disclosure documents that are publicly available.


(2) Wholly-owned subsidiaries. An entity, all of the outstanding ownership interests of which are owned directly or indirectly by the banking entity (or an affiliate thereof), except that:


(i) Up to five percent of the entity’s outstanding ownership interests, less any amounts outstanding under paragraph (c)(2)(ii) of this section, may be held by employees or directors of the banking entity or such affiliate (including former employees or directors if their ownership interest was acquired while employed by or in the service of the banking entity); and


(ii) Up to 0.5 percent of the entity’s outstanding ownership interests may be held by a third party if the ownership interest is acquired or retained by the third party for the purpose of establishing corporate separateness or addressing bankruptcy, insolvency, or similar concerns.


(3) Joint ventures. A joint venture between a banking entity or any of its affiliates and one or more unaffiliated persons, provided that the joint venture:


(i) Is composed of no more than 10 unaffiliated co-venturers;


(ii) Is in the business of engaging in activities that are permissible for the banking entity or affiliate, other than investing in securities for resale or other disposition; and


(iii) Is not, and does not hold itself out as being, an entity or arrangement that raises money from investors primarily for the purpose of investing in securities for resale or other disposition or otherwise trading in securities.


(4) Acquisition vehicles. An issuer:


(i) Formed solely for the purpose of engaging in a bona fide merger or acquisition transaction; and


(ii) That exists only for such period as necessary to effectuate the transaction.


(5) Foreign pension or retirement funds. A plan, fund, or program providing pension, retirement, or similar benefits that is:


(i) Organized and administered outside the United States;


(ii) A broad-based plan for employees or citizens that is subject to regulation as a pension, retirement, or similar plan under the laws of the jurisdiction in which the plan, fund, or program is organized and administered; and


(iii) Established for the benefit of citizens or residents of one or more foreign sovereigns or any political subdivision thereof.


(6) Insurance company separate accounts. A separate account, provided that no banking entity other than the insurance company participates in the account’s profits and losses.


(7) Bank owned life insurance. A separate account that is used solely for the purpose of allowing one or more banking entities to purchase a life insurance policy for which the banking entity or entities is beneficiary, provided that no banking entity that purchases the policy:


(i) Controls the investment decisions regarding the underlying assets or holdings of the separate account; or


(ii) Participates in the profits and losses of the separate account other than in compliance with applicable requirements regarding bank owned life insurance.


(8) Loan securitizations – (i) Scope. An issuing entity for asset-backed securities that satisfies all the conditions of this paragraph (c)(8) and the assets or holdings of which are composed solely of:


(A) Loans as defined in § 351.2(t);


(B) Rights or other assets designed to assure the servicing or timely distribution of proceeds to holders of such securities and rights or other assets that are related or incidental to purchasing or otherwise acquiring and holding the loans, provided that each asset that is a security (other than special units of beneficial interest and collateral certificates meeting the requirements of paragraph (c)(8)(v) of this section) meets the requirements of paragraph (c)(8)(iii) of this section;


(C) Interest rate or foreign exchange derivatives that meet the requirements of paragraph (c)(8)(iv) of this section;


(D) Special units of beneficial interest and collateral certificates that meet the requirements of paragraph (c)(8)(v) of this section; and


(E) Debt securities, other than asset-backed securities and convertible securities, provided that:


(1) The aggregate value of such debt securities does not exceed five percent of the aggregate value of loans held under paragraph (c)(8)(i)(A) of this section, cash and cash equivalents held under paragraph (c)(8)(iii)(A) of this section, and debt securities held under this paragraph (c)(8)(i)(E); and


(2) The aggregate value of the loans, cash and cash equivalents, and debt securities for purposes of this paragraph is calculated at par value at the most recent time any such debt security is acquired, except that the issuing entity may instead determine the value of any such loan, cash equivalent, or debt security based on its fair market value if:


(i) The issuing entity is required to use the fair market value of such assets for purposes of calculating compliance with concentration limitations or other similar calculations under its transaction agreements, and


(ii) The issuing entity’s valuation methodology values similarly situated assets consistently.


(ii) Impermissible assets. For purposes of this paragraph (c)(8), except as permitted under paragraph (c)(8)(i)(E) of this section, the assets or holdings of the issuing entity shall not include any of the following:


(A) A security, including an asset-backed security, or an interest in an equity or debt security other than as permitted in paragraphs (c)(8)(iii), (iv), or (v) of this section;


(B) A derivative, other than a derivative that meets the requirements of paragraph (c)(8)(iv) of this section; or


(C) A commodity forward contract.


(iii) Permitted securities. Notwithstanding paragraph (c)(8)(ii)(A) of this section, the issuing entity may hold securities, other than debt securities permitted under paragraph (c)(8)(i)(E) of this section, if those securities are:


(A) Cash equivalents – which, for the purposes of this paragraph, means high quality, highly liquid investments whose maturity corresponds to the securitization’s expected or potential need for funds and whose currency corresponds to either the underlying loans or the asset-backed securities – for purposes of the rights and assets in paragraph (c)(8)(i)(B) of this section; or


(B) Securities received in lieu of debts previously contracted with respect to the loans supporting the asset-backed securities.


(iv) Derivatives. The holdings of derivatives by the issuing entity shall be limited to interest rate or foreign exchange derivatives that satisfy all of the following conditions:


(A) The written terms of the derivatives directly relate to the loans, the asset-backed securities, the contractual rights or other assets described in paragraph (c)(8)(i)(B) of this section, or the debt securities described in paragraph (c)(8)(i)(E) of this section; and


(B) The derivatives reduce the interest rate and/or foreign exchange risks related to the loans, the asset-backed securities, the contractual rights or other assets described in paragraph (c)(8)(i)(B) of this section, or the debt securities described in paragraph (c)(8)(i)(E) of this section.


(v) Special units of beneficial interest and collateral certificates. The assets or holdings of the issuing entity may include collateral certificates and special units of beneficial interest issued by a special purpose vehicle, provided that:


(A) The special purpose vehicle that issues the special unit of beneficial interest or collateral certificate meets the requirements in this paragraph (c)(8);


(B) The special unit of beneficial interest or collateral certificate is used for the sole purpose of transferring to the issuing entity for the loan securitization the economic risks and benefits of the assets that are permissible for loan securitizations under this paragraph (c)(8) and does not directly or indirectly transfer any interest in any other economic or financial exposure;


(C) The special unit of beneficial interest or collateral certificate is created solely to satisfy legal requirements or otherwise facilitate the structuring of the loan securitization; and


(D) The special purpose vehicle that issues the special unit of beneficial interest or collateral certificate and the issuing entity are established under the direction of the same entity that initiated the loan securitization.


(9) Qualifying asset-backed commercial paper conduits. (i) An issuing entity for asset-backed commercial paper that satisfies all of the following requirements:


(A) The asset-backed commercial paper conduit holds only:


(1) Loans and other assets permissible for a loan securitization under paragraph (c)(8)(i) of this section; and


(2) Asset-backed securities supported solely by assets that are permissible for loan securitizations under paragraph (c)(8)(i) of this section and acquired by the asset-backed commercial paper conduit as part of an initial issuance either directly from the issuing entity of the asset-backed securities or directly from an underwriter in the distribution of the asset-backed securities;


(B) The asset-backed commercial paper conduit issues only asset-backed securities, comprised of a residual interest and securities with a legal maturity of 397 days or less; and


(C) A regulated liquidity provider has entered into a legally binding commitment to provide full and unconditional liquidity coverage with respect to all of the outstanding asset-backed securities issued by the asset-backed commercial paper conduit (other than any residual interest) in the event that funds are required to redeem maturing asset-backed securities.


(ii) For purposes of this paragraph (c)(9), a regulated liquidity provider means:


(A) A depository institution, as defined in section 3(c) of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act (12 U.S.C. 1813(c));


(B) A bank holding company, as defined in section 2(a) of the Bank Holding Company Act of 1956 (12 U.S.C. 1841(a)), or a subsidiary thereof;


(C) A savings and loan holding company, as defined in section 10a of the Home Owners’ Loan Act (12 U.S.C. 1467a), provided all or substantially all of the holding company’s activities are permissible for a financial holding company under section 4(k) of the Bank Holding Company Act of 1956 (12 U.S.C. 1843(k)), or a subsidiary thereof;


(D) A foreign bank whose home country supervisor, as defined in § 211.21(q) of the Board’s Regulation K (12 CFR 211.21(q)), has adopted capital standards consistent with the Capital Accord for the Basel Committee on banking Supervision, as amended, and that is subject to such standards, or a subsidiary thereof; or


(E) The United States or a foreign sovereign.


(10) Qualifying covered bonds – (i) Scope. An entity owning or holding a dynamic or fixed pool of loans or other assets as provided in paragraph (c)(8) of this section for the benefit of the holders of covered bonds, provided that the assets in the pool are composed solely of assets that meet the conditions in paragraph (c)(8)(i) of this section.


(ii) Covered bond. For purposes of this paragraph (c)(10), a covered bond means:


(A) A debt obligation issued by an entity that meets the definition of foreign banking organization, the payment obligations of which are fully and unconditionally guaranteed by an entity that meets the conditions set forth in paragraph (c)(10)(i) of this section; or


(B) A debt obligation of an entity that meets the conditions set forth in paragraph (c)(10)(i) of this section, provided that the payment obligations are fully and unconditionally guaranteed by an entity that meets the definition of foreign banking organization and the entity is a wholly-owned subsidiary, as defined in paragraph (c)(2) of this section, of such foreign banking organization.


(11) SBICs and public welfare investment funds. An issuer:


(i) That is a small business investment company, as defined in section 103(3) of the Small Business Investment Act of 1958 (15 U.S.C. 662), or that has received from the Small Business Administration notice to proceed to qualify for a license as a small business investment company, which notice or license has not been revoked, or that has voluntarily surrendered its license to operate as a small business investment company in accordance with 13 CFR 107.1900 and does not make any new investments (other than investments in cash equivalents, which, for the purposes of this paragraph, means high quality, highly liquid investments whose maturity corresponds to the issuer’s expected or potential need for funds and whose currency corresponds to the issuer’s assets) after such voluntary surrender;


(ii) The business of which is to make investments that are:


(A) Designed primarily to promote the public welfare, of the type permitted under paragraph (11) of section 5136 of the Revised Statutes of the United States (12 U.S.C. 24), including the welfare of low- and moderate-income communities or families (such as providing housing, services, or jobs) and including investments that qualify for consideration under the regulations implementing the Community Reinvestment Act (12 U.S.C. 2901 et seq.); or


(B) Qualified rehabilitation expenditures with respect to a qualified rehabilitated building or certified historic structure, as such terms are defined in section 47 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 or a similar State historic tax credit program;


(iii) That has elected to be regulated or is regulated as a rural business investment company, as described in 15 U.S.C. 80b-3(b)(8)(A) or (B), or that has terminated its participation as a rural business investment company in accordance with 7 CFR 4290.1900 and does not make any new investments (other than investments in cash equivalents, which, for the purposes of this paragraph, means high quality, highly liquid investments whose maturity corresponds to the issuer’s expected or potential need for funds and whose currency corresponds to the issuer’s assets) after such termination; or


(iv) That is a qualified opportunity fund, as defined in 26 U.S.C. 1400Z-2(d).


(12) Registered investment companies and excluded entities. An issuer:


(i) That is registered as an investment company under section 8 of the Investment Company Act of 1940 (15 U.S.C. 80a-8), or that is formed and operated pursuant to a written plan to become a registered investment company as described in § 351.20(e)(3) of subpart D and that complies with the requirements of section 18 of the Investment Company Act of 1940 (15 U.S.C. 80a-18);


(ii) That may rely on an exclusion or exemption from the definition of “investment company” under the Investment Company Act of 1940 (15 U.S.C. 80a-1 et seq.) other than the exclusions contained in section 3(c)(1) and 3(c)(7) of that Act; or


(iii) That has elected to be regulated as a business development company pursuant to section 54(a) of that Act (15 U.S.C. 80a-53) and has not withdrawn its election, or that is formed and operated pursuant to a written plan to become a business development company as described in § 351.20(e)(3) of subpart D and that complies with the requirements of section 61 of the Investment Company Act of 1940 (15 U.S.C. 80a-60).


(13) Issuers in conjunction with the FDIC’s receivership or conservatorship operations. An issuer that is an entity formed by or on behalf of the FDIC for the purpose of facilitating the disposal of assets acquired in the FDIC’s capacity as conservator or receiver under the Federal Deposit Insurance Act or Title II of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act.


(14) Other excluded issuers. (i) Any issuer that the appropriate Federal banking agencies, the SEC, and the CFTC jointly determine the exclusion of which is consistent with the purposes of section 13 of the BHC Act.


(ii) A determination made under paragraph (c)(14)(i) of this section will be promptly made public.


(15) Credit funds. Subject to paragraphs (c)(15)(iii), (iv), and (v) of this section, an issuer that satisfies the asset and activity requirements of paragraphs (c)(15)(i) and (ii) of this section.


(i) Asset requirements. The issuer’s assets must be composed solely of:


(A) Loans as defined in § 351.2(t);


(B) Debt instruments, subject to paragraph (c)(15)(iv) of this section;


(C) Rights and other assets that are related or incidental to acquiring, holding, servicing, or selling such loans or debt instruments, provided that:


(1) Each right or asset held under this paragraph (c)(15)(i)(C) that is a security is either:


(i) A cash equivalent (which, for the purposes of this paragraph, means high quality, highly liquid investments whose maturity corresponds to the issuer’s expected or potential need for funds and whose currency corresponds to either the underlying loans or the debt instruments);


(ii) A security received in lieu of debts previously contracted with respect to such loans or debt instruments; or


(iii) An equity security (or right to acquire an equity security) received on customary terms in connection with such loans or debt instruments; and


(2) Rights or other assets held under this paragraph (c)(15)(i)(C) of this section may not include commodity forward contracts or any derivative; and


(D) Interest rate or foreign exchange derivatives, if:


(1) The written terms of the derivative directly relate to the loans, debt instruments, or other rights or assets described in paragraph (c)(15)(i)(C) of this section; and


(2) The derivative reduces the interest rate and/or foreign exchange risks related to the loans, debt instruments, or other rights or assets described in paragraph (c)(15)(i)(C) of this section.


(ii) Activity requirements. To be eligible for the exclusion of paragraph (c)(15) of this section, an issuer must:


(A) Not engage in any activity that would constitute proprietary trading under § 351.3(b)(l)(i), as if the issuer were a banking entity; and


(B) Not issue asset-backed securities.


(iii) Requirements for a sponsor, investment adviser, or commodity trading advisor. A banking entity that acts as a sponsor, investment adviser, or commodity trading advisor to an issuer that meets the conditions in paragraphs (c)(15)(i) and (ii) of this section may not rely on this exclusion unless the banking entity:


(A) Provides in writing to any prospective and actual investor in the issuer the disclosures required under § 351.11(a)(8) of this subpart, as if the issuer were a covered fund;


(B) Ensures that the activities of the issuer are consistent with safety and soundness standards that are substantially similar to those that would apply if the banking entity engaged in the activities directly; and


(C) Complies with the limitations imposed in § 351.14, as if the issuer were a covered fund, except the banking entity may acquire and retain any ownership interest in the issuer.


(iv) Additional Banking Entity Requirements. A banking entity may not rely on this exclusion with respect to an issuer that meets the conditions in paragraphs (c)(15)(i) and (ii) of this section unless:


(A) The banking entity does not, directly or indirectly, guarantee, assume, or otherwise insure the obligations or performance of the issuer or of any entity to which such issuer extends credit or in which such issuer invests; and


(B) Any assets the issuer holds pursuant to paragraphs (c)(15)(i)(B) or (i)(C)(1)(iii) of this section would be permissible for the banking entity to acquire and hold directly under applicable federal banking laws and regulations.


(v) Investment and Relationship Limits. A banking entity’s investment in, and relationship with, the issuer must:


(A) Comply with the limitations imposed in § 351.15, as if the issuer were a covered fund; and


(B) Be conducted in compliance with, and subject to, applicable banking laws and regulations, including applicable safety and soundness standards.


(16) Qualifying venture capital funds. (i) Subject to paragraphs (c)(16)(ii) through (iv) of this section, an issuer that:


(A) Is a venture capital fund as defined in 17 CFR 275.203(l)-1; and


(B) Does not engage in any activity that would constitute proprietary trading under § 351.3(b)(1)(i), as if the issuer were a banking entity.


(ii) A banking entity that acts as a sponsor, investment adviser, or commodity trading advisor to an issuer that meets the conditions in paragraph (c)(16)(i) of this section may not rely on this exclusion unless the banking entity:


(A) Provides in writing to any prospective and actual investor in the issuer the disclosures required under § 351.11(a)(8), as if the issuer were a covered fund;


(B) Ensures that the activities of the issuer are consistent with safety and soundness standards that are substantially similar to those that would apply if the banking entity engaged in the activities directly; and


(C) Complies with the restrictions in § 351.14 as if the issuer were a covered fund (except the banking entity may acquire and retain any ownership interest in the issuer).


(iii) The banking entity must not, directly or indirectly, guarantee, assume, or otherwise insure the obligations or performance of the issuer.


(iv) A banking entity’s ownership interest in or relationship with the issuer must:


(A) Comply with the limitations imposed in § 351.15, as if the issuer were a covered fund; and


(B) Be conducted in compliance with, and subject to, applicable banking laws and regulations, including applicable safety and soundness standards.


(17) Family wealth management vehicles. (i) Subject to paragraph (c)(17)(ii) of this section, any entity that is not, and does not hold itself out as being, an entity or arrangement that raises money from investors primarily for the purpose of investing in securities for resale or other disposition or otherwise trading in securities, and:


(A) If the entity is a trust, the grantor(s) of the entity are all family customers; and


(B) If the entity is not a trust:


(1) A majority of the voting interests in the entity are owned (directly or indirectly) by family customers;


(2) A majority of the interests in the entity are owned (directly or indirectly) by family customers;


(3) The entity is owned only by family customers and up to 5 closely related persons of the family customers; and


(C) Notwithstanding paragraph (c)(17)(i)(A) and (B) of this section, up to an aggregate 0.5 percent of the entity’s outstanding ownership interests may be acquired or retained by one or more entities that are not family customers or closely related persons if the ownership interest is acquired or retained by such parties for the purpose of and to the extent necessary for establishing corporate separateness or addressing bankruptcy, insolvency, or similar concerns.


(ii) A banking entity may rely on the exclusion in paragraph (c)(17)(i) of this section with respect to an entity provided that the banking entity (or an affiliate):


(A) Provides bona fide trust, fiduciary, investment advisory, or commodity trading advisory services to the entity;


(B) Does not, directly or indirectly, guarantee, assume, or otherwise insure the obligations or performance of such entity;


(C) Complies with the disclosure obligations under § 351.11(a)(8), as if such entity were a covered fund, provided that the content may be modified to prevent the disclosure from being misleading and the manner of disclosure may be modified to accommodate the specific circumstances of the entity;


(D) Does not acquire or retain, as principal, an ownership interest in the entity, other than as described in paragraph (c)(17)(i)(C) of this section;


(E) Complies with the requirements of §§ 351.14(b) and 351.15, as if such entity were a covered fund; and


(F) Except for riskless principal transactions as defined in paragraph (d)(11) of this section, complies with the requirements of 12 CFR 223.15(a), as if such banking entity and its affiliates were a member bank and the entity were an affiliate thereof.


(iii) For purposes of paragraph (c)(17) of this section, the following definitions apply:


(A) Closely related person means a natural person (including the estate and estate planning vehicles of such person) who has longstanding business or personal relationships with any family customer.


(B) Family customer means:


(1) A family client, as defined in Rule 202(a)(11)(G)-1(d)(4) of the Investment Advisers Act of 1940 (17 CFR 275.202(a)(11)(G)-1(d)(4)); or


(2) Any natural person who is a father-in-law, mother-in-law, brother-in-law, sister-in-law, son-in-law or daughter-in-law of a family client, or a spouse or a spousal equivalent of any of the foregoing.


(18) Customer facilitation vehicles. (i) Subject to paragraph (c)(18)(ii) of this section, an issuer that is formed by or at the request of a customer of the banking entity for the purpose of providing such customer (which may include one or more affiliates of such customer) with exposure to a transaction, investment strategy, or other service provided by the banking entity.


(ii) A banking entity may rely on the exclusion in paragraph (c)(18)(i) of this section with respect to an issuer provided that:


(A) All of the ownership interests of the issuer are owned by the customer (which may include one or more of its affiliates) for whom the issuer was created;


(B) Notwithstanding paragraph (c)(18)(ii)(A) of this section, up to an aggregate 0.5 percent of the issuer’s outstanding ownership interests may be acquired or retained by one or more entities that are not customers if the ownership interest is acquired or retained by such parties for the purpose of and to the extent necessary for establishing corporate separateness or addressing bankruptcy, insolvency, or similar concerns; and


(C) The banking entity and its affiliates:


(1) Maintain documentation outlining how the banking entity intends to facilitate the customer’s exposure to such transaction, investment strategy, or service;


(2) Do not, directly or indirectly, guarantee, assume, or otherwise insure the obligations or performance of such issuer;


(3) Comply with the disclosure obligations under § 351.11(a)(8), as if such issuer were a covered fund, provided that the content may be modified to prevent the disclosure from being misleading and the manner of disclosure may be modified to accommodate the specific circumstances of the issuer;


(4) Do not acquire or retain, as principal, an ownership interest in the issuer, other than as described in paragraph (c)(18)(ii)(B) of this section;


(5) Comply with the requirements of §§ 351.14(b) and 351.15, as if such issuer were a covered fund; and


(6) Except for riskless principal transactions as defined in paragraph (d)(11) of this section, comply with the requirements of 12 CFR 223.15(a), as if such banking entity and its affiliates were a member bank and the issuer were an affiliate thereof.


(d) Definition of other terms related to covered funds. For purposes of this subpart:


(1) Applicable accounting standards means U.S. generally accepted accounting principles, or such other accounting standards applicable to a banking entity that the FDIC determines are appropriate and that the banking entity uses in the ordinary course of its business in preparing its consolidated financial statements.


(2) Asset-backed security has the meaning specified in Section 3(a)(79) of the Exchange Act (15 U.S.C. 78c(a)(79).


(3) Director has the same meaning as provided in section 215.2(d)(1) of the Board’s Regulation O (12 CFR 215.2(d)(1)).


(4) Issuer has the same meaning as in section 2(a)(22) of the Investment Company Act of 1940 (15 U.S.C. 80a-2(a)(22)).


(5) Issuing entity means with respect to asset-backed securities the special purpose vehicle that owns or holds the pool assets underlying asset-backed securities and in whose name the asset-backed securities supported or serviced by the pool assets are issued.


(6) Ownership interest – (i) Ownership interest means any equity, partnership, or other similar interest. An other similar interest means an interest that:


(A) Has the right to participate in the selection or removal of a general partner, managing member, member of the board of directors or trustees, investment manager, investment adviser, or commodity trading advisor of the covered fund, excluding:


(1) The rights of a creditor to exercise remedies upon the occurrence of an event of default or an acceleration event; and


(2) The right to participate in the removal of an investment manager for “cause” or participate in the selection of a replacement manager upon an investment manager’s resignation or removal. For purposes of this paragraph (d)(6)(i)(A)(2), “cause” for removal of an investment manager means one or more of the following events: (i) The bankruptcy, insolvency, conservatorship or receivership of the investment manager;


(ii) The breach by the investment manager of any material provision of the covered fund’s transaction agreements applicable to the investment manager;


(iii) The breach by the investment manager of material representations or warranties;


(iv) The occurrence of an act that constitutes fraud or criminal activity in the performance of the investment manager’s obligations under the covered fund’s transaction agreements;


(v) The indictment of the investment manager for a criminal offense, or the indictment of any officer, member, partner or other principal of the investment manager for a criminal offense materially related to his or her investment management activities;


(vi) A change in control with respect to the investment manager;


(vii) The loss, separation or incapacitation of an individual critical to the operation of the investment manager or primarily responsible for the management of the covered fund’s assets; or


(viii) Other similar events that constitute “cause” for removal of an investment manager, provided that such events are not solely related to the performance of the covered fund or the investment manager’s exercise of investment discretion under the covered fund’s transaction agreements;


(B) Has the right under the terms of the interest to receive a share of the income, gains or profits of the covered fund;


(C) Has the right to receive the underlying assets of the covered fund after all other interests have been redeemed and/or paid in full (excluding the rights of a creditor to exercise remedies upon the occurrence of an event of default or an acceleration event);


(D) Has the right to receive all or a portion of excess spread (the positive difference, if any, between the aggregate interest payments received from the underlying assets of the covered fund and the aggregate interest paid to the holders of other outstanding interests);


(E) Provides under the terms of the interest that the amounts payable by the covered fund with respect to the interest could be reduced based on losses arising from the underlying assets of the covered fund, such as allocation of losses, write-downs or charge-offs of the outstanding principal balance, or reductions in the amount of interest due and payable on the interest;


(F) Receives income on a pass-through basis from the covered fund, or has a rate of return that is determined by reference to the performance of the underlying assets of the covered fund; or


(G) Any synthetic right to have, receive, or be allocated any of the rights in paragraphs (d)(6)(i)(A) through (F) of this section.


(ii) Ownership interest does not include:


(A) Restricted profit interest, which is an interest held by an entity (or an employee or former employee thereof) in a covered fund for which the entity (or employee thereof) serves as investment manager, investment adviser, commodity trading advisor, or other service provider, so long as:


(1) The sole purpose and effect of the interest is to allow the entity (or employee or former employee thereof) to share in the profits of the covered fund as performance compensation for the investment management, investment advisory, commodity trading advisory, or other services provided to the covered fund by the entity (or employee or former employee thereof), provided that the entity (or employee or former employee thereof) may be obligated under the terms of such interest to return profits previously received;


(2) All such profit, once allocated, is distributed to the entity (or employee or former employee thereof) promptly after being earned or, if not so distributed, is retained by the covered fund for the sole purpose of establishing a reserve amount to satisfy contractual obligations with respect to subsequent losses of the covered fund and such undistributed profit of the entity (or employee or former employee thereof) does not share in the subsequent investment gains of the covered fund;


(3) Any amounts invested in the covered fund, including any amounts paid by the entity in connection with obtaining the restricted profit interest, are within the limits of § 351.12 of this subpart; and


(4) The interest is not transferable by the entity (or employee or former employee thereof) except to an affiliate thereof (or an employee of the banking entity or affiliate), to immediate family members, or through the intestacy, of the employee or former employee, or in connection with a sale of the business that gave rise to the restricted profit interest by the entity (or employee or former employee thereof) to an unaffiliated party that provides investment management, investment advisory, commodity trading advisory, or other services to the fund.


(B) Any senior loan or senior debt interest that has the following characteristics:


(1) Under the terms of the interest the holders of such interest do not have the right to receive a share of the income, gains, or profits of the covered fund, but are entitled to receive only:


(i) Interest at a stated interest rate, as well as commitment fees or other fees, which are not determined by reference to the performance of the underlying assets of the covered fund; and


(ii) Repayment of a fixed principal amount, on or before a maturity date, in a contractually-determined manner (which may include prepayment premiums intended solely to reflect, and compensate holders of the interest for, forgone income resulting from an early prepayment);


(2) The entitlement to payments under the terms of the interest are absolute and could not be reduced based on losses arising from the underlying assets of the covered fund, such as allocation of losses, write-downs or charge-offs of the outstanding principal balance, or reductions in the amount of interest due and payable on the interest; and


(3) The holders of the interest are not entitled to receive the underlying assets of the covered fund after all other interests have been redeemed or paid in full (excluding the rights of a creditor to exercise remedies upon the occurrence of an event of default or an acceleration event).


(7) Prime brokerage transaction means any transaction that would be a covered transaction, as defined in section 23A(b)(7) of the Federal Reserve Act (12 U.S.C. 371c(b)(7)), that is provided in connection with custody, clearance and settlement, securities borrowing or lending services, trade execution, financing, or data, operational, and administrative support.


(8) Resident of the United States means a person that is a “U.S. person” as defined in rule 902(k) of the SEC’s Regulation S (17 CFR 230.902(k)).


(9) Sponsor means, with respect to a covered fund:


(i) To serve as a general partner, managing member, or trustee of a covered fund, or to serve as a commodity pool operator with respect to a covered fund as defined in (b)(1)(ii) of this section;


(ii) In any manner to select or to control (or to have employees, officers, or directors, or agents who constitute) a majority of the directors, trustees, or management of a covered fund; or


(iii) To share with a covered fund, for corporate, marketing, promotional, or other purposes, the same name or a variation of the same name, except as permitted under § 351.11(a)(6).


(10) Trustee. (i) For purposes of paragraph (d)(9) of this section and § 351.11 of subpart C, a trustee does not include:


(A) A trustee that does not exercise investment discretion with respect to a covered fund, including a trustee that is subject to the direction of an unaffiliated named fiduciary who is not a trustee pursuant to section 403(a)(1) of the Employee’s Retirement Income Security Act (29 U.S.C. 1103(a)(1)); or


(B) A trustee that is subject to fiduciary standards imposed under foreign law that are substantially equivalent to those described in paragraph (d)(10)(i)(A) of this section;


(ii) Any entity that directs a person described in paragraph (d)(10)(i) of this section, or that possesses authority and discretion to manage and control the investment decisions of a covered fund for which such person serves as trustee, shall be considered to be a trustee of such covered fund.


(11) Riskless principal transaction. Riskless principal transaction means a transaction in which a banking entity, after receiving an order from a customer to buy (or sell) a security, purchases (or sells) the security in the secondary market for its own account to offset a contemporaneous sale to (or purchase from) the customer.


[79 FR 5805, Jan. 31, 2014, as amended at 84 FR 35021, July 22, 2019; 84 FR 62172, Nov. 14, 2019; 85 FR 46510, July 31, 2020]


§ 351.11 Permitted organizing and offering, underwriting, and market making with respect to a covered fund.

(a) Organizing and offering a covered fund in general. Notwithstanding § 351.10(a) of this subpart, a banking entity is not prohibited from acquiring or retaining an ownership interest in, or acting as sponsor to, a covered fund in connection with, directly or indirectly, organizing and offering a covered fund, including serving as a general partner, managing member, trustee, or commodity pool operator of the covered fund and in any manner selecting or controlling (or having employees, officers, directors, or agents who constitute) a majority of the directors, trustees, or management of the covered fund, including any necessary expenses for the foregoing, only if:


(1) The banking entity (or an affiliate thereof) provides bona fide trust, fiduciary, investment advisory, or commodity trading advisory services;


(2) The covered fund is organized and offered only in connection with the provision of bona fide trust, fiduciary, investment advisory, or commodity trading advisory services and only to persons that are customers of such services of the banking entity (or an affiliate thereof), pursuant to a written plan or similar documentation outlining how the banking entity or such affiliate intends to provide advisory or similar services to its customers through organizing and offering such fund;


(3) The banking entity and its affiliates do not acquire or retain an ownership interest in the covered fund except as permitted under § 351.12 of this subpart;


(4) The banking entity and its affiliates comply with the requirements of § 351.14 of this subpart;


(5) The banking entity and its affiliates do not, directly or indirectly, guarantee, assume, or otherwise insure the obligations or performance of the covered fund or of any covered fund in which such covered fund invests;


(6) The covered fund, for corporate, marketing, promotional, or other purposes:


(i) Does not share the same name or a variation of the same name with the banking entity (or an affiliate thereof), except that a covered fund may share the same name or a variation of the same name with a banking entity that is an investment adviser to the covered fund if:


(A) The investment adviser is not an insured depository institution, a company that controls an insured depository institution, or a company that is treated as a bank holding company for purposes of section 8 of the International Banking Act of 1978 (12 U.S.C. 3106); and


(B) The investment adviser does not share the same name or a variation of the same name as an insured depository institution, a company that controls an insured depository institution, or a company that is treated as a bank holding company for purposes of section 8 of the International Banking Act of 1978 (12 U.S.C. 3106); and


(ii) Does not use the word “bank” in its name;


(7) No director or employee of the banking entity (or an affiliate thereof) takes or retains an ownership interest in the covered fund, except for any director or employee of the banking entity or such affiliate who is directly engaged in providing investment advisory, commodity trading advisory, or other services to the covered fund at the time the director or employee takes the ownership interest; and


(8) The banking entity:


(i) Clearly and conspicuously discloses, in writing, to any prospective and actual investor in the covered fund (such as through disclosure in the covered fund’s offering documents):


(A) That “any losses in [such covered fund] will be borne solely by investors in [the covered fund] and not by [the banking entity] or its affiliates; therefore, [the banking entity’s] losses in [such covered fund] will be limited to losses attributable to the ownership interests in the covered fund held by [the banking entity] and any affiliate in its capacity as investor in the [covered fund] or as beneficiary of a restricted profit interest held by [the banking entity] or any affiliate”;


(B) That such investor should read the fund offering documents before investing in the covered fund;


(C) That the “ownership interests in the covered fund are not insured by the FDIC, and are not deposits, obligations of, or endorsed or guaranteed in any way, by any banking entity” (unless that happens to be the case); and


(D) The role of the banking entity and its affiliates and employees in sponsoring or providing any services to the covered fund; and


(ii) Complies with any additional rules of the appropriate Federal banking agencies, the SEC, or the CFTC, as provided in section 13(b)(2) of the BHC Act, designed to ensure that losses in such covered fund are borne solely by investors in the covered fund and not by the covered banking entity and its affiliates.


(b) Organizing and offering an issuing entity of asset-backed securities. (1) Notwithstanding § 351.10(a) of this subpart, a banking entity is not prohibited from acquiring or retaining an ownership interest in, or acting as sponsor to, a covered fund that is an issuing entity of asset-backed securities in connection with, directly or indirectly, organizing and offering that issuing entity, so long as the banking entity and its affiliates comply with all of the requirements of paragraph (a)(3) through (8) of this section.


(2) For purposes of this paragraph (b), organizing and offering a covered fund that is an issuing entity of asset-backed securities means acting as the securitizer, as that term is used in section 15G(a)(3) of the Exchange Act (15 U.S.C. 78o-11(a)(3)) of the issuing entity, or acquiring or retaining an ownership interest in the issuing entity as required by section 15G of that Act (15 U.S.C.78o-11) and the implementing regulations issued thereunder.


(c) Underwriting and market making in ownership interests of a covered fund. The prohibition contained in § 351.10(a) of this subpart does not apply to a banking entity’s underwriting activities or market making-related activities involving a covered fund so long as:


(1) Those activities are conducted in accordance with the requirements of § 351.4(a) or (b) of subpart B, respectively; and


(2) With respect to any banking entity (or any affiliate thereof) that: Acts as a sponsor, investment adviser or commodity trading advisor to a particular covered fund or otherwise acquires and retains an ownership interest in such covered fund in reliance on paragraph (a) of this section; or acquires and retains an ownership interest in such covered fund and is either a securitizer, as that term is used in section 15G(a)(3) of the Exchange Act (15 U.S.C. 78o-11(a)(3)), or is acquiring and retaining an ownership interest in such covered fund in compliance with section 15G of that Act (15 U.S.C.78o-11) and the implementing regulations issued thereunder each as permitted by paragraph (b) of this section, then in each such case any ownership interests acquired or retained by the banking entity and its affiliates in connection with underwriting and market making related activities for that particular covered fund are included in the calculation of ownership interests permitted to be held by the banking entity and its affiliates under the limitations of § 351.12(a)(2)(ii) and (iii) and (d) of this subpart.


[79 FR 5805, Jan. 31, 2014, as amended at 84 FR 35021, July 22, 2019; 84 FR 62172, Nov. 14, 2019]


§ 351.12 Permitted investment in a covered fund.

(a) Authority and limitations on permitted investments in covered funds. (1) Notwithstanding the prohibition contained in § 351.10(a) of this subpart, a banking entity may acquire and retain an ownership interest in a covered fund that the banking entity or an affiliate thereof organizes and offers pursuant to § 351.11, for the purposes of:


(i) Establishment. Establishing the fund and providing the fund with sufficient initial equity for investment to permit the fund to attract unaffiliated investors, subject to the limits contained in paragraphs (a)(2)(i) and (iii) of this section; or


(ii) De minimis investment. Making and retaining an investment in the covered fund subject to the limits contained in paragraphs (a)(2)(ii) and (iii) of this section.


(2) Investment limits – (i) Seeding period. With respect to an investment in any covered fund made or held pursuant to paragraph (a)(1)(i) of this section, the banking entity and its affiliates:


(A) Must actively seek unaffiliated investors to reduce, through redemption, sale, dilution, or other methods, the aggregate amount of all ownership interests of the banking entity in the covered fund to the amount permitted in paragraph (a)(2)(i)(B) of this section; and


(B) Must, no later than 1 year after the date of establishment of the fund (or such longer period as may be provided by the Board pursuant to paragraph (e) of this section), conform its ownership interest in the covered fund to the limits in paragraph (a)(2)(ii) of this section;


(ii) Per-fund limits. (A) Except as provided in paragraph (a)(2)(ii)(B) of this section, an investment by a banking entity and its affiliates in any covered fund made or held pursuant to paragraph (a)(1)(ii) of this section may not exceed 3 percent of the total number or value of the outstanding ownership interests of the fund.


(B) An investment by a banking entity and its affiliates in a covered fund that is an issuing entity of asset-backed securities may not exceed 3 percent of the total fair market value of the ownership interests of the fund measured in accordance with paragraph (b)(3) of this section, unless a greater percentage is retained by the banking entity and its affiliates in compliance with the requirements of section 15G of the Exchange Act (15 U.S.C. 78o-11) and the implementing regulations issued thereunder, in which case the investment by the banking entity and its affiliates in the covered fund may not exceed the amount, number, or value of ownership interests of the fund required under section 15G of the Exchange Act and the implementing regulations issued thereunder.


(iii) Aggregate limit. The aggregate value of all ownership interests of the banking entity and its affiliates in all covered funds acquired or retained under this section may not exceed 3 percent of the tier 1 capital of the banking entity, as provided under paragraph (c) of this section, and shall be calculated as of the last day of each calendar quarter.


(iv) Date of establishment. For purposes of this section, the date of establishment of a covered fund shall be:


(A) In general. The date on which the investment adviser or similar entity to the covered fund begins making investments pursuant to the written investment strategy for the fund;


(B) Issuing entities of asset-backed securities. In the case of an issuing entity of asset-backed securities, the date on which the assets are initially transferred into the issuing entity of asset-backed securities.


(b) Rules of construction – (1) Attribution of ownership interests to a covered banking entity. (i) For purposes of paragraph (a)(2) of this section, the amount and value of a banking entity’s permitted investment in any single covered fund shall include any ownership interest held under § 351.12 directly by the banking entity, including any affiliate of the banking entity.


(ii) Treatment of registered investment companies, SEC-regulated business development companies, and foreign public funds. For purposes of paragraph (b)(1)(i) of this section, a registered investment company, SEC-regulated business development companies, or foreign public fund as described in § 351.10(c)(1) will not be considered to be an affiliate of the banking entity so long as:


(A) The banking entity, together with its affiliates, does not own, control, or hold with the power to vote 25 percent or more of the voting shares of the company or fund; and


(B) The banking entity, or an affiliate of the banking entity, provides investment advisory, commodity trading advisory, administrative, and other services to the company or fund in compliance with the limitations under applicable regulation, order, or other authority.


(iii) Covered funds. For purposes of paragraph (b)(1)(i) of this section, a covered fund will not be considered to be an affiliate of a banking entity so long as the covered fund is held in compliance with the requirements of this subpart.


(iv) Treatment of employee and director investments financed by the banking entity. For purposes of paragraph (b)(1)(i) of this section, an investment by a director or employee of a banking entity who acquires an ownership interest in his or her personal capacity in a covered fund sponsored by the banking entity will be attributed to the banking entity if the banking entity, directly or indirectly, extends financing for the purpose of enabling the director or employee to acquire the ownership interest in the fund and the financing is used to acquire such ownership interest in the covered fund.


(2) Calculation of permitted ownership interests in a single covered fund. Except as provided in paragraph (b)(3) or (4), for purposes of determining whether an investment in a single covered fund complies with the restrictions on ownership interests under paragraphs (a)(2)(i)(B) and (a)(2)(ii)(A) of this section:


(i) The aggregate number of the outstanding ownership interests held by the banking entity shall be the total number of ownership interests held under this section by the banking entity in a covered fund divided by the total number of ownership interests held by all entities in that covered fund, as of the last day of each calendar quarter (both measured without regard to committed funds not yet called for investment);


(ii) The aggregate value of the outstanding ownership interests held by the banking entity shall be the aggregate fair market value of all investments in and capital contributions made to the covered fund by the banking entity, divided by the value of all investments in and capital contributions made to that covered fund by all entities, as of the last day of each calendar quarter (all measured without regard to committed funds not yet called for investment). If fair market value cannot be determined, then the value shall be the historical cost basis of all investments in and contributions made by the banking entity to the covered fund;


(iii) For purposes of the calculation under paragraph (b)(2)(ii) of this section, once a valuation methodology is chosen, the banking entity must calculate the value of its investment and the investments of all others in the covered fund in the same manner and according to the same standards.


(3) Issuing entities of asset-backed securities. In the case of an ownership interest in an issuing entity of asset-backed securities, for purposes of determining whether an investment in a single covered fund complies with the restrictions on ownership interests under paragraphs (a)(2)(i)(B) and (a)(2)(ii)(B) of this section:


(i) For securitizations subject to the requirements of section 15G of the Exchange Act (15 U.S.C. 78o-11), the calculations shall be made as of the date and according to the valuation methodology applicable pursuant to the requirements of section 15G of the Exchange Act (15 U.S.C. 78o-11) and the implementing regulations issued thereunder; or


(ii) For securitization transactions completed prior to the compliance date of such implementing regulations (or as to which such implementing regulations do not apply), the calculations shall be made as of the date of establishment as defined in paragraph (a)(2)(iv)(B) of this section or such earlier date on which the transferred assets have been valued for purposes of transfer to the covered fund, and thereafter only upon the date on which additional securities of the issuing entity of asset-backed securities are priced for purposes of the sales of ownership interests to unaffiliated investors.


(iii) For securitization transactions completed prior to the compliance date of such implementing regulations (or as to which such implementing regulations do not apply), the aggregate value of the outstanding ownership interests in the covered fund shall be the fair market value of the assets transferred to the issuing entity of the securitization and any other assets otherwise held by the issuing entity at such time, determined in a manner that is consistent with its determination of the fair market value of those assets for financial statement purposes.


(iv) For purposes of the calculation under paragraph (b)(3)(iii) of this section, the valuation methodology used to calculate the fair market value of the ownership interests must be the same for both the ownership interests held by a banking entity and the ownership interests held by all others in the covered fund in the same manner and according to the same standards.


(4) Multi-tier fund investments – (i) Master-feeder fund investments. If the principal investment strategy of a covered fund (the “feeder fund”) is to invest substantially all of its assets in another single covered fund (the “master fund”), then for purposes of the investment limitations in paragraphs (a)(2)(i)(B) and (a)(2)(ii) of this section, the banking entity’s permitted investment in such funds shall be measured only by reference to the value of the master fund. The banking entity’s permitted investment in the master fund shall include any investment by the banking entity in the master fund, as well as the banking entity’s pro-rata share of any ownership interest in the master fund that is held through the feeder fund; and


(ii) Fund-of-funds investments. If a banking entity organizes and offers a covered fund pursuant to § 351.11 for the purpose of investing in other covered funds (a “fund of funds”) and that fund of funds itself invests in another covered fund that the banking entity is permitted to own, then the banking entity’s permitted investment in that other fund shall include any investment by the banking entity in that other fund, as well as the banking entity’s pro-rata share of any ownership interest in the fund that is held through the fund of funds. The investment of the banking entity may not represent more than 3 percent of the amount or value of any single covered fund.


(5) Parallel Investments and Co-Investments. (i) A banking entity shall not be required to include in the calculation of the investment limits under paragraph (a)(2) of this section any investment the banking entity makes alongside a covered fund as long as the investment is made in compliance with applicable laws and regulations, including applicable safety and soundness standards.


(ii) A banking entity shall not be restricted under this section in the amount of any investment the banking entity makes alongside a covered fund as long as the investment is made in compliance with applicable laws and regulations, including applicable safety and soundness standards.


(c) Aggregate permitted investments in all covered funds. (1)(i) For purposes of paragraph (a)(2)(iii) of this section, the aggregate value of all ownership interests held by a banking entity shall be the sum of all amounts paid or contributed by the banking entity in connection with acquiring or retaining an ownership interest in covered funds (together with any amounts paid by the entity in connection with obtaining a restricted profit interest under § 351.10(d)(6)(ii)), on a historical cost basis;


(ii) Treatment of employee and director restricted profit interests financed by the banking entity. For purposes of paragraph (c)(1)(i) of this section, an investment by a director or employee of a banking entity who acquires a restricted profit interest in his or her personal capacity in a covered fund sponsored by the banking entity will be attributed to the banking entity if the banking entity, directly or indirectly, extends financing for the purpose of enabling the director or employee to acquire the restricted profit interest in the fund and the financing is used to acquire such ownership interest in the covered fund.


(2) Calculation of tier 1 capital. For purposes of paragraph (a)(2)(iii) of this section:


(i) Entities that are required to hold and report tier 1 capital. If a banking entity is required to calculate and report tier 1 capital, the banking entity’s tier 1 capital shall be equal to the amount of tier 1 capital of the banking entity as of the last day of the most recent calendar quarter, as reported to its primary financial regulatory agency; and


(ii) If a banking entity is not required to calculate and report tier 1 capital, the banking entity’s tier 1 capital shall be determined to be equal to:


(A) In the case of a banking entity that is controlled, directly or indirectly, by a depository institution that calculates and reports tier 1 capital, be equal to the amount of tier 1 capital reported by such controlling depository institution in the manner described in paragraph (c)(2)(i) of this section;


(B) In the case of a banking entity that is not controlled, directly or indirectly, by a depository institution that calculates and reports tier 1 capital:


(1) Bank holding company subsidiaries. If the banking entity is a subsidiary of a bank holding company or company that is treated as a bank holding company, be equal to the amount of tier 1 capital reported by the top-tier affiliate of such covered banking entity that calculates and reports tier 1 capital in the manner described in paragraph (c)(2)(i) of this section; and


(2) Other holding companies and any subsidiary or affiliate thereof. If the banking entity is not a subsidiary of a bank holding company or a company that is treated as a bank holding company, be equal to the total amount of shareholders’ equity of the top-tier affiliate within such organization as of the last day of the most recent calendar quarter that has ended, as determined under applicable accounting standards.


(iii) Treatment of foreign banking entities – (A) Foreign banking entities. Except as provided in paragraph (c)(2)(iii)(B) of this section, with respect to a banking entity that is not itself, and is not controlled directly or indirectly by, a banking entity that is located or organized under the laws of the United States or of any State, the tier 1 capital of the banking entity shall be the consolidated tier 1 capital of the entity as calculated under applicable home country standards.


(B) U.S. affiliates of foreign banking entities. With respect to a banking entity that is located or organized under the laws of the United States or of any State and is controlled by a foreign banking entity identified under paragraph (c)(2)(iii)(A) of this section, the banking entity’s tier 1 capital shall be as calculated under paragraphs (c)(2)(i) or (ii) of this section.


(d) Capital treatment for a permitted investment in a covered fund. For purposes of calculating compliance with the applicable regulatory capital requirements, a banking entity shall deduct from the banking entity’s tier 1 capital (as determined under paragraph (c)(2) of this section) the greater of:


(1)(i) The sum of all amounts paid or contributed by the banking entity in connection with acquiring or retaining an ownership interest (together with any amounts paid by the entity in connection with obtaining a restricted profit interest under § 351.10(d)(6)(ii) of subpart C of this part), on a historical cost basis, plus any earnings received; and


(ii) The fair market value of the banking entity’s ownership interests in the covered fund as determined under paragraph (b)(2)(ii) or (b)(3) of this section (together with any amounts paid by the entity in connection with obtaining a restricted profit interest under § 351.10(d)(6)(ii) of subpart C of this part), if the banking entity accounts for the profits (or losses) of the fund investment in its financial statements.


(2) Treatment of employee and director restricted profit interests financed by the banking entity. For purposes of paragraph (d)(1) of this section, an investment by a director or employee of a banking entity who acquires a restricted profit interest in his or her personal capacity in a covered fund sponsored by the banking entity will be attributed to the banking entity if the banking entity, directly or indirectly, extends financing for the purpose of enabling the director or employee to acquire the restricted profit interest in the fund and the financing is used to acquire such ownership interest in the covered fund.


(e) Extension of time to divest an ownership interest – (1) Extension period. Upon application by a banking entity, the Board may extend the period under paragraph (a)(2)(i) of this section for up to 2 additional years if the Board finds that an extension would be consistent with safety and soundness and not detrimental to the public interest.


(2) Application requirements. An application for extension must:


(i) Be submitted to the Board at least 90 days prior to the expiration of the applicable time period;


(ii) Provide the reasons for application, including information that addresses the factors in paragraph (e)(3) of this section; and


(iii) Explain the banking entity’s plan for reducing the permitted investment in a covered fund through redemption, sale, dilution or other methods as required in paragraph (a)(2) of this section.


(3) Factors governing the Board determinations. In reviewing any application under paragraph (e)(1) of this section, the Board may consider all the facts and circumstances related to the permitted investment in a covered fund, including:


(i) Whether the investment would result, directly or indirectly, in a material exposure by the banking entity to high-risk assets or high-risk trading strategies;


(ii) The contractual terms governing the banking entity’s interest in the covered fund;


(iii) The date on which the covered fund is expected to have attracted sufficient investments from investors unaffiliated with the banking entity to enable the banking entity to comply with the limitations in paragraph (a)(2)(i) of this section;


(iv) The total exposure of the covered banking entity to the investment and the risks that disposing of, or maintaining, the investment in the covered fund may pose to the banking entity and the financial stability of the United States;


(v) The cost to the banking entity of divesting or disposing of the investment within the applicable period;


(vi) Whether the investment or the divestiture or conformance of the investment would involve or result in a material conflict of interest between the banking entity and unaffiliated parties, including clients, customers, or counterparties to which it owes a duty;


(vii) The banking entity’s prior efforts to reduce through redemption, sale, dilution, or other methods its ownership interests in the covered fund, including activities related to the marketing of interests in such covered fund;


(viii) Market conditions; and


(ix) Any other factor that the Board believes appropriate.


(4) Authority to impose restrictions on activities or investment during any extension period. The Board may impose such conditions on any extension approved under paragraph (e)(1) of this section as the Board determines are necessary or appropriate to protect the safety and soundness of the banking entity or the financial stability of the United States, address material conflicts of interest or other unsound banking practices, or otherwise further the purposes of section 13 of the BHC Act and this part.


(5) Consultation. In the case of a banking entity that is primarily regulated by another Federal banking agency, the SEC, or the CFTC, the Board will consult with such agency prior to acting on an application by the banking entity for an extension under paragraph (e)(1) of this section.


[79 FR 5805, Jan. 31, 2014, as amended at 84 FR 62172, Nov. 14, 2019; 85 FR 46514, July 31, 2020]


§ 351.13 Other permitted covered fund activities and investments.

(a) Permitted risk-mitigating hedging activities. (1) The prohibition contained in § 351.10(a) of this subpart does not apply with respect to an ownership interest in a covered fund acquired or retained by a banking entity that is designed to reduce or otherwise significantly mitigate the specific, identifiable risks to the banking entity in connection with:


(i) A compensation arrangement with an employee of the banking entity or an affiliate thereof that directly provides investment advisory, commodity trading advisory or other services to the covered fund; or


(ii) A position taken by the banking entity when acting as intermediary on behalf of a customer that is not itself a banking entity to facilitate the exposure by the customer to the profits and losses of the covered fund.


(2) The risk-mitigating hedging activities of a banking entity are permitted under this paragraph (a) only if:


(i) The banking entity has established and implements, maintains and enforces an internal compliance program in accordance with subpart D of this part that is reasonably designed to ensure the banking entity’s compliance with the requirements of this section, including:


(A) Reasonably designed written policies and procedures; and


(B) Internal controls and ongoing monitoring, management, and authorization procedures, including relevant escalation procedures; and


(ii) The acquisition or retention of the ownership interest:


(A) Is made in accordance with the written policies, procedures, and internal controls required under this section;


(B) At the inception of the hedge, is designed to reduce or otherwise significantly mitigate one or more specific, identifiable risks arising:


(1) Out of a transaction conducted solely to accommodate a specific customer request with respect to the covered fund; or


(2) In connection with the compensation arrangement with the employee that directly provides investment advisory, commodity trading advisory, or other services to the covered fund;


(C) Does not give rise, at the inception of the hedge, to any significant new or additional risk that is not itself hedged contemporaneously in accordance with this section; and


(D) Is subject to continuing review, monitoring and management by the banking entity.


(iii) With respect to risk-mitigating hedging activity conducted pursuant to paragraph (a)(1)(i) of this section, the compensation arrangement relates solely to the covered fund in which the banking entity or any affiliate has acquired an ownership interest pursuant to paragraph (a)(1)(i) and such compensation arrangement provides that any losses incurred by the banking entity on such ownership interest will be offset by corresponding decreases in amounts payable under such compensation arrangement.


(b) Certain permitted covered fund activities and investments outside of the United States. (1) The prohibition contained in § 351.10(a) of this subpart does not apply to the acquisition or retention of any ownership interest in, or the sponsorship of, a covered fund by a banking entity only if:


(i) The banking entity is not organized or directly or indirectly controlled by a banking entity that is organized under the laws of the United States or of one or more States;


(ii) The activity or investment by the banking entity is pursuant to paragraph (9) or (13) of section 4(c) of the BHC Act;


(iii) No ownership interest in the covered fund is offered for sale or sold to a resident of the United States; and


(iv) The activity or investment occurs solely outside of the United States.


(2) An activity or investment by the banking entity is pursuant to paragraph (9) or (13) of section 4(c) of the BHC Act for purposes of paragraph (b)(1)(ii) of this section only if:


(i) The activity or investment is conducted in accordance with the requirements of this section; and


(ii)(A) With respect to a banking entity that is a foreign banking organization, the banking entity meets the qualifying foreign banking organization requirements of section 211.23(a), (c) or (e) of the Board’s Regulation K (12 CFR 211.23(a), (c) or (e)), as applicable; or


(B) With respect to a banking entity that is not a foreign banking organization, the banking entity is not organized under the laws of the United States or of one or more States and the banking entity, on a fully-consolidated basis, meets at least two of the following requirements:


(1) Total assets of the banking entity held outside of the United States exceed total assets of the banking entity held in the United States;


(2) Total revenues derived from the business of the banking entity outside of the United States exceed total revenues derived from the business of the banking entity in the United States; or


(3) Total net income derived from the business of the banking entity outside of the United States exceeds total net income derived from the business of the banking entity in the United States.


(3) An ownership interest in a covered fund is not offered for sale or sold to a resident of the United States for purposes of paragraph (b)(1)(iii) of this section only if it is not sold and has not been sold pursuant to an offering that targets residents of the United States in which the banking entity or any affiliate of the banking entity participates. If the banking entity or an affiliate sponsors or serves, directly or indirectly, as the investment manager, investment adviser, commodity pool operator or commodity trading advisor to a covered fund, then the banking entity or affiliate will be deemed for purposes of this paragraph (b)(3) to participate in any offer or sale by the covered fund of ownership interests in the covered fund.


(4) An activity or investment occurs solely outside of the United States for purposes of paragraph (b)(1)(iv) of this section only if:


(i) The banking entity acting as sponsor, or engaging as principal in the acquisition or retention of an ownership interest in the covered fund, is not itself, and is not controlled directly or indirectly by, a banking entity that is located in the United States or organized under the laws of the United States or of any State;


(ii) The banking entity (including relevant personnel) that makes the decision to acquire or retain the ownership interest or act as sponsor to the covered fund is not located in the United States or organized under the laws of the United States or of any State; and


(iii) The investment or sponsorship, including any transaction arising from risk-mitigating hedging related to an ownership interest, is not accounted for as principal directly or indirectly on a consolidated basis by any branch or affiliate that is located in the United States or organized under the laws of the United States or of any State.


(5) For purposes of this section, a U.S. branch, agency, or subsidiary of a foreign bank, or any subsidiary thereof, is located in the United States; however, a foreign bank of which that branch, agency, or subsidiary is a part is not considered to be located in the United States solely by virtue of operation of the U.S. branch, agency, or subsidiary.


(c) Permitted covered fund interests and activities by a regulated insurance company. The prohibition contained in § 351.10(a) of this subpart does not apply to the acquisition or retention by an insurance company, or an affiliate thereof, of any ownership interest in, or the sponsorship of, a covered fund only if:


(1) The insurance company or its affiliate acquires and retains the ownership interest solely for the general account of the insurance company or for one or more separate accounts established by the insurance company;


(2) The acquisition and retention of the ownership interest is conducted in compliance with, and subject to, the insurance company investment laws and regulations of the State or jurisdiction in which such insurance company is domiciled; and


(3) The appropriate Federal banking agencies, after consultation with the Financial Stability Oversight Council and the relevant insurance commissioners of the States and foreign jurisdictions, as appropriate, have not jointly determined, after notice and comment, that a particular law or regulation described in paragraph (c)(2) of this section is insufficient to protect the safety and soundness of the banking entity, or the financial stability of the United States.


(d) Permitted covered fund activities and investments of qualifying foreign excluded funds. (1) The prohibition contained in § 351.10(a) does not apply to a qualifying foreign excluded fund.


(2) For purposes of this paragraph (d), a qualifying foreign excluded fund means a banking entity that:


(i) Is organized or established outside the United States, and the ownership interests of which are offered and sold solely outside the United States;


(ii)(A) Would be a covered fund if the entity were organized or established in the United States, or


(B) Is, or holds itself out as being, an entity or arrangement that raises money from investors primarily for the purpose of investing in financial instruments for resale or other disposition or otherwise trading in financial instruments;


(iii) Would not otherwise be a banking entity except by virtue of the acquisition or retention of an ownership interest in, sponsorship of, or relationship with the entity, by another banking entity that meets the following:


(A) The banking entity is not organized, or directly or indirectly controlled by a banking entity that is organized, under the laws of the United States or of any State; and


(B) The banking entity’s acquisition of an ownership interest in or sponsorship of the fund by the foreign banking entity meets the requirements for permitted covered fund activities and investments solely outside the United States, as provided in § 351.13(b);


(iv) Is established and operated as part of a bona fide asset management business; and


(v) Is not operated in a manner that enables the banking entity that sponsors or controls the qualifying foreign excluded fund, or any of its affiliates, to evade the requirements of section 13 of the BHC Act or this part.


[79 FR 5805, Jan. 31, 2014, as amended at 84 FR 62172, Nov. 14, 2019; 85 FR 46515, July 31, 2020]


§ 351.14 Limitations on relationships with a covered fund.

(a) Relationships with a covered fund. (1) Except as provided for in paragraph (a)(2) of this section, no banking entity that serves, directly or indirectly, as the investment manager, investment adviser, commodity trading advisor, or sponsor to a covered fund, that organizes and offers a covered fund pursuant to § 351.11 of this subpart, or that continues to hold an ownership interest in accordance with § 351.11(b) of this subpart, and no affiliate of such entity, may enter into a transaction with the covered fund, or with any other covered fund that is controlled by such covered fund, that would be a covered transaction as defined in section 23A of the Federal Reserve Act (12 U.S.C. 371c(b)(7)), as if such banking entity and the affiliate thereof were a member bank and the covered fund were an affiliate thereof.


(2) Notwithstanding paragraph (a)(1) of this section, a banking entity may:


(i) Acquire and retain any ownership interest in a covered fund in accordance with the requirements of §§ 351.11, 351.12, or 351.13;


(ii) Enter into any prime brokerage transaction with any covered fund in which a covered fund managed, sponsored, or advised by such banking entity (or an affiliate thereof) has taken an ownership interest, if:


(A) The banking entity is in compliance with each of the limitations set forth in § 351.11 of this subpart with respect to a covered fund organized and offered by such banking entity (or an affiliate thereof);


(B) The chief executive officer (or equivalent officer) of the banking entity certifies in writing annually no later than March 31 to the FDIC (with a duty to update the certification if the information in the certification materially changes) that the banking entity does not, directly or indirectly, guarantee, assume, or otherwise insure the obligations or performance of the covered fund or of any covered fund in which such covered fund invests; and


(C) The Board has not determined that such transaction is inconsistent with the safe and sound operation and condition of the banking entity.


(C) The Board has not determined that such transaction is inconsistent with the safe and sound operation and condition of the banking entity; and


(iii) Enter into a transaction with a covered fund that would be an exempt covered transaction under 12 U.S.C. 371c(d) or § 223.42 of the Board’s Regulation W (12 CFR 223.42) subject to the limitations specified under 12 U.S.C. 371c(d) or § 223.42 of the Board’s Regulation W (12 CFR 223.42), as applicable,


(iv) Enter into a riskless principal transaction with a covered fund; and


(v) Extend credit to or purchase assets from a covered fund, provided:


(A) Each extension of credit or purchase of assets is in the ordinary course of business in connection with payment transactions; settlement services; or futures, derivatives, and securities clearing;


(B) Each extension of credit is repaid, sold, or terminated by the end of five business days; and


(C) The banking entity making each extension of credit meets the requirements of § 223.42(l)(1)(i) and (ii) of the Board’s Regulation W (12 CFR 223.42(l)(1)(i) and(ii)), as if the extension of credit was an intraday extension of credit, regardless of the duration of the extension of credit.


(3) Any transaction or activity permitted under paragraphs (a)(2)(iii), (iv) or (v) must comply with the limitations in § 351.15.


(b) Restrictions on transactions with covered funds. A banking entity that serves, directly or indirectly, as the investment manager, investment adviser, commodity trading advisor, or sponsor to a covered fund, or that organizes and offers a covered fund pursuant to § 351.11 of this subpart, or that continues to hold an ownership interest in accordance with § 351.11(b) of this subpart, shall be subject to section 23B of the Federal Reserve Act (12 U.S.C. 371c-1), as if such banking entity were a member bank and such covered fund were an affiliate thereof.


(c) Restrictions on other permitted transactions. Any transaction permitted under paragraphs (a)(2)(ii), (iii), or (iv) of this section shall be subject to section 23B of the Federal Reserve Act (12 U.S.C. 371c-1) as if the counterparty were an affiliate of the banking entity under section 23B.


[79 FR 5805, Jan. 31, 2014, as amended at 84 FR 62173, Nov. 14, 2019; 85 FR 46515, July 31, 2020]


§ 351.15 Other limitations on permitted covered fund activities.

(a) No transaction, class of transactions, or activity may be deemed permissible under §§ 351.11 through 351.13 of this subpart if the transaction, class of transactions, or activity would:


(1) Involve or result in a material conflict of interest between the banking entity and its clients, customers, or counterparties;


(2) Result, directly or indirectly, in a material exposure by the banking entity to a high-risk asset or a high-risk trading strategy; or


(3) Pose a threat to the safety and soundness of the banking entity or to the financial stability of the United States.


(b) Definition of material conflict of interest. (1) For purposes of this section, a material conflict of interest between a banking entity and its clients, customers, or counterparties exists if the banking entity engages in any transaction, class of transactions, or activity that would involve or result in the banking entity’s interests being materially adverse to the interests of its client, customer, or counterparty with respect to such transaction, class of transactions, or activity, and the banking entity has not taken at least one of the actions in paragraph (b)(2) of this section.


(2) Prior to effecting the specific transaction or class or type of transactions, or engaging in the specific activity, the banking entity:


(i) Timely and effective disclosure. (A) Has made clear, timely, and effective disclosure of the conflict of interest, together with other necessary information, in reasonable detail and in a manner sufficient to permit a reasonable client, customer, or counterparty to meaningfully understand the conflict of interest; and


(B) Such disclosure is made in a manner that provides the client, customer, or counterparty the opportunity to negate, or substantially mitigate, any materially adverse effect on the client, customer, or counterparty created by the conflict of interest; or


(ii) Information barriers. Has established, maintained, and enforced information barriers that are memorialized in written policies and procedures, such as physical separation of personnel, or functions, or limitations on types of activity, that are reasonably designed, taking into consideration the nature of the banking entity’s business, to prevent the conflict of interest from involving or resulting in a materially adverse effect on a client, customer, or counterparty. A banking entity may not rely on such information barriers if, in the case of any specific transaction, class or type of transactions or activity, the banking entity knows or should reasonably know that, notwithstanding the banking entity’s establishment of information barriers, the conflict of interest may involve or result in a materially adverse effect on a client, customer, or counterparty.


(c) Definition of high-risk asset and high-risk trading strategy. For purposes of this section:


(1) High-risk asset means an asset or group of related assets that would, if held by a banking entity, significantly increase the likelihood that the banking entity would incur a substantial financial loss or would pose a threat to the financial stability of the United States.


(2) High-risk trading strategy means a trading strategy that would, if engaged in by a banking entity, significantly increase the likelihood that the banking entity would incur a substantial financial loss or would pose a threat to the financial stability of the United States.


§ 351.16 Ownership of Interests in and Sponsorship of Issuers of Certain Collateralized Debt Obligations Backed by Trust-Preferred Securities.

(a) The prohibition contained in § 351.10(a)(1) does not apply to the ownership by a banking entity of an interest in, or sponsorship of, any issuer if:


(1) The issuer was established, and the interest was issued, before May 19, 2010;


(2) The banking entity reasonably believes that the offering proceeds received by the issuer were invested primarily in Qualifying TruPS Collateral; and


(3) The banking entity acquired such interest on or before December 10, 2013 (or acquired such interest in connection with a merger with or acquisition of a banking entity that acquired the interest on or before December 10, 2013).


(b) For purposes of this § 351.16, Qualifying TruPS Collateral shall mean any trust preferred security or subordinated debt instrument issued prior to May 19, 2010 by a depository institution holding company that, as of the end of any reporting period within 12 months immediately preceding the issuance of such trust preferred security or subordinated debt instrument, had total consolidated assets of less than $15,000,000,000 or issued prior to May 19, 2010 by a mutual holding company.


(c) Notwithstanding paragraph (a)(3) of this section, a banking entity may act as a market maker with respect to the interests of an issuer described in paragraph (a) of this section in accordance with the applicable provisions of §§ 351.4 and 351.11.


(d) Without limiting the applicability of paragraph (a) of this section, the Board, the FDIC and the OCC will make public a non-exclusive list of issuers that meet the requirements of paragraph (a). A banking entity may rely on the list published by the Board, the FDIC and the OCC.


[79 FR 5228, Jan. 31, 2014]


§§ 351.17-351.19 [Reserved]

Subpart D – Compliance Program Requirement; Violations

§ 351.20 Program for compliance; reporting.

(a) Program requirement. Each banking entity (other than a banking entity with limited trading assets and liabilities or a qualifying foreign excluded fund under section 351.6(f) or 351.13(d)) shall develop and provide for the continued administration of a compliance program reasonably designed to ensure and monitor compliance with the prohibitions and restrictions on proprietary trading and covered fund activities and investments set forth in section 13 of the BHC Act and this part. The terms, scope, and detail of the compliance program shall be appropriate for the types, size, scope, and complexity of activities and business structure of the banking entity.


(b) Banking entities with significant trading assets and liabilities. With respect to a banking entity with significant trading assets and liabilities, the compliance program required by paragraph (a) of this section, at a minimum, shall include:


(1) Written policies and procedures reasonably designed to document, describe, monitor and limit trading activities subject to subpart B (including those permitted under §§ 351.3 to 351.6 of subpart B), including setting, monitoring and managing required limits set out in § 351.4 and § 351.5, and activities and investments with respect to a covered fund subject to subpart C (including those permitted under §§ 351.11 through 351.14 of subpart C) conducted by the banking entity to ensure that all activities and investments conducted by the banking entity that are subject to section 13 of the BHC Act and this part comply with section 13 of the BHC Act and this part;


(2) A system of internal controls reasonably designed to monitor compliance with section 13 of the BHC Act and this part and to prevent the occurrence of activities or investments that are prohibited by section 13 of the BHC Act and this part;


(3) A management framework that clearly delineates responsibility and accountability for compliance with section 13 of the BHC Act and this part and includes appropriate management review of trading limits, strategies, hedging activities, investments, incentive compensation and other matters identified in this part or by management as requiring attention;


(4) Independent testing and audit of the effectiveness of the compliance program conducted periodically by qualified personnel of the banking entity or by a qualified outside party;


(5) Training for trading personnel and managers, as well as other appropriate personnel, to effectively implement and enforce the compliance program; and


(6) Records sufficient to demonstrate compliance with section 13 of the BHC Act and this part, which a banking entity must promptly provide to the FDIC upon request and retain for a period of no less than 5 years or such longer period as required by the FDIC.


(c) CEO attestation. The CEO of a banking entity that has significant trading assets and liabilities must, based on a review by the CEO of the banking entity, attest in writing to the FDIC, each year no later than March 31, that the banking entity has in place processes to establish, maintain, enforce, review, test and modify the compliance program required by paragraph (b) of this section in a manner reasonably designed to achieve compliance with section 13 of the BHC Act and this part. In the case of a U.S. branch or agency of a foreign banking entity, the attestation may be provided for the entire U.S. operations of the foreign banking entity by the senior management officer of the U.S. operations of the foreign banking entity who is located in the United States.


(d) Reporting requirements under appendix A to this part. (1) A banking entity (other than a qualifying foreign excluded fund under section 351.6(f) or 351.13(d)) engaged in proprietary trading activity permitted under subpart B shall comply with the reporting requirements described in appendix A to this part, if:


(i) The banking entity has significant trading assets and liabilities; or


(ii) The FDIC notifies the banking entity in writing that it must satisfy the reporting requirements contained in appendix A to this part.


(2) Frequency of reporting: Unless the FDIC notifies the banking entity in writing that it must report on a different basis, a banking entity subject to appendix A to this part shall report the information required by appendix A for each quarter within 30 days of the end of the quarter.


(e) Additional documentation for covered funds. A banking entity with significant trading assets and liabilities (other than a qualifying foreign excluded fund under section 351.6(f) or 351.13(d)) shall maintain records that include:


(1) Documentation of the exclusions or exemptions other than sections 3(c)(1) and 3(c)(7) of the Investment Company Act of 1940 relied on by each fund sponsored by the banking entity (including all subsidiaries and affiliates) in determining that such fund is not a covered fund;


(2) For each fund sponsored by the banking entity (including all subsidiaries and affiliates) for which the banking entity relies on one or more of the exclusions from the definition of covered fund provided by §§ 351.10(c)(1),351.10(c)(5), 351.10(c)(8), 351.10(c)(9), or 351.10(c)(10) of subpart C, documentation supporting the banking entity’s determination that the fund is not a covered fund pursuant to one or more of those exclusions;


(3) For each seeding vehicle described in § 351.10(c)(12)(i) or (iii) of subpart C that will become a registered investment company or SEC-regulated business development company, a written plan documenting the banking entity’s determination that the seeding vehicle will become a registered investment company or SEC-regulated business development company; the period of time during which the vehicle will operate as a seeding vehicle; and the banking entity’s plan to market the vehicle to third-party investors and convert it into a registered investment company or SEC-regulated business development company within the time period specified in § 351.12(a)(2)(i)(B) of subpart C;


(4) For any banking entity that is, or is controlled directly or indirectly by a banking entity that is, located in or organized under the laws of the United States or of any State, if the aggregate amount of ownership interests in foreign public funds that are described in § 351.10(c)(1) of subpart C owned by such banking entity (including ownership interests owned by any affiliate that is controlled directly or indirectly by a banking entity that is located in or organized under the laws of the United States or of any State) exceeds $50 million at the end of two or more consecutive calendar quarters, beginning with the next succeeding calendar quarter, documentation of the value of the ownership interests owned by the banking entity (and such affiliates) in each foreign public fund and each jurisdiction in which any such foreign public fund is organized, calculated as of the end of each calendar quarter, which documentation must continue until the banking entity’s aggregate amount of ownership interests in foreign public funds is below $50 million for two consecutive calendar quarters; and


(5) For purposes of paragraph (e)(4) of this section, a U.S. branch, agency, or subsidiary of a foreign banking entity is located in the United States; however, the foreign bank that operates or controls that branch, agency, or subsidiary is not considered to be located in the United States solely by virtue of operating or controlling the U.S. branch, agency, or subsidiary.


(f) Simplified programs for less active banking entities – (1) Banking entities with no covered activities. A banking entity that does not engage in activities or investments pursuant to subpart B or subpart C (other than trading activities permitted pursuant to § 351.6(a) of subpart B) may satisfy the requirements of this section by establishing the required compliance program prior to becoming engaged in such activities or making such investments (other than trading activities permitted pursuant to § 351.6(a) of subpart B).


(2) Banking entities with moderate trading assets and liabilities. A banking entity with moderate trading assets and liabilities may satisfy the requirements of this section by including in its existing compliance policies and procedures appropriate references to the requirements of section 13 of the BHC Act and this part and adjustments as appropriate given the activities, size, scope, and complexity of the banking entity.


(g) Rebuttable presumption of compliance for banking entities with limited trading assets and liabilities – (1) Rebuttable presumption. Except as otherwise provided in this paragraph, a banking entity with limited trading assets and liabilities shall be presumed to be compliant with subpart B and subpart C of this part and shall have no obligation to demonstrate compliance with this part on an ongoing basis.


(2) Rebuttal of presumption. If upon examination or audit, the FDIC determines that the banking entity has engaged in proprietary trading or covered fund activities that are otherwise prohibited under subpart B or subpart C of this part, the FDIC may require the banking entity to be treated under this part as if it did not have limited trading assets and liabilities. The FDIC’s rebuttal of the presumption in this paragraph must be made in accordance with the notice and response procedures in paragraph (i) of this section.


(h) Reservation of authority. Notwithstanding any other provision of this part, the FDIC retains its authority to require a banking entity without significant trading assets and liabilities to apply any requirements of this part that would otherwise apply if the banking entity had significant or moderate trading assets and liabilities if the FDIC determines that the size or complexity of the banking entity’s trading or investment activities, or the risk of evasion of subpart B or subpart C of this part, does not warrant a presumption of compliance under paragraph (g) of this section or treatment as a banking entity with moderate trading assets and liabilities, as applicable. The FDIC’s exercise of this reservation of authority must be made in accordance with the notice and response procedures in paragraph (i) of this section.


(i) Notice and response procedures – (1) Notice. The FDIC will notify the banking entity in writing of any determination requiring notice under this part and will provide an explanation of the determination.


(2) Response. The banking entity may respond to any or all items in the notice described in paragraph (i)(1) of this section. The response should include any matters that the banking entity would have the FDIC consider in deciding whether to make the determination. The response must be in writing and delivered to the designated FDIC official within 30 days after the date on which the banking entity received the notice. The FDIC may shorten the time period when, in the opinion of the FDIC, the activities or condition of the banking entity so requires, provided that the banking entity is informed of the time period at the time of notice, or with the consent of the banking entity. In its discretion, the FDIC may extend the time period for good cause.


(3) Waiver. Failure to respond within 30 days or such other time period as may be specified by the FDIC shall constitute a waiver of any objections to the FDIC determination.


(4) Decision. The FDIC will notify the banking entity of the decision in writing. The notice will include an explanation of the decision.


[79 FR 5805, Jan. 31, 2014, as amended at 84 FR 62173, Nov. 14, 2019; 85 FR 46515, July 31, 2020; 85 FR 60355, Sept. 25, 2020]


§ 351.21 Termination of activities or investments; penalties for violations.

(a) Any banking entity that engages in an activity or makes an investment in violation of section 13 of the BHC Act or this part, or acts in a manner that functions as an evasion of the requirements of section 13 of the BHC Act or this part, including through an abuse of any activity or investment permitted under subparts B or C, or otherwise violates the restrictions and requirements of section 13 of the BHC Act or this part, shall, upon discovery, promptly terminate the activity and, as relevant, dispose of the investment.


(b) Whenever the FDIC finds reasonable cause to believe any banking entity has engaged in an activity or made an investment in violation of section 13 of the BHC Act or this part, or engaged in any activity or made any investment that functions as an evasion of the requirements of section 13 of the BHC Act or this part, the FDIC may take any action permitted by law to enforce compliance with section 13 of the BHC Act and this part, including directing the banking entity to restrict, limit, or terminate any or all activities under this part and dispose of any investment.


Appendix A to Part 351 – Reporting and Recordkeeping Requirements for Covered Trading Activities

I. Purpose

a. This appendix sets forth reporting and recordkeeping requirements that certain banking entities must satisfy in connection with the restrictions on proprietary trading set forth in subpart B (“proprietary trading restrictions”). Pursuant to § 351.20(d), this appendix applies to a banking entity that, together with its affiliates and subsidiaries, has significant trading assets and liabilities. These entities are required to (i) furnish periodic reports to the FDIC regarding a variety of quantitative measurements of their covered trading activities, which vary depending on the scope and size of covered trading activities, and (ii) create and maintain records documenting the preparation and content of these reports. The requirements of this appendix must be incorporated into the banking entity’s internal compliance program under § 351.20.


b. The purpose of this appendix is to assist banking entities and the FDIC in:


(1) Better understanding and evaluating the scope, type, and profile of the banking entity’s covered trading activities;


(2) Monitoring the banking entity’s covered trading activities;


(3) Identifying covered trading activities that warrant further review or examination by the banking entity to verify compliance with the proprietary trading restrictions;


(4) Evaluating whether the covered trading activities of trading desks engaged in market making-related activities subject to § 351.4(b) are consistent with the requirements governing permitted market making-related activities;


(5) Evaluating whether the covered trading activities of trading desks that are engaged in permitted trading activity subject to § 351.4, § 351.5, or § 351.6(a) and (b) (i.e., underwriting and market making-related activity, risk-mitigating hedging, or trading in certain government obligations) are consistent with the requirement that such activity not result, directly or indirectly, in a material exposure to high-risk assets or high-risk trading strategies;


(6) Identifying the profile of particular covered trading activities of the banking entity, and the individual trading desks of the banking entity, to help establish the appropriate frequency and scope of examination by the FDIC of such activities; and


(7) Assessing and addressing the risks associated with the banking entity’s covered trading activities.


c. Information that must be furnished pursuant to this appendix is not intended to serve as a dispositive tool for the identification of permissible or impermissible activities.


d. In addition to the quantitative measurements required in this appendix, a banking entity may need to develop and implement other quantitative measurements in order to effectively monitor its covered trading activities for compliance with section 13 of the BHC Act and this part and to have an effective compliance program, as required by § 351.20. The effectiveness of particular quantitative measurements may differ based on the profile of the banking entity’s businesses in general and, more specifically, of the particular trading desk, including types of instruments traded, trading activities and strategies, and history and experience (e.g., whether the trading desk is an established, successful market maker or a new entrant to a competitive market). In all cases, banking entities must ensure that they have robust measures in place to identify and monitor the risks taken in their trading activities, to ensure that the activities are within risk tolerances established by the banking entity, and to monitor and examine for compliance with the proprietary trading restrictions in this part.


e. On an ongoing basis, banking entities must carefully monitor, review, and evaluate all furnished quantitative measurements, as well as any others that they choose to utilize in order to maintain compliance with section 13 of the BHC Act and this part. All measurement results that indicate a heightened risk of impermissible proprietary trading, including with respect to otherwise-permitted activities under §§ 351.4 through 351.6(a) and (b), or that result in a material exposure to high-risk assets or high-risk trading strategies, must be escalated within the banking entity for review, further analysis, explanation to the FDIC, and remediation, where appropriate. The quantitative measurements discussed in this appendix should be helpful to banking entities in identifying and managing the risks related to their covered trading activities.


II. Definitions

The terms used in this appendix have the same meanings as set forth in §§ 351.2 and 351.3. In addition, for purposes of this appendix, the following definitions apply:


Applicability identifies the trading desks for which a banking entity is required to calculate and report a particular quantitative measurement based on the type of covered trading activity conducted by the trading desk.


Calculation period means the period of time for which a particular quantitative measurement must be calculated.


Comprehensive profit and loss means the net profit or loss of a trading desk’s material sources of trading revenue over a specific period of time, including, for example, any increase or decrease in the market value of a trading desk’s holdings, dividend income, and interest income and expense.


Covered trading activity means trading conducted by a trading desk under § 351.4, § 351.5, § 351.6(a), or § 351.6(b). A banking entity may include in its covered trading activity trading conducted under § 351.3(d), § 351.6(c), § 351.6(d) or § 351.6(e).


Measurement frequency means the frequency with which a particular quantitative metric must be calculated and recorded.


Trading day means a calendar day on which a trading desk is open for trading.


III. Reporting and Recordkeeping

a. Scope of Required Reporting

1. Quantitative measurements. Each banking entity made subject to this appendix by § 351.20 must furnish the following quantitative measurements, as applicable, for each trading desk of the banking entity engaged in covered trading activities and calculate these quantitative measurements in accordance with this appendix:


i. Internal Limits and Usage;


ii. Value-at-Risk;


iii. Comprehensive Profit and Loss Attribution;


iv. Positions; and


v. Transaction Volumes.


2. Trading desk information. Each banking entity made subject to this appendix by § 351.20 must provide certain descriptive information, as further described in this appendix, regarding each trading desk engaged in covered trading activities.


3. Quantitative measurements identifying information. Each banking entity made subject to this appendix by § 351.20 must provide certain identifying and descriptive information, as further described in this appendix, regarding its quantitative measurements.


4. Narrative statement. Each banking entity made subject to this appendix by § 351.20 may provide an optional narrative statement, as further described in this appendix.


5. File identifying information. Each banking entity made subject to this appendix by § 351.20 must provide file identifying information in each submission to the FDIC pursuant to this appendix, including the name of the banking entity, the RSSD ID assigned to the top-tier banking entity by the Board, and identification of the reporting period and creation date and time.


b. Trading Desk Information

1. Each banking entity must provide descriptive information regarding each trading desk engaged in covered trading activities, including:


i. Name of the trading desk used internally by the banking entity and a unique identification label for the trading desk;


ii. Identification of each type of covered trading activity in which the trading desk is engaged;


iii. Brief description of the general strategy of the trading desk;


v. A list identifying each Agency receiving the submission of the trading desk;


2. Indication of whether each calendar date is a trading day or not a trading day for the trading desk; and


3. Currency reported and daily currency conversion rate.


c. Quantitative Measurements Identifying Information

Each banking entity must provide the following information regarding the quantitative measurements:


1. An Internal Limits Information Schedule that provides identifying and descriptive information for each limit reported pursuant to the Internal Limits and Usage quantitative measurement, including the name of the limit, a unique identification label for the limit, a description of the limit, the unit of measurement for the limit, the type of limit, and identification of the corresponding risk factor attribution in the particular case that the limit type is a limit on a risk factor sensitivity and profit and loss attribution to the same risk factor is reported; and


2. A Risk Factor Attribution Information Schedule that provides identifying and descriptive information for each risk factor attribution reported pursuant to the Comprehensive Profit and Loss Attribution quantitative measurement, including the name of the risk factor or other factor, a unique identification label for the risk factor or other factor, a description of the risk factor or other factor, and the risk factor or other factor’s change unit.


d. Narrative Statement

Each banking entity made subject to this appendix by § 351.20 may submit in a separate electronic document a Narrative Statement to the FDIC with any information the banking entity views as relevant for assessing the information reported. The Narrative Statement may include further description of or changes to calculation methods, identification of material events, description of and reasons for changes in the banking entity’s trading desk structure or trading desk strategies, and when any such changes occurred.


e. Frequency and Method of Required Calculation and Reporting

A banking entity must calculate any applicable quantitative measurement for each trading day. A banking entity must report the Trading Desk Information, the Quantitative Measurements Identifying Information, and each applicable quantitative measurement electronically to the FDIC on the reporting schedule established in § 351.20 unless otherwise requested by the FDIC. A banking entity must report the Trading Desk Information, the Quantitative Measurements Identifying Information, and each applicable quantitative measurement to the FDIC in accordance with the XML Schema specified and published on the FDIC’s website.


f. Recordkeeping

A banking entity must, for any quantitative measurement furnished to the FDIC pursuant to this appendix and § 351.20(d), create and maintain records documenting the preparation and content of these reports, as well as such information as is necessary to permit the FDIC to verify the accuracy of such reports, for a period of five years from the end of the calendar year for which the measurement was taken. A banking entity must retain the Narrative Statement, the Trading Desk Information, and the Quantitative Measurements Identifying Information for a period of five years from the end of the calendar year for which the information was reported to the FDIC.


IV. Quantitative Measurements

a. Risk-Management Measurements

1. Internal Limits and Usage

i. Description: For purposes of this appendix, Internal Limits are the constraints that define the amount of risk and the positions that a trading desk is permitted to take at a point in time, as defined by the banking entity for a specific trading desk. Usage represents the value of the trading desk’s risk or positions that are accounted for by the current activity of the desk. Internal limits and their usage are key compliance and risk management tools used to control and monitor risk taking and include, but are not limited to, the limits set out in §§ 351.4 and 351.5. A trading desk’s risk limits, commonly including a limit on “Value-at-Risk,” are useful in the broader context of the trading desk’s overall activities, particularly for the market making activities under § 351.4(b) and hedging activity under § 351.5. Accordingly, the limits required under §§ 351.4(b)(2)(iii)(C) and 351.5(b)(1)(i)(A) must meet the applicable requirements under §§ 351.4(b)(2)(iii)(C) and 351.5(b)(1)(i)(A) and also must include appropriate metrics for the trading desk limits including, at a minimum, “Value-at-Risk” except to the extent the “Value-at-Risk” metric is demonstrably ineffective for measuring and monitoring the risks of a trading desk based on the types of positions traded by, and risk exposures of, that desk.


A. A banking entity must provide the following information for each limit reported pursuant to this quantitative measurement: The unique identification label for the limit reported in the Internal Limits Information Schedule, the limit size (distinguishing between an upper and a lower limit), and the value of usage of the limit.


ii. Calculation Period: One trading day.


iii. Measurement Frequency: Daily.


iv. Applicability: All trading desks engaged in covered trading activities.


2. Value-at-Risk

i. Description: For purposes of this appendix, Value-at-Risk (“VaR”) is the measurement of the risk of future financial loss in the value of a trading desk’s aggregated positions at the ninety-nine percent confidence level over a one-day period, based on current market conditions.


ii. Calculation Period: One trading day.


iii. Measurement Frequency: Daily.


iv. Applicability: All trading desks engaged in covered trading activities.


b. Source-of-Revenue Measurements

1. Comprehensive Profit and Loss Attribution

i. Description: For purposes of this appendix, Comprehensive Profit and Loss Attribution is an analysis that attributes the daily fluctuation in the value of a trading desk’s positions to various sources. First, the daily profit and loss of the aggregated positions is divided into two categories: (i) Profit and loss attributable to a trading desk’s existing positions that were also positions held by the trading desk as of the end of the prior day (“existing positions”); and (ii) profit and loss attributable to new positions resulting from the current day’s trading activity (“new positions”).


A. The comprehensive profit and loss associated with existing positions must reflect changes in the value of these positions on the applicable day. The comprehensive profit and loss from existing positions must be further attributed, as applicable, to (i) changes in the specific risk factors and other factors that are monitored and managed as part of the trading desk’s overall risk management policies and procedures; and (ii) any other applicable elements, such as cash flows, carry, changes in reserves, and the correction, cancellation, or exercise of a trade.


B. For the attribution of comprehensive profit and loss from existing positions to specific risk factors and other factors, a banking entity must provide the following information for the factors that explain the preponderance of the profit or loss changes due to risk factor changes: The unique identification label for the risk factor or other factor listed in the Risk Factor Attribution Information Schedule, and the profit or loss due to the risk factor or other factor change.


C. The comprehensive profit and loss attributed to new positions must reflect commissions and fee income or expense and market gains or losses associated with transactions executed on the applicable day. New positions include purchases and sales of financial instruments and other assets/liabilities and negotiated amendments to existing positions. The comprehensive profit and loss from new positions may be reported in the aggregate and does not need to be further attributed to specific sources.


D. The portion of comprehensive profit and loss from existing positions that is not attributed to changes in specific risk factors and other factors must be allocated to a residual category. Significant unexplained profit and loss must be escalated for further investigation and analysis.


ii. Calculation Period: One trading day.


iii. Measurement Frequency: Daily.


iv. Applicability: All trading desks engaged in covered trading activities.


c. Positions and Transaction Volumes Measurements

1. Positions

i. Description: For purposes of this appendix, Positions is the value of securities and derivatives positions managed by the trading desk. For purposes of the Positions quantitative measurement, do not include in the Positions calculation for “securities” those securities that are also “derivatives,” as those terms are defined under subpart A; instead, report those securities that are also derivatives as “derivatives.”
1225
A banking entity must separately report the trading desk’s market value of long securities positions, short securities positions, derivatives receivables, and derivatives payables.




1225 See § 351.2(h), (aa). For example, under this part, a security-based swap is both a “security” and a “derivative.” For purposes of the Positions quantitative measurement, security-based swaps are reported as derivatives rather than securities.


ii. Calculation Period: One trading day.


iii. Measurement Frequency: Daily.


iv. Applicability: All trading desks that rely on § 351.4(a) or § 351.4(b) to conduct underwriting activity or market-making-related activity, respectively.


2. Transaction Volumes

i. Description: For purposes of this appendix, Transaction Volumes measures three exclusive categories of covered trading activity conducted by a trading desk. A banking entity is required to report the value and number of security and derivative transactions conducted by the trading desk with: (i) Customers, excluding internal transactions; (ii) non-customers, excluding internal transactions; and (iii) trading desks and other organizational units where the transaction is booked into either the same banking entity or an affiliated banking entity. For securities, value means gross market value. For derivatives, value means gross notional value. For purposes of calculating the Transaction Volumes quantitative measurement, do not include in the Transaction Volumes calculation for “securities” those securities that are also “derivatives,” as those terms are defined under subpart A; instead, report those securities that are also derivatives as “derivatives.”
1226
Further, for purposes of the Transaction Volumes quantitative measurement, a customer of a trading desk that relies on § 351.4(a) to conduct underwriting activity is a market participant identified in § 351.4(a)(7), and a customer of a trading desk that relies on § 351.4(b) to conduct market making-related activity is a market participant identified in § 351.4(b)(3).




1226 See § 351.2(h), (aa).


ii. Calculation Period: One trading day.


iii. Measurement Frequency: Daily.


iv. Applicability: All trading desks that rely on § 351.4(a) or § 351.4(b) to conduct underwriting activity or market-making-related activity, respectively.


[84 FR 62174, Nov. 14, 2019]


PART 352 – NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF DISABILITY


Authority:12 U.S.C. 1819(a); 29 U.S.C. 794d.


Source:69 FR 26492, May 13, 2004, unless otherwise noted.

§ 352.1 Purpose.

(a) One purpose of this part is to implement the spirit of section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (the Rehabilitation Act) as amended by section 119 of the Rehabilitation, Comprehensive Services, and Developmental Disabilities Amendments of 1978 and the Workforce Investment Act of 1998. Section 504 prohibits discrimination on the basis of disability in programs and activities conducted by a federal executive agency. Although the FDIC does not believe that Congress contemplated coverage of non-appropriated, independent regulatory agencies such as the FDIC, the FDIC has chosen to promulgate this final regulation to ensure that, to the extent practicable, persons with disabilities are provided with equal access to FDIC programs and activities.


(b) This part is also intended to implement section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act as amended. Section 508 requires each federal agency or department to ensure that the electronic and information technology they procure allows individuals with disabilities access to that technology comparable to the access of those who are not disabled, unless the agency would incur an undue burden.


§ 352.2 Application.

(a) This part applies to all programs, activities, and electronic and information technology developed, procured, maintained, used or conducted by the FDIC. The following programs and activities involve the direct provision of benefits and services to, or participation by, members of the public:


(1) Attending Board of Directors meetings open to the public and all other public meetings;


(2) Making inquiries or filing complaints at the FDIC Office of Legislative Affairs and Office of Public Affairs;


(3) Using the FDIC library in Washington, DC;


(4) Using the FDIC Web site on the Internet;


(5) Visiting an insured bank at which they conducted business (or an alternative liquidation site selected by the FDIC) and which has become insolvent, or been purchased by another bank under FDIC supervision, for the purpose of:


(i) Collecting FDIC checks for the insured amount of their deposits previously held in such bank; and/or


(ii) Discussing with FDIC representatives matters related to the repayment of debts which they previously owed to such bank, prior to its failure or purchase by another bank under FDIC supervision;


(6) Seeking employment with the FDIC;


(b) This regulation governs the conduct of FDIC personnel in their interaction with employees of insured banks and employees of other state or federal agencies while discharging the FDIC’s statutory obligations as insurer and/or receiver of financial institutions. It does not apply to financial institutions insured by the FDIC.


(c) Although application for employment and employment with the FDIC are programs and activities of the FDIC for purposes of this regulation, they shall be governed only by the standards set forth in § 352.6 of this part.


§ 352.3 Definitions.

For purposes of this part, the term –


(a) “Auxiliary aids” means services or devices that enable persons with impaired sensory, manual, or speaking skills to have an equal opportunity to participate in, and enjoy the benefits of, the FDIC programs or activities, and Electronic and Information Technology set forth in § 352.2.


(b) “Electronic and Information Technology” (“EIT”) has the same meaning as “information technology” except EIT also includes any equipment or interconnected system or subsystem of equipment that is used in the creation, conversion, or duplication of data or information. The term EIT includes, but is not limited to, telecommunication products (such as telephones), information kiosks and transaction machines, worldwide web sites, multimedia, and office equipment (such as copiers and fax machines).


(c) “Facility” means all or any portion of buildings, structures, equipment, roads, walks, parking lots and other real or personal property. As used in this definition, “personal property” means only furniture, carpeting and similar features not considered to be real property.


(d) “Individual with a disability” means any person who has a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities, has a record of such an impairment, or is regarded as having such an impairment.


(e) “Qualified individual with a disability” means –


(1) With respect to any FDIC program or activity in which a person is required to perform services or to achieve a level of accomplishment, an individual with a disability who meets the essential eligibility requirements and can achieve the purpose of the program or activity without modifications in the program or activity that the FDIC can determine on the basis of a written record would result in a fundamental alteration in its nature;


(2) With respect to any other program or activity, an individual with a disability who meets the essential eligibility requirements for participation in, or receipt of benefits from, that program or activity;


(3) With respect to employment, an individual with a disability as defined in 29 CFR 1630.2(g), which is made applicable to this part by § 352.6.


(f) “Sections 504 and 508” mean sections 504 and 508 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (Pub. L. 93-112, 87 Stat. 394 (29 U.S.C. 794 and 794d)), as amended by the Rehabilitation Act Amendments of 1974 (Pub. L. 93-516, 88 Stat. 1617), the Rehabilitation, Comprehensive Services, and Developmental Disabilities Amendments of 1978 (Pub. L. 95-602, 92 Stat. 2955), and the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 (Pub. L. 105-220, 112 Stat. 936). As used in this regulation, sections 504 and 508 shall be applied only to the programs, activities, and EIT conducted by the FDIC as set forth in §§ 352.2 and 352.3(b) of this regulation.


§ 352.4 Nondiscrimination in any program or activity conducted by the FDIC.

In accordance with section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, no qualified individual with a disability shall, solely by reason of his or her disability, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination in any program or activity conducted by the FDIC.


§ 352.5 Accessibility to electronic and information technology.

(a) In accordance with section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act, the FDIC shall ensure, absent an undue burden, that the electronic and information technology the agency develops, procures, maintains or allows:


(1) Individuals with disabilities who are FDIC employees or applicants to have access to and use of information and data that is comparable to the access to and use of information and data by FDIC employees or applicants who are not individuals with disabilities; and


(2) Individuals with disabilities who are members of the public seeking information or services from the FDIC to have access to and use of information and data that is comparable to the access to and use of information and data by members of the public who are not individuals with disabilities.


(b) When development or procurement of electronic and information technology that meets the standards published by the Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board, 36 CFR 1194, would pose an undue burden, the FDIC shall provide individuals with disabilities covered by paragraph (a) of this section with the information and data by an alternative means of access that allows the individuals to use the information and data.


§ 352.6 Employment.

No qualified individual with a disability shall, on the basis of that disability, be subjected to discrimination in employment in any program or activity conducted by the FDIC. The definitions, requirements, and procedures (including those pertaining to employment discrimination complaints) of sections 501 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as established in 29 CFR parts 1614 and 1630, shall apply to employment in the FDIC.


§ 352.7 Accessibility of programs and activities: Existing facilities.

The FDIC shall operate each of the programs or activities set forth in § 352.2 of this part so that when viewed in its entirety, the program or activity is readily accessible to and usable by individuals with disabilities.


§ 352.8 Program accessibility: New construction and alterations.

Each building or part of a building, whether newly constructed, or substantially altered, in which FDIC programs or activities will be conducted, shall be designed, constructed or altered so as to be readily accessible to, and usable by, individuals with disabilities.


§ 352.9 Communications.

(a) The FDIC shall take appropriate steps to ensure effective communication with participants in FDIC programs, activities and EIT.


(1) The FDIC shall furnish appropriate auxiliary aids where necessary to afford an individual with a disability an equal opportunity to participate in, and enjoy the benefits of, the FDIC programs or activities.


(i) In determining what type of auxiliary aid is necessary, the FDIC shall give primary consideration to any reasonable requests of the individual with a disability.


(ii) The FDIC need not provide individually prescribed devices, readers for personal use or study, or other devices of a personal nature.


(2) Where the FDIC communicates by telephone, it shall use telecommunications devices for deaf persons (TDD’s) or equally effective telecommunication systems with hearing impaired participants and beneficiaries.


(b) The FDIC shall ensure that interested persons, including persons with impaired vision or hearing, can obtain information as to the existence and location of accessible services, activities, facilities and EIT. Interested persons may obtain such information by calling, writing or visiting the FDIC Office of Minority and Women Inclusion (OMWI), located at 3501 Fairfax Drive, Arlington, VA 22226. The FDIC telephone number is (877) 275-3342 or (703) 562-2473 (TTY).


(c) The FDIC shall provide information at a primary entrance to each of its facilities where programs or activities are conducted, directing users to a location at which they can obtain information about accessible facilities. The international symbol for accessibility shall be used at each primary entrance of an accessible facility.


[69 FR 26492, May 13, 2004, as amended at 73 FR 45857, Aug. 7, 2008; 80 FR 62445, Oct. 16, 2015]


§ 352.10 Compliance procedures.

(a) Applicability. Paragraph (b) of this section applies to employment complaints. The remaining sections concern complaints alleging disability discrimination in FDIC programs or activities and denial of technology access.


(b) Employment complaints. The FDIC shall process complaints alleging employment discrimination on the basis of disability according to the procedures established by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission in 29 CFR parts 1614 and 1630 pursuant to section 501 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (29 U.S.C. 791).


(c) Informal process. A complainant shall first exhaust informal administrative procedures before filing a formal complaint alleging disability discrimination in FDIC programs or activities, or a denial of technology access. The FDIC’s Office of Minority and Women Inclusion shall be responsible for coordinating implementation of this section. An aggrieved individual initiates the process by filing an informal complaint with OMWI within 180 calendar days from the date of the alleged disability discrimination or denial of access to electronic information technology. An informal complaint with respect to any FDIC program or activity must include a written statement containing the individual’s name and address which describes the FDIC’s action in sufficient detail to inform the FDIC of the nature and date of the alleged violation of these regulations. An informal complaint for denial of technology access must clearly identify the individual and the manner in which the EIT was inaccessible. All informal complaints shall be signed by the complainant or one authorized to do so on his or her behalf. Informal complaints filed on behalf of third parties shall describe or identify (by name if possible) the alleged victim of discrimination or denial of technology access. During the informal resolution process, OMWI has 30 days to attempt a resolution of the matter. If the aggrieved individual elects to participate in mediation, the period for attempting informal resolution will be extended for an additional 60 calendar days. If the matter is not resolved informally, the individual will be provided written notice of the right to file a formal complaint. All complaints should be sent to the FDIC’s Office of Minority and Women Inclusion, 3501 Fairfax Drive, Arlington, VA 22226.


(d) If the FDIC receives a complaint over which it does not have jurisdiction, it shall promptly notify the complainant and shall make reasonable efforts to refer the complainant to the appropriate government entity.


(e) Formal complaints. The individual must file a written formal complaint within 15 calendar days after receiving the notice of a right to file a formal complaint. Formal complaints must be filed with the FDIC Chairman or the OMWI Director. Within 120 days of the receipt of such a complaint for which it has jurisdiction, the FDIC shall notify the complainant of the results of the investigation in a letter containing –


(1) A finding regarding the alleged violations;


(2) A description of a remedy for each violation found; and


(3) A notice of the right to appeal.


(f) Appeals of the findings or remedies must be filed by the complainant within 30 days of receipt from the FDIC of the letter required by § 352.10 (e). The FDIC may extend this time for good cause.


(g) Timely appeals shall be accepted and processed by the FDIC Chairman or OMWI Director.


(h) The FDIC Chairman or ODEO Director shall notify the complainant of the results of the appeal within 60 days of the receipt of the request. If the FDIC Chairman or OMWI Director determines that additional information is needed from the complainant, he or she shall have 60 days from the date of receipt of the additional information to make a determination on the appeal.


(i) The time limits set forth in (e) and (h) above may be extended for an individual case when the FDIC Chairman or OMWI Director determines that there is good cause, based on the particular circumstances of that case.


(j) The FDIC may delegate its authority for conducting complaint investigations to other federal agencies or independent contractors, except that the authority for making the final determination may not be delegated.


[69 FR 26492, May 13, 2004, as amended at 73 FR 45857, Aug. 7, 2008; 80 FR 62445, Oct. 16, 2015]


§ 352.11 Notice.

The FDIC shall make available to employees, applicants, participants, beneficiaries, and other interested persons such information regarding the provisions of this part and its applicability to the programs or activities conducted by the FDIC, and make such information available to them in such manner as the Chairman or designee finds necessary to apprise such persons of the protections against discrimination under section 504 or technology access provided under section 508 and this regulation.


PART 353 – SUSPICIOUS ACTIVITY REPORTS


Authority:12 U.S.C. 1818, 1819; 31 U.S.C. 5318.


Source:61 FR 6099, Feb. 16, 1996, unless otherwise noted.

§ 353.1 Purpose and scope.

The purpose of this part is to ensure that an FDIC supervised institution files a Suspicious Activity Report when it detects a known or suspected criminal violation of federal law or a suspicious transaction related to a money laundering activity or a violation of the Bank Secrecy Act. This part applies to all FDIC supervised institutions.


[85 FR 3247, Jan. 21, 2020]


§ 353.2 Definitions.

For the purposes of this part:


(a) FinCEN means the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network of the Department of the Treasury.


(b) Institution-affiliated party means any institution-affiliated party as that term is defined in sections 3(u) and 8(b)(5) of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act (12 U.S.C. 1813(u) and 1818(b)(5)).


(c) FDIC-supervised institution means an entity for which the FDIC is the appropriate Federal banking agency pursuant to section 3(q) of the FDI Act, 12 U.S.C. 1813(q).


[61 FR 6099, Feb. 16, 1996, as amended at 85 FR 3247, Jan. 21, 2020]


§ 353.3 Reports and records.

(a) Suspicious activity reports required. An FDIC-supervised institution shall file a suspicious activity report with the appropriate federal law enforcement agencies and the Department of the Treasury, in accordance with the form’s instructions, by sending a completed suspicious activity report to FinCEN in the following circumstances:


(1) Insider abuse involving any amount. Whenever the FDIC-supervised institution detects any known or suspected federal criminal violation, or pattern of criminal violations, committed or attempted against the FDIC-supervised institution or involving a transaction or transactions conducted through the FDIC-supervised institution, where the FDIC-supervised institution believes it was either an actual or potential victim of a criminal violation, or series of criminal violations, or that the FDIC-supervised institution was used to facilitate a criminal transaction, and the FDIC-supervised institution has a substantial basis for identifying one of the FDIC-supervised institution’s directors, officers, employees, agents, or other institution-affiliated parties as having committed or aided in the commission of the criminal violation, regardless of the amount involved in the violation;


(2) Transactions aggregating $5,000 or more where a suspect can be identified. Whenever the FDIC-supervised institution detects any known or suspected federal criminal violation, or pattern of criminal violations, committed or attempted against the FDIC-supervised institution or involving a transaction or transactions conducted through the FDIC-supervised institution, and involving or aggregating $5,000 or more in funds or other assets, where the FDIC-supervised institution believes it was either an actual or potential victim of a criminal violation, or series of criminal violations, or that the FDIC-supervised institution was used to facilitate a criminal transaction, and the FDIC-supervised institution has a substantial basis for identifying a possible suspect or group of suspects. If it is determined prior to filing this report that the identified suspect or group of suspects has used an “alias”, then information regarding the true identity of the suspect or group of suspects, as well as alias identifiers, such as driver’s license or social security numbers, addresses and telephone numbers, must be reported;


(3) Transactions aggregating $25,000 or more regardless of potential suspects. Whenever the FDIC-supervised institution detects any known or suspected federal criminal violation, or pattern of criminal violations, committed or attempted against the FDIC-supervised institution or involving a transaction or transactions conducted through the FDIC-supervised institution, involving or aggregating $25,000 or more in funds or other assets, where the FDIC-supervised institution believes it was either an actual or potential victim of a criminal violation, or series of criminal violations, or that the FDIC-supervised institution was used to facilitate a criminal transaction, even though the FDIC-supervised institution has no substantial basis for identifying a possible suspect or group of suspects; or


(4) Transactions aggregating $5,000 or more that involve potential money laundering or violations of the Bank Secrecy Act. Any transaction (which for purposes of this paragraph (a)(4) means a deposit, withdrawal, transfer between accounts, exchange of currency, loan, extension of credit, purchase or sale of any stock, bond, certificate of deposit, or other monetary instrument or investment security, or any other payment, transfer, or delivery by, through, or to a financial institution, by whatever means effected) conducted or attempted by, at or through the FDIC-supervised institution and involving or aggregating $5,000 or more in funds or other assets, if the FDIC-supervised institution knows, suspects, or has reason to suspect that:


(i) The transaction involves funds derived from illegal activities or is intended or conducted in order to hide or disguise funds or assets derived from illegal activities (including, without limitation, the ownership, nature, source, location, or control of such funds or assets) as part of a plan to violate or evade any federal law or regulation or to avoid any transaction reporting requirement under federal law;


(ii) The transaction is designed to evade any regulations promulgated under the Bank Secrecy Act; or


(iii) The transaction has no business or apparent lawful purpose or is not the sort of transaction in which the particular customer would normally be expected to engage, and the FDIC-supervised institution knows of no reasonable explanation for the transaction after examining the available facts, including the background and possible purpose of the transaction.


(b) Time for reporting. (1) An FDIC-supervised institution shall file the suspicious activity report no later than 30 calendar days after the date of initial detection of facts that may constitute a basis for filing a suspicious activity report. If no suspect was identified on the date of detection of the incident requiring the filing, an FDIC-supervised institution may delay filing a suspicious activity report for an additional 30 calendar days to identify a suspect. In no case shall reporting be delayed more than 60 calendar days after the date of initial detection of a reportable transaction.


(2) In situations involving violations requiring immediate attention, such as when a reportable violation is ongoing, the FDIC-supervised institution shall immediately notify, by telephone, an appropriate law enforcement authority and the appropriate FDIC regional office (Division of Supervision and Consumer Protection (DSC)) in addition to filing a timely report.


(c) Reports to state and local authorities. An FDIC-supervised institution is encouraged to file a copy of the suspicious activity report with state and local law enforcement agencies where appropriate.


(d) Exemptions. (1) An FDIC-supervised institution need not file a suspicious activity report for a robbery or burglary committed or attempted, that is reported to appropriate law enforcement authorities.


(2) An FDIC-supervised institution need not file a suspicious activity report for lost, missing, counterfeit, or stolen securities if it files a report pursuant to the reporting requirements of 17 CFR 240.17f-1.


(e) Retention of records. An FDIC-supervised institution shall maintain a copy of any suspicious activity report filed and the original or business record equivalent of any supporting documentation for a period of five years from the date of filing the suspicious activity report. Supporting documentation shall be identified and maintained by the FDIC-supervised institution as such, and shall be deemed to have been filed with the suspicious activity report. An FDIC-supervised institution must make all supporting documentation available to appropriate law enforcement authorities upon request.


(f) Notification to board of directors. The management of an FDIC-supervised institution shall promptly notify its board of directors, or a committee thereof, of any report filed pursuant to this section. The term “board of directors” includes the managing official of a foreign bank having an insured branch for purposes of this part.


(g) Confidentiality of suspicious activity reports. Suspicious activity reports are confidential. An FDIC-supervised institution subpoenaed or otherwise requested to disclose a suspicious activity report or the information contained in a suspicious activity report shall decline to produce the suspicious activity report or to provide any information that would disclose that a suspicious activity report has been prepared or filed citing this part, applicable law (e.g., 31 U.S.C. 5318(g)), or both, and notify the appropriate FDIC regional office (Division of Supervision and Consumer Protection (DSC)).


(h) Safe harbor. The safe harbor provisions of 31 U.S.C. 5318(g), which exempts an FDIC-supervised institution that makes a disclosure of any possible violation of law or regulation from liability under any law or regulation of the United States, or any constitution, law or regulation of any state or political subdivision, cover all reports of suspected or known criminal violations and suspicious activities to law enforcement and financial institution supervisory authorities, including supporting documentation, regardless of whether such reports are filed pursuant to this part or are filed on a voluntary basis.


[61 FR 6099, Feb. 16, 1996, as amended at 85 FR 3247, Jan. 21, 2020]


PART 354 – INDUSTRIAL BANKS


Authority:12 U.S.C. 1811, 1815, 1816, 1817, 1818, 1819(a) (Seventh) and (Tenth), 1820(g), 1831o-1, 3108, 3207.


Source:86 FR 10727, Feb. 23, 2021, unless otherwise noted.

§ 354.1 Scope.

(a) In addition to the applicable filing procedures of part 303 of this chapter, this part establishes certain requirements for filings involving an industrial bank or a Covered Company.


(b) The requirements of this part do not apply to an industrial bank that is organized as a subsidiary of a company that is not subject to Federal consolidated supervision by the Federal Reserve Board (FRB) before April 1, 2021. In addition, this part does not apply to:


(1) Any industrial bank that is or becomes controlled by a company that is subject to Federal consolidated supervision by the FRB; and


(2) Any industrial bank that is not or will not become a subsidiary of a company.


§ 354.2 Definitions.

Unless defined in this section, terms shall have the meaning given to them in section 3 of the FDI Act.


Control means the power, directly or indirectly, to direct the management or policies of a company or to vote 25 percent or more of any class of voting securities of a company, and includes the rebuttable presumptions of control at § 303.82(b)(1) of this chapter and of acting in concert at § 303.82(b)(2) of this chapter. For purposes of this part, the presumptions set forth in § 303.82(b)(1) and (2) of this chapter shall apply with respect to any company in the same manner and to the same extent as if they applied to an acquisition of securities of the company.


Covered Company means any company that is not subject to Federal consolidated supervision by the FRB and that controls an industrial bank:


(1) As a result of a change in bank control pursuant to section 7(j) of the FDI Act;


(2) As a result of a merger transaction pursuant to section 18(c) of the FDI Act; or


(3) That is granted deposit insurance by the FDIC pursuant to section 6 of the FDI Act, in each case on or after April 1, 2021.


FDI Act means the Federal Deposit Insurance Act, 12 U.S.C. 1811, et seq.


Filing has the meaning given to it in § 303.2(s) of this chapter.


FRB means the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System and each Federal Reserve Bank.


Industrial bank means any insured State bank that is an industrial bank, industrial loan company, or other similar institution that is excluded from the definition of the term “bank” in section 2(c)(2)(H) of the Bank Holding Company Act, 12 U.S.C. 1841(c)(2)(H).


Senior executive officer has the meaning given it in § 303.101(b) of this chapter.


§ 354.3 Written agreement.

(a) No industrial bank may become a subsidiary of a Covered Company unless the Covered Company enters into one or more written agreements with both the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) and the subsidiary industrial bank, which contain commitments by the Covered Company to comply with each of paragraphs (a)(1) through (8) in § 354.4 and such other written agreements, commitments, or restrictions as the FDIC deems appropriate, including, but not limited to, the provisions of §§ 354.4 and 354.5.


(b) The FDIC may, at its sole discretion, condition a grant of deposit insurance, issuance of a non-objection to a change in control, or approval of a merger on an individual who is a controlling shareholder of a Covered Company joining as a party to any written agreement required by paragraph (a) of this section.


§ 354.4 Required commitments and provisions of written agreement.

(a) The commitments required to be made in the written agreements referenced in § 354.3 are set forth in paragraphs (a)(1) through (8) of this section. In addition, with respect to an industrial bank subject to this part, the FDIC will condition each grant of deposit insurance, each issuance of a non-objection to a change in control, and each approval of a merger on compliance with paragraphs (a)(1) through (8) of this section by the parties to the written agreement. As required, each Covered Company must:


(1) Submit to the FDIC an initial listing of all of the Covered Company’s subsidiaries and update such list annually;


(2) Consent to the examination by the FDIC of the Covered Company and each of its subsidiaries to permit the FDIC to assess compliance with the provisions of any written agreement, commitment, or condition imposed; the FDI Act; or any other Federal law for which the FDIC has specific enforcement jurisdiction against such Covered Company or subsidiary, and all relevant laws and regulations;


(3) Submit to the FDIC an annual report describing the Covered Company’s operations and activities, in the form and manner prescribed by the FDIC, and such other reports as may be requested by the FDIC to inform the FDIC as to the Covered Company’s:


(i) Financial condition;


(ii) Systems for identifying, measuring, monitoring, and controlling financial and operational risks;


(iii) Transactions with depository institution subsidiaries of the Covered Company;


(iv) Systems for protecting the security, confidentiality, and integrity of consumer and nonpublic personal information; and


(v) Compliance with applicable provisions of the FDI Act and any other law or regulation;


(4) Maintain such records as the FDIC may deem necessary to assess the risks to the subsidiary industrial bank or to the Deposit Insurance Fund;


(5) Cause an independent audit of each subsidiary industrial bank to be performed annually;


(6) Limit the Covered Company’s direct and indirect representation on the board of directors or board of managers, as the case may be, of each subsidiary industrial bank to less than 50 percent of the members of such board of directors or board of managers, in the aggregate, and, in the case of a subsidiary industrial bank that is organized as a member-managed limited liability company, limit the Covered Company’s direct and indirect representation as a managing member to less than 50 percent of the managing member interests of the subsidiary industrial bank, in the aggregate;


(7) Maintain the capital and liquidity of the subsidiary industrial bank at such levels as the FDIC deems appropriate, and take such other actions as the FDIC deems appropriate to provide the subsidiary industrial bank with a resource for additional capital and liquidity including, for example, pledging assets, obtaining and maintaining a letter of credit from a third-party institution acceptable to the FDIC, and providing indemnification of the subsidiary industrial bank; and


(8) Execute a tax allocation agreement with its subsidiary industrial bank that expressly states that an agency relationship exists between the Covered Company and the subsidiary industrial bank with respect to tax assets generated by such industrial bank, and that further states that all such tax assets are held in trust by the Covered Company for the benefit of the subsidiary industrial bank and will be promptly remitted to such industrial bank. The tax allocation agreement also must provide that the amount and timing of any payments or refunds to the subsidiary industrial bank by the Covered Company should be no less favorable than if the subsidiary industrial bank were a separate taxpayer.


(b) The FDIC may require such Covered Company and industrial bank to commit to provide to the FDIC, and, thereafter, implement and adhere to, a contingency plan subject to the FDIC’s approval that sets forth, at a minimum, recovery actions to address significant financial or operational stress that could threaten the safe and sound operation of the industrial bank and one or more strategies for the orderly disposition of such industrial bank without the need for the appointment of a receiver or conservator.


§ 354.5 Restrictions on industrial bank subsidiaries of Covered Companies.

Without the FDIC’s prior written approval, an industrial bank that is controlled by a Covered Company shall not:


(a) Make a material change in its business plan after becoming a subsidiary of such Covered Company;


(b) Add or replace a member of the board of directors, board of managers, or a managing member, as the case may be, of the subsidiary industrial bank during the first three years after becoming a subsidiary of such Covered Company;


(c) Add or replace a senior executive officer during the first three years after becoming a subsidiary of such Covered Company;


(d) Employ a senior executive officer who is, or during the past three years has been, associated in any manner (e.g., as a director, officer, employee, agent, owner, partner, or consultant) with an affiliate of the industrial bank; or


(e) Enter into any contract for services material to the operations of the industrial bank (for example, loan servicing function) with such Covered Company or any subsidiary thereof.


§ 354.6 Reservation of authority.

Nothing in this part limits the authority of the FDIC under any other provision of law or regulation to take supervisory or enforcement actions, including actions to address unsafe or unsound practices or conditions, or violations of law.


PART 357 – DETERMINATION OF ECONOMICALLY DEPRESSED REGIONS


Authority:12 U.S.C. 1819, 1823(k)(5).

§ 357.1 Economically depressed regions.

(a) Purpose. Section 13(k)(5) of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act (12 U.S.C. 1823(k)(5)) provides that the FDIC shall consider proposals for financial assistance for eligible insured savings associations before grounds exist for appointment of a conservator or receiver for such member. One of the criteria for eligibility is that an institution’s offices are located in an economically depressed region as determined by the FDIC.


(b) Economically depressed regions. (1) For the purpose of determining “economically depressed regions”, the FDIC will determine whether an institution qualifies as being located in an “economically depressed region” on a case-by-case basis. That determination will be based on four criteria:


(i) High unemployment rates;


(ii) Significant declines in non-farm employment;


(iii) High delinquency rates of real estate assets at insured depository institutions; and


(iv) Evidence indicating declining real estate values.


(2) In addition, the FDIC will also consider relevant information from institutions regarding their geographic market area, as well as information on whether that market is “economically depressed”.


[55 FR 11161, Mar. 27, 1990, as amended at 63 FR 10295, Mar. 3, 1998; 71 FR 20527, Apr. 21, 2006]


PART 359 – GOLDEN PARACHUTE AND INDEMNIFICATION PAYMENTS


Authority:12 U.S.C. 1828(k).


Source:61 FR 5930, Feb. 15, 1996, unless otherwise noted.

§ 359.0 Scope.

(a) This part limits and/or prohibits, in certain circumstances, the ability of insured depository institutions, their subsidiaries and affiliated depository institution holding companies to enter into contracts to pay and to make golden parachute and indemnification payments to institution-affiliated parties (IAPs).


(b) The limitations on golden parachute payments apply to troubled insured depository institutions which seek to enter into contracts to pay or to make golden parachute payments to their IAPs. The limitations also apply to depository institution holding companies which are troubled and seek to enter into contracts to pay or to make golden parachute payments to their IAPs as well as healthy holding companies which seek to enter into contracts to pay or to make golden parachute payments to IAPs of a troubled insured depository institution subsidiary. A “golden parachute payment” is generally considered to be any payment to an IAP which is contingent on the termination of that person’s employment and is received when the insured depository institution making the payment is troubled or, if the payment is being made by an affiliated holding company, either the holding company itself or the insured depository institution employing the IAP, is troubled. The definition of golden parachute payment does not include payments pursuant to qualified retirement plans, nonqualified bona fide deferred compensation plans, nondiscriminatory severance pay plans, other types of common benefit plans, state statutes and death benefits. Certain limited exceptions to the golden parachute payment prohibition are provided for in cases involving the hiring of a white knight and unassisted changes in control. A procedure is also set forth whereby an institution or IAP can request permission to make what would otherwise be a prohibited golden parachute payment.


(c) The limitations on indemnification payments apply to all insured depository institutions, their subsidiaries and affiliated depository institution holding companies regardless of their financial health. Generally, this part prohibits insured depository institutions, their subsidiaries and affiliated holding companies from indemnifying an IAP for that portion of the costs sustained with regard to an administrative or civil enforcement action commenced by any federal banking agency which results in a final order or settlement pursuant to which the IAP is assessed a civil money penalty, removed from office, prohibited from participating in the affairs of an insured depository institution or required to cease and desist from or take an affirmative action described in section 8(b) (12 U.S.C. 1818(b)) of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act (FDI Act). However, there are exceptions to this general prohibition. First, an institution or holding company may purchase commercial insurance to cover such expenses, except judgments and penalties. Second, the institution or holding company may advance legal and other professional expenses to an IAP directly (except for judgments and penalties) if its board of directors makes certain specific findings and the IAP agrees in writing to reimburse the institution if it is ultimately determined that the IAP violated a law, regulation or other fiduciary duty.


§ 359.1 Definitions.

(a) Act means the Federal Deposit Insurance Act, as amended (12 U.S.C. 1811, et seq.).


(b) Appropriate federal banking agency, bank holding company, depository institution holding company and savings and loan holding company have the meanings given to such terms in section 3 of the Act.


(c) Benefit plan means any plan, contract, agreement or other arrangement which is an “employee welfare benefit plan” as that term is defined in section 3(1) of the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974, as amended (29 U.S.C. 1002(1)), or other usual and customary plans such as dependent care, tuition reimbursement, group legal services or cafeteria plans; provided however, that such term shall not include any plan intended to be subject to paragraphs (f)(2)(iii) and (v) of this section.


(d) Bona fide deferred compensation plan or arrangement means any plan, contract, agreement or other arrangement whereby:


(1) An IAP voluntarily elects to defer all or a portion of the reasonable compensation, wages or fees paid for services rendered which otherwise would have been paid to such party at the time the services were rendered (including a plan that provides for the crediting of a reasonable investment return on such elective deferrals) and the insured depository institution or depository institution holding company either:


(i) Recognizes compensation expense and accrues a liability for the benefit payments according to generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP); or


(ii) Segregates or otherwise sets aside assets in a trust which may only be used to pay plan and other benefits, except that the assets of such trust may be available to satisfy claims of the institution’s or holding company’s creditors in the case of insolvency; or


(2) An insured depository institution or depository institution holding company establishes a nonqualified deferred compensation or supplemental retirement plan, other than an elective deferral plan described in paragraph (e)(1) of this section:


(i) Primarily for the purpose of providing benefits for certain IAPs in excess of the limitations on contributions and benefits imposed by sections 415, 401(a)(17), 402(g) or any other applicable provision of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 (26 U.S.C. 415, 401(a)(17), 402(g)); or


(ii) Primarily for the purpose of providing supplemental retirement benefits or other deferred compensation for a select group of directors, management or highly compensated employees (excluding severance payments described in paragraph (f)(2)(v) of this section and permissible golden parachute payments described in § 359.4); and


(3) In the case of any nonqualified deferred compensation or supplemental retirement plans as described in paragraphs (d)(1) and (2) of this section, the following requirements shall apply:


(i) The plan was in effect at least one year prior to any of the events described in paragraph (f)(1)(ii) of this section;


(ii) Any payment made pursuant to such plan is made in accordance with the terms of the plan as in effect no later than one year prior to any of the events described in paragraph (f)(1)(ii) of this section and in accordance with any amendments to such plan during such one year period that do not increase the benefits payable thereunder;


(iii) The IAP has a vested right, as defined under the applicable plan document, at the time of termination of employment to payments under such plan;


(iv) Benefits under such plan are accrued each period only for current or prior service rendered to the employer (except that an allowance may be made for service with a predecessor employer);


(v) Any payment made pursuant to such plan is not based on any discretionary acceleration of vesting or accrual of benefits which occurs at any time later than one year prior to any of the events described in paragraph (f)(1)(ii) of this section;


(vi) The insured depository institution or depository institution holding company has previously recognized compensation expense and accrued a liability for the benefit payments according to GAAP or segregated or otherwise set aside assets in a trust which may only be used to pay plan benefits, except that the assets of such trust may be available to satisfy claims of the institution’s or holding company’s creditors in the case of insolvency; and


(vii) Payments pursuant to such plans shall not be in excess of the accrued liability computed in accordance with GAAP.


(e) Corporation means the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, in its corporate capacity.


(f) Golden parachute payment. (1) The term golden parachute payment means any payment (or any agreement to make any payment) in the nature of compensation by any insured depository institution or an affiliated depository institution holding company for the benefit of any current or former IAP pursuant to an obligation of such institution or holding company that:


(i) Is contingent on, or by its terms is payable on or after, the termination of such party’s primary employment or affiliation with the institution or holding company; and


(ii) Is received on or after, or is made in contemplation of, any of the following events:


(A) The insolvency (or similar event) of the insured depository institution which is making the payment or bankruptcy or insolvency (or similar event) of the depository institution holding company which is making the payment; or


(B) The appointment of any conservator or receiver for such insured depository institution; or


(C) A determination by the insured depository institution’s or depository institution holding company’s appropriate federal banking agency, respectively, that the insured depository institution or depository institution holding company is in a troubled condition, as defined in the applicable regulations of the appropriate federal banking agency (§ 303.101(c) of this chapter); or


(D) The insured depository institution is assigned a composite rating of 4 or 5 by the appropriate federal banking agency or informed in writing by the Corporation that it is rated a 4 or 5 under the Uniform Financial Institutions Rating System of the Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council, or the depository institution holding company is assigned a composite rating of 4 or 5 or unsatisfactory by its appropriate federal banking agency; or


(E) The insured depository institution is subject to a proceeding to terminate or suspend deposit insurance for such institution; and


(iii)(A) Is payable to an IAP whose employment by or affiliation with an insured depository institution is terminated at a time when the insured depository institution by which the IAP is employed or with which the IAP is affiliated satisfies any of the conditions enumerated in paragraphs (f)(1)(ii)(A) through (E) of this section, or in contemplation of any of these conditions; or


(B) Is payable to an IAP whose employment by or affiliation with an insured depository institution holding company is terminated at a time when the insured depository institution holding company by which the IAP is employed or with which the IAP is affiliated satisfies any of the conditions enumerated in paragraphs (f)(1)(ii)(A), (C) or (D) of this section, or in contemplation of any of these conditions.


(2) Exceptions. The term golden parachute payment shall not include:


(i) Any payment made pursuant to a pension or retirement plan which is qualified (or is intended within a reasonable period of time to be qualified) under section 401 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 (26 U.S.C. 401) or pursuant to a pension or other retirement plan which is governed by the laws of any foreign country; or


(ii) Any payment made pursuant to a benefit plan as that term is defined in paragraph (c) of this section; or


(iii) Any payment made pursuant to a bona fide deferred compensation plan or arrangement as defined in paragraph (d) of this section; or


(iv) Any payment made by reason of death or by reason of termination caused by the disability of an institution-affiliated party; or


(v) Any payment made pursuant to a nondiscriminatory severance pay plan or arrangement which provides for payment of severance benefits to all eligible employees upon involuntary termination other than for cause, voluntary resignation, or early retirement; provided, however, that no employee shall receive any such payment which exceeds the base compensation paid to such employee during the twelve months (or such longer period or greater benefit as the Corporation shall consent to) immediately preceding termination of employment, resignation or early retirement, and such severance pay plan or arrangement shall not have been adopted or modified to increase the amount or scope of severance benefits at a time when the insured depository institution or depository institution holding company was in a condition specified in paragraph (f)(1)(ii) of this section or in contemplation of such a condition without the prior written consent of the appropriate federal banking agency; or


(vi) Any severance or similar payment which is required to be made pursuant to a state statute or foreign law which is applicable to all employers within the appropriate jurisdiction (with the exception of employers that may be exempt due to their small number of employees or other similar criteria); or


(vii) Any other payment which the Corporation determines to be permissible in accordance with § 359.4.


(g) Insured depository institution means any bank or savings association the deposits of which are insured by the Corporation pursuant to the Act, or any subsidiary thereof.


(h) Institution-affiliated party (IAP) means:


(1) Any director, officer, employee, or controlling stockholder (other than a depository institution holding company) of, or agent for, an insured depository institution or depository institution holding company;


(2) Any other person who has filed or is required to file a change-in-control notice with the appropriate federal banking agency under section 7(j) of the Act (12 U.S.C. 1817(j));


(3) Any shareholder (other than a depository institution holding company), consultant, joint venture partner, and any other person as determined by the appropriate federal banking agency (by regulation or case-by-case) who participates in the conduct of the affairs of an insured depository institution or depository institution holding company; and


(4) Any independent contractor (including any attorney, appraiser, or accountant) who knowingly or recklessly participates in: Any violation of any law or regulation, any breach of fiduciary duty, or any unsafe or unsound practice, which caused or is likely to cause more than a minimal financial loss to, or a significant adverse effect on, the insured depository institution or depository institution holding company.


(i) Liability or legal expense means:


(1) Any legal or other professional fees and expenses incurred in connection with any claim, proceeding, or action;


(2) The amount of, and any cost incurred in connection with, any settlement of any claim, proceeding, or action; and


(3) The amount of, and any cost incurred in connection with, any judgment or penalty imposed with respect to any claim, proceeding, or action.


(j) Nondiscriminatory means that the plan, contract or arrangement in question applies to all employees of an insured depository institution or depository institution holding company who meet reasonable and customary eligibility requirements applicable to all employees, such as minimum length of service requirements. A nondiscriminatory plan, contract or arrangement may provide different benefits based only on objective criteria such as salary, total compensation, length of service, job grade or classification, which are applied on a proportionate basis (with a variance in severance benefits relating to any criterion of plus or minus ten percent) to groups of employees consisting of not less than the lesser of 33 percent of employees or 1,000 employees.


(k) Payment means:


(1) Any direct or indirect transfer of any funds or any asset;


(2) Any forgiveness of any debt or other obligation;


(3) The conferring of any benefit, including but not limited to stock options and stock appreciation rights; and


(4) Any segregation of any funds or assets, the establishment or funding of any trust or the purchase of or arrangement for any letter of credit or other instrument, for the purpose of making, or pursuant to any agreement to make, any payment on or after the date on which such funds or assets are segregated, or at the time of or after such trust is established or letter of credit or other instrument is made available, without regard to whether the obligation to make such payment is contingent on:


(i) The determination, after such date, of the liability for the payment of such amount; or


(ii) The liquidation, after such date, of the amount of such payment.


(l) Prohibited indemnification payment. (1) The term prohibited indemnification payment means any payment (or any agreement or arrangement to make any payment) by any insured depository institution or an affiliated depository institution holding company for the benefit of any person who is or was an IAP of such insured depository institution or holding company, to pay or reimburse such person for any civil money penalty or judgment resulting from any administrative or civil action instituted by any federal banking agency, or any other liability or legal expense with regard to any administrative proceeding or civil action instituted by any federal banking agency which results in a final order or settlement pursuant to which such person:


(i) Is assessed a civil money penalty;


(ii) Is removed from office or prohibited from participating in the conduct of the affairs of the insured depository institution; or


(iii) Is required to cease and desist from or take any affirmative action described in section 8(b) of the Act with respect to such institution.


(2) Exceptions. (i) The term prohibited indemnification payment shall not include any reasonable payment by an insured depository institution or depository institution holding company which is used to purchase any commercial insurance policy or fidelity bond, provided that such insurance policy or bond shall not be used to pay or reimburse an IAP for the cost of any judgment or civil money penalty assessed against such person in an administrative proceeding or civil action commenced by any federal banking agency, but may pay any legal or professional expenses incurred in connection with such proceeding or action or the amount of any restitution to the insured depository institution, depository institution holding company or receiver.


(ii) The term prohibited indemnification payment shall not include any reasonable payment by an insured depository institution or depository institution holding company that represents partial indemnification for legal or professional expenses specifically attributable to particular charges for which there has been a formal and final adjudication or finding in connection with a settlement that the IAP has not violated certain banking laws or regulations or has not engaged in certain unsafe or unsound banking practices or breaches of fiduciary duty, unless the administrative action or civil proceeding has resulted in a final prohibition order against the IAP.


[61 FR 5930, Feb. 15, 1996, as amended at 68 FR 50461, Aug. 21, 2003]


§ 359.2 Golden parachute payments prohibited.

No insured depository institution or depository institution holding company shall make or agree to make any golden parachute payment, except as provided in this part.


§ 359.3 Prohibited indemnification payments.

No insured depository institution or depository institution holding company shall make or agree to make any prohibited indemnification payment, except as provided in this part.


§ 359.4 Permissible golden parachute payments.

(a) An insured depository institution or depository institution holding company may agree to make or may make a golden parachute payment if and to the extent that:


(1) The appropriate federal banking agency, with the written concurrence of the Corporation, determines that such a payment or agreement is permissible; or


(2) Such an agreement is made in order to hire a person to become an IAP either at a time when the insured depository institution or depository institution holding company satisfies or in an effort to prevent it from imminently satisfying any of the criteria set forth in § 359.1(f)(1)(ii), and the institution’s appropriate federal banking agency and the Corporation consent in writing to the amount and terms of the golden parachute payment. Such consent by the FDIC and the institution’s appropriate federal banking agency shall not improve the IAP’s position in the event of the insolvency of the institution since such consent can neither bind a receiver nor affect the provability of receivership claims. In the event that the institution is placed into receivership or conservatorship, the FDIC and/or the institution’s appropriate federal banking agency shall not be obligated to pay the promised golden parachute and the IAP shall not be accorded preferential treatment on the basis of such prior approval; or


(3) Such a payment is made pursuant to an agreement which provides for a reasonable severance payment, not to exceed twelve months salary, to an IAP in the event of a change in control of the insured depository institution; provided, however, that an insured depository institution or depository institution holding company shall obtain the consent of the appropriate federal banking agency prior to making such a payment and this paragraph (a)(3) shall not apply to any change in control of an insured depository institution which results from an assisted transaction as described in section 13 of the Act (12 U.S.C. 1823) or the insured depository institution being placed into conservatorship or receivership; and


(4) An insured depository institution, depository institution holding company or IAP making a request pursuant to paragraphs (a)(1) through (3) of this section shall demonstrate that it does not possess and is not aware of any information, evidence, documents or other materials which would indicate that there is a reasonable basis to believe, at the time such payment is proposed to be made, that:


(i) The IAP has committed any fraudulent act or omission, breach of trust or fiduciary duty, or insider abuse with regard to the depository institution or depository institution holding company that has had or is likely to have a material adverse effect on the institution or holding company;


(ii) The IAP is substantially responsible for the insolvency of, the appointment of a conservator or receiver for, or the troubled condition, as defined by applicable regulations of the appropriate federal banking agency, of the insured depository institution, depository institution holding company or any insured depository institution subsidiary of such holding company;


(iii) The IAP has materially violated any applicable federal or state banking law or regulation that has had or is likely to have a material effect on the insured depository institution or depository institution holding company; and


(iv) The IAP has violated or conspired to violate section 215, 656, 657, 1005, 1006, 1007, 1014, 1032, or 1344 of title 18 of the United States Code, or section 1341 or 1343 of such title affecting a federally insured financial institution as defined in title 18 of the United States Code.


(b) In making a determination under paragraphs (a)(1) through (3) of this section, the appropriate federal banking agency and the Corporation may consider:


(1) Whether, and to what degree, the IAP was in a position of managerial or fiduciary responsibility;


(2) The length of time the IAP was affiliated with the insured depository institution or depository institution holding company, and the degree to which the proposed payment represents a reasonable payment for services rendered over the period of employment; and


(3) Any other factors or circumstances which would indicate that the proposed payment would be contrary to the intent of section 18(k) of the Act or this part.


§ 359.5 Permissible indemnification payments.

(a) An insured depository institution or depository institution holding company may make or agree to make reasonable indemnification payments to an IAP with respect to an administrative proceeding or civil action initiated by any federal banking agency if:


(1) The insured depository institution’s or depository institution holding company’s board of directors, in good faith, determines in writing after due investigation and consideration that the institution-affiliated party acted in good faith and in a manner he/she believed to be in the best interests of the institution;


(2) The insured depository institution’s or depository institution holding company’s board of directors, respectively, in good faith, determines in writing after due investigation and consideration that the payment of such expenses will not materially adversely affect the institution’s or holding company’s safety and soundness;


(3) The indemnification payments do not constitute prohibited indemnification payments as that term is defined in § 359.1(l); and


(4) The IAP agrees in writing to reimburse the insured depository institution or depository institution holding company, to the extent not covered by payments from insurance or bonds purchased pursuant to § 359.1(l)(2), for that portion of the advanced indemnification payments which subsequently become prohibited indemnification payments, as defined in § 359.1(l)


(b) An IAP requesting indemnification payments shall not participate in any way in the board’s discussion and approval of such payments; provided, however, that such IAP may present his/her request to the board and respond to any inquiries from the board concerning his/her involvement in the circumstances giving rise to the administrative proceeding or civil action.


(c) In the event that a majority of the members of the board of directors are named as respondents in an administrative proceeding or civil action and request indemnification, the remaining members of the board may authorize independent legal counsel to review the indemnification request and provide the remaining members of the board with a written opinion of counsel as to whether the conditions delineated in paragraph (a) of this section have been met. If independent legal counsel opines that said conditions have been met, the remaining members of the board of directors may rely on such opinion in authorizing the requested indemnification.


(d) In the event that all of the members of the board of directors are named as respondents in an administrative proceeding or civil action and request indemnification, the board shall authorize independent legal counsel to review the indemnification request and provide the board with a written opinion of counsel as to whether the conditions delineated in paragraph (a) of this section have been met. If independent legal counsel opines that said conditions have been met, the board of directors may rely on such opinion in authorizing the requested indemnification.


§ 359.6 Filing instructions.

Requests to make excess nondiscriminatory severance plan payments pursuant to § 359.1(f)(2)(v) and golden parachute payments permitted by § 359.4 shall be submitted in writing to the appropriate regional director (DSC). For filing requirements, consult 12 CFR 303.244. In the event that the consent of the institution’s primary federal regulator is required in addition to that of the FDIC, the requesting party shall submit a copy of its letter to the FDIC to the institution’s primary federal regulator. In the case of national banks, such written requests shall be submitted to the OCC. In the case of state member banks and bank holding companies, such written requests shall be submitted to the Federal Reserve district bank where the institution or holding company, respectively, is located. In the case of savings associations and savings association holding companies, such written requests shall be submitted to the OTS regional office where the institution or holding company, respectively, is located. In cases where only the prior consent of the institution’s primary federal regulator is required and that agency is not the FDIC, a written request satisfying the requirements of this section shall be submitted to the primary federal regulator as described in this section.


[63 FR 44751, Aug. 20, 1998]


§ 359.7 Applicability in the event of receivership.

The provisions of this part, or any consent or approval granted under the provisions of this part by the FDIC (in its corporate capacity), shall not in any way bind any receiver of a failed insured depository institution. Any consent or approval granted under the provisions of this part by the FDIC or any other federal banking agency shall not in any way obligate such agency or receiver to pay any claim or obligation pursuant to any golden parachute, severance, indemnification or other agreement. Claims for employee welfare benefits or other benefits which are contingent, even if otherwise vested, when the FDIC is appointed as receiver for any depository institution, including any contingency for termination of employment, are not provable claims or actual, direct compensatory damage claims against such receiver. Nothing in this part may be construed to permit the payment of salary or any liability or legal expense of any IAP contrary to 12 U.S.C. 1828(k)(3).


PART 360 – RESOLUTION AND RECEIVERSHIP RULES


Authority:12 U.S.C. 1811 et seq., 1817(b), 1818(a)(2), 1818(t), 1819(a) Seventh, Ninth, and Tenth, 1820(b)(3) and (4), 1820(g), 1821(d)(1), 1821(d)(10)(C), 1821(d)(11), 1821(e)(1), 1821(e)(8)(D)(i), 1821(f)(1), 1822(c), 1823(c)(4), and 1823(e)(2).

§ 360.1 Least-cost resolution.

(a) General rule. Except as provided in section 13(c)(4)(G) of the FDI Act (12 U.S.C. 1823 (c)(4)(G)), the FDIC shall not take any action, directly or indirectly, under sections 13(c), 13(d), 13(f), 13(h) or 13(k) of the FDI Act (12 U.S.C. 1823 (c), (d), (f), (h) or (k)) with respect to any insured depository institution that would have the effect of increasing losses to any insurance fund by protecting:


(1) Depositors for more than the insured portion of their deposits (determined without regard to whether such institution is liquidated); or


(2) Creditors other than depositors.


(b) Purchase and assumption transactions. Subject to the requirement of section 13(c)(4)(A) of the FDI Act (12 U.S.C. 1823(c)(4)(A)), paragraph (a) of this section shall not be construed as prohibiting the FDIC from allowing any person who acquires any assets or assumes any liabilities of any insured depository institution, for which the FDIC has been appointed conservator or receiver, to acquire uninsured deposit liabilities of such institution as long as the applicable insurance fund does not incur any loss with respect to such uninsured deposit liabilities in an amount greater than the loss which would have been incurred with respect to such liabilities if the institution had been liquidated.


[58 FR 67664, Dec. 22, 1993, as amended at 63 FR 37761, July 14, 1998]


§ 360.2 Federal Home Loan banks as secured creditors.

(a) Notwithstanding any other provisions of federal or state law or any other provisions of these regulations, the receiver of a borrower from a Federal Home Loan Bank shall recognize the priority of any security interest granted to a Federal Home Loan Bank by any member of any Federal Home Loan Bank or any affiliate of any such member, whether such security interest is in specifically designated assets or a blanket interest in all assets or categories of assets, over the claims and rights of any other party (including any receiver, conservator, trustee or similar party having rights of a lien creditor) other than claims and rights that


(1) Would be entitled to priority under otherwise applicable law; and


(2) Are held by actual bona fide purchasers for value or by actual secured parties that are secured by actual perfected security interests.


(b) If the receiver rather than the Bank shall have possession of any collateral consisting of notes, securities, other instruments, chattel paper or cash securing advances of the Bank, the receiver shall, upon request by the Bank, promptly deliver possession of such collateral to the Bank or its designee.


(c) In the event that a receiver is appointed for any member of a Federal Home Loan Bank, the following procedures shall apply:


(1) The receiver and the Bank shall immediately seek and develop a mutually agreeable plan for the payment of any advances made by the Bank to such borrower or for the servicing, foreclosure upon and liquidation of the collateral securing any such advances, taking into account the nature and amount of such collateral, the markets in which such collateral is normally traded or sold and other relevant factors.


(2) In the event that the receiver and the Bank shall not, in good faith, be able to develop such a mutually agreeable plan, or, in the interim, the Bank in good faith reasonably concludes that the value of such collateral is decreasing, because of interest rate or other market changes, at such a rate that to delay liquidation or other exercise of the Bank’s rights as a secured party for the development of a mutually agreeable plan could reasonably cause the value of such collateral to decrease to an amount that is insufficient to satisfy the Bank’s claim in full, the Bank may, at any time thereafter if permitted to do so by the terms of the advances or other security agreement with such borrower or otherwise by applicable law, proceed to foreclose upon, sell, lease or otherwise dispose of such collateral (or any portion thereof), or otherwise exercise its rights as a secured party, provided that the Bank acts in good faith and in a commercially reasonable manner and otherwise in accordance with applicable law.


(3) The foregoing provisions of this paragraph (c) shall not apply in the event that a purchase and assumption transaction is entered into regarding any such member.


(d) The Bank’s rights pursuant to the second sentence of section 10(d) of the Federal Home Loan Bank Act shall not be affected or diminished by any provisions of state law that may be applicable to a security interest in property of the member.


(e) The receiver for a borrower from a Federal Home Loan Bank shall allow a claim for a prepayment fee by the Bank if, and only if:


(1) The claim is made pursuant to a written contract that provides for a prepayment fee, provided, however, that such prepayment fee allowed by the receiver shall not exceed the present value of the loss attributable to the difference between the contract rate of the secured borrowing and the reinvestment rate then available to the Bank; and


(2) The indebtedness owed to the Bank by such borrower is secured by sufficient collateral in which a perfected security interest in favor of the Bank exists or as to which the Bank’s security interest is entitled to priority under section 306(d) of the Competitive Equality Banking Act of 1987 (CEBA) (12 U.S.C. 1430(e), footnote (1), or otherwise so that the aggregate of the outstanding principal on the advances secured by such collateral, the accrued but unpaid interest thereon and the prepayment fee applicable to such advances can be paid in full from the amounts realized from such collateral. For purposes of this paragraph (e)(2), the adequacy of such collateral shall be determined as of the date such prepayment fees shall be due and payable under the terms of the written contract providing therefor.


[54 FR 19156, May 4, 1989. Redesignated at 54 FR 42801, Oct. 18, 1989, and further redesignated at 55 FR 46496, Nov. 5, 1990. Redesignated at 58 FR 67664, Dec. 22, 1993, as amended at 63 FR 37761, July 14, 1998]


§ 360.3 Priorities.

(a) Unsecured claims against an association or the receiver that are proved to the satisfaction of the receiver shall have priority in the following order:


(1) Administrative expenses of the receiver, including the costs, expenses, and debts of the receiver;


(2) Administrative expenses of the association, provided that such expenses were incurred within thirty (30) days prior to the receiver’s taking possession, and that such expenses shall be limited to reasonable expenses incurred for services actually provided by accountants, attorneys, appraisers, examiners, or management companies, or reasonable expenses incurred by employees which were authorized and reimbursable under a pre-existing expense reimbursement policy, that, in the opinion of the receiver, are of benefit to the receivership, and shall not include wages or salaries of employees of the association;


(3) Claims for wages and salaries, including vacation and sick leave pay and contributions to employee benefit plans, earned prior to the appointment of the receiver by an employee of the association whom the receiver determines it is in the best interests of the receivership to engage or retain for a reasonable period of time;


(4) If authorized by the receiver, claims for wages and salaries, including vacation and sick leave pay and contributions to employee benefits plans, earned prior to the appointment of the receiver, up to a maximum of three thousand dollars ($3,000) per person, by an employee of the association not engaged or retained pursuant to a determination by the receiver pursuant to the third category above;


(5) Claims of governmental units for unpaid taxes, other than Federal income taxes, except to the extent subordinated pursuant to applicable law; but no other claim of a governmental unit shall have a priority higher than that of a general creditor under paragraph (a)(6) of this section;


(6) Claims for withdrawable accounts, including those of the Corporation as subrogee or transferee, and all other claims which have accrued and become unconditionally fixed on or before the date of default, whether liquidated or unliquidated, except as provided in paragraphs (a)(1) through (a)(5) of this section, provided, however, that if the association is chartered and was operated under the laws of a state that provided a priority for holders of withdrawable accounts over such other claims or general creditors, such priority within this paragraph (a)(6) shall be observed by the receiver; and provided further, that if deposits of a Federal association are booked or registered at an office of such association that is located in a State that provides such priority with respect to State-chartered associations, such deposits in a Federal association shall have priority over such other claims or general creditors, which shall be observed by the receiver;


(7) Claims other than those that have accrued and become unconditionally fixed on or before the date of default, including claims for interest after the date of default on claims under paragraph (a)(6) of this section, Provided that any claim based on an agreement for accelerated, stipulated, or liquidated damages, which claim did not accrue prior to the date of default, shall be considered as not having accrued and become unconditionally fixed on or before the date of default;


(8) Claims of the United States for unpaid Federal income taxes;


(9) Claims that have been subordinated in whole or in part to general creditor claims, which shall be given the priority specified in the written instruments that evidence such claims; and


(10) Claims by holders of nonwithdrawable accounts, including stock, which shall have priority within this paragraph (a)(10) in accordance with the terms of the written instruments that evidence such claims.


(b) Interest after the date of default on claims under paragraph (a)(6) of this section shall be at a rate or rates adjusted monthly to reflect the average rate for U.S. Treasury bills with maturities of not more than ninety-one (91) days during the preceding three (3) months.


(c) [Reserved]


(d) All unsecured claims of any category or class or priority described in paragraphs (a)(1) through (a)(10) of this section shall be paid in full, or provision made for such payment, before any claims of lesser priority are paid. If there are insufficient funds to pay all claims of a category or class in full, distribution to claimants in such category or class shall be made pro rata. Notwithstanding anything to the contrary herein, the receiver may, at any time, and from time to time, prior to the payment in full of all claims of a category or class with higher priority, make such distributions to claimants in priority classes outlined in paragraphs (a)(1) through (a)(6) of this section as the receiver believes are reasonably necessary to conduct the receivership,


Provided that the receiver determines that adequate funds exist or will be recovered during the receivership to pay in full all claims of any higher priority.


(e) If the association is in mutual form, and a surplus remains after making distribution in full of allowed claims as set forth in paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section, such surplus shall be distributed to the depositors in proportion to their accounts as of the date of default.


(f) Under the provisions of section 11(d)(11) of the Act (12 U.S.C. 1821(d)(11)), the provisions of this § 360.3 do not apply to any receivership established and liquidation or other resolution occurring after August 10, 1993.


[53 FR 25132, July 5, 1988, as amended at 53 FR 30667, Aug. 15, 1988. Redesignated and amended at 54 FR 42801, Oct. 18, 1989, and further redesignated and amended at 55 FR 46496, Nov. 5, 1990; 58 FR 43070, Aug. 13, 1993. Redesignated at 58 FR 67664, Dec. 22, 1993; 60 FR 35488, July 10, 1995]


§ 360.4 Administrative expenses.

The priority for administrative expenses of the receiver, as that term is used in section 11(d)(11) of the Act (12 U.S.C. 1821(d)(11), shall include those necessary expenses incurred by the receiver in liquidating or otherwise resolving the affairs of a failed insured depository institution. Such expenses shall include pre-failure and post-failure obligations that the receiver determines are necessary and appropriate to facilitate the smooth and orderly liquidation or other resolution of the institution.


[60 FR 35488, July 10, 1995]


§ 360.5 Definition of qualified financial contracts.

(a) Authority and purpose. Sections 11(e) (8) through (10) of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act, 12 U.S.C. 1821(e) (8) through (10), provide special rules for the treatment of qualified financial contracts of an insured depository institution for which the FDIC is appointed conservator or receiver, including rules describing the manner in which qualified financial contracts may be transferred or closed out. Section 11(e)(8)(D)(i) of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act, 12 U.S.C. 1821(e)(8)(D)(i), grants the Corporation authority to determine by regulation whether any agreement, other than those identified within section 11(e)(8)(D), should be recognized as qualified financial contracts under the statute. The purpose of this section is to identify additional agreements which the Corporation has determined to be qualified financial contracts.


(b) Repurchase agreements. The following agreements shall be deemed “repurchase agreements” under section 11(e)(8)(D)(v) of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act, as amended (12 U.S.C. 1821(e)(8)(D)(v)): A repurchase agreement on qualified foreign government securities is an agreement or combination of agreements (including master agreements) which provides for the transfer of securities that are direct obligations of, or that are fully guaranteed by, the central governments (as set forth at 12 CFR 324.2 (definition of sovereign exposure), as may be amended from time to time) of the OECD-based group of countries (as generally discussed in 12 CFR 324.32) against the transfer of funds by the transferee of such securities with a simultaneous agreement by such transferee to transfer to the transferor thereof securities as described above, at a date certain not later than one year after such transfers or on demand, against the transfer of funds.


(c) Swap agreements. The following agreements shall be deemed “swap agreements” under section 11(e)(8)(D)(vi) of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act, as amended (12 U.S.C. 1821(e)(8)(D)(vi)): A spot foreign exchange agreement is any agreement providing for or effecting the purchase or sale of one currency in exchange for another currency (or a unit of account established by an intergovernmental organization such as the European Currency Unit) with a maturity date of two days or less after the agreement has been entered into, and includes short-dated transactions such as tomorrow/next day and same day/tomorrow transactions.


(d) Nothing in this section shall be construed as limiting or changing a party’s obligation to comply with all reasonable trading practices and requirements, non-insolvency law requirements and any other requirements imposed by other provisions of the FDI Act. This section in no way limits the authority of the Corporation to take supervisory or enforcement actions, or to otherwise manage the affairs of a financial institution for which the Corporation has been appointed conservator or receiver.


[60 FR 66865, Dec. 27, 1995, as amended at 78 FR 55595, Sept. 10, 2013; 83 FR 17741, Apr. 24, 2018]


§ 360.6 Treatment of financial assets transferred in connection with a securitization or participation.

(a) Definitions –


(1) Applicable compliance date means, with respect to a securitization, the date on which compliance with Section 15G of the Securities Exchange Act, 15 U.S.C. 78a et seq., added by Section 941(b) of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act is required with respect to that securitization.


(2) Financial asset means cash or a contract or instrument that conveys to one entity a contractual right to receive cash or another financial instrument from another entity.


(3) Investor means a person or entity that owns an obligation issued by an issuing entity.


(4) Issuing entity means an entity that owns a financial asset or financial assets transferred by the sponsor and issues obligations supported by such asset or assets. Issuing entities may include, but are not limited to, corporations, partnerships, trusts, and limited liability companies and are commonly referred to as special purpose vehicles or special purpose entities. To the extent a securitization is structured as a multi-step transfer, the term issuing entity would include both the issuer of the obligations and any intermediate entities that may be a transferee. Notwithstanding the foregoing, a Specified GSE or an entity established or guaranteed by a Specified GSE shall not constitute an issuing entity.


(5) Monetary default means a default in the payment of principal or interest when due following the expiration of any cure period.


(6) Obligation means a debt or equity (or mixed) beneficial interest or security that is primarily serviced by the cash flows of one or more financial assets or financial asset pools, either fixed or revolving, that by their terms convert into cash within a finite time period, or upon the disposition of the underlying financial assets, and by any rights or other assets designed to assure the servicing or timely distributions of proceeds to the security holders issued by an issuing entity. The term may include beneficial interests in a grantor trust, common law trust or similar issuing entity to the extent that such interests satisfy the criteria set forth in the preceding sentence, but does not include LLC interests, partnership interests, common or preferred equity, or similar instruments evidencing ownership of the issuing entity.


(7) Participation means the transfer or assignment of an undivided interest in all or part of a financial asset, that has all of the characteristics of a “participating interest,” from a seller, known as the “lead,” to a buyer, known as the “participant,” without recourse to the lead, pursuant to an agreement between the lead and the participant. “Without recourse” means that the participation is not subject to any agreement that requires the lead to repurchase the participant’s interest or to otherwise compensate the participant upon the borrower’s default on the underlying obligation.


(8) Securitization means the issuance by an issuing entity of obligations for which the investors are relying on the cash flow or market value characteristics and the credit quality of transferred financial assets (together with any external credit support permitted by this section) to repay the obligations.


(9) Servicer means any entity responsible for the management or collection of some or all of the financial assets on behalf of the issuing entity or making allocations or distributions to holders of the obligations, including reporting on the overall cash flow and credit characteristics of the financial assets supporting the securitization to enable the issuing entity to make payments to investors on the obligations. The term “servicer” does not include a trustee for the issuing entity or the holders of obligations that makes allocations or distributions to holders of the obligations if the trustee receives such allocations or distributions from a servicer and the trustee does not otherwise perform the functions of a servicer.


(10) Specified GSE means each of the following:


(i) The Federal National Mortgage Association and any affiliate thereof;


(ii) Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation and any affiliate thereof;


(iii) The Government National Mortgage Association; and


(iv) Any federal or state sponsored mortgage finance agency.


(11) Sponsor means a person or entity that organizes and initiates a securitization by transferring financial assets, either directly or indirectly, including through an affiliate, to an issuing entity, whether or not such person owns an interest in the issuing entity or owns any of the obligations issued by the issuing entity.


(12) Transfer means:


(i) The conveyance of a financial asset or financial assets to an issuing entity or


(ii) The creation of a security interest in such asset or assets for the benefit of the issuing entity.


(b) Coverage. This section shall apply to securitizations that meet the following criteria:


(1) Capital Structure and Financial Assets. The documents creating the securitization must define the payment structure and capital structure of the transaction.


(i) Requirements applicable to all securitizations:


(A) The securitization shall not consist of re-securitizations of obligations or collateralized debt obligations unless the documents creating the securitization require that disclosures required in paragraph (b)(2) of this section are made available to investors for the underlying assets supporting the securitization at initiation and while obligations are outstanding; and


(B) The documents creating the securitization shall require that payment of principal and interest on the securitization obligation must be primarily based on the performance of financial assets that are transferred to the issuing entity and, except for interest rate or currency mismatches between the financial assets and the obligations, shall not be contingent on market or credit events that are independent of such financial assets. The securitization may not be an unfunded securitization or a synthetic transaction.


(ii) Requirements applicable only to securitizations in which the financial assets include any residential mortgage loans:


(A) The capital structure of the securitization shall be limited to no more than six credit tranches and cannot include “sub-tranches,” grantor trusts or other structures. Notwithstanding the foregoing, the most senior credit tranche may include time-based sequential pay or planned amortization and companion sub-tranches; and


(B) The credit quality of the obligations cannot be enhanced at the issuing entity or pool level through external credit support or guarantees. However, the credit quality of the obligations may be enhanced by credit support or guarantees provided by Specified GSEs and the temporary payment of principal and/or interest may be supported by liquidity facilities, including facilities designed to permit the temporary payment of interest following appointment of the FDIC as conservator or receiver. Individual financial assets transferred into a securitization may be guaranteed, insured or otherwise benefit from credit support at the loan level through mortgage and similar insurance or guarantees, including by private companies, agencies or other governmental entities, or government-sponsored enterprises, and/or through co-signers or other guarantees.


(2) Disclosures. The documents shall require that the sponsor, issuing entity, and/or servicer, as appropriate, shall make available to investors, information describing the financial assets, obligations, capital structure, compensation of relevant parties, and relevant historical performance data set forth in paragraph (b)(2) of this section.


(i) Requirements applicable to all securitizations:


(A) In the case of an issuance of obligations that is subject to 17 CFR part 229, subpart 229.1100 (Regulation AB of the Securities and Exchange Commission (Regulation AB)), the documents shall require that, on or prior to issuance of obligations and at the time of delivery of any periodic distribution report and, in any event, at least once per calendar quarter, while obligations are outstanding, information about the obligations and the securitized financial assets shall be disclosed to all potential investors at the financial asset or pool level, as appropriate for the financial assets, and security-level to enable evaluation and analysis of the credit risk and performance of the obligations and financial assets. The documents shall require that such information and its disclosure, at a minimum, shall comply with the requirements of Regulation AB. Information that is unknown or not available to the sponsor or the issuer after reasonable investigation may be omitted if the issuer includes a statement in the offering documents disclosing that the specific information is otherwise unavailable;


(B) The documents shall require that, on or prior to issuance of obligations, the structure of the securitization and the credit and payment performance of the obligations shall be disclosed, including the capital or tranche structure, the priority of payments and specific subordination features; representations and warranties made with respect to the financial assets, the remedies for and the time permitted for cure of any breach of representations and warranties, including the repurchase of financial assets, if applicable; liquidity facilities and any credit enhancements permitted by this rule, any waterfall triggers or priority of payment reversal features; and policies governing delinquencies, servicer advances, loss mitigation, and write-offs of financial assets;


(C) The documents shall require that while obligations are outstanding, the issuing entity shall provide to investors information with respect to the credit performance of the obligations and the financial assets, including periodic and cumulative financial asset performance data, delinquency and modification data for the financial assets, substitutions and removal of financial assets, servicer advances, as well as losses that were allocated to such tranche and remaining balance of financial assets supporting such tranche, if applicable, and the percentage of each tranche in relation to the securitization as a whole; and


(D) In connection with the issuance of obligations, the documents shall require that the nature and amount of compensation paid to the originator, sponsor, rating agency or third-party advisor, any mortgage or other broker, and the servicer(s), and the extent to which any risk of loss on the underlying assets is retained by any of them for such securitization be disclosed. The securitization documents shall require the issuer to provide to investors while obligations are outstanding any changes to such information and the amount and nature of payments of any deferred compensation or similar arrangements to any of the parties.


(ii) Requirements applicable only to securitizations in which the financial assets include any residential mortgage loans:


(A) Prior to issuance of obligations, sponsors shall disclose loan level information about the financial assets including, but not limited to, loan type, loan structure (for example, fixed or adjustable, resets, interest rate caps, balloon payments, etc.), maturity, interest rate and/or Annual Percentage Rate, and location of property; and


(B) Prior to issuance of obligations, sponsors shall affirm compliance in all material respects with applicable statutory and regulatory standards for origination of mortgage loans, including that the mortgages are underwritten at the fully indexed rate relying on documented income, and comply with supervisory guidance governing the underwriting of residential mortgages, including the Interagency Guidance on Non-Traditional Mortgage Products, October 5, 2006, and the Interagency Statement on Subprime Mortgage Lending, July 10, 2007, and such other or additional guidance applicable at the time of loan origination. Sponsors shall disclose a third party due diligence report on compliance with such standards and the representations and warranties made with respect to the financial assets; and


(C) The documents shall require that prior to issuance of obligations and while obligations are outstanding, servicers shall disclose any ownership interest by the servicer or an affiliate of the servicer in other whole loans secured by the same real property that secures a loan included in the financial asset pool. The ownership of an obligation, as defined in this regulation, shall not constitute an ownership interest requiring disclosure.


(3) Documentation and recordkeeping. The documents creating the securitization must specify the respective contractual rights and responsibilities of all parties and include the requirements described in paragraph (b)(3) of this section and use as appropriate any available standardized documentation for each different asset class.


(i) Requirements applicable to all securitizations. The documents shall define the contractual rights and responsibilities of the parties, including but not limited to representations and warranties and ongoing disclosure requirements, and any measures to avoid conflicts of interest; and provide authority for the parties, including but not limited to the originator, sponsor, servicer, and investors, to fulfill their respective duties and exercise their rights under the contracts and clearly distinguish between any multiple roles performed by any party.


(ii) Requirements applicable only to securitizations in which the financial assets include any residential mortgage loans:


(A) Servicing and other agreements must provide servicers with authority, subject to contractual oversight by any master servicer or oversight advisor, if any, to mitigate losses on financial assets consistent with maximizing the net present value of the financial asset. Servicers shall have the authority to modify assets to address reasonably foreseeable default, and to take other action to maximize the value and minimize losses on the securitized financial assets. The documents shall require that the servicers apply industry best practices for asset management and servicing. The documents shall require the servicer to act for the benefit of all investors, and not for the benefit of any particular class of investors, that the servicer maintain records of its actions to permit full review by the trustee or other representative of the investors and that the servicer must commence action to mitigate losses no later than ninety (90) days after an asset first becomes delinquent unless all delinquencies have been cured, provided that this requirement shall not be deemed to require that the documents include any provision concerning loss mitigation that requires any action that may conflict with the requirements of Regulation X (12 CFR part 1024), as Regulation X may be amended or modified from time to time.


(B) The servicing agreement shall not require a primary servicer to advance delinquent payments of principal and interest for more than three payment periods, unless financing or reimbursement facilities are available, which may include, but are not limited to, the obligations of the master servicer or issuing entity to fund or reimburse the primary servicer, or alternative reimbursement facilities. Such “financing or reimbursement facilities” under this paragraph shall not be dependent for repayment on foreclosure proceeds.


(4) Compensation. The following requirements apply only to securitizations in which the financial assets include any residential mortgage loans. Compensation to parties involved in the securitization of such financial assets must be structured to provide incentives for sustainable credit and the long-term performance of the financial assets and securitization as follows:


(i) The documents shall require that any fees or other compensation for services payable to credit rating agencies or similar third-party evaluation companies shall be payable, in part, over the five (5) year period after the first issuance of the obligations based on the performance of surveillance services and the performance of the financial assets, with no more than sixty (60) percent of the total estimated compensation due at closing; and


(ii) The documents shall provide that compensation to servicers shall include incentives for servicing, including payment for loan restructuring or other loss mitigation activities, which maximizes the net present value of the financial assets. Such incentives may include payments for specific services, and actual expenses, to maximize the net present value or a structure of incentive fees to maximize the net present value, or any combination of the foregoing that provides such incentives.


(5) Origination and retention requirements – (i) Requirements applicable to all securitizations. (A) Prior to the applicable compliance date for regulations required under Section 15G of the Securities Exchange Act, 15 U.S.C. 78a et seq., added by Section 941(b) of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act, the documents creating the securitization shall require that the sponsor retain an economic interest in a material portion, defined as not less than five (5) percent, of the credit risk of the financial assets. This retained interest may be either in the form of an interest of not less than five (5) percent in each of the credit tranches sold or transferred to the investors or in a representative sample of the securitized financial assets equal to not less than five (5) percent of the principal amount of the financial assets at transfer. This retained interest may not be sold, pledged or hedged, except for the hedging of interest rate or currency risk, during the term of the securitization.


(B) For any securitization that closes upon or following the applicable compliance date for regulations required under Section 15G of the Securities Exchange Act, 15 U.S.C. 78a et seq., added by Section 941(b) of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act, the documents creating the securitization shall instead require retention of an economic interest in the credit risk of the financial assets in accordance with such regulations, including the restrictions on sale, pledging and hedging set forth therein.


(C) Notwithstanding paragraph (b)(5)(i)(A) of this section, for any securitization that closes following ________________ November 24, 2015 and prior to the applicable compliance date for regulations required under Section 15G of the Securities Exchange Act, 15 U.S.C. 78a et seq., added by Section 941(b) of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act, at the option of the sponsor, the requirements of paragraph (b)(5)(i)(B) of this section may be satisfied if (in lieu of the requirement set forth in paragraph (b)(5)(i)(A) of this section) the documents creating the securitization require retention of an economic interest in the credit risk of the financial assets in accordance with the requirements of the Section 15G regulations as though such regulations were then in effect.


(ii) Requirements applicable only to securitizations in which the financial assets include any residential mortgage loans:


(A) The documents shall require the establishment of a reserve fund equal to at least five (5) percent of the cash proceeds of the securitization payable to the sponsor to cover the repurchase of any financial assets required for breach of representations and warranties. The balance of such fund, if any, shall be released to the sponsor one year after the date of issuance.


(B) The documents shall include a representation that the assets shall have been originated in all material respects in compliance with statutory, regulatory, and originator underwriting standards in effect at the time of origination. The documents shall include a representation that the mortgages included in the securitization were underwritten at the fully indexed rate, based upon the borrowers’ ability to repay the mortgage according to its terms, and rely on documented income and comply with all existing supervisory guidance governing the underwriting of residential mortgages, including the Interagency Guidance on Non-Traditional Mortgage Products, October 5, 2006, and the Interagency Statement on Subprime Mortgage Lending, July 10, 2007, and such other or additional regulations or guidance applicable to insured depository institutions at the time of loan origination. Residential mortgages originated prior to the issuance of such guidance shall meet all supervisory guidance governing the underwriting of residential mortgages then in effect at the time of loan origination.


(c) Other requirements. (1) The transaction should be an arms length, bona fide securitization transaction. The documents shall require that the obligations issued in a securitization shall not be predominantly sold to an affiliate (other than a wholly-owned subsidiary consolidated for accounting and capital purposes with the sponsor) or insider of the sponsor;


(2) The securitization agreements are in writing, approved by the board of directors of the bank or its loan committee (as reflected in the minutes of a meeting of the board of directors or committee), and have been, continuously, from the time of execution in the official record of the bank;


(3) The securitization was entered into in the ordinary course of business, not in contemplation of insolvency and with no intent to hinder, delay or defraud the bank or its creditors;


(4) The transfer was made for adequate consideration;


(5) The transfer and/or security interest was properly perfected under the UCC or applicable state law;


(6) The transfer and duties of the sponsor as transferor must be evidenced in a separate agreement from its duties, if any, as servicer, custodian, paying agent, credit support provider or in any capacity other than the transferor; and


(7) The documents shall require that the sponsor separately identify in its financial asset data bases the financial assets transferred into any securitization and maintain an electronic or paper copy of the closing documents for each securitization in a readily accessible form, a current list of all of its outstanding securitizations and issuing entities, and the most recent Form 10-K, if applicable, or other periodic financial report for each securitization and issuing entity. The documents shall provide that to the extent serving as servicer, custodian or paying agent for the securitization, the sponsor shall not comingle amounts received with respect to the financial assets with its own assets except for the time, not to exceed two business days, necessary to clear any payments received. The documents shall require that the sponsor shall make these records readily available for review by the FDIC promptly upon written request.


(d) Safe harbor – (1) Participations. With respect to transfers of financial assets made in connection with participations, the FDIC as conservator or receiver shall not, in the exercise of its statutory authority to disaffirm or repudiate contracts, reclaim, recover, or recharacterize as property of the institution or the receivership any such transferred financial assets, provided that such transfer satisfies the conditions for sale accounting treatment under generally accepted accounting principles, except for the “legal isolation” condition that is addressed by this section. The foregoing paragraph shall apply to a last-in, first-out participation, provided that the transfer of a portion of the financial asset satisfies the conditions for sale accounting treatment under generally accepted accounting principles that would have applied to such portion if it had met the definition of a “participating interest,” except for the “legal isolation” condition that is addressed by this section.


(2) Transition period safe harbor. With respect to:


(i) Any participation or securitization for which transfers of financial assets were made on or before December 31, 2010 or


(ii) Any obligations of revolving trusts or master trusts, for which one or more obligations were issued as of the date of adoption of this rule, or


(iii) Any obligations issued under open commitments up to the maximum amount of such commitments as of the date of adoption of this rule if one or more obligations were issued under such commitments on or before December 31, 2010, the FDIC as conservator or receiver shall not, in the exercise of its statutory authority to disaffirm or repudiate contracts, reclaim, recover, or recharacterize as property of the institution or the receivership the transferred financial assets notwithstanding that the transfer of such financial assets does not satisfy all conditions for sale accounting treatment under generally accepted accounting principles as effective for reporting periods after November 15, 2009, provided that such transfer satisfied the conditions for sale accounting treatment under generally accepted accounting principles in effect for reporting periods before November 15, 2009, except for the “legal isolation” condition that is addressed by this paragraph and the transaction otherwise satisfied the provisions of § 360.6 in effect prior to the effective date of this regulation.


(3) For securitizations meeting sale accounting requirements. With respect to any securitization for which transfers of financial assets were made after December 31, 2010, or from a master trust or revolving trust established after adoption of this rule or from any open commitments that do not meet the requirements of paragraph (d)(2) of this section, and which complies with the requirements applicable to that securitization as set forth in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section, the FDIC as conservator or receiver shall not, in the exercise of its statutory authority to disaffirm or repudiate contracts, reclaim, recover, or recharacterize as property of the institution or the receivership such transferred financial assets, provided that such transfer satisfies the conditions for sale accounting treatment under generally accepted accounting principles in effect for reporting periods after November 15, 2009, except for the “legal isolation” condition that is addressed by this paragraph (d)(3).


(4) For securitization not meeting sale accounting requirements. With respect to any securitization for which transfers of financial assets were made after December 31, 2010, or from a master trust or revolving trust established after adoption of this rule or from any open commitments that do not meet the requirements of paragraph (d)(2) or (d)(3) of this section, and which complies with the requirements applicable to that securitization as set forth in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section, but where the transfer does not satisfy the conditions for sale accounting treatment set forth by generally accepted accounting principles in effect for reporting periods after November 15, 2009:


(i) Monetary default. If at any time after appointment, the FDIC as conservator or receiver is in a monetary default under a securitization due to its failure to pay or apply collections from the financial assets received by it in accordance with the securitization documents, whether as servicer or otherwise, and remains in monetary default for ten (10) business days after actual delivery of a written notice to the FDIC pursuant to paragraph (f) of this section requesting the exercise of contractual rights because of such monetary default, the FDIC hereby consents pursuant to 12 U.S.C. 1821(e)(13)(C) and 12 U.S.C. 1825(b)(2) to the exercise of any contractual rights in accordance with the documents governing such securitization, including but not limited to taking possession of the financial assets and exercising self-help remedies as a secured creditor under the transfer agreements, provided no involvement of the receiver or conservator is required other than such consents, waivers, or execution of transfer documents as may be reasonably requested in the ordinary course of business in order to facilitate the exercise of such contractual rights. Such consent shall not waive or otherwise deprive the FDIC or its assignees of any seller’s interest or other obligation or interest issued by the issuing entity and held by the FDIC or its assignees, but shall serve as full satisfaction of the obligations of the insured depository institution in conservatorship or receivership and the FDIC as conservator or receiver for all amounts due.


(ii) Repudiation. If the FDIC as conservator or receiver provides a written notice of repudiation of the securitization agreement pursuant to which the financial assets were transferred, and the FDIC does not pay damages, defined in this paragraph, within ten (10) business days following the effective date of the notice, the FDIC hereby consents pursuant to 12 U.S.C. 1821(e)(13)(C) and 12 U.S.C. 1825(b)(2) to the exercise of any contractual rights in accordance with the documents governing such securitization, including but not limited to taking possession of the financial assets and exercising self-help remedies as a secured creditor under the transfer agreements, provided no involvement of the receiver or conservator is required other than such consents, waivers, or execution of transfer documents as may be reasonably requested in the ordinary course of business in order to facilitate the exercise of such contractual rights. For purposes of this paragraph, the damages due shall be in an amount equal to the par value of the obligations outstanding on the date of appointment of the conservator or receiver, less any payments of principal received by the investors through the date of repudiation, plus unpaid, accrued interest through the date of repudiation in accordance with the contract documents to the extent actually received through payments on the financial assets received through the date of repudiation. Upon payment of such repudiation damages, all liens or claims on the financial assets created pursuant to the securitization documents shall be released. Such consent shall not waive or otherwise deprive the FDIC or its assignees of any seller’s interest or other obligation or interest issued by the issuing entity and held by the FDIC or its assignees, but shall serve as full satisfaction of the obligations of the insured depository institution in conservatorship or receivership and the FDIC as conservator or receiver for all amounts due.


(iii) Effect of repudiation. If the FDIC repudiates or disaffirms a securitization agreement, it shall not assert that any interest payments made to investors in accordance with the securitization documents before any such repudiation or disaffirmance remain the property of the conservatorship or receivership.


(e) Consent to certain actions. Prior to repudiation or, in the case of a monetary default referred to in paragraph (d)(4)(i) of this section, prior to the effectiveness of the consent referred to therein, the FDIC as conservator or receiver consents pursuant to 12 U.S.C. 1821(e)(13)(C) to the making of, or if serving as servicer, shall make, the payments to the investors to the extent actually received through payments on the financial assets (but in the case of repudiation, only to the extent supported by payments on the financial assets received through the date of the giving of notice of repudiation) in accordance with the securitization documents, and, subject to the FDIC’s rights to repudiate such agreements, consents to any servicing activity required in furtherance of the securitization or, if acting as servicer the FDIC as receiver or conservator shall perform such servicing activities in accordance with the terms of the applicable servicing agreements, with respect to the financial assets included in securitizations that meet the requirements applicable to that securitization as set forth in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section.


(f) Notice for consent. Any party requesting the FDIC’s consent as conservator or receiver under 12 U.S.C. 1821(e)(13)(C) and 12 U.S.C. 1825(b)(2) pursuant to paragraph (d)(4)(i) of this section shall provide notice to the Deputy Director, Division of Resolutions and Receiverships, Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, 550 17th Street, NW., F-7076, Washington, DC 20429-0002, and a statement of the basis upon which such request is made, and copies of all documentation supporting such request, including without limitation a copy of the applicable agreements and of any applicable notices under the contract.


(g) Contemporaneous requirement. The FDIC will not seek to avoid an otherwise legally enforceable agreement that is executed by an insured depository institution in connection with a securitization or in the form of a participation solely because the agreement does not meet the “contemporaneous” requirement of 12 U.S.C. 1821(d)(9), 1821(n)(4)(I), or 1823(e).


(h) Limitations. The consents set forth in this section do not act to waive or relinquish any rights granted to the FDIC in any capacity, pursuant to any other applicable law or any agreement or contract except as specifically set forth herein. Nothing contained in this section alters the claims priority of the securitized obligations.


(i) No waiver. Except as specifically set forth herein, this section does not authorize, and shall not be construed as authorizing the waiver of the prohibitions in 12 U.S.C. 1825(b)(2) against levy, attachment, garnishment, foreclosure, or sale of property of the FDIC, nor does it authorize nor shall it be construed as authorizing the attachment of any involuntary lien upon the property of the FDIC. Nor shall this section be construed as waiving, limiting or otherwise affecting the rights or powers of the FDIC to take any action or to exercise any power not specifically mentioned, including but not limited to any rights, powers or remedies of the FDIC regarding transfers or other conveyances taken in contemplation of the institution’s insolvency or with the intent to hinder, delay or defraud the institution or the creditors of such institution, or that is a fraudulent transfer under applicable law.


(j) No assignment. The right to consent under 12 U.S.C. 1821(e)(13)(C) or 12 U.S.C. 1825(b)(2), may not be assigned or transferred to any purchaser of property from the FDIC, other than to a conservator or bridge bank.


(k) Repeal. This section may be repealed by the FDIC upon 30 days notice provided in the Federal Register, but any repeal shall not apply to any issuance made in accordance with this section before such repeal.


[75 FR 60297, Sept. 30, 2010, as amended at 80 FR 73089, Nov. 24, 2015; 81 FR 41423, June 27, 2016; 85 FR 12731, Mar. 4, 2020]


§ 360.7 Post-insolvency interest.

(a) Purpose and scope. This section establishes rules governing the calculation and distribution of post-insolvency interest to creditors with proven claims in all FDIC-administered receiverships established after June 13, 2002.


(b) Definitions – (1) Equityholder. The owner of an equity interest in a failed depository institution, whether such ownership is represented by stock, membership in a mutual association, or otherwise.


(2) Post-insolvency interest. Interest calculated from the date the receivership is established on proven creditor claims in receiverships with surplus funds.


(3) Post-insolvency interest rate. For any calendar quarter, the coupon equivalent yield of the average discount rate set on the three-month Treasury bill at the last auction held by the United States Treasury Department during the preceding calendar quarter, and adjusted each quarter thereafter.


(4) Principal amount. The proven claim amount and any interest accrued thereon as of the date the receivership is established.


(5) Proven claim. A claim that is allowed by a receiver or upon which a final non-appealable judgment has been entered in favor of a claimant against a receivership by a court with jurisdiction to adjudicate the claim.


(c) Post-insolvency interest distributions. (1) Post-insolvency interest shall only be distributed following satisfaction by the receiver of the principal amount of all creditor claims.


(2) The receiver shall distribute post-insolvency interest at the post-insolvency interest rate prior to making any distribution to equityholders. Post-insolvency interest distributions shall be made in the order of priority set forth in section 11(d)(11)(A) of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act, 12 U.S.C. 1821(d)(11)(A).


(3) Post-insolvency interest distributions shall be made at such time as the receiver determines that such distributions are appropriate and only to the extent of funds available in the receivership estate. Post-insolvency interest shall be calculated on the outstanding balance of a proven claim, as reduced from time to time by any interim dividend distributions, from the date the receivership is established until the principal amount of a proven claim has been fully distributed but not thereafter. Post-insolvency interest shall be calculated on a contingent claim from the date such claim becomes proven.


(4) Post-insolvency interest shall be determined using a simple interest method of calculation.


[67 FR 34386, May 14, 2002]


§ 360.8 Method for determining deposit and other liability account balances at a failed insured depository institution.

(a) Purpose. The purpose of this section is to describe the process the FDIC will use to determine deposit and other liability account balances for insurance coverage and receivership purposes at a failed insured depository institution.


(b) Definitions. (1) The FDIC Cutoff Point means the point in time the FDIC establishes after it has been appointed receiver of a failed insured depository institution and takes control of the failed institution.


(2) The Applicable Cutoff Time for a specific type of deposit account transaction means the earlier of either the failed institution’s normal cutoff time for that specific type of transaction or the FDIC Cutoff Point.


(3) Close-of-Business Account Balance means the closing end-of-day ledger balance of a deposit or other liability account on the day of failure of an insured depository institution determined by using the Applicable Cutoff Times. This balance may be adjusted to reflect steps taken by the receiver to ensure that funds are not received by or removed from the institution after the FDIC Cutoff Point.


(4) A sweep account is an account held pursuant to a contract between an insured depository institution and its customer involving the pre-arranged, automated transfer of funds from a deposit account to either another account or investment vehicle located within the depository institution (internal sweep account), or an investment vehicle located outside the depository institution (external sweep account).


(c) Principles. (1) In making deposit insurance determinations and in determining the value and nature of claims against the receivership on the institution’s date of failure, the FDIC, as insurer and receiver, will treat deposits and other liabilities of the failed institution according to the ownership and nature of the underlying obligations based on end-of-day ledger balances for each account using, except as expressly provided otherwise in this section, the depository institution’s normal posting procedures.


(2) In its role as receiver of a failed insured depository institution, in order to ensure the proper distribution of the failed institution’s assets under the FDI Act (12 U.S.C. 1821(d)(11)) as of the FDIC Cutoff Point, the FDIC will use its best efforts to take all steps necessary to stop the generation, via transactions or transfers coming from or going outside the institution, of new liabilities or extinguishing existing liabilities for the depository institution.


(3) End-of-day ledger balances are subject to corrections for posted transactions that are inconsistent with the above principles.


(d) Determining closing day balances. (1) In determining account balances for insurance coverage and receivership purposes at a failed insured depository institution, the FDIC will use Close-of-Business Account Balances.


(2) A check posted to the Close-of-Business Account Balance but not collected by the depository institution will be included as part of the balance, subject to the correction of errors and omissions and adjustments for uncollectible items that the FDIC may make in its role as receiver of the failed depository institution.


(3) In determining Close-of-Business Account Balances involving sweep accounts:


(i) For internal sweep accounts, the FDIC will determine the ownership of the funds and the nature of the receivership claim based on the records established and maintained by the institution for that specific account or investment vehicle as of the closing day end-of-day ledger balance. (For example, if a sweep account entails the daily transfer of funds from a demand deposit account to a Eurodollar account at a foreign branch of the insured depository institution, if the institution should fail on that day, the FDIC would treat the funds swept to the Eurodollar account, as reflected on the institution’s end-of-day records, as an unsecured general creditor’s claim against the receivership.);


(ii) For external sweep accounts, the FDIC will treat swept funds consistent with their status in the end-of-day ledger balances of the depository institution and the external entity, as long as the transfer of funds is completed prior to the Applicable Cutoff Time. (For example, if funds held in connection with a money market sweep account are wired from a customer’s deposit account at the insured depository institution to the mutual fund prior to the Applicable Cutoff Time, if the institution should fail on that day, the FDIC would recognize that sweep transaction as completed for claims and receivership purposes.);


(iii) For repurchase agreement sweep accounts, where, as a result of the sweep transaction, the customer becomes either the legal owner of identified assets subject to repurchase or obtains a perfected security interest in those assets, the FDIC will recognize, for receivership purposes, the customer’s ownership interest or security interest in the assets.


(4) For deposit insurance and receivership purposes in connection with the failure of an insured depository institution, the FDIC will determine the rights of the depositor or other liability holder as of the point the Close-of-Business Account Balance is calculated.


(e) Disclosure requirements. Beginning July 1, 2009, in all new sweep account contracts, in renewals of existing sweep account contracts and within sixty days after July 1, 2009, and no less than annually thereafter, institutions must prominently disclose in writing to sweep account customers whether their swept funds are deposits within the meaning of 12 U.S.C. 1813(l). If the funds are not deposits, the institution must further disclose the status such funds would have if the institution failed – for example, general creditor status or secured creditor status. Such disclosures must be consistent with how the institution reports such funds on its quarterly Consolidated Reports of Condition and Income or Thrift Financial Reports. The disclosure requirements imposed under this provision do not apply to sweep accounts where: The transfers are within a single account, or a sub-account; or the sweep account involves only deposit-to-deposit sweeps, such as zero-balance accounts, unless the sweep results in a change in the customer’s insurance coverage.


[74 FR 5806, Feb. 2, 2009]


§ 360.9 Large-bank deposit insurance determination modernization.

(a) Purpose and scope. This section is intended to allow the deposit and other operations of a large insured depository institution (defined as a “Covered Institution”) to continue functioning on the day following failure. It also is intended to permit the FDIC to fulfill its legal mandates regarding the resolution of failed insured institutions to provide liquidity to depositors promptly, enhance market discipline, ensure equitable treatment of depositors at different institutions and reduce the FDIC’s costs by preserving the franchise value of a failed institution.


(b) Definitions. (1) A covered Institution means an insured depository institution which, based on items as defined in Reports of Income and Condition or Thrift Financial Reports filed with the applicable federal regulator, has at least $2 billion in deposits and at least either:


(i) 250,000 deposit accounts; or


(ii) $20 billion in total assets, regardless of the number of deposit accounts.


(2) Deposits, number of deposit accounts and total assets are as defined in the instructions for the filing of Reports of Income and Condition and Thrift Financial Reports, as applicable to the insured depository institution for determining whether it qualifies as a covered institution. A foreign deposit means an uninsured deposit liability maintained in a foreign branch of an insured depository institution. An international banking facility deposit is as defined by the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System in Regulation D (12 CFR § 204.8(a)(2)). A demand deposit account, NOW account, money market deposit account, savings deposit account and time deposit account are as defined in the instructions for the filing of Reports of Income and Condition and Thrift Financial Reports.


(3) Sweep account arrangements consist of a deposit account linked to an interest-bearing investment vehicle whereby funds are swept to and from the deposit account according to prearranged rules, usually on a daily basis, where the sweep investment vehicle is not a deposit and is reflected on the books and records of the Covered Institution.


(4) Automated credit account arrangements consist of a deposit account into which funds are automatically credited from an interest-bearing investment vehicle where the funds in the interest-bearing investment vehicle were not invested by prearranged rules.


(5) Non-covered institution means an insured depository institution that does not meet the definition of a covered institution.


(6) Provisional hold means an effective restriction on access to some or all of a deposit or other liability account after the failure of an insured depository institution.


(c) Posting and removing provisional holds. (1) A covered institution shall have in place an automated process for implementing a provisional hold on deposit accounts, foreign deposit accounts and sweep and automated credit account arrangements immediately following the determination of the close-of-business account balances, as defined in § 360.8(b)(3), at the failed covered institution.


(2) The system requirements under paragraph (c)(1) must have the capability of placing the provisional holds prescribed under that provision no later than 9 a.m. local time the day following the FDIC cutoff point, as defined in § 360.8(b)(1).


(3) Pursuant to instructions to be provided by the FDIC, a covered institution must notify the FDIC of the person(s) responsible for producing the standard data download and administering provisional holds, both while the functionality is being constructed and on an on-going basis.


(4) For deposit accounts held in domestic offices of an insured depository institution, the provisional hold algorithm must be designed to exempt accounts below a specific account balance threshold, as determined by the FDIC. The account balance threshold could be any amount, including zero. For accounts above the account balance threshold determined by the FDIC, the algorithm must be designed to calculate and place a hold equal to the dollar amount of funds in excess of the account balance threshold multiplied by the provisional hold percentage determined by the FDIC. The provisional hold percentage could be any amount, from zero to one hundred percent. The account balance threshold as well as the provisional hold percentage could vary for the following four categories, as the covered institution customarily defines consumer accounts:


(i) Consumer demand deposit, NOW and money market deposit accounts;


(ii) Other consumer deposit accounts (time deposit and savings accounts, excluding NOW and money market deposit accounts);


(iii) Non-consumer demand deposit, NOW and money market deposit accounts; and


(iv) Other non-consumer deposit accounts (time deposit and savings accounts, excluding NOW and money market deposit accounts).


(5) For deposit accounts held in foreign offices of an insured depository institution, other than those connected to a sweep or automated credit arrangement, the provisional hold algorithm will apply a provisional hold percentage to the entire account balance. For deposit accounts held in foreign offices the provisional hold percentage may differ from that applied to deposit accounts. Also, the provisional hold percentage would not vary by account category (i.e., consumer versus non-consumer and transaction versus non-transaction) as is the case with deposit accounts.


(6) For international banking facility deposits, other than those connected to a sweep or automated credit arrangements, the provisional hold algorithm will apply a provisional hold percentage to the entire account balance. For IBF deposits the provisional hold percentage may differ from that applied to deposit or foreign deposit accounts. Also, the provisional hold percentage would not vary by account category (i.e., consumer versus non-consumer, and transaction versus non-transaction) as is the case with deposit accounts.


(7) For the interest-bearing investment vehicle of a sweep arrangement, the provisional hold algorithm must be designed with the capability to place a provisional hold on the interest-bearing investment vehicle with possibly a different account balance threshold and a different hold percentage according to the type of interest-bearing investment vehicle.


(8) For the interest-bearing investment vehicle of an automated credit account arrangement, the provisional hold algorithm must be designed with the capability to place a provisional hold on the interest-bearing investment vehicle with possibly a different account balance threshold and a different hold percentage according to the type of interest-bearing investment vehicle.


(9) A covered institution may submit a request to the FDIC, using the address indicated in § 360.9(g): to develop a provisional hold process involving memo holds or alternative account mechanisms; or to exempt from the provisional hold requirements of this section those account systems servicing a relatively small number of accounts where the manual application of provisional holds is feasible. Such requests may be in the form of a letter and must include a justification for the request and address the relative effectiveness of the alternative for posting provisional holds in the event of failure. The FDIC will consider such requests on a case-by-case basis in light of the objectives of this section.


(10) The automated process for provisional holds required by paragraph (c)(1) of this section must include the capability of removing provisional holds in batch mode and, during the same processing cycle, applying debits, credits or additional holds on the deposit or other accounts from which the provisional holds were removed, as determined by the FDIC. The FDIC will provide files listing the accounts subject to: removal of provisional holds or additional holds (file format as specified in appendix A); application of debits or credits (file format as specified in appendix B); and application of additional holds (file format as specified in appendix A). In addition to the batch process used to remove provisional holds, the Covered Institution is required to have in place a mechanism for manual removal of provisional holds on a case-by-case basis.


(d) Providing a standard data format for generating deposit account and customer data. (1) A covered institution must have in place practices and procedures for providing the FDIC in a standard format upon the close of any day’s business with required depositor and customer data for all deposit accounts held in domestic and foreign offices and interest-bearing investment accounts connected with sweep and automated credit arrangements. Such standard data files are to be created through a mapping of pre-existing data elements and internal institution codes into standard data formats. Deposit account and customer data provided must be current as of the close of business for that day.


(2) The requirements of paragraph (d)(1) of this section shall be provided in five separate files, as indicated in the appendices C through G to this part 360.


(3) Upon request by the FDIC, a covered institution must submit the data required by paragraph (d)(1) of this section to the FDIC, in a manner prescribed by the FDIC.


(4) In providing the data required under paragraph (d)(1) of this section to the FDIC, the Covered Institution must be able to reconcile the total deposit balances and the number of deposit accounts to the institution’s subsidiary system control totals.


(e) Implementation requirements. (1) A covered institution must comply with the requirements of this section no later than February 18, 2010.


(2) An insured depository institution not within the definition of a covered institution on the effective date of this section must comply with the requirements of this section no later than eighteen months following the end of the second calendar quarter for which it meets the criteria for a covered institution.


(3) Upon the merger of two or more non-covered institutions, if the resulting institution meets the criteria for a covered institution, that covered institution must comply with the requirements of this section no later than eighteen months after the effective date of the merger.


(4) Upon the merger of two or more covered institutions, the merged institution must comply with the requirements of this section within eighteen months following the effective date of the merger. This provision, however, does not supplant any preexisting implementation date requirement, in place prior to the date of the merger, for the individual covered institution(s) involved in the merger.


(5) Upon the merger of one or more covered institutions with one or more non-covered institutions, the merged institution(s) must comply with the requirements of this section within eighteen months following the effective date of the merger. This provision, however, does not supplant any preexisting implementation date requirement for the individual covered institution(s) involved in the merger.


(6) Notwithstanding the general requirements of this paragraph (e), on a case-by-case basis, the FDIC may accelerate, upon notice, the implementation timeframe of all or part of the requirements of this section for a covered institution that: Has a composite rating of 3, 4, or 5 under the Uniform Financial Institution’s Rating System, or in the case of an insured branch of a foreign bank, an equivalent rating; is undercapitalized, as defined under the prompt corrective action provisions of 12 CFR part 324; or is determined by the appropriate Federal banking agency or the FDIC in consultation with the appropriate Federal banking agency to be experiencing a significant deterioration of capital or significant funding difficulties or liquidity stress, notwithstanding the composite rating of the institution by its appropriate Federal banking agency in its most recent report of examination. In implementing this paragraph (e)(6), the FDIC must consult with the covered institution’s primary federal regulator and consider the: Complexity of the institution’s deposit systems and operations, extent of the institution’s asset quality difficulties, volatility of the institution’s funding sources, expected near-term changes in the institution’s capital levels, and other relevant factors appropriate for the FDIC to consider in its roles as insurer and possible receiver of the institution.


(7) Notwithstanding the general requirements of this paragraph (e), a covered institution may request, by letter, that the FDIC extend the deadline for complying with the requirements of this section. A request for such an extension is subject to the FDIC’s rules of general applicability under 12 CFR. 303.251.


(f) A covered institution may apply to the FDIC for an exemption from the requirements of this § 360.9 if it has a high concentration of deposits incidental to credit card operations. The FDIC will consider such applications on a case-by-case basis in light of the objectives of this section.


(g) Requests for exemptions from the requirements of this section, for flexibility in the use of provisional holds or for extensions of the implementation requirements of this section and the submission of point-of-contact information should be submitted in writing to: Office of the Director, Division of Resolutions and Receiverships, Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, 550 17th Street, NW., Washington, DC 20429-0002.


(h) Testing requirements. Covered institutions must provide appropriate assistance to the FDIC in its testing of the systems required by this section. The FDIC will provide testing details to covered institutions through the issuance of subsequent procedures and/or guidelines.


[73 FR 41195, July 17, 2008, as amended at 78 FR 55595, Sept. 10, 2013; 83 FR 17741, Apr. 24, 2018]


§ 360.10 Resolution plans required for insured depository institutions with $50 billion or more in total assets.

(a) Scope and purpose. This section requires each insured depository institution with $50 billion or more in total assets to submit periodically to the FDIC a plan for the resolution of such institution in the event of its failure. This section also establishes the rules and requirements regarding the submission and content of a resolution plan as well as procedures for review by the FDIC of a resolution plan. This section requires a covered insured depository institution to submit a resolution plan that should enable the FDIC, as receiver, to resolve the institution under Sections 11 and 13 of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act (“FDI Act”), 12 U.S.C. 1821 and 1823, in a manner that ensures that depositors receive access to their insured deposits within one business day of the institution’s failure (two business days if the failure occurs on a day other than Friday), maximizes the net present value return from the sale or disposition of its assets and minimizes the amount of any loss realized by the creditors in the resolution. This rule is intended to ensure that the FDIC has access to all of the material information it needs to resolve efficiently a covered insured depository institution in the event of its failure.


(b) Definitions – (1) Affiliate has the same meaning given such term in Section 3(w)(6) of the FDI Act, 12 U.S.C. 1813(w)(6).


(2) Company has the same meaning given such term in § 362.2(d) of the FDIC’s Regulations, 12 CFR 362.2(d).


(3) Core business lines means those business lines of the covered insured depository institution (“CIDI”), including associated operations, services, functions and support, that, in the view of the CIDI, upon failure would result in a material loss of revenue, profit, or franchise value.


(4) Covered insured depository institution (“CIDI”) means an insured depository institution with $50 billion or more in total assets, as determined based upon the average of the institution’s four most recent Reports of Condition and Income or Thrift Financial Reports, as applicable to the insured depository institution.


(5) Critical services means services and operations of the CIDI, such as servicing, information technology support and operations, human resources and personnel that are necessary to continue the day-to-day operations of the CIDI.


(6) Foreign-based company means any company that is not incorporated or organized under the laws of the United States.


(7) Insured depository institution shall have the meaning given such term in Section 3(c)(2) of the FDI Act, 12 U.S.C. 1813(c)(2).


(8) Material entity means a company that is significant to the activities of a critical service or core business line.


(9) Parent company means the company that controls, directly or indirectly, an insured depository institution. In a multi-tiered holding company structure, parent company means the top-tier of the multi-tiered holding company only.


(10) Parent company affiliate means any affiliate of the parent company other than the CIDI and subsidiaries of the CIDI.


(11) Resolution plan means the plan described in paragraph (c) of this section for resolving the CIDI under Sections 11 and 13 of the FDI Act, 12 U.S.C. 1821 and 1823.


(12) Subsidiary has the same meaning given such term in Section 3(w)(4) of the FDI Act, 12 U.S.C. 1813(w)(4).


(13) Total assets are defined in the instructions for the filing of Reports of Condition and Income and Thrift Financial Reports, as applicable to the insured depository institution, for determining whether it qualifies as a CIDI.


(14) United States means the United States and includes any state of the United States, the District of Columbia, any territory of the United States, Puerto Rico, Guam, American Samoa and the Virgin Islands.


(c) Resolution Plans to be submitted by CIDI to FDIC – (1) General – (i) Initial Resolution Plans Required. Each CIDI shall submit a resolution plan to the FDIC, Attention: Office of Complex Financial Institutions, 550 17th Street NW., Washington, DC 20429, on or before the date set forth below (“Initial Submission Date”):


(A) July 1, 2012, with respect to a CIDI whose parent company, as of November 30, 2011, had $250 billion or more in total nonbank assets (or in the case of a parent company that is a foreign-based company, such company’s total U.S. nonbank assets);


(B) July 1, 2013, with respect to any CIDI not described paragraph (c)(1)(i)(A) of this section whose parent company, as of November 30, 2011, had $100 billion or more in total nonbank assets (or, in the case of a parent company that is a foreign-based company, such company’s total U.S. nonbank assets); and


(C) December 31, 2013, with respect to any CIDI not described in of this paragraph (c)(1)(i)(A) or (B) of this section.


(ii) Submission by New CIDIs. An insured depository institution that becomes a CIDI after April 1, 2012 shall submit its initial resolution plan no later than the next July 1 following the date the insured depository institution becomes a CIDI, provided such date occurs no earlier than 270 days after the date on which the insured depository institution became a CIDI.


(iii) After filing its initial Resolution Plan pursuant to paragraph (c)(1)(i) or (c)(1)(ii) of this section, each CIDI shall submit a Resolution Plan to the FDIC annually on or before each anniversary date of its Initial Submission Date.


(iv) Notwithstanding anything to the contrary in this paragraph (c)(1), the FDIC may determine that a CIDI shall file its initial or annual Resolution Plan by a date other than as provided in this paragraph (c). The FDIC shall provide a CIDI with written notice of a determination under this paragraph (c)(1)(iv) no later than 180 days prior to the date on which the FDIC determines to require the CIDI to submit its Resolution Plan.


(v) Notice of Material Events. (A) Each CIDI shall file with the FDIC a notice no later than 45 days after any event, occurrence, change in conditions or circumstances or other change that results in, or could reasonably be foreseen to have, a material effect on the resolution plan of the CIDI. Such notice shall describe the event, occurrence or change and explain why the event, occurrence or change may require changes to the resolution plan. The CIDI shall address any event, occurrence or change with respect to which it has provided notice pursuant hereto in the following resolution plan submitted by the CIDI.


(B) A CIDI shall not be required to file a notice under paragraph (c)(1)(v)(A) of this section if the date on which the CIDI would be required to submit a notice under paragraph (c)(1)(v)(A) would be within 90 days prior to the date on which the CIDI is required to file an annual Resolution Plan under paragraph (c)(1)(iii) of this section.


(vi) Incorporation of data and other information from a Dodd-Frank Act resolution plan. The CIDI may incorporate data and other information from a resolution plan filed pursuant to Section 165(d) of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act, 12 U.S.C. 5365(d), by its parent company.


(2) Content of the Resolution Plan. The resolution plan submitted should enable the FDIC, as receiver, to resolve the CIDI in the event of its insolvency under the FDI Act in a manner that ensures that depositors receive access to their insured deposits within one business day of the institution’s failure (two business days if the failure occurs on a day other than Friday), maximizes the net present value return from the sale or disposition of its assets and minimizes the amount of any loss realized by the creditors in the resolution in accordance with Sections 11 and 13 of the FDI Act, 12 U.S.C. 1821 and 1823. The resolution plan strategies should take into account that failure of the CIDI may occur under the baseline, adverse and severely adverse economic conditions developed by the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System pursuant to 12 U.S.C. 5365(i)(1)(B); provided, however, a CIDI may submit its initial resolution plan assuming the baseline conditions only, or, if a baseline scenario is not then available, a reasonable substitute developed by the CIDI. At a minimum, the resolution plan shall:


(i) Executive Summary. Include an executive summary describing the key elements of the CIDI’s strategic plan for resolution under the FDI Act in the event of its insolvency. After the CIDI files its initial plan, each annual resolution plan shall also describe:


(A) Material events, such as acquisitions, sales, litigation and operational changes, since the most recently filed plan that may have a material effect on the plan;


(B) Material changes to the CIDI’s resolution plan from its most recently filed plan; and


(C) Any actions taken by the CIDI since filing of the previous plan to improve the effectiveness of its resolution plan or remediate or otherwise mitigate any material weaknesses or impediments to the effective and timely execution of the resolution plan.


(ii) Organizational Structure: Legal Entities; Core Business Lines and Branches. Provide the CIDI’s, parent company’s, and affiliates’ legal and functional structures and identify core business lines. Provide a mapping of core business lines, including material asset holdings and liabilities related thereto, to material entities. Discuss the CIDI’s overall deposit activities including, among other things, unique aspects of the deposit base or underlying systems that may create operational complexity for the FDIC, result in extraordinary resolution expenses in the event of failure and a description of the branch organization, both domestic and foreign. Identify key personnel tasked with managing core business lines and deposit activities and the CIDI’s branch organization.


(iii) Critical Services. Identify critical services and providers of critical services. Provide a mapping of critical services to material entities and core business lines. Describe the CIDI’s strategy for continuing critical services in the event of the CIDI’s failure. When critical services are provided by the parent company or a parent company affiliate, describe the CIDI’s strategy for continuing critical services in the event of the parent company’s or parent company affiliate’s failure. Assess the ability of each parent company affiliate providing critical services to function on a stand-alone basis in the event of the parent company’s failure.


(iv) Interconnectedness to Parent Company’s Organization; Potential Barriers or Material Obstacles to Orderly Resolution. Identify the elements or aspects of the parent company’s organizational structure, the interconnectedness of its legal entities, the structure of legal or contractual arrangements, or its overall business operations that would, in the event the CIDI were placed in receivership, diminish the CIDI’s franchise value, obstruct its continued business operations or increase the operational complexity to the FDIC of resolution of the CIDI. Identify potential barriers or other material obstacles to an orderly resolution of the CIDI, inter-connections and inter-dependencies that hinder the timely and effective resolution of the CIDI, and include the remediation steps or mitigating responses necessary to eliminate or minimize such barriers or obstacles.


(v) Strategy to Separate from Parent Company’s Organization. Provide a strategy to unwind or separate the CIDI and its subsidiaries from the organizational structure of its parent company in a cost-effective and timely fashion. Describe remediation or mitigating steps that could be taken to eliminate or mitigate obstacles to such separation.


(vi) Strategy for the Sale or Disposition of Deposit Franchise, Business Lines and Assets. Provide a strategy for the sale or disposition of the deposit franchise, including branches, core business lines and major assets of the CIDI in a manner that ensures that depositors receive access to their insured deposits within one business day of the institution’s failure (two business days if the failure occurs on a day other than Friday), maximizes the net present value return from the sale or disposition of such assets and minimizes the amount of any loss realized in the resolution of cases.


(vii) Least Costly Resolution Method. Describe how the strategies for the separation of the CIDI and its subsidiaries from its parent company’s organization and sale or disposition of deposit franchise, core business lines and major assets can be demonstrated to be the least costly to the Deposit Insurance Fund of all possible methods for resolving the CIDI.


(viii) Asset Valuation and Sales. Provide a detailed description of the processes the CIDI employs for:


(A) Determining the current market values and marketability of core business lines and material asset holdings;


(B) Assessing the feasibility of the CIDI’s plans, under baseline, adverse and severely adverse economic condition scenarios for executing any sales, divestitures, restructurings, recapitalizations, or similar actions contemplated in the CIDI’s resolution plan; and


(C) Assessing the impact of any sales, divestitures, restructurings, recapitalizations, or other similar actions on the value, funding and operations of the CIDI and its core business lines.


(ix) Major Counterparties. Identify the major counterparties of the CIDI and describe the interconnections, interdependencies and relationships with such major counterparties. Analyze whether the failure of each major counterparty would likely have an adverse impact on or result in the material financial distress or failure of the CIDI.


(x) Off-balance-sheet Exposures. Describe any material off-balance-sheet exposures (including unfunded commitments, guarantees and contractual obligations) of the CIDI and map those exposures to core business lines.


(xi) Collateral Pledged. Identify and describe processes used by the CIDI to:


(A) Determine to whom the CIDI has pledged collateral;


(B) Identify the person or entity that holds such collateral; and


(C) Identify the jurisdiction in which the collateral is located; and if different, the jurisdiction in which the security interest in the collateral is enforceable against the CIDI.


(xii) Trading, derivatives and hedges. Describe the practices of the CIDI and its core business lines related to the booking of trading and derivative activities. Identify each system on which the CIDI conducts a material number or value amount of trades. Map each trading system to the CIDI’s legal entities and core business lines. Identify material hedges of the CIDI and its core business lines related to trading and derivative activities, including a mapping to legal entity. Describe hedging strategies of the CIDI.


(xiii) Unconsolidated Balance Sheet of CIDI; Material Entity Financial Statements. Provide an unconsolidated balance sheet for the CIDI and a consolidating schedule for all material entities that are subject to consolidation with the CIDI. Provide financial statements for material entities. When available, audited financial statements should be provided.


(xiv) Payment, clearing and settlement systems. Identify each payment, clearing and settlement system of which the CIDI, directly or indirectly, is a member. Map membership in each such system to the CIDI’s legal entities and core business lines.


(xv) Capital Structure; Funding Sources. Provide detailed descriptions of the funding, liquidity and capital needs of, and resources available to, the CIDI and its material entities, which shall be mapped to core business lines and critical services. Describe the material components of the liabilities of the CIDI and its material entities and identify types and amounts of short-term and long-term liabilities by type and term to maturity, secured and unsecured liabilities and subordinated liabilities.


(xvi) Affiliate Funding, Transactions, Accounts, Exposures and Concentrations. Describe material affiliate funding relationships, accounts, and exposures, including terms, purpose, and duration, that the CIDI or any of its subsidiaries have with its parent or any parent company affiliate. Include in such description material affiliate financial exposures, claims or liens, lending or borrowing lines and relationships, guaranties, asset accounts, deposits, or derivatives transactions. Clearly identify the nature and extent to which parent company or parent company affiliates serve as a source of funding to the CIDI and its subsidiaries, the terms of any contractual arrangements, including any capital maintenance agreements, the location of related assets, funds or deposits and the mechanisms by which funds can be downstreamed from the parent company to the CIDI and its subsidiaries.


(xvii) Systemically Important Functions. Describe systemically important functions that the CIDI, its subsidiaries and affiliates provide, including the nature and extent of the institution’s involvement in payment systems, custodial or clearing operations, large sweep programs, and capital markets operations in which it plays a dominant role. Discuss critical vulnerabilities, estimated exposure and potential losses, and why certain attributes of the businesses detailed in previous sections could pose a systemic risk to the broader economy.


(xviii) Cross-Border Elements. Describe material components of the CIDI’s structure that are based or located outside the United States, including foreign branches, subsidiaries and offices. Provide detail on the location and amount of foreign deposits and assets. Discuss the nature and extent of the CIDI’s cross-border assets, operations, interrelationships and exposures and map to legal entities and core business lines.


(xix) Management Information Systems; Software Licenses; Intellectual Property. Provide a detailed inventory and description of the key management information systems and applications, including systems and applications for risk management, accounting, and financial and regulatory reporting, used by the CIDI and its subsidiaries. Identify the legal owner or licensor of the systems identified above; describe the use and function of the system or application, and provide a listing of service level agreements and any software and systems licenses or associated intellectual property related thereto. Identify and discuss any disaster recovery or other backup plans. Identify common or shared facilities and systems as well as personnel necessary to operate such facilities and systems. Describe the capabilities of the CIDI’s processes and systems to collect, maintain, and report the information and other data underlying the resolution plan to management of the CIDI and, upon request to the FDIC. Describe any deficiencies, gaps or weaknesses in such capabilities and the actions the CIDI intends to take to promptly address such deficiencies, gaps, or weaknesses, and the time frame for implementing such actions.


(xx) Corporate Governance. Include a detailed description of:


(A) How resolution planning is integrated into the corporate governance structure and processes of the CIDI;


(B) The CIDI’s policies, procedures, and internal controls governing preparation and approval of the resolution plan; and


(C) The identity and position of the senior management official of the CIDI who is primarily responsible and accountable for the development, maintenance, implementation, and filing of the resolution plan and for the CIDI’s compliance with this section.


(xxi) Assessment of the Resolution Plan. Describe the nature, extent, and results of any contingency planning or similar exercise conducted by the CIDI since the date of the most recently filed resolution plan to assess the viability of or improve the resolution plan.


(xxii) Any other material factor. Identify and discuss any other material factor that may impede the resolution of the CIDI.


(3) Approval. The CIDI’s board of directors must approve the resolution plan. Such approval shall be noted in the Board minutes.


(4) Review of Resolution Plan.


(i) Each resolution plan submitted shall be credible. A resolution plan is credible if its strategies for resolving the CIDI, and the detailed information required by this section, are well-founded and based on information and data related to the CIDI that are observable or otherwise verifiable and employ reasonable projections from current and historical conditions within the broader financial markets.


(ii) After receiving a resolution plan, the FDIC shall determine whether the submitted plan satisfies the minimum informational requirements of paragraph (c)(2) of this section; and either acknowledge acceptance of the plan for review or return the resolution plan if the FDIC determines that it is incomplete or that substantial additional information is required to facilitate review of the resolution plan.


(iii) If the FDIC determines that a resolution plan is informationally incomplete or that additional information is necessary to facilitate review of the plan, the FDIC shall inform the CIDI in writing of the area(s) in which the plan is informationally incomplete or with respect to which additional information is required.


(iv) The CIDI shall resubmit an informationally complete resolution plan or such additional information as requested to facilitate review of the resolution plan no later than 30 days after receiving the notice described in paragraph (c)(4)(iii) of this section, or such other time period as the FDIC may determine.


(v) Upon acceptance of a resolution plan as informationally complete, the FDIC will review the resolution plan in consultation with the appropriate Federal banking agency for the CIDI and its parent company. If, after consultation with the appropriate Federal banking agency for the CIDI, the FDIC determines that the resolution plan of a CIDI submitted is not credible, the FDIC shall notify the CIDI in writing of such determination. Any notice provided under this paragraph shall identify the aspects of the resolution plan that the FDIC determines to be deficient.


(vi) Within 90 days of receiving a notice of deficiencies issued pursuant to the preceding paragraph, or such shorter or longer period as the FDIC may determine, a CIDI shall submit a revised resolution plan to the FDIC that addresses the deficiencies identified by the FDIC and discusses in detail the revisions made to address such deficiencies.


(vii) Upon its own initiative or a written request by a CIDI, the FDIC may extend any time period under this section. Each extension request shall be in writing and shall describe the basis and justification for the request.


(d) Implementation Matters. (1) In order to allow evaluation of the resolution plan, each CIDI must provide the FDIC such information and access to such personnel of the CIDI as the FDIC determines is necessary to assess the credibility of the resolution plan and the ability of the CIDI to implement the resolution plan. The FDIC will rely to the fullest extent possible on examinations conducted by or on behalf of the appropriate Federal banking agency for the relevant company.


(2) Within a reasonable period of time, as determined by the FDIC, following its Initial Submission Date, the CIDI shall demonstrate its capability to produce promptly, in a time frame and format acceptable to the FDIC, the information and data underlying its resolution plan. The FDIC shall consult with the appropriate Federal banking agency for the CIDI before finding that the CIDI’s capability to produce the information and data underlying its resolution plan is unacceptable.


(3) Notwithstanding the general requirements of paragraph (c)(1) of this section, on a case-by-case basis, the FDIC may extend, on its own initiative or upon written request, the implementation and updating time frames for all or part of the requirements of this section.


(4) FDIC may, on its own initiative or upon written request, exempt a CIDI from one or more of the requirements of this section.


(e) No limiting effect on FDIC. No resolution plan provided pursuant to this section shall be binding on the FDIC as supervisor, deposit insurer or receiver for a CIDI or otherwise require the FDIC to act in conformance with such plan.


(f) Form of Resolution Plans; Confidential Treatment of Resolution Plans. (1) Each resolution plan of a CIDI shall be divided into a Public Section and a Confidential Section. Each CIDI shall segregate and separately identify the Public Section from the Confidential Section. The Public Section shall consist of an executive summary of the resolution plan that describes the business of the CIDI and includes, to the extent material to an understanding of the CIDI:


(i) The names of material entities;


(ii) A description of core business lines;


(iii) Consolidated financial information regarding assets, liabilities, capital and major funding sources;


(iv) A description of derivative activities and hedging activities;


(v) A list of memberships in material payment, clearing and settlement systems;


(vi) A description of foreign operations;


(vii) The identities of material supervisory authorities;


(viii) The identities of the principal officers;


(ix) A description of the corporate governance structure and processes related to resolution planning;


(x) A description of material management information systems; and


(xi) A description, at a high level, of the CIDI’s resolution strategy, covering such items as the range of potential purchasers of the CIDI, its material entities and core business lines.


(2) The confidentiality of resolution plans shall be determined in accordance with applicable exemptions under the Freedom of Information Act (5 U.S.C. 552(b)) and the FDIC’s Disclosure of Information Rules (12 CFR part 309).


(3) Any CIDI submitting a resolution plan or related materials pursuant to this section that desires confidential treatment of the information submitted pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 552(b)(4) and the FDIC’s Disclosure of Information Rules (12 CFR part 309) and related policies may file a request for confidential treatment in accordance with those rules.


(4) To the extent permitted by law, information comprising the Confidential Section of a resolution plan will be treated as confidential.


(5) To the extent permitted by law, the submission of any nonpublicly available data or information under this section shall not constitute a waiver of, or otherwise affect, any privilege arising under Federal or state law (including the rules of any Federal or state court) to which the data or information is otherwise subject. Privileges that apply to resolution plans and related materials are protected pursuant to Section 18(x) of the FDI Act, 12 U.S.C. 1828(x).


[77 FR 3084, Jan. 23, 2012]


§ 360.11 Records of failed insured depository institutions.

(a) Definitions. For purposes of this section, the following definitions apply –


(1) Failed insured depository institution is an insured depository institution for which the FDIC has been appointed receiver pursuant to 12 U.S.C. 1821(c)(1).


(2) Insured depository institution has the same meaning as provided by 12 U.S.C. 1813(c)(2).


(3) Records means any reasonably accessible document, book, paper, map, photograph, microfiche, microfilm, computer or electronically-created record generated or maintained by an insured depository institution in the course of and necessary to its transaction of business.


(i) Examples of records include, without limitation, board or committee meeting minutes, contracts to which the insured depository institution was a party, deposit account information, employee and employee benefits information, general ledger and financial reports or data, litigation files, and loan documents.


(ii) Records do not include:


(A) Multiple copies of records; or


(B) Examination, operating, or condition reports prepared by, on behalf of, or for the use of the FDIC or any agency responsible for the regulation or supervision of insured depository institutions.


(b) Determination of records. In determining whether particular documentary material obtained from a failed insured depository institution is a record for purposes of 12 U.S.C. 1821(d)(15)(D), the FDIC in its discretion will consider the following factors:


(1) Whether the documentary material related to the business of the insured depository institution,


(2) Whether the documentary material was generated or maintained as records in the regular course of the business of the insured depository institution in accordance with its own recordkeeping practices and procedures or pursuant to standards established by its regulators,


(3) Whether the documentary material is needed by the FDIC to carry out its receivership function, and


(4) The expected evidentiary needs of the FDIC.


(c) The FDIC’s determination that documentary material from a failed insured depository institution constitutes records is solely for the purpose of identifying that documentary material that must be maintained pursuant to 12 U.S.C. 1821(d)(15)(D) and shall not bear on the discoverability or admissibility of such documentary material in any court, tribunal or other adjudicative proceeding, nor on whether such documentary material is subject to release under the Freedom of Information Act, the Privacy Act or other law.


(d) Destruction of records. (1) Except as provided in paragraph (d)(2) of this section, after the end of the six-year period beginning on the date the FDIC is appointed as receiver of a failed insured depository institution, the FDIC may destroy any records of an institution which the FDIC, in its discretion, determines to be unnecessary unless directed not to do so by a court of competent jurisdiction or governmental agency, prohibited by law, or subject to a legal hold imposed by the FDIC.


(2) Notwithstanding paragraph (d)(1) of this section, the FDIC may destroy records of a failed insured depository institution which are at least 10 years old as of the date on which the FDIC is appointed as the receiver of such institution in accordance with paragraph (d)(1) of this section at any time after such appointment is final, without regard to the six-year period of limitation contained in paragraph (d)(1) of this section.


(e) Transfer of records. If the FDIC transfers records to a third party in connection with a transaction involving the purchase and assumption of assets and liabilities of an insured depository institution, the recordkeeping requirements of 12 U.S.C. 1821(d)(15)(D), and paragraph (d) of this section shall be satisfied if the transferee agrees that it will not destroy such records for at least six years from the date the FDIC was appointed as receiver of such failed insured depository institution unless otherwise notified in writing by the FDIC.


(f) Policies and procedures. The FDIC may establish policies and procedures with respect to the retention and destruction of records that are consistent with this section.


[78 FR 54376, Sept. 4, 2013]


Appendix A to Part 360 – Non-Monetary Transaction File Structure

This is the structure of the data file the FDIC will provide to remove or add a FDIC hold for an individual account or sub-account. The file will be in a tab- or pipe-delimited ASCII format and provided through FDICconnect or Direct Connect. The file will be encrypted using an FDIC-supplied algorithm.


Field name
Field description
Comments
Format
1. DP__Acct__IdentifierAccount Identifier

The primary field used to identify the account. This field may be the Account Number.
The Account Identifier may be composed of more than one physical data element. If multiple fields are required to identify the account, data should be placed in separate fields and the FDIC instructed how these fields are combined to uniquely identify the accountCharacter (25).
2. DP__Acct__Identifier – 2Account Identifier – 2Character (25).
If necessary, the second element used to identify the account
3. DP__Acct__Identifier – 3Account Identifier – 3Character (25).
If necessary, the third element used to identify the account
4. DP__Acct__Identifier – 4Account Identifier – 4Character (25).
If necessary, the fourth element used to identify the account
5. DP__Acct__Identifier – 5Account Identifier – 5Character (25).
If necessary, the fifth element used to identify the account
6. DP__Sub__Acct__IdentifierSub-Account Identifier

If available, the Sub-Account identifier for the account.
The Sub-Account Identifier may identify separate deposits tied to this account where there are different processing parameters such as interest rates or maturity dates, but all owners are the sameCharacter (25).
7. PH__Hold__ActionHold Action

The requested hold action to be taken for this account or sub-account.
Character (1).
Possible values are:
• R = Remove
• A = Add
8. PH__Hold__AmtHold AmountDecimal (14,2).
Dollar amount of the FDIC hold to be removed or added
9. PH__Hold__DescHold DescriptionCharacter (225).
FDIC hold to be removed or added

[73 FR 41197, July 17, 2008]


Appendix B to Part 360 – Debit/Credit File Structure

This is the structure of the data file the FDIC will provide to apply debits and credits to an individual account or sub-account after the removal of FDIC holds. The file will be in a tab- or pipe-delimited ASCII format and provided through FDICconnect or Direct Connect. The file will be encrypted using an FDIC-supplied algorithm.


Field name
Field description
Comments
Format
1. DP__Acct__IdentifierAccount Identifier

The primary field used to identify the account. This field may the Account Number.
The Account Identifier may be composed of more than one physical data element. If multiple fields are required to identify the account, data should be placed in separate fields and the FDIC instructed how these fields are combined to uniquely identify the accountCharacter (25).
2. DP__Acct__Identifier – 2Account Identifier – 2Character (25).
If necessary, the second element used to identify the account
3. DP__Acct__Identifier – 3Account Identifier – 3Character (25).
If necessary, the third element used to identify the account
4. DP__Acct__Identifier – 4Account Identifier – 4Character (25).
If necessary, the fourth element used to identify the account
5. DP__Acct__Identifier – 5Account Identifier – 5Character (25).
If necessary, the fifth element used to identify the account
6. DP__Sub__Acct__IdentifierSub-Account Identifier

If available, the sub-account identifier for the account.
The Sub-Account Identifier may identify separate deposits tied to this account where there are different processing parameters such as interest rates or maturity dates, but all owners are the sameCharacter (25).
7. DC__Debit__AmtDebit AmountDecimal (14,2).
Dollar amount of the debit to be applied to the account or sub-account
8. DC__Credit__AmtCredit AmountDecimal (14,2).
Dollar amount of the credit to be applied to the account or sub-account
9. DC__Transaction__DescDebit/Credit DescriptionCharacter (225).
FDIC message associated with the debit or credit transaction

[73 FR 41197, July 17, 2008]


Appendix C to Part 360 – Deposit File Structure

This is the structure for the data file to provide deposit data to the FDIC. If data or information are not maintained or do not apply, a null value in the appropriate field should be indicated. The file will be in a tab-or pipe-delimited ASCII format. Each file name will contain the institution’s FDIC Certificate Number, an indication that it is a deposit file type and the date of the extract. The files will be encrypted using an FDIC-supplied algorithm. The FDIC will transmit to the covered institution the encryption algorithm over FDICconnect.


The total deposit balances and the number of deposit accounts in each deposit file must be reconciled to the subsidiary system control totals.


The FDIC intends to fully utilize a covered institution’s understanding of its customers and the data maintained around deposit accounts. Should additional information be available to the covered institution to help the FDIC more quickly complete its insurance determination process, it may add this information to the end of this data file. Should additional data elements be provided, a complete data dictionary for these elements must be supplied along with a description of how this information could be best used to establish account ownership or insurance category.


The deposit data elements provide information specific to deposit account balances and account data. The sequencing of these elements, their physical data structures and the field data format and field length must be provided to the FDIC along with the data structures identified below.


A header record will also be required at the beginning of this file. This record will contain the number of accounts to be included in this file, the maximum number of characters contained in largest account title field maintained within the deposit file and the maximum number of characters contained in largest address field maintained within the deposit file.



Note:

Each record must contain the account title/name and current account statement mailing address. Fields 17-33 relate to the account name and address information. Some systems provide for separate fields for account title/name, street address, city, state, ZIP, and country, all of which are parsed out. Others systems may simply provide multiple lines for name, street address, city, state, ZIP, with no distinction. Populate fields that best fit the system’s data, either fields 17-27 or fields 28-33.


Field name
Field description
Comments
Format
1. DP__Acct__IdentifierAccount Identifier

The primary field used to identify the account. This field may be the Account Number.
The Account Identifier may be composed of more than one physical data element. If multiple fields are required to identify the account, data should be placed in separate fields and the FDIC instructed how these fields are combined to uniquely identify the account.Character (25).
2. DP__Acct__Identifier – 2Account Identifier – 2

If necessary, the second element used to identify the account.
Character (25).
3. DP__Acct__Identifier – 3Account Identifier – 3

If necessary, the third element used to identify the account.
Character (25).
4. DP__Acct__Identifier – 4Account Identifier – 4

If necessary, the fourth element used to identify the account.
Character (25).
5. DP__Acct__Identifier – 5Account Identifier – 5

If necessary, the fifth element used to identify the account.
Character (25).
6. DP__Sub__Acct__IdentifierSub-Account Identifier

If available, the sub-account identifier for the account.
The Sub-Account Identifier may identify separate deposits tied to this account where there are different processing parameters such as interest rates or maturity dates, but all owners are the same.Character (25).
7. DP__Bank__NoBank Number

The bank number assigned to the deposit account.
Character (15).
8. DP__Tax__IDTax ID

The tax identification number maintained on the account.
For consumer accounts, typically, this would be the primary account holder’s social security number (“SSN”). For business accounts it would be the federal tax identification number (“TIN”). Hyphens are optional in this field.Character (15).
9. DP__Tax__CodeTax ID Code

The type of the tax identification number. Possible values are:

• S = Social Security Number.

• T = Federal Tax Identification Number.

• O = Other.
Generally deposit systems have flags or indicators set to indicate whether the number is an SSN or TIN.Character (1).
10. DP__BranchBranch Number

The branch or office associated with the account.
In lieu of a branch number this field may represent a specialty department or division.Character (15).
11. DP__Cost__CenterCost Center or G/L Code

The identifier used for organization reporting or ownership of the account. Insert null value if the cost center is not carried in the deposit record.
This field ties to the general ledger accounts.Character (20).
12. DP__Dep__TypeDeposit Type Indicator

The type of deposit by office location. Possible values are:

• D = Deposit (Domestic).

• F = Foreign Deposit.
A deposit – also called a “domestic deposit” – includes only deposit liabilities payable in the United States, typically those deposits maintained in a domestic office of an insured depository institution, as defined in section 3(l) of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act (12 U.S.C. 1813(l)). A foreign deposit is a deposit liability in a foreign branch payable solely at a foreign branch or branches.Character (1).
13. DP__Currency__TypeCurrency Type

The ISO 4217 currency code.
Character (3).
14. DP__Ownership__IndCustomer Ownership Indicator

The type of ownership at the account level. Possible values are:

• S = Single.

• J = Joint Account.

• P = Partnership account.

• C = Corporation.

• B = Brokered Deposits.

• I = IRA Accounts.

• U = Unincorporated Association.

• R = Revocable Trust.

• IR = Irrevocable Trust.

• G = Government Accounts.

• E = Employee Benefit Plan Accounts.

• O = Other.
Single: Accounts owned by an individual and those accounts held as Minor Accounts, Estate Accounts, Non-Minor Custodian/Guardian Accounts, Attorney in Fact Accounts and Sole Proprietorships

Joint Account: Accounts owned by two or more individuals, but does not include the ownership of a Payable on Death Account or Trust Account.

Partnership Account: Accounts owned by a Partnership

Corporation: Accounts owned by a Corporation (e.g. Inc., L.L.C., or P.C.).

Brokered Deposits: Accounts placed by a deposit broker who acts as an intermediary for the actual owner or sub-broker.

IRA Accounts: Accounts for which the owner has the right to direct how the funds are invested including Keoghs and other Self-Directed Retirement Accounts.
Character (2).
Unincorporated Association: An account owned by an association of two or more persons formed for some religious, educational, charitable, social or other non-commercial purpose.
Revocable Trusts: Including PODs and formal revocable trusts (e.g. Living Trusts, Intervivos Trusts or Family Trusts).
Irrevocable Trusts: Accounts held by a trust established by statute or written trust in which the grantor relinquishes all power to revoke the trust.
Government Accounts: Accounts owned by a government entity (e.g. City, State, County or Federal government entities and their sub-divisions).
Employee Benefit Plan: Accounts established by the administrator of an Employee Benefit Plan including defined contribution, defined benefit and employee welfare plans.
Other Accounts: Accounts owned by an entity not described above.
15. DP__Prod__CatProduct Category

The product classification. Possible values are:
Product Category is sometimes referred to as “application type” or “system type”.Character (3).
• DDA = Non-Interest Bearing Checking accounts.
• NOW = Interest Bearing Checking accounts.
• MMA = Money Market Deposit Accounts.
• SAV = Other savings accounts.
• CDS = Time Deposit accounts and Certificate of Deposit accounts, including any accounts with specified maturity dates that may or may not be renewable.
16. DP__Stat__CodeStatus Code

Status or condition of the account. Possible values are:
Character (1).
• O = Open.
• D = Dormant.
• I = Inactive.
• E = Escheatment.
• A = Abandoned.
• C = Closing.
• R = Restricted/Frozen/Blocked.
17. DP__Acct__Title – 1Account Title Line 1

Account styling or titling of the account.
These data will be used to identify the owners and beneficiaries of the account.Character (100).
18. DP__Acct__Title – 2Account Title Line 2

If available, the second account title line.
Character (100).
19. DP__Acct__Title – 3Account Title Line 3

If available, the third account title line.
Character (100).
20. DP__Acct__Title – 4Account Title Line 4

If available, the fourth account title line.
Character (100).
21. DP__Street__Add__Ln – 1Street Address Line 1

The current account statement mailing address of record.
Character (100).
22. DP__Street__Add__Ln – 2Street Address Line 2

If available, the second mailing address line.
Character (100).
23. DP__Street__Add__Ln – 3Street Address Line 3

If available, the third mailing address line.
Character (100).
24. DP__CityCity

The city associated with the mailing address.
Character (50).
25. DP__StateState

The state abbreviation associated with the mailing address.
Use a two-character state code (official U.S. Postal Service abbreviations).Character (2).
26. DP__ZIPZIP

The ZIP + 4 code associated with the mailing address.
If the “ + 4” code is not available provide only the 5-digit ZIP code. Hyphens are optional in this field.Character (10).
27. DP__CountryCountry

The country associated with the mailing address.
Provide the country name or the standard IRS country code.Character (10).
28. DP__NA__Line – 1Name/Address Line 1

Alternate name/address format for the current account statement mailing address of record, first line.
Fields 28-33 are to be used if address data are not parsed to populate Fields 17-27.Character (100).
29. DP__NA__Line – 2Name/Address Line 2

Alternate name/address format, second line.
Character (100).
30. DP__NA__Line – 3Name/Address Line 3

Alternate name/address format, third line.
Character (100).
31. DP__NA__Line – 4Name/Address Line 4

Alternate name/address format, fourth line.
Character (100).
32. DP__NA__Line – 5Name/Address Line 5

Alternate name/address format, fifth line.
Character (100).
33. DP__NA__Line – 6Name/Address Line 6

Alternate name/address format, sixth line.
Character (100).
34. DP__Cur__BalCurrent Balance

The current balance in the account at the end of business on the effective date of this file.
This balance should not be reduced by float or holds. For CDs and time deposits, the balance should reflect the principal balance plus any interest paid and available for withdrawal not already included in the principal (do not include accrued interest). The total of all current balances in this file should reconcile to the total deposit trial balance totals or other summary reconciliation of deposits performed by the institution.Decimal (14,2).
35. DP__Int__RateInterest Rate

The current interest rate in effect for interest bearing accounts.
Interest rate should be expressed in decimal format, i.e., 2.0% should be represented as 0.020000000.Decimal (10,9).
36. DP__Acc__IntAccrued Interest

The amount of interest that has been earned but not yet paid to the account as of the date of the file.
Decimal (14,2).
37. DP__Lst__Int__PdDate Last Interest Paid

The date through which interest was last paid to the account.
Date (YYYYMMDD).
38. DP__Lst__DepositDate Last Deposit

The date of the last deposit transaction posted to the account.
For example, a deposit that included checks and/or cash.Date (YYYYMMDD).
39. DP__Int__Term__NoInterest Term Number

The number of months in the current interest term.
Decimal (3,0).
40. DP__Nxt__MatDate of Next Maturity

For CD and time deposit accounts, the next date the account is to mature.
For non-renewing CDs that have matured and are waiting to be redeemed this date may be in the past.Date (YYYYMMDD).
41. DP__Open__DTAccount Open Date

The date the account was opened.
If the account had previously been closed and re-opened, this should reflect the most recent re-opened date.Date (YYYYMMDD).
42. DP__Sweep__CodeSweep CodeCharacter (1).
Indicates if the account is a sweep account. Possible values are:
• Y = Yes.
• N = No.
43. DP__Hold__To__PostFull Hold on the account: Indicator if all postings to this account are restricted. Possible values are:Character (1).
• Y = Yes.
• N = No.
44. DP__Issue__Val__AmtIssued Value Amount

The value of the current CD when issued.
For CDs only.Decimal (14,2).
45. DP__Int__CD__CdeType of Interest for CDFor CDs only.Character (1).
Possible values are:
• C = Rate Change Allowed.
• N = Rate Change Not Allowed.
• R = Change Rate to Default at Renewal.
• T = Rate Change Allowed Only During the Term.
46. DP__IRA__CdeIRA Code

The type of IRA. Possible values are:

• C = Corporate Retirement

• E = Educational IRA.

• I = IRA Account.

• K = Keogh Account.

• R = Roth IRA Account.

• S = SEP Account.

• T = Transitional Roth IRA.

• V = Versa Account.

• H = Health Savings Account.
Optional code field to be used if available to help further identify the types of IRA accounts.Character (1).
47. DP__Deposit__Class__TypeDeposit Class Type

The deposit class. Possible values are:
The institution may also use more or fewer class types.Character (10).
• RTL = Retail.
• FED = Federal government.
• STATE = State government.
• COMM = Commercial.
• CORP = Corporate.
• BANK = Bank Owned.
• DUE TO = Other Banks.
48. DP__Product__Class__CdeDeposit Class Codes

The deposit class codes. Possible values are:

RTL

• 1 = Payable on Death.

• 2 = Individual.

• 3 = Living Trust – Intervivos or Family.

• 4 = Irrevocable Trust (includes Educational IRAs).

• 5 = Estate.

• 6 = Attorney in Fact.

• 7 = Minor – (includes all variations of Uniform Gifts to Minor Accounts).

• 8 = Bankruptcy Personal.

• 9 = Pre-Need Burial.

• 10 = Escrow.

• 11 = Representative Payee/Beneficiary.

• 12 = Sole Proprietorship.

• 13 = Joint.

• 14 = Non-Minor Custodian/Guardian.

• 15 = Other Retail.
These Product Class codes are used in conjunction with the Deposit Class Types in field 51. This field is to be used in concert with fields 12 and 13 identified above to enable the financial institution to capture more detailed information concerning account types. It is the intent of the FDIC to have the financial institution map its detailed account types to the codes identified in this field. The institution may also use additional codes, but in this event the institution must supply the detailed description and code value for each additional code used. If no additional account product type detail is available then this field should be left blank.Character (2).
FED

• 16 = FHA.

• 17 = Federal Government.

STATE

• 18 = City.

• 19 = State.

• 20 = County, Clerk of Court.

• 21 = Other State.

COMMERCIAL

• 22 = Business Escrow.

• 23 = Bankruptcy.

• 24 = Club.

• 25 = Church.

• 26 = Unincorporated Association.

• 27 = Unincorporated Non-Profit.

• • 28 = Other Commercial.

CORPORATION

• 29 = Business Trust.

• 30 = Business Agent.

• 31 = Business Guardian.

• 32 = Incorporated Association.

• 33 = Incorporated Non-Profit.

• 33 = Incorporated Non-Profit.

• 34 = Corporation.

• 35 = Corporate Partnership.

• 36 = Corporate Partnership Trust.

• 37 = Corporate Agent.

• 38 = Corporate Guardian.

• 39 = Pre-Need Funeral Trust.

• 40 = Limited Liability Incorporation.

• 41 = LLC partnership.

• 42 = Lawyer Trust.

• 43 = Realtor Trust.

• 44 = Other Corporation.

BANK

• 45 = Certified & Official Checks, Money Orders, Loan Disbursements Checks, and Expense Checks.

• 46 = ATM Settlement.

• 47 = Other Bank Owned Accounts.

DUE TO (Other Banks)

• 48 = Due to U.S. Banks.

• 49 = Due to U.S. Branches of Foreign Banks.

• 50 = Due to Other Depository Institutions.

• 51 = Due to Foreign Banks.

• 52 = Due to Foreign Branches of U.S. banks.

• 53 = Due to Foreign Governments and Official Institutions.

[73 FR 41197, July 17, 2008]


Appendix D to Part 360 – Sweep/Automated Credit Account File Structure

This is the structure of the data file to provide information to the FDIC on funds residing in investment vehicles linked to each non-closed deposit account or sub-account: (1) Involved in sweep activity where the sweep investment vehicle is not a deposit and is reflected on the books and records of the covered institution or (2) which accepts automated credits. A single record should be used for each instance where funds affiliated with the deposit account are held in an alternative investment vehicle. For any alternative investment vehicle, a separate account may or may not exist. If an account exists for the investment vehicle, it should be noted in the record. If no account exists, then a null value for the Sweep/Automated Credit Account Identifiers should be provided, but the remainder of the data fields defined below should be populated.


For data provided in the Sweep/Automated Credit Account File, the total account balances and the number of accounts must be reconciled to subsidiary system control totals. The file will be in a tab- or pipe-delimited ASCII format. The files will be encrypted using an FDIC-supplied algorithm. The FDIC will transmit the encryption algorithm over FDICconnect.


Field name
Field description
Comments
Format
1. DP__Acct__IdentifierAccount Identifier

The primary field used to identify the account from which funds are swept or debited. The field may be the Account number.
The Account Identifier may be composed of more than one physical data element. If multiple fields are required to identify the account, data should be placed in separate fields and the FDIC instructed how these fields are combined to uniquely identify the accountCharacter (25).
2. DP__Acct__Identifier – 2Account Identifier – 2

If necessary, the second element used to identify the account from which funds are swept or debited.
Character (25).
3. DP__Acct__Identifier – 3Account Identifier – 3

If necessary, the third element used to identify the account from which funds are swept or debited.
Character (25).
4. DP__Acct__Identifier – 4Account Identifier – 4

If necessary, the fourth element used to identify the account from which funds are swept or debited.
Character (25).
5. DP__Acct__Identifier – 5Account Identifier – 5

If necessary, the fifth element used to identify the account from which funds are swept or debited.
Character (25).
6. DP__Sub__Acct__IdentifierSub-Account Identifier

If available, the sub-account identifier for the account.
The Sub-Account Identifier may identify separate deposits tied to this account where there are different processing parameters such as interest rates or maturity dates, but all owners are the sameCharacter (25).
7. SW__Acct__IdentifierSweep/Automated Credit Account Identifier

The primary field used to identify the account into which funds are swept or credited. This field may be the Account Number.
Funds may be swept into an investment vehicle not represented as an account. In this case this field should be a null value

The Sweep/Automated Credit Account Identifier may be composed of more than one physical data element. If multiple fields are required to identify the account, data should be placed in separate fields and the FDIC instructed how these fields are combined to uniquely identify the account.
Character (25).
8. SW__Acct__Identifier – 2Sweep/Automated Credit Account Identifier – 2

If necessary, the second element of the account identifier used to identify the account into which funds are swept or credited.
Character (25).
9. SW__Acct__Identifier – 3Sweep/Automated Credit Account Identifier – 3

If necessary, the third element of the account identifier used to identify the account into which funds are swept or credited.
Character (25).
10. SW__Acct__Identifier – 4Sweep/Automated Credit Account Identifier – 4

If necessary, the fourth element of the account identifier used to identify the account into which funds are swept or credited.
Character (25).
11. SW__Acct__Identifier – 5Sweep/Automated Credit Account Identifier-5

If necessary, the fifth element of the account identifier used to identify the account into which funds are swept or credited.
Character (25).
12. SW__Sub__Acct__IdentifierSweep/Automated Credit Sub-Account Identifier

If available, the sub-account identifier for the account
Character (25).
13. SW__TypeSweep/Automated Credit TypeThe investment vehicle. Possible values are:

• RE = Repurchase Agreement.

• DD = Deposit Held in a Domestic Office.

• DF = Deposit Held in a Foreign Office.

• IBF = Deposit Held in an International Banking Facility.

• AI = Deposit Held in an affiliated depository institution.

• FF = Federal Funds.

• CP = Commercial Paper.

• OT = Other.
Character (3).
14. SW__Inv__AmountFund Balance in Sweep/Automated Credit Investment Vehicle.

Dollar amount residing in the investment vehicle.
Decimal (14,2).
15. SW__Currency__TypeCurrency Type

The ISO 4217 currency code.
Character (3).
16. SW__Hold__AmountFDIC Hold Amount

Amount of FDIC hold on funds residing in the investment vehicle.
Decimal (14,2).
17. SW__Sweep__IntervalSweep/Investment Frequency

The frequency with which the sweep or investment occurs. Possible values are:

• D = Daily.

• W = Weekly.

• BW = Bi-Weekly.

• M = Monthly.

• BM = Bi-Monthly.

• Q = Quarterly.

• O = Other.
Character (2).

[73 FR 41197, July 17, 2008]


Appendix E to Part 360 – Hold File Structure

This is the structure of the data file to provide information to the FDIC for each legal or collateral hold placed on a deposit account or sub-account. If data or information are not maintained or do not apply, a null value in the appropriate field should be indicated. The file will be in a tab-or pipe-delimited ASCII format. Each file name will contain the institution’s FDIC Certificate Number, an indication that it is a hold data file type and the date of the extract. The files will be encrypted using an FDIC-supplied algorithm. The FDIC will transmit the encryption algorithm over FDICconnect.


Field name
Field description
Comments
Format
1. DP__Acct__IdentifierAccount Identifier

The primary field used to identify the account. This field may be the Account Number.
The Account Identifier may be composed of more than one physical data element. If multiple fields are required to identify the account, data should be placed in separate fields and the FDIC instructed how these fields are combined to uniquely identify the accountCharacter (25).
2. DP__Acct__Identifier – 2Account Identifier – 2Character (25).
If necessary, the second element used to identify the account
3. DP__Acct__Identifier – 3Account Identifier – 3Character (25).
If necessary, the third element used to identify the account
4. DP__Acct__Identifier – 4Account Identifier – 4Character (25).
If necessary, the fourth element used to identify the account
5. DP__Acct__Identifier – 5Account Identifier – 5Character (25).
If necessary, the fifth element used to identify the account
6. DP__Sub__Acct__IdentifierSub-Account Identifier

If available, the sub-account identifier for the account.
The Sub-Account Identifier may identify separate deposits tied to this account where there are different processing parameters such as interest rates or maturity dates, but all owners are the same.Character (25).
7. HD__Hold__AmtHold AmountDecimal (14,2).
Dollar amount of the hold
8. HD__Hold__ReasonHold Reason

Reason for the hold. Possible values are:
Character (2).
• LN = Loan Collateral Hold
• LG = Court Order Hold
• FD = FDIC hold
• OT = Other (do not include daily operational type holds)
9. HD__Hold__DescHold DescriptionCharacter (255).
Description of the hold available on the system
10. HD__Hold__Start__DtHold Start Date

The date the hold was initiated.
Date (YYYYMMDD).
11. HD__Hold__Exp__DtHold Expiration Date

The date the hold is to expire.
Date (YYYYMMDD)

[73 FR 41197, July 17, 2008]


Appendix F to Part 360 – Customer File Structure

This is the structure of the data file to provide to the FDIC information related to each customer who has an account or sub-account reported in the deposit data or sweep/automated credit account file. If data or information are not maintained or do not apply, a null value in the appropriate field should be indicated. The file will be in a tab-or pipe-delimited ASCII format. Each file name will contain the institution’s FDIC Certificate Number, an indication that it is a customer file type and the date of the extract. The files will be encrypted using an FDIC-supplied algorithm. The FDIC will transmit the encryption algorithm over FDICconnect.



Note:

Each record must contain the customer’s name and permanent legal address. Fields 4-12 relate to the customer name for individuals only. Fields 13-14 relate to the customer name for entities other than individuals. Some systems provide for separate fields for name, street address, city, state, ZIP, and country, all of which are parsed out. Others systems may simply provide multiple lines for name, street address, city, state, ZIP, with no distinction. In this case, certain name and address data elements must be parsed and provided in the appropriate fields.


Field name
Field description
Comments
Format
1. CS__Cust__IdentifierCustomer IdentifierCharacter (25).
The unique field used by the institution to identify the customer
2. CS__Tax__IDCustomer Tax ID NumberHyphens are optional in this fieldCharacter (11).
The tax identification number on record for the customer
3. CS__Tax__CodeCustomer Tax ID CodeCharacter (1).
The type of the tax identification number of the customer. Possible values are:
• S = Social Security Number
• T = Federal Tax Identification Number
• O = Other
4. CS__Name__Line – 1Individual Customer Name Line 1Character (100).
If available, the free-form name narrative of the customer, first line
5. CS__Name__Line – 2Individual Customer Name Line 2Character (100).
If available, the free-form name narrative of the customer, second line.
6. CS__Last__NameIndividual Customer Last Name

For individuals, the customer’s last name.
This field is required if the data element is in the institution’s records. If necessary, data should be parsed from fields 4 or 5 to obtain this elementCharacter (50).
7. CS__First__NameIndividual Customer First Name

For individuals, the customer’s first name.
This field is required if the data element is in the institution’s records. If necessary, data should be parsed from fields 4 or 5 to obtain this elementCharacter (50).
8. CS__Middle__NameIndividual Customer Middle Name

For individuals, the customer’s middle name.
This field is required if the data element is in the institution’s records. If necessary, data should be parsed from fields 4 or 5 to obtain this elementCharacter (50).
9. CS__SuffixIndividual Professional Suffix

For individuals, the suffix designating customer’s academic, professional or honorary status, such as Esq., Ph.D., M.D., and D.D.S.
This field is required if the data element is in the institution’s records. If necessary, data should be parsed from fields 4 or 5 to obtain this elementCharacter (20).
10. CS__GenerationIndividual Generational Suffix

For individuals, the suffix designating the customer’s generational status, such as Jr., Sr. or III.
This field is required if the data element is in the institution’s records. If necessary, data should be parsed from fields 4 or 5 to obtain this elementCharacter (10).
11. CS__PrefixIndividual Customer Prefix

For individuals, the prefix of the customer, such as Rev., Dr., Mrs., Mr. or Ms.
This field is required if the data element is in the institution’s records. If necessary, data should be parsed from fields 4 or 5 to obtain this elementCharacter (10).
12. CS__Birth__DtIndividual Customer Birth DateDate (YYYYMMDD).
For individuals, the customer’s birth date
13. CS__Ent__Name__Line – 1Entity Name Line 1Character (100).
For entities other than individuals, the free-form name narrative of the customer, first line
14. CS__Ent__Name__Line – 2Entity Name Line 2Character (100).
If available for entities other than individuals, the free-form name narrative of the customer, second line
15. CS__Nar__Addr__Line – 1Customer Address Line 1Character (100).
If available, the free-form permanent legal address narrative for the customer, line one
16. CS__Nar__Addr__Line – 2Customer Address Line 2Character (100).
If available, the free-form permanent legal address narrative of the customer, line two
17. CS__Nar__Addr__Line – 3Customer Address Line 3Character (100).
If available, the free-form permanent legal address narrative of the customer, line three
18. CS__Street__Address – 1Street Address Line 1

The permanent legal address of the customer, line one.
This field is required. If necessary, data should be parsed from fields 16 or 17 to obtain this elementCharacter (100).
19. CS__Street__Address – 2Street Address Line 2

The permanent legal address of the customer, line two.
This field is required. If necessary, data should be parsed from fields 16 or 17 to obtain this elementCharacter (100).
20. CS__CityCity

The city associated with the permanent legal address.
This field is required. If necessary, data should be parsed from fields 16 or 17 to obtain this elementCharacter (25).
21. CS__StateState

The state abbreviation associated with the permanent legal address.
This field is required. If necessary, data should be parsed from fields 16 or 17 to obtain this element. Use a two-character state code (official U.S. Postal Service abbreviations)Character (2).
22. CS__ZIPZIP

The ZIP + 4 code associated with the permanent legal address.
This field is required. If necessary, data should be parsed from fields 16 or 17 to obtain this element. If the “ + 4” code is not available, provide only the 5-digit ZIP code. Hyphens are optional in this fieldCharacter (10).
23. CS__CountryCountry

The country associated with the permanent legal address.
This field is required. If necessary, data should be parsed from fields 16 or 17 to obtain this element. Provide the name of the country or the standard IRS country codeCharacter (10).
24. CS__TelephoneCustomer Telephone NumberCharacter (20).
The telephone number on record for the customer
25. CS__EmailCustomer Email AddressCharacter (150).
The e-mail address on record for the customer

[73 FR 41197, July 17, 2008]


Appendix G to Part 360 – Deposit-Customer Join File Structure

This is the structure of the data file to provide to the FDIC information necessary to link the records in the deposit and customer files. If data or information are not maintained or do not apply, a null value in the appropriate field should be indicated. The file will be in a tab- or pipe-delimited ASCII format. Each file name will contain the institution’s FDIC Certificate Number, an indication that it is a join file type and the date of the extract. The files will be encrypted using an FDIC-supplied algorithm. The FDIC will transmit the encryption algorithm over FDICconnect.


The deposit-customer join file will have one or more records for each deposit account, depending on the number of relationships to each account. A simple individual account, for example, will be associated with only one record in the deposit-customer join file indicating the owner of the account. A joint account with two owners will be associated with two records in the deposit-customer join file, one for each owner. The deposit-customer join file will contain other records associated with a deposit account to designate, among other things, beneficiaries, custodians, trustees and agents. This methodology allows the FDIC to know all of the possible relationships for an individual account and also whether a single customer is involved in many accounts.


Field name
FDIC field description
Comments
Format
1. CS__Cust__IdentifierCustomer IdentifierCharacter (25).
The unique field used by the institution to identify the customer
2. DP__Acct__IdentifierAccount Identifier

The primary field used to identify the account. This field may be the Account Number.
The Account Identifier may be composed of more than one physical data element. If multiple fields are required to identify the account, the data should be placed in separate fields and the FDIC instructed how these fields are combined to uniquely identify the accountCharacter (25).
3. DP__Acct__Identifier – 2Account Identifier – 2Character (25).
If necessary, the second element used to identify the account
4. DP__Acct__Identifier – 3Account Identifier – 3Character (25).
If necessary, the third element used to identify the account
5. DP__Acct__Identifier – 4Account Identifier – 4Character (25).
If necessary, the fourth element used to identify the account
6. DP__Acct__Identifier – 5Account Identifier – 5Character (25).
If necessary, the fifth element used to identify the account
7. DP__Sub__Acct__IdentifierSub-Account Identifier

If available, the sub-account identifier for the account.
The Sub-Account Identifier may identify separate deposits tied to this account where there are different processing parameters such as interest rates or maturity dates, but all owners are the sameCharacter (25).
8. CS__Rel__CodeRelationship Code

The code indicating how the customer is related to the account. Possible values are:

• ADM = Administrator.

• AGT = Agent/Representative.

• ATF = Attorney For.

• AUT = Authorized Signer.
Institutions must map their relationship codes to the codes in the list to the left. If the institution maintains more relationships they must supply the additional relationship codes being utilized along with the code definitionCharacter (5).
• BNF = Beneficiary
• CSV = Conservator
• CUS = Custodian
• DBA = Doing Business As
• EXC = Executor
• GDN = Guardian
• MIN = Minor
• PRI = Primary Owner
• SEC = Secondary Owner(s)
• TTE = Trustee
9. CS__Bene__CodeBeneficiary Type Code

If the customer is considered a beneficiary, the type of account associated with this customer. Possible values are:
This includes beneficiaries on retirement accounts, trust accounts, minor accounts, and payable-on-death accountsCharacter (1).
• I = IRA
• T = Trust – Irrevocable
• R = Trust – Revocable
• M = Uniform Gift to Minor
• P = Payable on Death
• O = Other

[73 FR 41197, July 17, 2008]


Appendix H to Part 360 – Possible File Combinations for Deposit Data

A covered institution must provide deposit data using separate deposit, sweep/automated credit, hold, customer, and deposit-customer join files. The simplest file structure involves providing one of each file. This basic file format is shown in Figure 1.



Multiple combinations of deposit, sweep/automated credit, hold, customer, and deposit-customer join files are permissible, but only in the following circumstances:


1. Each separate deposit file must have companion sweep/automated credit and hold files covering the same deposit accounts.


2. A single customer file may be submitted covering customers affiliated with deposit accounts in one or more deposit files as long as the customer file contains information on all of the customers affiliated with the deposit files.


3. Several customer files may be submitted as long as each separate customer file contains information on all of the customers affiliated with the associated deposit files.


Figure 2 shows a permissible file configuration using a single Customer File affiliated with Deposit File A and Deposit File B. As required, Deposit File A has a companion Sweep/Automated Credit File A and Hold File A. The same is true for Deposit File B.


Another permissible combination of files is shown in Figure 3, which is a variation of the basic data file structure shown in Figure 1.




[73 FR 41197, July 17, 2008]


PART 361 – MINORITY AND WOMEN OUTREACH PROGRAM CONTRACTING


Authority:12 U.S.C. 1833e.


Source:65 FR 31253, May 17, 2000, unless otherwise noted.

§ 361.1 Why do minority- and women-owned businesses need this outreach regulation?

The purpose of the FDIC Minority and Women Outreach Program (MWOP) is to ensure that minority- and women-owned businesses (MWOBs) are given the opportunity to participate fully in all contracts entered into by the FDIC.


§ 361.2 Why does the FDIC have this outreach program?

It is the policy of the FDIC that minorities and women, and businesses owned by them have the maximum practicable opportunity to participate in contracts awarded by the FDIC.


§ 361.3 Who may participate in this outreach program?

For purposes of this part:


(a) Minority has the same meaning as defined by the Small Business Administration at 13 CFR 124.103(b).


(b) Legal Services means all services provided by attorneys or law firms (including services of support staff).


§ 361.4 What contracts are eligible for this outreach program?

The FDIC outreach program applies to all contracts entered into by the FDIC. The outreach program is incorporated into FDIC policies and guidelines governing contracting and the retention of legal services.


§ 361.5 What are the FDIC’s oversight and monitoring responsibilities in administering this program?

(a) The FDIC Office of Minority and Women Inclusion (OMWI) has overall responsibility for nationwide outreach oversight, which includes, but is not limited to, the monitoring, review and interpretation of relevant regulations. In addition, the OMWI is responsible for providing the FDIC with technical assistance and guidance to facilitate the identification, registration, and solicitation of MWOBs.


(b) Each FDIC office that performs contracting or outreach activities will submit information to the OMWI on a quarterly basis, or upon request. Quarterly submissions will include, at a minimum, statistical information on contract awards and solicitations by designated demographic categories.


[65 FR 31253, May 17, 2000, as amended at 80 FR 62445, Oct. 16, 2015]


§ 361.6 What outreach efforts are included in this program?

(a) Each office engaged in contracting with the private sector will designate one or more MWOP coordinators. The coordinators will perform outreach activities for MWOP and act as liaison between the FDIC and the public on MWOP issues. On a quarterly basis, or as requested by the OMWI, the coordinators will report to the OMWI on their implementation of the outreach program.


(b) Outreach includes the identification and registration of MWOBs who can provide goods and services utilized by the FDIC. This includes distributing information concerning the MWOP.


(c) The identification of MWOBs for the provision of legal and non-legal services will primarily be accomplished by:


(1) Obtaining various lists and directories of MWOBs maintained by other federal, state, and local governmental agencies;


(2) Participating in conventions, seminars and professional meetings comprised of, or attended predominately by, MWOBs;


(3) Conducting seminars, meetings, workshops and other various functions to promote the identification and registration of MWOBs;


(4) Placing MWOP promotional advertisements indicating opportunities with the FDIC in minority- and women-owned media; and


(5) Monitoring to assure that FDIC staff interfacing with the contracting community are knowledgeable of, and actively promoting, the MWOP.


[65 FR 31253, May 17, 2000, as amended at 80 FR 62445, Oct. 16, 2015]


PART 362 – ACTIVITIES OF INSURED STATE BANKS AND INSURED SAVINGS ASSOCIATIONS


Authority:12 U.S.C. 1816, 1818, 1819(a)(Tenth), 1828(j), 1828(m), 1828a, 1831a, 1831e, 1831w, 1843(l).


Source:63 FR 66326, Dec. 1, 1998, unless otherwise noted.

Subpart A – Activities of Insured State Banks

§ 362.1 Purpose and scope.

(a) This subpart, along with the notice and application procedures in subpart G of part 303 of this chapter, implements the provisions of section 24 of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act (12 U.S.C. 1831a) that restrict and prohibit insured State banks and their subsidiaries from engaging in activities and investments that are not permissible for national banks and their subsidiaries. The phrase “activity permissible for a national bank” means any activity authorized for national banks under any statute including the National Bank Act (12 U.S.C. 21 et seq.), as well as activities recognized as permissible for a national bank in regulations, official circulars, bulletins, orders or written interpretations issued by the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC).


(b) This subpart does not cover the following activities:


(1) Activities conducted other than “as principal,” defined for purposes of this subpart as activities conducted as agent for a customer, conducted in a brokerage, custodial, advisory, or administrative capacity, or conducted as trustee, or in any substantially similar capacity. For example, this subpart does not cover acting solely as agent for the sale of insurance, securities, real estate, or travel services; nor does it cover acting as trustee, providing personal financial planning advice, or safekeeping services;


(2) Interests in real estate in which the real property is used or intended in good faith to be used within a reasonable time by an insured State bank or its subsidiaries as offices or related facilities for the conduct of its business or future expansion of its business or used as public welfare investments of a type permissible for national banks; and


(3) Equity investments acquired in connection with debts previously contracted (DPC) if the insured State bank does not hold the property for speculation and takes only such actions as would be permissible for a national bank’s DPC. The bank must dispose of the property within the shorter of the period set by Federal law for national banks or the period allowed under State law. For real estate, national banks may not hold DPC for more than 10 years. For equity securities, national banks must generally divest DPC as soon as possible consistent with obtaining a reasonable return.


(c) A subsidiary of an insured state bank may not engage in real estate investment activities that are not permissible for a subsidiary of a national bank unless the bank does so through a subsidiary of which the bank is a majority owner, is in compliance with applicable capital standards, and the FDIC has determined that the activity poses no significant risk to the appropriate deposit insurance fund. This subpart provides standards for majority-owned subsidiaries of insured state banks engaging in real estate investment activities that are not permissible for a subsidiary of a national bank.


(d) The FDIC intends to allow insured State banks and their subsidiaries to undertake only safe and sound activities and investments that do not present significant risks to the Deposit Insurance Fund and that are consistent with the purposes of Federal deposit insurance and other applicable law. This subpart does not authorize any insured State bank to make investments or to conduct activities that are not authorized or that are prohibited by either State or Federal law.


[63 FR 66326, Dec. 1, 1998, as amended at 66 FR 1028, Jan. 5, 2001; 71 FR 20527, Apr. 21, 2006]


§ 362.2 Definitions.

For the purposes of this subpart, the following definitions will apply:


(a) Bank, State bank, savings association, State savings association, depository institution, insured depository institution, insured State bank, Federal savings association, and insured State nonmember bank shall each have the same respective meaning contained in section 3 of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act (12 U.S.C. 1813).


(b) Activity means the conduct of business by a state-chartered depository institution, including acquiring or retaining an equity investment or other investment.


(c) Change in control means any transaction:


(1) By a State bank or its holding company for which a notice is required to be filed with the FDIC, or the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (FRB), pursuant to section 7(j) of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act (12 U.S.C. 1817(j)) except a transaction that is presumed to be an acquisition of control under the FDIC’s or FRB’s regulations implementing section 7(j);


(2) As a result of which a State bank eligible for the exception described in § 362.3(a)(2)(iii) is acquired by or merged into a depository institution that is not eligible for the exception, or as a result of which its holding company is acquired by or merged into a holding company which controls one or more bank subsidiaries not eligible for the exception; or


(3) In which control of the State bank is acquired by a bank holding company in a transaction requiring FRB approval under section 3 of the Bank Holding Company Act (12 U.S.C. 1842), other than a one bank holding company formation in which all or substantially all of the shares of the holding company will be owned by persons who were shareholders of the bank.


(d) Company means any corporation, partnership, limited liability company, business trust, association, joint venture, pool, syndicate or other similar business organization.


(e) Control means the power to vote, directly or indirectly, 25 percent or more of any class of the voting securities of a company, the ability to control in any manner the election of a majority of a company’s directors or trustees, or the ability to exercise a controlling influence over the management and policies of a company.


(f) Convert its charter means an insured State bank undergoes any transaction that causes the bank to operate under a different form of charter than it had as of December 19, 1991, except a change from mutual to stock form shall not be considered a charter conversion.


(g) Equity investment means an ownership interest in any company; any membership interest that includes a voting right in any company; any interest in real estate; any transaction which in substance falls into any of these categories even though it may be structured as some other form of business transaction; and includes an equity security. The term “equity investment” does not include any of the foregoing if the interest is taken as security for a loan.


(h) Equity security means any stock (other than adjustable rate preferred stock, money market (auction rate) preferred stock, or other newly developed instrument determined by the FDIC to have the character of debt securities), certificate of interest or participation in any profit-sharing agreement, collateral-trust certificate, preorganization certificate or subscription, transferable share, investment contract, or voting-trust certificate; any security immediately convertible at the option of the holder without payment of substantial additional consideration into such a security; any security carrying any warrant or right to subscribe to or purchase any such security; and any certificate of interest or participation in, temporary or interim certificate for, or receipt for any of the foregoing.


(i) Extension of credit, executive officer, director, principal shareholder, and related interest each has the same respective meaning as is applicable for the purposes of section 22(h) of the Federal Reserve Act (12 U.S.C. 375b) and § 337.3 of this chapter.


(j) Institution shall have the same meaning as “state-chartered depository institution.”


(k) Majority-owned subsidiary means any corporation in which the parent insured State bank owns a majority of the outstanding voting stock.


(l) National securities exchange means a securities exchange that is registered as a national securities exchange by the Securities and Exchange Commission pursuant to section 6 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (15 U.S.C. 78f) and the National Market System, i.e., the top tier of the National Association of Securities Dealers Automated Quotation System.


(m) Real estate investment activity means any interest in real estate (other than as security for a loan) held directly or indirectly that is not permissible for a national bank.


(n) Residents of the state includes individuals living in the State, individuals employed in the State, any person to whom the company provided insurance as principal without interruption since such person resided in or was employed in the State, and companies or partnerships incorporated in, organized under the laws of, licensed to do business in, or having an office in the State.


(o) Security has the same meaning as it has in part 344 of this chapter.


(p) Significant risk to the Deposit Insurance Fund shall be understood to be present whenever the FDIC determines there is a high probability that the Deposit Insurance Fund administered by the FDIC may suffer a loss. Such risk may be present either when an activity contributes or may contribute to the decline in condition of a particular state-chartered depository institution or when a type of activity is found by the FDIC to contribute or potentially contribute to the deterioration of the overall condition of the banking system.


(q) State-chartered depository institution means any State bank or State savings association insured by the FDIC.


(r) Subsidiary means any company that is owned or controlled directly or indirectly by one or more insured depository institutions.


(s) Tier one capital has the same meaning as set forth in part 324 of this chapter for an insured State nonmember bank or insured state savings association. For other state-chartered depository institutions, the term “tier one capital” has the same meaning as set forth in the capital regulations adopted by the appropriate Federal banking agency.


(t) Well-capitalized has the same meaning set forth in part 324 of this chapter for an insured State nonmember bank or insured state savings association. For other state-chartered depository institutions, the term “well-capitalized” has the same meaning as set forth in the capital regulations adopted by the appropriate Federal banking agency.


[63 FR 66326, Dec. 1, 1998, as amended at 66 FR 1028, Jan. 5, 2001; 71 FR 20527, Apr. 21, 2006; 78 FR 55596, Sept. 10, 2013; 83 FR 17741, Apr. 24, 2018]


§ 362.3 Activities of insured State banks.

(a) Equity investments – (1) Prohibited equity investments. No insured State bank may directly or indirectly acquire or retain as principal any equity investment of a type that is not permissible for a national bank unless one of the exceptions in paragraph (a)(2) of this section applies.


(2) Exceptions – (i) Equity investment in majority-owned subsidiaries. An insured State bank may acquire or retain an equity investment in a subsidiary of which the bank is a majority owner, provided that the subsidiary is engaging in activities that are allowed pursuant to the provisions of or by application under § 362.4(b).


(ii) Investments in qualified housing projects. An insured State bank may invest as a limited partner in a partnership, or as a noncontrolling interest holder of a limited liability company, the sole purpose of which is to invest in the acquisition, rehabilitation, or new construction of a qualified housing project, provided that the bank’s aggregate investment (including legally binding commitments) does not exceed, when made, 2 percent of total assets as of the date of the bank’s most recent consolidated report of condition prior to making the investment. For the purposes of this paragraph (a)(2)(ii), Aggregate investment means the total book value of the bank’s investment in the real estate calculated in accordance with the instructions for the preparation of the consolidated report of condition. Qualified housing project means residential real estate intended to primarily benefit lower income persons throughout the period of the bank’s investment including any project that has received an award of low income housing tax credits under section 42 of the Internal Revenue Code (26 U.S.C. 42) (such as a reservation or allocation of credits) from a State or local housing credit agency. A residential real estate project that does not qualify for the tax credit under section 42 of the Internal Revenue Code will qualify under this exception if 50 percent or more of the housing units are to be occupied by lower income persons. A project will be considered residential despite the fact that some portion of the total square footage of the project is utilized for commercial purposes, provided that such commercial use is not the primary purpose of the project. Lower income has the same meaning as “low income” and “moderate income” as defined for the purposes of § 345.12(n)(1) and (2) of this chapter.


(iii) Grandfathered investments in common or preferred stock; shares of investment companies – (A) General. An insured State bank that is located in a State which as of September 30, 1991, authorized investment in:


(1)(i) Common or preferred stock listed on a national securities exchange (listed stock); or


(ii) Shares of an investment company registered under the Investment Company Act of 1940 (15 U.S.C. 80a-1 et seq.) (registered shares); and


(2) Which during the period beginning on September 30, 1990, and ending on November 26, 1991, made or maintained an investment in listed stock or registered shares, may retain whatever lawfully acquired listed stock or registered shares it held and may continue to acquire listed stock and/or registered shares, provided that the bank files a notice in accordance with section 24(f)(6) of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act in compliance with § 303.121 of this chapter and the FDIC processes the notice without objection under § 303.122 of this chapter. Approval will be granted only if the FDIC determines that acquiring or retaining the stock or shares does not pose a significant risk to the Deposit Insurance Fund. Approval may be subject to whatever conditions or restrictions the FDIC determines are necessary or appropriate.


(B) Loss of grandfather exception. The exception for grandfathered investments under paragraph (a)(2)(iii)(A) of this section shall no longer apply if the bank converts its charter or the bank or its parent holding company undergoes a change in control. If any of these events occur, the bank may retain its existing investments unless directed by the FDIC or other applicable authority to divest the listed stock or registered shares.


(C) Maximum permissible investment. A bank’s aggregate investment in listed stock and registered shares under paragraph (a)(2)(iii)(A) of this section shall in no event exceed, when made, 100 percent of the bank’s tier one capital as measured on the bank’s most recent consolidated report of condition (call report) prior to making any such investment. The lower of the bank’s cost as determined in accordance with call report instructions or the market value of the listed stock and shares shall be used to determine compliance. The FDIC may determine when acting upon a notice filed in accordance with paragraph (a)(2)(iii)(A)(2) of this section that the permissible limit for any particular insured State bank is something less than 100 percent of tier one capital.


(iv) Stock investment in insured depository institutions owned exclusively by other banks and savings associations. An insured State bank may acquire or retain the stock of an insured depository institution if the insured depository institution engages only in activities permissible for national banks; the insured depository institution is subject to examination and regulation by a State bank supervisor; the voting stock is owned by 20 or more insured depository institutions, but no one institution owns more than 15 percent of the voting stock; and the insured depository institution’s stock (other than directors’ qualifying shares or shares held under or acquired through a plan established for the benefit of the officers and employees) is owned only by insured depository institutions.


(v) Stock investment in insurance companies – (A) Stock of director and officer liability insurance company. An insured State bank may acquire and retain up to 10 percent of the outstanding stock of a corporation that solely provides or reinsures directors’, trustees’, and officers’ liability insurance coverage or bankers’ blanket bond group insurance coverage for insured depository institutions.


(B) Stock of savings bank life insurance company. An insured State bank located in Massachusetts, New York, or Connecticut may own stock in a savings bank life insurance company, provided that the savings bank life insurance company provides written disclosures to purchasers or potential purchasers of life insurance policies, other insurance products, and annuities that are consistent with the disclosures described in the Interagency Statement on the Retail Sale of Nondeposit Investment Products (FIL-9-94,
1
February 17, 1994) or any successor requirement which indicates that the policies, products, and annuities are not FDIC insured deposits, are not guaranteed by the bank and are subject to investment risks, including possible loss of the principal amount invested.




1 Financial institution letters (FILs) are available in the FDIC Public Information Center, room 100, 801 17th Street, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20429.


(b) Activities other than equity investments – (1) Prohibited activities. An insured State bank may not directly or indirectly engage as principal in any activity, that is not an equity investment, and is of a type not permissible for a national bank unless one of the exceptions in paragraph (b)(2) of this section applies.


(2) Exceptions – (i) Consent obtained through application. An insured State bank that meets and continues to meet the applicable capital standards set by the appropriate Federal banking agency may conduct activities prohibited by paragraph (b)(1) of this section if the bank obtains the FDIC’s prior written consent. Consent will be given only if the FDIC determines that the activity poses no significant risk to the Deposit Insurance Fund. Applications for consent should be filed in accordance with § 303.121 of this chapter and will be processed under § 303.122(b) of this chapter. Approvals granted under § 303.122(b) of this chapter may be made subject to any conditions or restrictions found by the FDIC to be necessary to protect the Deposit Insurance Fund from risk, to prevent unsafe or unsound banking practices, and/or to ensure that the activity is consistent with the purposes of Federal deposit insurance and other applicable law.


(ii) Insurance underwriting – (A) Savings bank life insurance. An insured State bank that is located in Massachusetts, New York or Connecticut may provide as principal savings bank life insurance through a department of the bank, provided that the department meets the core standards of paragraph (c) of this section or submits an application in compliance with § 303.121 of this chapter and the FDIC grants its consent under the procedures in § 303.122(b) of this chapter, and the department provides purchasers or potential purchasers of life insurance policies, other insurance products and annuities written disclosures that are consistent with the disclosures described in the Interagency Statement on the Retail Sale of Nondeposit Investment Products (FIL-9-94, February 17, 1994) and any successor requirement which indicates that the policies, products and annuities are not FDIC insured deposits, are not guaranteed by the bank, and are subject to investment risks, including the possible loss of the principal amount invested.


(B) Federal crop insurance. Any insured State bank that was providing insurance as principal on or before September 30, 1991, which was reinsured in whole or in part by the Federal Crop Insurance Corporation, may continue to do so.


(C) Grandfathered insurance underwriting. A well-capitalized insured State bank that on November 21, 1991, was lawfully providing insurance as principal through a department of the bank may continue to provide the same types of insurance as principal to the residents of the State or States in which the bank did so on such date provided that the bank’s department meets the core standards of paragraph (c) of this section, or submits an application in compliance with § 303.121 of this chapter and the FDIC grants its consent under the procedures in § 303.122(b) of this chapter.


(iii) Acquiring and retaining adjustable rate and money market preferred stock. (A) An insured State bank’s investment of up to 15 percent of the bank’s tier one capital in adjustable rate preferred stock or money market (auction rate) preferred stock does not represent a significant risk to the Deposit Insurance Fund. An insured State bank may conduct this activity without first obtaining the FDIC’s consent, provided that the bank meets and continues to meet the applicable capital standards as prescribed by the appropriate Federal banking agency. The fact that prior consent is not required by this subpart does not preclude the FDIC from taking any appropriate action with respect to the activities if the facts and circumstances warrant such action.


(B) An insured State bank may acquire or retain other instruments of a type determined by the FDIC to have the character of debt securities and not to represent a significant risk to the Deposit Insurance Fund. Such instruments shall be included in the 15 percent of tier one capital limit imposed in paragraph (b)(2)(iii)(A) of this section. An insured State bank may conduct this activity without first obtaining the FDIC’s consent, provided that the bank meets and continues to meet the applicable capital standards as prescribed by the appropriate Federal banking agency. The fact that prior consent is not required by this subpart does not preclude the FDIC from taking any appropriate action with respect to the activities if the facts and circumstances warrant such action.


(c) Core standards. For any insured State bank to be eligible to conduct insurance activities listed in paragraph (b)(2)(ii)(A) or (C) of this section, the bank must conduct the activities in a department that meets the following core separation and operating standards:


(1) The department is physically distinct from the remainder of the bank;


(2) The department maintains separate accounting and other records;


(3) The department has assets, liabilities, obligations and expenses that are separate and distinct from those of the remainder of the bank;


(4) The department is subject to State statute that requires its obligations, liabilities and expenses be satisfied only with the assets of the department; and


(5) The department informs its customers that only the assets of the department may be used to satisfy the obligations of the department.


[63 FR 66326, Dec. 1, 1998, as amended at 71 FR 20527, Apr. 21, 2006]


§ 362.4 Subsidiaries of insured State banks.

(a) Prohibition. A subsidiary of an insured State bank may not engage as principal in any activity that is not of a type permissible for a subsidiary of a national bank, unless it meets one of the exceptions in paragraph (b) of this section.


(b) Exceptions – (1) Consent obtained through application. A subsidiary of an insured State bank may conduct otherwise prohibited activities if the bank obtains the FDIC’s prior written consent and the insured State bank meets and continues to meet the applicable capital standards set by the appropriate Federal banking agency. Consent will be given only if the FDIC determines that the activity poses no significant risk to the Deposit Insurance Fund. Applications for consent should be filed in accordance with § 303.121 of this chapter and will be processed under § 303.122(b) of this chapter. Approvals granted under § 303.122(b) of this chapter may be made subject to any conditions or restrictions found by the FDIC to be necessary to protect the Deposit Insurance Fund from risk, to prevent unsafe or unsound banking practices, and/or to ensure that the activity is consistent with the purposes of Federal deposit insurance and other applicable law.


(2) Grandfathered insurance underwriting subsidiaries. A subsidiary of an insured State bank may:


(i) Engage in grandfathered insurance underwriting if the insured State bank or its subsidiary on November 21, 1991, was lawfully providing insurance as principal. The subsidiary may continue to provide the same types of insurance as principal to the residents of the State or states in which the bank or subsidiary did so on such date provided that:


(A)(1) The bank meets the capital requirements of paragraph (e) of this section; and


(2) The subsidiary is an “eligible subsidiary” as described in paragraph (c)(2) of this section; or


(B) The bank submits an application in compliance with § 303.121 of this chapter and the FDIC grants its consent under the procedures in § 303.122(b) of this chapter.


(ii) Continue to provide as principal title insurance, provided the bank was required before June 1, 1991, to provide title insurance as a condition of the bank’s initial chartering under State law and neither the bank nor its parent holding company undergoes a change in control.


(iii) May continue to provide as principal insurance which is reinsured in whole or in part by the Federal Crop Insurance Corporation if the subsidiary was engaged in the activity on or before September 30, 1991.


(3) Majority-owned subsidiaries’ ownership of equity investments that represent a control interest in a company. The FDIC has determined that investment in the following by a majority-owned subsidiary of an insured State bank does not represent a significant risk to the Deposit Insurance Fund:


(i) Equity investment in a company engaged in real estate or securities activities authorized in paragraph (b)(5) of this section if the bank complies with the following restrictions and files a notice in compliance with § 303.121 of this chapter and the FDIC processes the notice without objection under § 303.122(a) of this chapter. The FDIC is not precluded from taking any appropriate action or imposing additional requirements with respect to the activity if the facts and circumstances warrant such action. If changes to the management or business plan of the company at any time result in material changes to the nature of the company’s business or the manner in which its business is conducted, the insured State bank shall advise the appropriate regional director (DSC) in writing within 10 business days after such change. Investment under this paragraph is authorized if:


(A) The majority-owned subsidiary controls the company;


(B) The bank meets the core eligibility criteria of paragraph (c)(1) of this section;


(C) The majority-owned subsidiary meets the core eligibility criteria of paragraph (c)(2) of this section (including any modifications thereof applicable under paragraph (b)(5)(i) of this section), or the company is a corporation meeting such criteria;


(D) The bank’s transactions with the majority-owned subsidiary, and the bank’s transactions with the company, comply with the investment and transaction limits of paragraph (d) of this section;


(E) The bank complies with the capital requirements of paragraph (e) of this section with respect to the majority-owned subsidiary and the company; and


(F) To the extent the company is engaged in securities activities authorized by paragraph (b)(5)(ii) of this section, the bank and the company comply with the additional requirements therein as if the company were a majority-owned subsidiary.


(ii) Equity securities of a company engaged in the following activities, if the majority-owned subsidiary controls the company or the company is controlled by insured depository institutions, and the bank meets and continues to meet the applicable capital standards as prescribed by the appropriate Federal banking agency. The FDIC consents that a majority-owned subsidiary may conduct such activity without first obtaining the FDIC’s consent. The fact that prior consent is not required by this subpart does not preclude the FDIC from taking any appropriate action with respect to the activity if the facts and circumstances warrant such action:


(A) Any activity that is permissible for a national bank, including such permissible activities that may require the company to register as a securities broker;


(B) Acting as an insurance agency;


(C) Engaging in any activity permissible for an insured State bank under § 362.3(b)(2)(iii) to the same extent permissible for the insured bank thereunder, so long as instruments held under this paragraph (b)(3)(ii)(C), paragraph (b)(7) of this section, and § 362.3(b)(2)(iii) in the aggregate do not exceed the limit set by § 362.3(b)(2)(iii);


(D) Engaging in any activity permissible for a majority-owned subsidiary of an insured State bank under paragraph (b)(6) of this section to the same extent and manner permissible for the majority-owned subsidiary thereunder; and


(4) Majority-owned subsidiary’s ownership of certain securities that do not represent a control interest – (i) Grandfathered investments in common or preferred stock and shares of investment companies. Any insured State bank that has received approval to invest in common or preferred stock or shares of an investment company pursuant to § 362.3(a)(2)(iii) may conduct the approved investment activities through a majority-owned subsidiary of the bank without any additional approval from the FDIC provided that any conditions or restrictions imposed with regard to the approval granted under § 362.3(a)(2)(iii) are met.


(ii) Bank stock. An insured State bank may indirectly through a majority-owned subsidiary organized for such purpose invest in up to ten percent of the outstanding stock of another insured bank.


(5) Majority-owned subsidiaries conducting real estate investment activities and securities underwriting. The FDIC has determined that the following activities do not represent a significant risk to the Deposit Insurance Fund, provided that the activities are conducted by a majority-owned subsidiary of an insured State bank in compliance with the core eligibility requirements listed in paragraph (c) of this section; any additional requirements listed in paragraph (b)(5)(i) or (ii) of this section; the bank complies with the investment and transaction limitations of paragraph (d) of this section; and the bank meets the capital requirements of paragraph (e) of this section. The FDIC consents that these listed activities may be conducted by a majority-owned subsidiary of an insured State bank if the bank files a notice in compliance with § 303.121 of this chapter and the FDIC processes the notice without objection under § 303.122(a) of this chapter. The FDIC is not precluded from taking any appropriate action or imposing additional requirements with respect to the activities if the facts and circumstances warrant such action. If changes to the management or business plan of the majority-owned subsidiary at any time result in material changes to the nature of the majority-owned subsidiary’s business or the manner in which its business is conducted, the insured State bank shall advise the appropriate regional director (DSC) in writing within 10 business days after such change. Such a majority-owned subsidiary may:


(i) Real estate investment activities. Engage in real estate investment activities. However, the requirements of paragraph (c)(2)(ii), (v), (vi), and (xi) of this section need not be met if the bank’s investment in the equity securities of the subsidiary does not exceed 2 percent of the bank’s tier one capital; the bank has only one subsidiary engaging in real estate investment activities; and the bank’s total investment in the subsidiary does not include any extensions of credit from the bank to the subsidiary, any debt instruments issued by the subsidiary, or any other transaction originated by the bank that is used to benefit the subsidiary.


(ii) Securities activities. Engage in the public sale, distribution or underwriting of securities that are not permissible for a national bank under section 16 of the Banking Act of 1933 (12 U.S.C. 24 Seventh), provided that the insured state nonmember bank lawfully controlled or acquired the subsidiary and had an approved notice or order from the FDIC prior to November 12, 1999 and provided that the following additional conditions are, and continue to be, met:


(A) The state-chartered depository institution adopts policies and procedures, including appropriate limits on exposure, to govern the institution’s participation in financing transactions underwritten or arranged by an underwriting majority-owned subsidiary;


(B) The state-chartered depository institution may not express an opinion on the value or the advisability of the purchase or sale of securities underwritten or dealt in by a majority-owned subsidiary unless the state-chartered depository institution notifies the customer that the majority-owned subsidiary is underwriting or distributing the security;


(C) The majority-owned subsidiary is registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission, is a member in good standing with the appropriate self-regulatory organization, and promptly informs the appropriate regional director (DSC) in writing of any material actions taken against the majority-owned subsidiary or any of its employees by the State, the appropriate self-regulatory organizations or the Securities and Exchange Commission; and


(D) The state-chartered depository institution does not knowingly purchase as principal or fiduciary during the existence of any underwriting or selling syndicate any securities underwritten by the majority-owned subsidiary unless the purchase is approved by the state-chartered depository institution’s board of directors before the securities are initially offered for sale to the public.


(6) Real estate leasing. A majority-owned subsidiary of an insured State bank acting as lessor under a real property lease which is the equivalent of a financing transaction, meeting the lease criteria of paragraph (b)(6)(i) of this section and the underlying real estate requirements of paragraph (b)(6)(ii) of this section, does not represent a significant risk to the Deposit Insurance Fund. A majority-owned subsidiary may conduct this activity without first obtaining the FDIC’s consent, provided that the bank meets and continues to meet the applicable capital standards as prescribed by the appropriate Federal banking agency. The fact that prior consent is not required by this subpart does not preclude the FDIC from taking any appropriate action with respect to the activity if the facts and circumstances warrant such action.


(i) Lease criteria – (A) Capital lease. The lease must qualify as a capital lease as to the lessor under generally accepted accounting principles.


(B) Nonoperating basis. The bank and the majority-owned subsidiary shall not, directly or indirectly, provide or be obligated to provide servicing, repair, or maintenance to the property, except that the lease may include provisions permitting the subsidiary to protect the value of the leased property in the event of a change in circumstances that increases the subsidiary’s exposure to loss, or the subsidiary may take reasonable and appropriate action to salvage or protect the value of the leased property in such circumstances.


(ii) Underlying real property requirements – (A) Acquisition. The majority-owned subsidiary may acquire specific real estate to be leased only after the subsidiary has entered into:


(1) A lease meeting the requirements of paragraph (b)(6)(i) of this section;


(2) A legally binding written commitment to enter into such a lease; or


(3) A legally binding written agreement that indemnifies the subsidiary against loss in connection with its acquisition of the property.


(B) Improvements. Any expenditures by the majority-owned subsidiary to make reasonable repairs, renovations, and improvements necessary to render the property suitable to the lessee shall not exceed 25 percent of the majority-owned subsidiary’s full investment in the real estate.


(C) Divestiture. At the expiration of the initial lease (including any renewals or extensions thereof), the majority-owned subsidiary shall, as soon as practicable but in any event no less than two years, either:


(1) Re-lease the property under a lease meeting the requirement of paragraph (b)(6)(i)(B) of this section; or


(2) Divest itself of all interest in the property.


(7) Acquiring and retaining adjustable rate and money market preferred stock and similar instruments. The FDIC has determined it does not present a significant risk to the Deposit Insurance Fund for a majority-owned subsidiary of an insured State bank to engage in any activity permissible for an insured State bank under § 362.3(b)(2)(iii), so long as instruments held under this paragraph, paragraph (b)(3)(ii)(C) of this section, and § 362.3(b)(2)(iii) in the aggregate do not exceed the limit set by § 362.3(b)(2)(iii). A majority-owned subsidiary may conduct this activity without first obtaining the FDIC’s consent, provided that the bank meets and continues to meet the applicable capital standards as prescribed by the appropriate Federal banking agency. The fact that prior consent is not required by this subpart does not preclude the FDIC from taking any appropriate action with respect to the activity if the facts and circumstances warrant such action.


(c) Core eligibility requirements. If specifically required by this part or by FDIC order, any state-chartered depository institution that wishes to be eligible and continue to be eligible to conduct as principal activities through a subsidiary that are not permissible for a subsidiary of a national bank must be an “eligible depository institution” and the subsidiary must be an “eligible subsidiary”.


(1) A state-chartered depository institution is an “eligible depository institution” if it:


(i) Has been chartered and operating for three or more years, unless the appropriate regional director (DSC) finds that the state-chartered depository institution is owned by an established, well-capitalized, well-managed holding company or is managed by seasoned management;


(ii) Has an FDIC-assigned composite rating of 1 or 2 assigned under the Uniform Financial Institutions Rating System (UFIRS) (or such other comparable rating system as may be adopted in the future) as a result of its most recent Federal or State examination for which the FDIC assigned a rating;


(iii) Received a rating of 1 or 2 under the “management” component of the UFIRS as assigned by the institution’s appropriate Federal banking agency;


(iv) Has a satisfactory or better Community Reinvestment Act rating at its most recent examination conducted by the institution’s appropriate Federal banking agency;


(v) Has a compliance rating of 1 or 2 at its most recent examination conducted by the institution’s appropriate Federal banking agency; and


(vi) Is not subject to a cease and desist order, consent order, prompt corrective action directive, formal or informal written agreement, or other administrative agreement with its appropriate Federal banking agency or chartering authority.


(2) A subsidiary of a state-chartered depository institution is an “eligible subsidiary” if it:


(i) Meets applicable statutory or regulatory capital requirements and has sufficient operating capital in light of the normal obligations that are reasonably foreseeable for a business of its size and character within the industry;


(ii) Is physically separate and distinct in its operations from the operations of the state-chartered depository institution, provided that this requirement shall not be construed to prohibit the state-chartered depository institution and its subsidiary from sharing the same facility if the area where the subsidiary conducts business with the public is clearly distinct from the area where customers of the state-chartered depository institution conduct business with the institution. The extent of the separation will vary according to the type and frequency of customer contact;


(iii) Maintains separate accounting and other business records;


(iv) Observes separate business entity formalities such as separate board of directors’ meetings;


(v) Has a chief executive officer of the subsidiary who is not an employee of the institution;


(vi) Has a majority of its board of directors who are neither directors nor executive officers of the state-chartered depository institution;


(vii) Conducts business pursuant to independent policies and procedures designed to inform customers and prospective customers of the subsidiary that the subsidiary is a separate organization from the state-chartered depository institution and that the state-chartered depository institution is not responsible for and does not guarantee the obligations of the subsidiary;


(viii) Has only one business purpose within the types described in paragraphs (b)(2) and (b)(5) of this section;


(ix) Has a current written business plan that is appropriate to the type and scope of business conducted by the subsidiary;


(x) Has qualified management and employees for the type of activity contemplated, including all required licenses and memberships, and complies with industry standards; and


(xi) Establishes policies and procedures to ensure adequate computer, audit and accounting systems, internal risk management controls, and has necessary operational and managerial infrastructure to implement the business plan.


(d) Investment and transaction limits – (1) General. If specifically required by this part or FDIC order, the following conditions and restrictions apply to an insured State bank and its subsidiaries that engage in and wish to continue to engage in activities which are not permissible for a national bank subsidiary.


(2) Investment limits – (i) Aggregate investment in subsidiaries. An insured state bank’s aggregate investment in all subsidiaries conducting activities subject to this paragraph (d) shall not exceed 20 percent of the insured State bank’s tier one capital.


(ii) Definition of investment. (A) For purposes of this paragraph (d), the term “investment” means:


(1) Any extension of credit to the subsidiary by the insured State bank;


(2) Any debt securities, as such term is defined in part 344 of this chapter, issued by the subsidiary held by the insured State bank;


(3) The acceptance by the insured State bank of securities issued by the subsidiary as collateral for an extension of credit to any person or company; and


(4) Any extensions of credit by the insured State bank to any third party for the purpose of making a direct investment in the subsidiary, making any investment in which the subsidiary has an interest, or which is used for the benefit of, or transferred to, the subsidiary.


(B) For the purposes of this paragraph (d), the term “investment” does not include:


(1) Extensions of credit by the insured State bank to finance sales of assets by the subsidiary which do not involve more than the normal degree of risk of repayment and are extended on terms that are substantially similar to those prevailing at the time for comparable transactions with or involving unaffiliated persons or companies;


(2) An extension of credit by the insured State bank to the subsidiary that is fully collateralized by government securities, as such term is defined in § 344.3 of this chapter; or


(3) An extension of credit by the insured State bank to the subsidiary that is fully collateralized by a segregated deposit in the insured State bank.


(3) Transaction requirements – (i) Arm’s length transaction requirement. With the exception of giving the subsidiary immediate credit for uncollected items received in the ordinary course of business, an insured State bank may not carry out any of the following transactions with a subsidiary subject to this paragraph (d) unless the transaction is on terms and conditions that are substantially the same as those prevailing at the time for comparable transactions with unaffiliated parties:


(A) Make an investment in the subsidiary;


(B) Purchase from or sell to the subsidiary any assets (including securities);


(C) Enter into a contract, lease, or other type of agreement with the subsidiary;


(D) Pay compensation to a majority-owned subsidiary or any person or company who has an interest in the subsidiary; or


(E) Engage in any such transaction in which the proceeds thereof are used for the benefit of, or are transferred to, the subsidiary.


(ii) Prohibition on purchase of low quality assets. An insured State bank is prohibited from purchasing a low quality asset from a subsidiary subject to this paragraph (d). For purposes of this subsection, “low quality asset” means:


(A) An asset classified as “substandard”, “doubtful”, or “loss” or treated as “other assets especially mentioned” in the most recent report of examination of the bank;


(B) An asset in a nonaccrual status;


(C) An asset on which principal or interest payments are more than 30 days past due; or


(D) An asset whose terms have been renegotiated or compromised due to the deteriorating financial condition of the obligor.


(iii) Insider transaction restriction. Neither the insured State bank nor the subsidiary subject to this paragraph (d) may enter into any transaction (exclusive of those covered by § 337.3 of this chapter) with the bank’s executive officers, directors, principal shareholders or related interests of such persons which relate to the subsidiary’s activities unless:


(A) The transactions are on terms and conditions that are substantially the same as those prevailing at the time for comparable transactions with persons not affiliated with the insured State bank; or


(B) The transactions are pursuant to a benefit or compensation program that is widely available to employees of the bank, and that does not give preference to the bank’s executive officers, directors, principal shareholders or related interests of such persons over other bank employees.


(iv) Anti-tying restriction. Neither the insured State bank nor the majority-owned subsidiary may require a customer to either buy any product or use any service from the other as a condition of entering into a transaction.


(4) Collateralization requirements. (i) An insured State bank is prohibited from making an investment in a subsidiary subject to this paragraph (d) unless such transaction is fully-collateralized at the time the transaction is entered into. No insured State bank may accept a low quality asset as collateral. An extension of credit is fully collateralized if it is secured at the time of the transaction by collateral having a market value equal to at least:


(A) 100 percent of the amount of the transaction if the collateral is composed of:


(1) Obligations of the United States or its agencies;


(2) Obligations fully guaranteed by the United States or its agencies as to principal and interest;


(3) Notes, drafts, bills of exchange or bankers acceptances that are eligible for rediscount or purchase by the Federal Reserve Bank; or


(4) A segregated, earmarked deposit account with the insured State bank;


(B) 110 percent of the amount of the transaction if the collateral is composed of obligations of any State or political subdivision of any State;


(C) 120 percent of the amount of the transaction if the collateral is composed of other debt instruments, including receivables; or


(D) 130 percent of the amount of the transaction if the collateral is composed of stock, leases, or other real or personal property.


(ii) An insured State bank may not release collateral prior to proportional payment of the extension of credit; however, collateral may be substituted if there is no diminution of collateral coverage.


(5) Investment and transaction limits extended to insured State bank subsidiaries. For purposes of applying paragraphs (d)(2) through (d)(4) of this section, any reference to “insured State bank” means the insured State bank and any subsidiaries of the insured State bank which are not themselves subject under this part or FDIC order to the restrictions of this paragraph (d).


(e) Capital requirements. If specifically required by this part or by FDIC order, any insured State bank that wishes to conduct or continue to conduct as principal activities through a subsidiary that are not permissible for a subsidiary of a national bank must:


(1) Be well-capitalized after deducting from its tier one capital the investment in equity securities of the subsidiary as well as the bank’s pro rata share of any retained earnings of the subsidiary;


(2) Reflect this deduction on the appropriate schedule of the bank’s consolidated report of income and condition; and


(3) Use such regulatory capital amount for the purposes of the bank’s assessment risk classification under part 327 of this chapter and its categorization as a “well-capitalized”, an “adequately capitalized”, an “undercapitalized”, or a “significantly undercapitalized” institution as defined in § 324.403(b) of this chapter, provided that the capital deduction shall not be used for purposes of determining whether the bank is “critically undercapitalized” under part 324 of this chapter.


[63 FR 66326, Dec. 1, 1998, as amended at 66 FR 1028, Jan. 5, 2001; 71 FR 20527, Apr. 21, 2006; 78 FR 55596, Sept. 10, 2013; 83 FR 17741, Apr. 24, 2018]


§ 362.5 Approvals previously granted.

(a) FDIC consent by order or notice. An insured State bank that previously filed an application or notice under part 362 in effect prior to January 1, 1999 (see 12 CFR part 362 revised as of January 1, 1998), and obtained the FDIC’s consent to engage in an activity or to acquire or retain a majority-owned subsidiary engaging as principal in an activity or acquiring and retaining any investment that is prohibited under this subpart may continue that activity or retain that investment without seeking the FDIC’s consent, provided that the insured State bank and its subsidiary, if applicable, continue to meet the conditions and restrictions of the approval. An insured State bank which was granted approval based on conditions which differ from the requirements of § 362.4(c)(2), (d) and (e) will be considered to meet the conditions and restrictions of the approval relating to being an eligible subsidiary, meeting investment and transactions limits, and meeting capital requirements if the insured State bank and subsidiary meet the requirements of § 362.4(c)(2), (d) and (e). If the majority-owned subsidiary is engaged in real estate investment activities not exceeding 2 percent of the tier one capital of a bank and meeting the other conditions of § 362.4(b)(5)(i), the majority-owned subsidiary’s compliance with § 362.4(c)(2) under the preceding sentence may be pursuant to the modifications authorized by § 362.4(b)(5)(i). Once an insured State bank elects to comply with § 362.4(c)(2), (d), and (e), it may not revert to the corresponding provisions of the approval order.


(b) Approvals by regulation


(1)-(5) [Reserved]


(6) Adjustable rate or money market preferred stock. An insured State bank owning adjustable rate or money market (auction rate) preferred stock pursuant to § 362.4(c)(3)(v) in effect prior to January 1, 1999 (see 12 CFR part 362 revised as of January 1, 1998), in excess of the amount limit in § 362.3(b)(2)(iii) may continue to hold any overlimit shares of such stock acquired before January 1, 1999, until redeemed or repurchased by the issuer, but such stock shall be included as part of the amount limit in § 362.3(b)(2)(iii) when determining whether the bank may acquire new stock thereunder.


(c) Charter conversions. (1) An insured State bank that has converted its charter from an insured state savings association may continue activities through a majority-owned subsidiary that were permissible prior to the time it converted its charter only if the insured State bank receives the FDIC’s consent. Except as provided in paragraph (c)(2) of this section, the insured State bank should apply under § 362.4(b)(1), submit any notice required under § 362.4(b)(4) or (5), or comply with the provisions of § 362.4(b)(3), (6), or (7) if applicable, to continue the activity.


(2) Exception for prior consent. If the FDIC had granted consent to the savings association under section 28 of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act (12 U.S.C. 1831(e)) prior to the time the savings association converted its charter, the insured State bank may continue the activities without providing notice or making application to the FDIC, provided that the bank and its subsidiary as applicable are in compliance with:


(i) The terms of the FDIC approval order; and


(ii) The provisions of § 362.4(c)(2), (d), and (e) regarding operating as an “eligible subsidiary”, “investment and transaction limits”, and “capital requirements’.


(3) Divestiture. An insured State bank that does not receive FDIC consent shall divest of the nonconforming investment as soon as practical but in no event later than two years from the date of charter conversion.


[63 FR 66326, Dec. 1, 1998, as amended at 66 FR 1028, Jan. 5, 2001]


Subpart B – Safety and Soundness Rules Governing Insured State Nonmember Banks

§ 362.6 Purpose and scope.

This subpart, along with the notice and application procedures in subpart G of part 303 of this chapter apply to certain banking practices that may have adverse effects on the safety and soundness of insured state nonmember banks. This subpart contains the required prudential separations between certain securities underwriting affiliates and insured state nonmember banks. The standards only will apply to affiliates of insured state nonmember banks that are not controlled by an entity that is supervised by a federal banking agency.


[66 FR 1028, Jan. 5, 2001]


§ 362.7 Definitions.

For the purposes of this subpart, the following definitions apply:


(a) Affiliate has the same meaning contained in section 3 of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act (12 U.S.C. 1813).


(b) Activity, company, control, equity security, insured state nonmember bank, security and subsidiary have the same meaning as provided in subpart A of this part.


[63 FR 66326, Dec. 1, 1998, as amended at 66 FR 1028, Jan. 5, 2001]


§ 362.8 Restrictions on activities of insured state nonmember banks affiliated with certain securities companies.

(a) The FDIC has found that an unrestricted affiliation between an insured state nonmember bank and certain companies may have adverse effects on the safety and soundness of insured state nonmember banks.


(b) An insured state nonmember bank is prohibited from becoming or remaining affiliated with any securities underwriting affiliate company that directly engages in the public sale, distribution or underwriting of stocks, bonds, debentures, notes, or other securities activity, of a type not permissible for a national bank directly, unless the company is controlled by an entity that is supervised by a federal banking agency or the state nonmember bank submits an application in compliance with § 303.121 of this chapter and the FDIC grants its consent under the procedure in § 303.122(b) of this chapter, or the state nonmember bank and the securities underwriting affiliate company comply with the following requirements:


(1) The securities business of the affiliate is physically separate and distinct in its operations from the operations of the bank, provided that this requirement shall not be construed to prohibit the bank and its affiliate from sharing the same facility if the area where the affiliate conducts retail sales activity with the public is physically distinct from the routine deposit taking area of the bank;


(2) The affiliate conducts business pursuant to independent policies and procedures designed to inform customers and prospective customers of the affiliate that the affiliate is a separate organization from the bank and the state-chartered depository institution is not responsible for and does not guarantee the obligations of the affiliate;


(3) The bank adopts policies and procedures, including appropriate limits on exposure, to govern its participation in financing transactions underwritten by an underwriting affiliate;


(4) The bank does not express an opinion on the value or the advisability of the purchase or sale of securities underwritten or dealt in by an affiliate unless it notifies the customer that the entity underwriting, making a market, distributing or dealing in the securities is an affiliate of the bank; and


(5) The bank complies with the investment and transaction limitations in sections 23A and 23B of the Federal Reserve Act (12 U.S.C. 371c and 371c-1) with respect to the affiliate.


[66 FR 1028, Jan. 5, 2001]


Subpart C – Activities of Insured State Savings Associations

§ 362.9 Purpose and scope.

(a) This subpart, along with the notice and application procedures in subpart H of part 303 of this chapter, implements the provisions of section 28(a) of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act (12 U.S.C. 1831e(a)) that restrict and prohibit insured state savings associations and their service corporations from engaging in activities and investments of a type that are not permissible for a Federal savings association and their service corporations. This subpart also implements the provision of section 28(d) of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act (12 U.S.C. 1831e(d)) that restricts state and federal savings associations from investing in certain corporate debt securities. The phrase “activity permissible for a Federal savings association” means any activity authorized for a Federal savings association under any statute including the Home Owners’ Loan Act (HOLA) (12 U.S.C. 1464 et seq.), as well as activities recognized as permissible for a Federal savings association in regulations issued by the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC) or in bulletins, orders or written interpretations issued by the OCC, or by the former Office of Thrift Supervision until modified, terminated, set aside, or superseded by the OCC.


(b) This subpart does not cover the following activities:


(1) Activities conducted by the insured state savings association other than “as principal”, defined for purposes of this subpart as activities conducted as agent for a customer, conducted in a brokerage, custodial, advisory, or administrative capacity, or conducted as trustee, or in any substantially similar capacity. For example, this subpart does not cover acting solely as agent for the sale of insurance, securities, real estate, or travel services; nor does it cover acting as trustee, providing personal financial planning advice, or safekeeping services.


(2) Interests in real estate in which the real property is used or intended in good faith to be used within a reasonable time by an insured savings association or its service corporations as offices or related facilities for the conduct of its business or future expansion of its business or used as public welfare investments of a type and in an amount permissible for Federal savings associations.


(3) Equity investments acquired in connection with debts previously contracted (DPC) if the insured savings association or its service corporation takes only such actions as would be permissible for a Federal savings association’s or its service corporation’s DPC holdings.


(c) The FDIC intends to allow insured state savings associations and their service corporations to undertake only safe and sound activities and investments that do not present significant risks to the Deposit Insurance Fund and that are consistent with the purposes of Federal deposit insurance and other applicable law. This subpart does not authorize any insured state savings association to make investments or conduct activities that are not authorized or that are prohibited by either Federal or state law.


[63 FR 66326, Dec. 1, 1998, as amended at 71 FR 20527, Apr. 21, 2006; 77 FR 43155, July 24, 2012]


§ 362.10 Definitions.

For the purposes of this subpart, the definitions provided in § 362.2 apply. Additionally, the following definitions apply to this subpart:


(a) Affiliate has the same meaning as provided in subpart B of this part.


(b) Corporate debt securities not of investment grade means any corporate debt security that when acquired was not rated among the four highest rating categories by at least one nationally recognized statistical rating organization. The term shall not include any obligation issued or guaranteed by a corporation that may be held by a Federal savings association without limitation as to percentage of assets under subparagraphs (D), (E), or (F) of section 5(c)(1) of HOLA (12 U.S.C. 1464(c)(1) (D), (E), (F)).


(c) Insured state savings association means any state-chartered savings association insured by the FDIC.


(d) Qualified affiliate means, in the case of a stock insured state savings association, an affiliate other than a subsidiary or an insured depository institution. In the case of a mutual savings association, “qualified affiliate” means a subsidiary other than an insured depository institution provided that all of the savings association’s investments in, and extensions of credit to, the subsidiary are deducted from the savings association’s capital.


(e) Service corporation means any corporation the capital stock of which is available for purchase by savings associations.


[63 FR 66326, Dec. 1, 1998, as amended at 66 FR 1029, Jan. 5, 2001]


§ 362.11 Activities of insured savings associations.

(a) Equity investments – (1) Prohibited investments. No insured state savings association may directly acquire or retain as principal any equity investment of a type, or in an amount, that is not permissible for a Federal savings association unless the exception in paragraph (a)(2) of this section applies.


(2) Exception: Equity investment in service corporations. An insured state savings association that is and continues to be in compliance with the applicable capital standards as prescribed by the appropriate Federal banking agency may acquire or retain an equity investment in a service corporation:


(i) Not permissible for a Federal savings association to the extent the service corporation is engaging in activities that are allowed pursuant to the provisions of or an application under § 362.12(b); or


(ii) Of a type permissible for a Federal savings association, but in an amount exceeding the investment limits applicable to Federal savings associations, if the insured state savings association obtains the FDIC’s prior consent. Consent will be given only if the FDIC determines that the amount of the investment in a service corporation engaged in such activities does not present a significant risk to the Deposit Insurance Fund. Applications should be filed in accordance with § 303.141 of this chapter and will be processed under § 303.142(b) of this chapter. Approvals granted under § 303.142(b) of this chapter may be made subject to any conditions or restrictions found by the FDIC to be necessary to protect the Deposit Insurance Fund from significant risk, to prevent unsafe or unsound practices, and/or to ensure that the activity is consistent with the purposes of Federal deposit insurance and other applicable law.


(b) Activities other than equity investments – (1) Prohibited activities. An insured state savings association may not directly engage as principal in any activity, that is not an equity investment, of a type not permissible for a Federal savings association, and an insured state savings association shall not make nonresidential real property loans in an amount exceeding that described in section 5(c)(2)(B) of HOLA (12 U.S.C. 1464(c)(2)(B)), unless one of the exceptions in paragraph (b)(2) of this section applies. This section shall not be read to require the divestiture of any asset (including a nonresidential real estate loan), if the asset was acquired prior to August 9, 1989; however, any activity conducted with such asset must be conducted in accordance with this subpart. On and after July 21, 2012, an insured savings association directly or through a subsidiary (other than, in the case of a mutual savings association, a subsidiary that is a qualified affiliate), shall not acquire or retain a corporate debt security unless the savings association, prior to acquiring the security and periodically thereafter, determines that the issuer of the security has adequate capacity to meet all financial commitments under the security for the projected life of the security. Saving associations have until January 1, 2013 to come into compliance with this treatment of corporate debt securities.


(2) Exceptions – (i) Consent obtained through application. An insured state savings association that meets and continues to meet the applicable capital standards set by the appropriate Federal banking agency may directly conduct activities prohibited by paragraph (b)(1) of this section if the savings association obtains the FDIC’s prior consent. Consent will be given only if the FDIC determines that conducting the activity designated poses no significant risk to the Deposit Insurance Fund. Applications should be filed in accordance with § 303.141 of this chapter and will be processed under § 303.142(b) of this chapter. Approvals granted under § 303.142(b) of this chapter may be made subject to any conditions or restrictions found by the FDIC to be necessary to protect the Deposit Insurance Fund from significant risk, to prevent unsafe or unsound practices, and/or to ensure that the activity is consistent with the purposes of Federal deposit insurance and other applicable law.


(ii) Nonresidential realty loans permissible for a Federal savings association conducted in an amount not permissible. An insured state savings association that meets and continues to meet the applicable capital standards set by the appropriate Federal banking agency may make nonresidential real property loans in an amount exceeding the amount described in section 5(c)(2)(B) of HOLA, if the savings association files a notice in compliance with § 303.141 of this chapter and the FDIC processes the notice without objection under § 303.142(a) of this chapter. Consent will be given only if the FDIC determines that engaging in such lending in the amount designated poses no significant risk to the Deposit Insurance Fund.


(iii) Acquiring and retaining adjustable rate and money market preferred stock. (A) An insured state savings association’s investment of up to 15 percent of the association’s tier one capital in adjustable rate preferred stock or money market (auction rate) preferred stock does not represent a significant risk to the Deposit Insurance Fund. An insured state savings association may conduct this activity without first obtaining the FDIC’s consent, provided that the association meets and continues to meet the applicable capital standards as prescribed by the appropriate Federal banking agency. The fact that prior consent is not required by this subpart does not preclude the FDIC from taking any appropriate action with respect to the activities if the facts and circumstances warrant such action.


(B) An insured state savings association may acquire or retain other instruments of a type determined by the FDIC to have the character of debt securities and not to represent a significant risk to the Deposit Insurance Fund. Such instruments shall be included in the 15 percent of tier one capital limit imposed in paragraph (b)(2)(iii)(A) of this section. An insured state savings association may conduct this activity without first obtaining the FDIC’s consent, provided that the association meets and continues to meet the applicable capital standards as prescribed by the appropriate Federal banking agency. The fact that prior consent is not required by this subpart does not preclude the FDIC from taking any appropriate action with respect to the activities if the facts and circumstances warrant such action.


(3) Activities permissible for a Federal savings association conducted in an amount not permissible. Except as provided in paragraph (b)(2)(ii) of this section, an insured state savings association may engage as principal in any activity, which is not an equity investment of a type permissible for a Federal savings association, in an amount in excess of that permissible for a Federal savings association, if the savings association meets and continues to meet the applicable capital standards set by the appropriate Federal banking agency, the institution has advised the appropriate regional director (DSC) under the procedure in § 303.142(c) of this chapter within thirty days before engaging in the activity, and the FDIC has not advised the insured state savings association that conducting the activity in the amount indicated poses a significant risk to the Deposit Insurance Fund. This section shall not be read to require the divestiture of any asset if the asset was acquired prior to August 9, 1989; however, any activity conducted with such asset must be conducted in accordance with this subpart.


[63 FR 66326, Dec. 1, 1998, as amended at 71 FR 20527, Apr. 21, 2006; 77 FR 43155, July 24, 2012]


§ 362.12 Service corporations of insured State savings associations.

(a) Prohibition. A service corporation of an insured state savings association may not engage in any activity that is not permissible for a service corporation of a Federal savings association, unless it meets one of the exceptions in paragraph (b) of this section.


(b) Exceptions – (1) Consent obtained through application. A service corporation of an insured state savings association may conduct activities prohibited by paragraph (a) of this section if the savings association obtains the FDIC’s prior written consent and the insured state savings association meets and continues to meet the applicable capital standards set by the appropriate Federal banking agency. Consent will be given only if the FDIC determines that the activity poses no significant risk to the Deposit Insurance Fund. Applications for consent should be filed in accordance with § 303.141 of this chapter and will be processed under § 303.142(b) of this chapter. Approvals granted under § 303.142(b) of this chapter may be made subject to any conditions or restrictions found by the FDIC to be necessary to protect the Deposit Insurance Fund from risk, to prevent unsafe or unsound banking practices, and/or to ensure that the activity is consistent with the purposes of Federal deposit insurance and other applicable law. The activities covered by this paragraph may include, but are not limited to, acquiring and retaining equity securities of a company engaged in the public sale distribution or underwriting of securities.


(2) Service corporations conducting unrestricted activities. The FDIC has determined that the following activities do not represent a significant risk to the Deposit Insurance Fund:


(i) [Reserved]


(ii) A service corporation of an insured state savings association may acquire and retain equity securities of a company engaged in the following activities, if the service corporation controls the company or the company is controlled by insured depository institutions, and the association continues to meet the applicable capital standards as prescribed by the appropriate Federal banking agency. The FDIC consents that such activity may be conducted by a service corporation of an insured state savings association without first obtaining the FDIC’s consent. The fact that prior consent is not required by this subpart does not preclude the FDIC from taking any appropriate action with respect to the activities if the facts and circumstances warrant such action.


(A) Equity securities of a company that engages in permissible activities. A service corporation may own the equity securities of a company that engages in any activity permissible for a Federal savings association.


(B) Equity securities of a company that acquires and retains adjustable-rate and money market preferred stock. A service corporation may own the equity securities of a company that engages in any activity permissible for an insured state savings association under § 362.11(b)(2)(iii) so long as instruments held under this paragraph (b)(2)(ii)(B), paragraph (b)(2)(iv) of this section, and § 362.11(b)(2)(iii) in the aggregate do not exceed the limit set by § 362.11(b)(2)(iii).


(C) Equity securities of a company acting as an insurance agency. A service corporation may own the equity securities of a company that acts as an insurance agency.


(iii) Activities that are not conducted “as principal”. A service corporation controlled by the insured state savings association may engage in activities which are not conducted “as principal” such as acting as an agent for a customer, acting in a brokerage, custodial, advisory, or administrative capacity, or acting as trustee, or in any substantially similar capacity.


(iv) Acquiring and retaining adjustable-rate and money market preferred stock. A service corporation may engage in any activity permissible for an insured state savings association under § 362.11(b)(2)(iii) so long as instruments held under this paragraph (b)(2)(iv), paragraph (b)(2)(ii)(B) of this section, and § 362.11(b)(2)(iii) in the aggregate do not exceed the limit set by § 362.11(b)(2)(iii).


(3)-(4) [Reserved]


(c) Investment and transaction limits. The restrictions detailed in § 362.4(d) apply to transactions between an insured state savings association and any service corporation engaging in activities which are not permissible for a service corporation of a Federal savings association if specifically required by this part or FDIC order. For purposes of applying the investment limits in § 362.4(d)(2), the term “investment” includes only those items described in § 362.4(d)(2)(ii)(A)(3) and (4). For purposes of applying § 362.4(d)(2), (3), and (4) to this paragraph (c), references to the terms “insured State bank” and “subsidiary” in § 362.4(d)(2), (3), and (4), shall be deemed to refer, respectively, to the insured state savings association and the service corporation. For purposes of applying § 362.4(d)(5), references to the terms “insured State bank” and “subsidiary” in § 362.4(d)(5) shall be deemed to refer, respectively, to the insured state savings association and the service corporations or subsidiaries.


(d) Capital requirements. If specifically required by this part or by FDIC order, an insured state savings association that wishes to conduct as principal activities through a service corporation which are not permissible for a service corporation of a Federal savings association must:


(1) Be well-capitalized after deducting from its capital any investment in the service corporation, both equity and debt.


(2) Use such regulatory capital amount for the purposes of the insured state savings association’s assessment risk classification under part 327 of this chapter.


[63 FR 66326, Dec. 1, 1998, as amended at 66 FR 1029, Jan. 5, 2001; 71 FR 20527, Apr. 21, 2006]


§ 362.13 Approvals previously granted.

FDIC consent by order or notice. An insured state savings association that previously filed an application and obtained the FDIC’s consent to engage in an activity or to acquire or retain an investment in a service corporation engaging as principal in an activity or acquiring and retaining any investment that is prohibited under this subpart may continue that activity or retain that investment without seeking the FDIC’s consent, provided the insured state savings association and the service corporation, if applicable, continue to meet the conditions and restrictions of approval. An insured state savings association which was granted approval based on conditions which differ from the requirements of §§ 362.4(c)(2) and 362.12 (c) and (d) will be considered to meet the conditions and restrictions of the approval if the insured state savings association and any applicable service corporation meet the requirements of §§ 362.4(c)(2) and 362.12 (c) and (d). For the purposes of applying § 362.4(c)(2), references to the terms “eligible subsidiary” and “subsidiary” in § 362.4(c)(2) shall be deemed to refer, respectively, to the eligible service corporation and the service corporation.


Subpart D – Acquiring, Establishing, or Conducting New Activities Through a Subsidiary by an Insured Savings Association

§ 362.14 Purpose and scope.

This subpart implements section 18(m) of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act (12 U.S.C. 1828(m)) which requires that prior notice be given the FDIC when an insured savings association establishes or acquires a subsidiary or engages in any new activity in a subsidiary. For the purposes of this subpart, the term “subsidiary” does not include any insured depository institution as that term is defined in the Federal Deposit Insurance Act. Unless otherwise indicated, the definitions provided in § 362.2 apply to this subpart.


§ 362.15 Acquiring or establishing a subsidiary; conducting new activities through a subsidiary.

No state insured savings association may establish or acquire a subsidiary, or conduct any new activity through a subsidiary, unless it files a notice in compliance with § 303.142(c) of this chapter at least 30 days prior to establishment of the subsidiary or commencement of the activity and the FDIC does not object to the notice. This section does not apply to any state savings association that acquired its principal assets from a Federal savings bank that was chartered prior to October 15, 1982, as a savings bank under state law.


[86 FR 8104, Feb. 3, 2021]


Subpart E – Financial Subsidiaries of Insured State Nonmember Banks


Source:66 FR 1029, Jan. 5, 2001, unless otherwise noted.

§ 362.16 Purpose and scope.

(a) This subpart, along with the notice and application procedures in subpart G of part 303 of this chapter, implements section 46 of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act (12 U.S.C. 1831w) and requires that an insured state nonmember bank certify certain facts and file a notice with the FDIC before the insured state nonmember bank may control or hold an interest in a financial subsidiary under section 46(a) of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act. This subpart also implements the statutory Community Reinvestment Act (CRA) (12 U.S.C. 2901 et seq.) requirement set forth in subsection (4)(l)(2) of the Bank Holding Company Act (12 U.S.C. 1843(l)(2)), which is applicable to state nonmember banks that commence new activities through a financial subsidiary or directly or indirectly acquire control of a company engaged in an activity under section 46(a).


(b) This subpart does not cover activities conducted other than “as principal”. For purposes of this subpart, activities conducted other than “as principal” are defined as activities conducted as agent for a customer, conducted in a brokerage, custodial, advisory, or administrative capacity, or conducted as trustee, or in any substantially similar capacity. For example, this subpart does not cover acting solely as agent for the sale of insurance, securities, real estate, or travel services; nor does it cover acting as trustee, providing personal financial planning advice, or safekeeping services.


§ 362.17 Definitions.

For the purposes of this subpart, the following definitions will apply:


(a) Activity, company, control, insured depository institution, insured state bank, insured state nonmember bank and subsidiary have the same meaning as provided in subpart A of this part.


(b) Affiliate has the same meaning provided in subpart B of this part.


(c) Financial subsidiary means any company that is controlled by one or more insured depository institutions other than:


(1) A subsidiary that only engages in activities that the state nonmember bank is permitted to engage in directly and that are conducted on the same terms and conditions that govern the conduct of the activities by the state nonmember bank; or


(2) A subsidiary that the state nonmember bank is specifically authorized to control by the express terms of a federal statute (other than section 46(a) of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act (12 U.S.C. 1831w)), and not by implication or interpretation, such as the Bank Service Company Act (12 U.S.C. 1861 et seq.).


(d) Tangible equity and Tier 2 capital have the same meaning as set forth in part 324 of this chapter.


(e) Well-managed means:


(1) Unless otherwise determined in writing by the appropriate federal banking agency, the institution has received a composite rating of 1 or 2 under the Uniform Financial Institutions Rating System (or an equivalent rating under an equivalent rating system) in connection with the most recent state or federal examination or subsequent review of the depository institution and at least a rating of 2 for management, if such a rating is given; or


(2) In the case of any depository institution that has not been examined by its appropriate federal banking agency, the existence and use of managerial resources that the appropriate federal banking agency determines are satisfactory.


[63 FR 66326, Dec. 1, 1998, as amended at 78 FR 55596, Sept. 10, 2013; 83 FR 17741, Apr. 24, 2018]


§ 362.18 Financial subsidiaries of insured state nonmember banks.

(a) “As principal” activities. An insured state nonmember bank may not obtain control of or hold an interest in a financial subsidiary that engages in activities as principal or commence any such new activity pursuant to section 46(a) of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act (12 U.S.C. 1831w) unless the insured state nonmember bank files a notice containing the information required in § 303.121(b) of this chapter and certifies that:


(1) The insured state nonmember bank is well-managed;


(2) The insured state nonmember bank and all of its insured depository institution affiliates are well-capitalized as defined in the appropriate capital regulation and guidance of each institution’s primary federal regulator; and


(3) The insured state nonmember bank will deduct the aggregate amount of its outstanding equity investment, including retained earnings, in all financial subsidiaries that engage in activities as principal pursuant to section 46(a) of the Federal Deposit Act (12 U.S.C. 1831w(a)), from the bank’s total assets and tangible equity and deduct such investment from its total risk-based capital (this deduction shall be made equally from tier 1 and tier 2 capital) or from common equity tier 1 capital in accordance with 12 CFR part 324, subpart C, as applicable.


(b) Community Reinvestment Act (CRA). An insured state nonmember bank may not commence any new activity subject to section 46(a) of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act (12 U.S.C. 1831w) or directly or indirectly acquire control of a company engaged in any such activity pursuant to § 362.18(a)(1), if the bank or any of its insured depository institution affiliates received a CRA rating of less than “satisfactory record of meeting community credit needs” in its most recent CRA examination.


(c) Other requirements. An insured state nonmember bank controlling or holding an interest in a financial subsidiary under section 46(a) of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act (12 U.S.C. 1831w) must meet and continue to meet the requirements set forth in paragraph (a) of this section as long as the insured state nonmember bank holds the financial subsidiary and:


(1) Disclose and continue to disclose the capital separation required in paragraph (a)(3) in any published financial statements;


(2) Comply and continue to comply with sections 23A and 23B of the Federal Reserve Act (12 U.S.C. 371c and 371c-1) as if the subsidiary were a financial subsidiary of a national bank; and


(3) Comply and continue to comply with the financial and operational standards provided by section 5136A(d) of the Revised Statutes of the United States (12 U.S.C. 24A(d)), unless otherwise determined by the FDIC.


(d) Securities underwriting. If the financial subsidiary of the insured state nonmember bank will engage in the public sale, distribution or underwriting of stocks, bonds, debentures, notes, or other securities activity of a type permissible for a national bank only through a financial subsidiary, then the state nonmember bank and the financial subsidiary also must comply and continue to comply with the following additional requirements:


(1) The securities business of the financial subsidiary must be physically separate and distinct in its operations from the operations of the bank, provided that this requirement shall not be construed to prohibit the bank and its financial subsidiary from sharing the same facility if the area where the financial subsidiary conducts securities business with the public is physically distinct from the routine deposit taking area of the bank;


(2) The financial subsidiary must conduct its securities business pursuant to independent policies and procedures designed to inform customers and prospective customers of the financial subsidiary that the financial subsidiary is a separate organization from the insured state nonmember bank and that the insured state nonmember bank is not responsible for and does not guarantee the obligations of the financial subsidiary;


(3) The bank must adopt policies and procedures, including appropriate limits on exposure, to govern its participation in financing transactions underwritten by its financial subsidiary; and


(4) The bank must not express an opinion on the value or the advisability of the purchase or sale of securities underwritten or dealt in by its financial subsidiary unless the bank notifies the customer that the entity underwriting, making a market, distributing or dealing in the securities is a financial subsidiary of the bank.


(e) Applications for exceptions to certain requirements. Any insured state nonmember bank that is unable to comply with the well-managed requirement of § 362.18(a)(1) and (c)(1), any state nonmember bank that has appropriate reasons for not meeting the financial and operational standards applicable to a financial subsidiary of a national bank conducting the same activities as provided in § 362.18(c)(3) or any state nonmember bank and its financial subsidiary subject to the securities underwriting activities requirements in § 362.18(d) that is unable to meet such requirements may submit an application in compliance with § 303.121 of this chapter to seek a waiver or modification of such requirements under the procedure in § 303.122(b) of this chapter. The FDIC may impose additional prudential safeguards as are necessary as a condition of its consent.


(f) Failure to meet requirements – (1) Notification by FDIC. The FDIC will notify the insured state nonmember bank in writing and identify the areas of noncompliance, if:


(i) The FDIC finds that an insured state nonmember bank or any of its insured depository institution affiliates is not in compliance with the CRA requirement of § 362.18(b) at the time any new activity is commenced or control of the financial subsidiary is acquired;


(ii) The FDIC finds that the facts to which an insured state nonmember bank certified under § 362.18(a) are not accurate in whole or in part; or


(iii) The FDIC finds that the insured state nonmember bank or any of its insured depository institution affiliates or the financial subsidiary fails to meet or continue to comply with the requirements of § 362.18(c) and (d), if applicable, and the FDIC has not granted an exception under the procedures set forth in § 362.18(e) and in § 303.122(b) of this chapter.


(2) Notification by state nonmember bank. An insured state nonmember bank that controls or holds an interest in a financial subsidiary must promptly notify the FDIC if the bank becomes aware that any depository institution affiliate of the bank has ceased to be well-capitalized.


(3) Subsequent action by FDIC. The FDIC may take any appropriate action or impose any limitations, including requiring that the insured state nonmember bank to divest control of any such financial subsidiary, on the conduct or activities of the insured state nonmember bank or any financial subsidiary of the insured state bank that fails to:


(i) Meet the requirements listed in § 362.18(a) and (b) at the time that any new section 46 activity is commenced or control of a financial subsidiary is acquired by an insured state nonmember bank; or


(ii) Meet and continue to meet the requirements listed in § 362.18(c) and (d), as applicable.


(g) Coordination with section 24 of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act – (1) Continuing authority under section 24. Notwithstanding § 362.18(a) through (f), an insured state bank may retain its interest in any subsidiary:


(i) That was conducting a financial activity with authorization in accordance with section 24 of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act (12 U.S.C. 1831a) and the applicable implementing regulation found in subpart A of this part 362 before the date on which any such activity became for the first time permissible for a financial subsidiary of a national bank; and


(ii) Which insured state nonmember bank and its subsidiary continue to meet the conditions and restrictions of the section 24 order or regulation approving the activity as well as other applicable law.


(2) Continuing authority under section 24(f) of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act. Notwithstanding § 362.18(a) through (f), an insured state bank with authority under section 24(f) of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act (12 U.S.C. 1831a(f)) to hold equity securities may continue to establish new subsidiaries to engage in that investment activity.


(3) Relief from conditions. Any state nonmember bank that meets the requirements of paragraph (g)(1) of this section or that is subject to section 46(b) of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act (12 U.S.C. 1831w(b)) may submit an application in compliance with § 303.121 of this chapter and seek the consent of the FDIC under the procedure in § 303.122(b) of this chapter for modification of any conditions or restrictions the FDIC previously imposed in connection with a section 24 order or regulation approving the activity.


(4) New financial subsidiaries. Notwithstanding subpart A of this part 362, an insured state bank may not, on or after November 12, 1999, acquire control of, or acquire an interest in, a financial subsidiary that engages in activities as principal or commences any new activity under section 46(a) of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act (12 U.S.C. 1831w) other than as provided in this section.


[63 FR 66326, Dec. 1, 1998, as amended at 78 FR 55596, Sept. 10, 2013]


PART 363 – ANNUAL INDEPENDENT AUDITS AND REPORTING REQUIREMENTS


Authority:12 U.S.C. 1831m.


Source:74 FR 35745, July 20, 2009, unless otherwise noted.

§ 363.0 OMB control number.

The information collection requirements in this part have been approved by the Office of Management and Budget under OMB control number 3064-0113.


§ 363.1 Scope and definitions.

(a) Applicability. This part applies to any insured depository institution with respect to any fiscal year in which its consolidated total assets as of the beginning of such fiscal year are $500 million or more. The requirements specified in this part are in addition to any other statutory and regulatory requirements otherwise applicable to an insured depository institution.


(b) Compliance by subsidiaries of holding companies. (1) For an insured depository institution that is a subsidiary of a holding company, the audited financial statements requirement of § 363.2(a) may be satisfied:


(i) For fiscal years ending on or before June 14, 2010, by audited consolidated financial statements of the top-tier or any mid-tier holding company.


(ii) For fiscal years ending on or after June 15, 2010, by audited consolidated financial statements of the top-tier or any mid-tier holding company provided that the consolidated total assets of the insured depository institution (or the consolidated total assets of all of the holding company’s insured depository institution subsidiaries, regardless of size, if the holding company owns or controls more than one insured depository institution) comprise 75 percent or more of the consolidated total assets of this top-tier or mid-tier holding company as of the beginning of its fiscal year.


(2) The other requirements of this part for an insured depository institution that is a subsidiary of a holding company may be satisfied by the top-tier or any mid-tier holding company if the insured depository institution meets the criterion specified in § 363.1(b)(1) and if:


(i) The services and functions comparable to those required of the insured depository institution by this part are provided at this top-tier or mid-tier holding company level; and


(ii) The insured depository institution has as of the beginning of its fiscal year:


(A) Total assets of less than $5 billion; or


(B) Total assets of $5 billion or more and a composite CAMELS rating of 1 or 2.


(3) The appropriate Federal banking agency may revoke the exception in paragraph (b)(2) of this section for any institution with total assets in excess of $9 billion for any period of time during which the appropriate Federal banking agency determines that the institution’s exemption would create a significant risk to the Deposit Insurance Fund.


(c) Financial reporting. For purposes of the management report requirement of § 363.2(b) and the internal control reporting requirement of § 363.3(b), “financial reporting,” at a minimum, includes both financial statements prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles for the insured depository institution or its holding company and financial statements prepared for regulatory reporting purposes. For recognition and measurement purposes, financial statements prepared for regulatory reporting purposes shall conform to generally accepted accounting principles and section 37 of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act.


(d) Definitions. For purposes of this part, the following definitions apply:


(1) AICPA means the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants.


(2) GAAP means generally accepted accounting principles.


(3) PCAOB means the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board.


(4) Public company means an insured depository institution or other company that has a class of securities registered with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission or the appropriate Federal banking agency under Section 12 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 and nonpublic company means an insured depository institution or other company that does not meet the definition of a public company.


(5) SEC means the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission.


(6) SOX means the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.


[74 FR 35745, July 20, 2009, as amended at 85 FR 67433, Oct. 23, 2020; 86 FR 66155, Nov. 22, 2021]


§ 363.2 Annual reporting requirements.

(a) Audited financial statements. Each insured depository institution shall prepare annual financial statements in accordance with GAAP, which shall be audited by an independent public accountant. The annual financial statements must reflect all material correcting adjustments necessary to conform with GAAP that were identified by the independent public accountant.


(b) Management report. Each insured depository institution annually shall prepare, as of the end of the institution’s most recent fiscal year, a management report that must contain the following:


(1) A statement of management’s responsibilities for preparing the institution’s annual financial statements, for establishing and maintaining an adequate internal control structure and procedures for financial reporting, and for complying with laws and regulations relating to safety and soundness that are designated by the FDIC and the appropriate Federal banking agency;


(2) An assessment by management of the insured depository institution’s compliance with such laws and regulations during such fiscal year. The assessment must state management’s conclusion as to whether the insured depository institution has complied with the designated safety and soundness laws and regulations during the fiscal year and disclose any noncompliance with these laws and regulations; and


(3) For an insured depository institution with consolidated total assets of $1 billion or more as of the beginning of such fiscal year, an assessment by management of the effectiveness of such internal control structure and procedures as of the end of such fiscal year that must include the following:


(i) A statement identifying the internal control framework
14
used by management to evaluate the effectiveness of the insured depository institution’s internal control over financial reporting;




14 For example, in the United States, the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations (COSO) of the Treadway Commission has published Internal Control – Integrated Framework, including an addendum on safeguarding assets. Known as the COSO report, this publication provides a suitable and available framework for purposes of management’s assessment.


(ii) A statement that the assessment included controls over the preparation of regulatory financial statements in accordance with regulatory reporting instructions including identification of such regulatory reporting instructions; and


(iii) A statement expressing management’s conclusion as to whether the insured depository institution’s internal control over financial reporting is effective as of the end of its fiscal year. Management must disclose all material weaknesses in internal control over financial reporting, if any, that it has identified that have not been remediated prior to the insured depository institution’s fiscal year-end. Management is precluded from concluding that the institution’s internal control over financial reporting is effective if there are one or more material weaknesses.


(c) Management report signatures. Subject to the criteria specified in § 363.1(b):


(1) If the audited financial statements requirement specified in § 363.2(a) is satisfied at the insured depository institution level and the management report requirement specified in § 363.2(b) is satisfied in its entirety at the insured depository institution level, the management report must be signed by the chief executive officer and the chief accounting officer or chief financial officer of the insured depository institution;


(2) If the audited financial statements requirement specified in § 363.2(a) is satisfied at the holding company level and the management report requirement specified in § 363.2(b) is satisfied in its entirety at the holding company level, the management report must be signed by the chief executive officer and the chief accounting officer or chief financial officer of the holding company; and


(3) If the audited financial statements requirement specified in § 363.2(a) is satisfied at the holding company level and (i) the management report requirement specified in § 363.2(b) is satisfied in its entirety at the insured depository institution level or (ii) one or more of the components of the management report specified in § 363.2(b) is satisfied at the holding company level and the remaining components of the management report are satisfied at the insured depository institution level, the management report must be signed by the chief executive officers and the chief accounting officers or chief financial officers of both the holding company and the insured depository institution and the management report must clearly indicate the level (institution or holding company) at which each of its components is being satisfied.


§ 363.3 Independent public accountant.

(a) Annual audit of financial statements. Each insured depository institution shall engage an independent public accountant to audit and report on its annual financial statements in accordance with generally accepted auditing standards or the PCAOB’s auditing standards, if applicable, and section 37 of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act (12 U.S.C. 1831n). The scope of the audit engagement shall be sufficient to permit such accountant to determine and report whether the financial statements are presented fairly and in accordance with GAAP.


(b) Internal control over financial reporting. For each insured depository institution with total assets of $1 billion or more at the beginning of the institution’s fiscal year, the independent public accountant who audits the institution’s financial statements shall examine, attest to, and report separately on the assertion of management concerning the effectiveness of the institution’s internal control structure and procedures for financial reporting. The attestation and report shall be made in accordance with generally accepted standards for attestation engagements or the PCAOB’s auditing standards, if applicable. The accountant’s report must not be dated prior to the date of the management report and management’s assessment of the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting. Notwithstanding the requirements set forth in applicable professional standards, the accountant’s r