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Title 13 – Business Credit and Assistance–Volume 1

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Title 13 – Business Credit and Assistance–Volume 1


Part


chapter i – Small Business Administration

101


chapter iii – Economic Development Administration, Department of Commerce

300


chapter iv – Emergency Steel Guarantee Loan Board

400


chapter v – Emergency Oil and Gas Guaranteed Loan Board

500


Abbreviations Used in This Chapter:

SBA = Small Business Administration. SBID = The Small Business Investment Division of SBA. RFC = Reconstruction Finance Corporation.

CHAPTER I – SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

PARTS 1-100 [RESERVED]

PART 101 – ADMINISTRATION


Authority:5 U.S.C. 552 and App. 3, secs. 2, 4(a), 6(a), and 9(a)(1)(T); 15 U.S.C. 633, 634, 687; 31 U.S.C. 6506; 44 U.S.C. 3512; 42 U.S.C. 6307(d); 15 U.S.C. 657h; E.O. 12372 (July 14, 1982), 47 FR 30959, 3 CFR, 1982 Comp., p. 197, as amended by E.O. 12416 (April 8, 1983), 48 FR 15887, 3 CFR, 1983 Comp., p. 186.


Source:61 FR 2394, Jan. 26, 1996, unless otherwise noted.

Subpart A – Overview

§ 101.100 What is the purpose of SBA?

The U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) aids, counsels, assists, and protects the interests of small business concerns, and advocates on their behalf within the Government. It also helps victims of disasters. It provides financial assistance, contractual assistance, and business development assistance. For a more detailed description of the functions of SBA see The United States Government Manual, a special publication of the Federal Register, which is available from Superintendent of Documents, P.O. Box 371954, Pittsburgh, PA 15250-7954.


§ 101.101 Who manages SBA?

(a) An Administrator, appointed by the President with the advice and consent of the Senate, manages SBA. The Administrator –


(1) Is responsible to the President and Congress for exercising direction, authority, and control over SBA.


(2) Determines and approves all policies covering SBA’s programs to aid, counsel, assist, and protect the interests of the nation’s small businesses.


(3) Employs or appoints employees necessary to implement the Small Business Act, as amended, the Small Business Investment Act, as amended, and other laws and directives.


(4) Delegates certain activities, by issuing regulations or otherwise, to Headquarters and field positions.


(b) A Deputy Administrator, appointed by the President with the advice and consent of the Senate, serves as Acting Administrator during the absence or disability of the Administrator or in the event of a vacancy in the Office of the Administrator.


§ 101.102 Where is SBA’s Headquarters located?

The Headquarters of SBA is at 409 3rd Street, SW., Washington, DC 20416.


§ 101.103 Where are SBA’s field offices located?

A list of SBA’s field offices with addresses, phone numbers and jurisdictions served is periodically published in the Federal Register. You can also obtain the address and phone number of an SBA office to serve you by calling 1-800-8-ASK-SBA or 1-800-827-5722.


§ 101.104 What are the functions of SBA’s field offices?

(a) Regional offices. Regional offices are managed by a Regional Administrator who is responsible to the Administrator and to the Associate Administrator for Field Operations. They are located in major cities and have geographical boundaries which cover multi-state areas. Regional offices exercise limited authority over field activities within their region.


(b) District offices. District offices are managed by a District Director and are located in cities within a region. District offices are responsible to Headquarters, the Associate Administrator for Field Operations, and to a regional office. Within their delegated authority, district offices have authority for –


(1) Conducting all program delivery activities within the district boundaries;


(2) Supervising all branch offices located within the district boundaries; and


(3) Providing subordinate branch offices with the technical capability necessary to execute assigned programs.


(c) Branch offices. Branch offices are managed by a Branch Manager and are located in cities within a district. Branch offices are responsible to the district office within whose boundaries it is located. Branch offices execute one or more elements of the business or disaster loan programs and have limited authority for program execution.


(d) Disaster assistance offices. The Office of Disaster Assistance maintains five permanent field offices which are named according to the particular functions they perform in the disaster loan making process. The office names are: Disaster Assistance Customer Service Center, Disaster Assistance Processing and Disbursement Center, Disaster Assistance Field Operations Center East, Disaster Assistance Field Operations Center West, and the Disaster Assistance Personnel and Administrative Services Center. Each office is managed by a Center Director who reports to the Deputy Associate Administrator for Disaster Assistance. The offices provide loan services to victims of declared disasters, or support the efforts of the other offices to do so. Temporary disaster offices may be established in areas where disasters have occurred.


(e) Responsibilities. Each field office has responsibilities within a defined geographical area as periodically set forth in the Federal Register.


[61 FR 2394, Jan. 26, 1996, as amended at 71 FR 63676, Oct. 31, 2006]


§ 101.105 Who may use SBA’s official seal and for what purpose?

(a) General. This section describes the official seal of the SBA and prescribes rules for its use.


(b) Official Seal. The official seal of the SBA is illustrated below.



(c) Authorized Use. The official seal and reproductions of the seal may only be used as follows:


(1) Certify and authenticate originals and copies of any books, records, papers or other documents on file within SBA or extracts taken from them or to provide certification for the purposes authorized in 28 U.S.C. 1733;


(2) SBA award certificates and medals;


(3) SBA awards for career service;


(4) Security credentials and employee identification cards;


(5) Business cards for SBA employees;


(6) Official SBA signs;


(7) Plaques; the design of the SBA seal may be incorporated in plaques for display in Agency auditoriums, presentation rooms, lobbies, offices and on buildings occupied by SBA;


(8) The SBA flag;


(9) Officially authorized reports or publications of the SBA; or


(10) For such other purposes as determined necessary by the Administrator.


(d) Unauthorized use. The official seal shall not be used, except as authorized by the Administrator, in connection with:


(1) Contractor operated facilities;


(2) Souvenir or novelty items;


(3) Toys or commercial gifts or premiums;


(4) Letterhead design, except on official SBA stationery;


(5) Clothing or equipment; or


(6) Any article which may disparage the seal or reflect unfavorably upon SBA.


(e) SBA’s seal will not be used in any manner which implies SBA endorsement of commercial products or services or of the user’s policies or activities.


(f) Reproduction of Official Seal. Requests for permission to reproduce the SBA seal in circumstances other than those listed in paragraph (c) of this section must be made in writing to the Administrator. The decision whether to grant permission will be made in writing on a case-by-case basis, in consultation with the General Counsel, with consideration of any relevant factors which may include the benefit or cost to the Agency of granting the request; the unintended appearance of endorsement or authentication by SBA; the potential for misuse; the reputability of the use; the extent of control by SBA over the use; and the extent of control by SBA over distribution of any products or publications bearing the SBA seal.


(g) Penalties for Unauthorized Use. Fraudulent or wrongful use of SBA’s seal can lead to criminal penalties under 18 U.S.C. 506 or 18 U.S.C. 1017.


[72 FR 1963, Jan. 11, 2008]


§ 101.106 Does Federal law apply to SBA programs and activities?

(a) SBA makes loans and provides other services that are authorized and executed under Federal programs to achieve national purposes.


(b) The following are construed and enforced in accordance with Federal law –


(1) Instruments evidencing loans;


(2) Security interests in real or personal property payable to or held by SBA or the Administrator such as promissory notes, bonds, guarantee agreements, mortgages, and deeds of trust;


(3) Other evidences of debt or security;


(4) Contracts or agreements to which SBA is a party, unless expressly provided otherwise.


(c) To the extent feasible, SBA uses local or state procedures, especially for recordation and notification purposes, in implementing and facilitating SBA’s loan programs. This use of local or state procedures is not a waiver by SBA of any Federal immunity from any local or state control, penalty, tax, or liability.


(d) No person, corporation, or organization that applies for and receives any benefit or assistance from SBA, or that offers any assurance or security upon which SBA relies for the granting of such benefit or assistance, is entitled to claim or assert any local or state law to defeat the obligation incurred in obtaining or assuring such Federal benefit or assistance.


§ 101.107 What SBA forms are approved for public use?

(a) SBA uses forms approved by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) under the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (44 U.S.C. 3501 et seq.), as amended. You may obtain approved forms for use by the public when applying for or obtaining SBA assistance, or when providing services for SBA, from any field office (see § 101.103). You may also use forms which you have prepared yourself, or have obtained from another source, if those forms are identical in every respect to the forms approved by OMB for the same purpose.


(b) Any member of the public who has reason to believe any SBA office or agent is in violation of the Public Protection Clause of the Paperwork Reduction Act (44 U.S.C. 3512 and see 5 CFR 1320.6) should notify SBA. Direct such comments to the Director, Office of Business Operations at 409 3rd Street, SW., Washington, DC 20416.


[61 FR 2394, Jan. 26, 1996, as amended at 72 FR 50038, Aug. 30, 2007]


§ 101.108 Has SBA waived any of the public participation exemptions of the Administrative Procedure Act?

Yes. Despite these exemptions, SBA will follow the public participation requirements of the Administrative Procedure Act, 5 U.S.C. 553, in rulemakings relating to public property, loans, grants, benefits, or contracts.


§ 101.109 Do SBA regulations include the section headings?

Yes. All SBA regulations must be interpreted as including the section headings.


Subpart B – Employment of Private Counsel

§ 101.200 When does SBA hire private counsel?

(a) Business loans. SBA may hire private counsel to represent it in regard to business loans when the volume of activity in an area is not sufficient to require a full-time SBA employee, or the area is too remote for economical use of a full-time SBA employee.


(b) Disaster loans. SBA may hire private counsel in regard to disaster loans when the disaster presents an emergency and a volume of activity that cannot be promptly and economically serviced by available SBA employees.


§ 101.201 What are the minimum terms of private counsel’s employment?

(a) Private counsel must perform all requested work in compliance with SBA’s regulations, policies, and instructions, and take such action as is legally required under the Small Business Act, the Small Business Investment Act, and other laws applicable to SBA.


(b) Private counsel must adhere to the highest standards of professional conduct and maintain confidentiality appropriate to the attorney-client relationship.


(c) Private counsel acts under the supervision of the SBA General Counsel (and designees).


(d) Private counsel usually is compensated at an hourly rate as approved by SBA. Contingency fee agreements may be used if approved by the General Counsel.


(e) Either party may terminate the employment upon written notice.


Subpart C – Inspector General

§ 101.300 What is the Inspector General’s authority to conduct audits, investigations, and inspections?

The Inspector General Act of 1978, as amended (5 U.S.C. App. 3) authorizes SBA’s Inspector General to provide policy direction for, and to conduct, supervise, and coordinate such audits, investigations, and inspections relating to the programs and operations of SBA as appears necessary or desirable.


§ 101.301 Who should receive information or allegations of waste, fraud, and abuse?

The Office of Inspector General should receive all information or allegations of waste, fraud, or abuse regarding SBA programs and operations.


§ 101.302 What is the scope of the Inspector General’s authority?

To obtain the necessary information and evidence, the Inspector General (and designees) have the right to:


(a) Have access to all records, reports, audits, reviews, documents, papers, recommendations, and other materials available to SBA and relating to SBA’s programs and operations;


(b) Require by subpoena the production of all information, documents, reports, answers, records, accounts, papers, and other data and documentary evidence;


(c) Administer oaths and affirmations or take affidavits; and


(d) Request information or assistance from any Federal, state, or local government agency or unit.


§ 101.303 How are Inspector General subpoenas served?

(a) Service of subpoenas may be effected by any of the following means –


(1) If by mail, a copy of the subpoena must be addressed to the person, partnership, corporation, or unincorporated association to be served at a residence or usual dwelling place, or a principal office or place of business, and mailed first class by registered or certified mail (postage prepaid, return receipt requested), or by a commercial or U.S. Postal Service overnight or express delivery service.


(2) If by personal delivery, a copy of the subpoena must be delivered to the person to be served, or to a member of the partnership to be served, or to an executive officer or a director of the corporation or unincorporated association to be served, or to a person authorized by appointment or by law to receive process for the person or entity named in the subpoena.


(3) If by delivery to an address, a copy of the subpoena must be left at the principal office or place of business of the person, partnership, corporation, or unincorporated association to be served, or at the residence or usual dwelling place of the person, member of the partnership, or officer or director of the corporation or unincorporated association to be served, with someone of suitable age and discretion.


(b) Proof of service –


(1) When service is by registered, certified, overnight, or express mail, it is complete upon delivery of the document by the Postal Service or commercial service.


(2) The return Postal Service receipt for a document that was registered or certified and mailed, the signed receipt for a document delivered by an overnight or express delivery service, or the Return of Service completed by the individual serving the subpoena by personal delivery shall be proof of service.


Subpart D – Intergovernmental Partnership

§ 101.400 What is the purpose of this subpart?

(a) This subpart implements section 401 of the Intergovernmental Cooperation Act (31 U.S.C. 6506 et seq.) which promotes intergovernmental partnership and strengthens Federalism by relying on state processes and state, area-wide, regional, and local coordination for the review of proposed Federal financial assistance and direct Federal development.


(b) While guiding SBA’s management, this subpart does not create any right or benefit enforceable at law.


§ 101.401 What programs and activities of SBA are subject to this subpart?

SBA publishes in the Federal Register a list of programs and activities subject to this subpart.


§ 101.402 What procedures apply to the selection of SBA programs and activities?

(a) A state may –


(1) Select any program or activity published in the Federal Register under § 101.401 for intergovernmental review (providing it consults with local elected officials before doing so) and then notify the Administrator of the programs and activities selected; and


(2) Notify the Administrator of changes in its selections at any time. For each change, the state submits to the Administrator an assurance that it consulted with local elected officials regarding the change.


(b) SBA may establish deadlines by which states must inform the Administrator of changes in their program selections.


(c) After receiving notice of a state’s selections, the Administrator uses a state’s process as soon as feasible depending on individual programs and activities.


(d) “State” means any of the 50 States, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, American Samoa, the U.S. Virgin Islands, or the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands.


§ 101.403 What are the notice and comment procedures?

(a) The Administrator provides notice to directly affected state, area-wide, regional, and local entities in a state of proposed SBA financial assistance or direct SBA development if –


(1) The state has not adopted a process under Executive Order 12372 (3 CFR, 1982 Comp., p. 197), as amended by Executive Order 12416 (3 CFR, 1983 Comp., p. 186); or


(2) The assistance or development involves a program or activity not selected for the state process.


(b) Notice may be made by publication in the Federal Register or other means as SBA deems appropriate.


(c) Except in unusual circumstances the Administrator gives state processes or directly affected state, area-wide, regional, and local officials and entities at least 60 days to comment on proposed SBA financial assistance or direct SBA development.


(d) In cases where SBA delegates the review, coordination, and communication authority under this subpart, this section also applies.


§ 101.404 How does the Administrator receive comments?

(a) The Administrator follows the procedures of § 101.405 if –


(1) A state office or official is designated to act as a single point of contact between a state process and all Federal agencies; and


(2) That office or official transmits a state process recommendation for a program selected under § 101.402(a).


(b)(1) The single point of contact is not obligated to transmit comments from state, area-wide, regional, or local officials and entities where there is no state process recommendation.


(2) If a state process recommendation is transmitted by a single point of contact, all comments from state, area-wide, regional, and local officials and entities that differ from it must also be transmitted.


(c) If a state has not established a process, or is unable to submit a state process recommendation, state, area-wide, regional, and local officials and entities may submit comments to SBA.


(d) If a program or activity is not selected for a state process, state, area-wide, regional, and local officials and entities may submit comments to SBA. In addition, if a state process recommendation for a non-selected program or activity is transmitted to SBA by the single point of contact, the Administrator follows the procedures of § 101.405.


(e) The Administrator considers comments which do not constitute a state process recommendation submitted under this subpart and for which the Administrator is not required to apply the procedures of § 101.405 when such comments are provided by a single point of contact directly to SBA by a commenting party.


§ 101.405 How does the Administrator respond to comments?

(a) If a state process provides a recommendation to SBA through its single point of contact, the Administrator:


(1) Accepts the recommendation; or


(2) Reaches a mutually agreeable solution with the state process; or


(3) Provides the single point of contact with a written explanation of the decision in a form the Administrator deems appropriate. The Administrator may also supplement the written explanation by telephone or other means.


(b) In any explanation under paragraph (a)(3) of this section, the Administrator informs the single point of contact that –


(1) SBA will not implement its decision for at least 10 days after the single point of contact receives the explanation; or


(2) Because of unusual circumstances the waiting period of at least 10 days is not feasible.


(c) For purposes of computing the waiting period under paragraph (b)(1) of this section, a single point of contact is presumed to have received written notification 5 days after the date of mailing.


§ 101.406 What are the Administrator’s responsibilities in interstate situations?

The Administrator is responsible for –


(a) Identifying proposed SBA financial assistance and direct SBA development that have an impact on interstate areas;


(b) Notifying appropriate officials and entities in states which have adopted a process and selected an SBA program or activity;


(c) Making efforts to identify and notify the affected state, area-wide, regional, and local officials and entities in states that have not adopted a process or selected an SBA program or activity;


(d) Using the procedures of § 101.405 if a recommendation of a designated area-wide agency is transmitted by a single point of contact in cases in which the review, coordination, and communication with SBA has been delegated; and


(e) Using the procedures of § 101.405 if a state process provides a state recommendation to SBA through a single point of contact.


§ 101.407 May the Administrator waive these regulations?

The Administrator may waive any provision of §§ 101.400 through and including 101.406 in an emergency.


Subpart E – Small Business Energy Efficiency

§ 101.500 Small Business Energy Efficiency Program.

(a) The Administration has developed and coordinated a Government-wide program, which is located at http://www.sba.gov/energy, building on the Energy Star for Small Business Program, to assist small business concerns in becoming more energy efficient, understanding the cost savings from improved energy efficiency, and identifying financing options for energy efficiency upgrades.


(b) The Program has been developed and coordinated in consultation with the Secretary of the Department of Energy and the Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency, and in cooperation with entities the Administrator has considered appropriate, for example, such as industry trade associations, industry members, and energy efficiency organizations. SBA’s Office of Policy and Strategic Planning will be responsible for overseeing the program but will coordinate with the Department of Energy and EPA.


(c) The Administration is distributing and making available online, the information and materials developed under the program to small business concerns, including smaller design, engineering, and construction firms, and other Federal programs for energy efficiency, such as the Energy Star for Small Business Program.


(d) The Administration will develop a strategy to educate, encourage, and assist small business concerns in adopting energy efficient building fixtures and equipment.


[73 FR 61666, Oct. 17, 2008]


PART 102 – RECORD DISCLOSURE AND PRIVACY


Authority:5 U.S.C. 301, 552, 552a; 31 U.S.C. 3717, 9701; 44 U.S.C. 3501.


Source:61 FR 2673, Jan. 29, 1996, unless otherwise noted.

Subpart A – Disclosure of Information


Source:82 FR 46371, Oct. 5, 2017, unless otherwise noted.

§ 102.1 General provisions.

(a) This subpart contains the rules that SBA follows in processing requests for records under the Freedom of Information Act (“FOIA”), 5 U.S.C. 552. The rules in this subpart should be read in conjunction with the text of the FOIA and the Uniform Freedom of Information Fee Schedule and Guidelines published by the Office of Management and Budget (“OMB Guidelines”). Requests made by individuals for records about themselves under the Privacy Act of 1974, 5 U.S.C. 552a, are processed under subpart B of this part as well as under this subpart.


(b) As referenced in this subpart, “component” means each separate bureau, office, division, district office, regional office, area office, service center, loan processing center or central office duty location within the SBA that is responsible for processing FOIA requests. See appendix A to this subpart for a list of information generally exempt from disclosure. For contact information for each office visit https://www.sba.gov/foia and for a detailed description of the function of each office to help ascertain the types of records maintained by each component, please visit https://www.sba.gov/about-sba. The rules described in this regulation that apply to SBA also apply to its components.


(c) The SBA has a decentralized system for processing requests, with each component handling requests for its records.


(d) The term record means:


(1) Any information that would be an agency record subject to the requirements of this section when maintained by SBA in any format, including written or electronic format; and


(2) Any information described under paragraph (d)(1) of this section that is maintained for SBA by an entity under Government contract, for purposes of records management.


§ 102.2 Proactive disclosure of records.

Records that are required by the FOIA to be made available for public inspection in an electronic format may be accessed through the SBA’s Web site at https://www.sba.gov/foia. Each component of SBA is responsible for determining which of its records are required to be made publicly available, as well as for identifying additional records of interest to the public that are appropriate for public disclosure, and for posting and indexing such records. Each component shall ensure that its Web site of posted records and indices is reviewed and updated on an ongoing basis. Each component has a FOIA Public Liaison who can assist individuals in locating records particular to a component. A list of the SBA’s FOIA Public Liaisons is available at https://www.sba.gov/foia.


§ 102.3 Requirements pertaining to the submission of requests.

(a) General information. (1) The SBA has a decentralized system for responding to FOIA requests, with each component handling requests for its records. All components have the capability to receive requests electronically either through email or a web portal. To make a request for records, a requester should write directly to the Freedom of Information/Privacy Acts (FOI/PA) Office by mail to 409 3rd St SW., Washington, DC 20416 or submit a fax to 202-205-7059 or email to [email protected] Requesters may also submit their request through the FOIA online portal at https://foiaonline.regulations.gov/foia/action/public/home. Additional information for submitting a request to SBA is listed at https://www.sba.gov/foia. However, a request will receive the quickest possible response if it is addressed to the component that maintains the records sought.


(2) A requester who is making a request for records about himself or herself must comply with the verification of identity provision set forth in subpart B of this part. The Certification of Identity form, available at http://www.justice.gov/oip/forms/cert_ind.pdf, may be used by individuals who are making requests for records pertaining to themselves.


(3) Where a request for records pertains to another individual, a requester may receive greater access by submitting either a notarized authorization signed by that individual or a declaration made in compliance with the requirements set forth in 28 U.S.C. 1746 by that individual authorizing disclosure of the records to the requester, or by submitting proof that the individual is deceased (e.g., a copy of a death certificate or an obituary). As an exercise of administrative discretion, each component can require a requester to supply additional information if necessary in order to verify that a particular individual has consented to disclosure.


(b) Description of records sought. Requesters must describe the records sought in sufficient detail to enable agency personnel to locate them with a reasonable amount of effort. To the extent possible, requesters should include specific information that may help the component in identifying the requested records, such as the date, title or name, author, recipient, subject matter of the record, case number, file designation, reference number, the timeframe for which the records are sought, the office that created the records, or any other information that will assist the component in locating documents responsive to the request. Before submitting their requests, requesters may contact the component’s FOIA Contact or FOIA Public Liaison to discuss the records they are seeking and to receive assistance in describing the records. If, after receiving a request, a component determines that the request does not adequately describe the records sought, the component will inform the requester what additional information is needed or why the request is otherwise insufficient. The component will also notify the requester that it will not be able to comply with their request unless the additional information it has requested is received from them in writing within 20 working days after the component has requested it. If this type of notification is received, a requester may wish to discuss it with the FOIA Public Liaison. If the component does not receive a written response containing the additional information within 20 working days after it has been requested, the SBA will presume that the requester is no longer interested in the records and will close the file on the request. Requesters who are attempting to reformulate or modify such a request may discuss their request with the component’s designated FOIA Contact or its FOIA Public Liaison, or a representative of the FOI/PA Office, each of whom is available to assist the requester in reasonably describing the records sought. If a request does not reasonably describe the records sought, the SBA’s response to the request may be delayed.


(c) Form or format. Requests may specify the preferred form or format (including electronic formats) for the records sought. The SBA will accommodate the request if the record is readily reproducible in that form or format.


(d) Contact information. Requesters must provide contact information, such as their phone number, email address, and mailing address, to assist the SBA in communicating with the requester and providing the released records.


§ 102.4 Responsibility for responding to requests.

(a) In general. Except in the instances described in paragraphs (c) and (d) of this section, the component that first receives a request for a record and maintains that record is the component responsible for responding to the request. In determining which records are responsive to a request, a component ordinarily will include only records in its possession as of the date that it begins its search. If any other date is used, the component shall inform the requester of that date. A record that is excluded from the requirements of the FOIA pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 552(c) is not considered responsive to a request.


(b) Authority to grant or deny requests. The head of a component, or designee, is authorized to grant or to deny any requests for records that are maintained by that component.


(c) Re-routing of misdirected requests. Where a component determines that a request was misdirected within the SBA, the receiving component shall route the request to the proper component(s).


(d) Consultation, referral, and coordination. When reviewing records located by a component in response to a request, the component shall determine whether another component of SBA or another agency of the Federal Government is better able to determine whether the record is exempt from disclosure under the FOIA. As to any such record, the component shall proceed in one of the following ways:


(1) Consultation. When records originated with the component processing the request, but contain within them information of interest to another component, agency, or other Federal Government office, the component processing the request should typically consult with that other component or agency prior to making a release determination.


(2) Referral. (i) When the component processing the request believes that a different component, agency, or other Federal Government office is best able to determine whether to disclose the record, the component typically should refer the responsibility for responding to the request regarding that record, as long as the referral is to a component or agency that is subject to the FOIA. Ordinarily, the component or agency that originated the record will be presumed to be best able to make the disclosure determination. However, if the component processing the request and the originating component or agency jointly agrees that the former is in the best position to respond regarding the record, then the record may be handled as a consultation.


(ii) Whenever a component refers any part of the responsibility for responding to a request to another component or agency, it shall document the referral, maintain a copy of the record that it refers, and notify the requester of the referral and inform the requester of the name(s) of the component or agency to which the record was referred, including that component’s or agency’s FOIA Contact information.


(3) Coordination. The standard referral procedure is not appropriate where disclosure of the identity of the component or agency to which the referral would be made could harm an interest protected by an applicable exemption, such as the exemptions that protect personal privacy or national security interests. For example, if a non-law enforcement component responding to a request for records on a living third party locates within its files records originating with a law enforcement agency, and if the existence of that law enforcement interest in the third party was not publicly known, then to disclose that law enforcement interest could cause an unwarranted invasion of the personal privacy of the third party. Similarly, if a component locates within its files material originating with an Intelligence Community agency and the involvement of that agency in the matter is classified and not publicly acknowledged, then to disclose or give attribution to the involvement of that Intelligence Community agency could cause national security harms. In such instances, in order to avoid harm to an interest protected by an applicable exemption, the component that received the request should coordinate with the originating component or agency to seek its views on the disclosure of the record. The release determination for the record that is the subject of the coordination should then be conveyed to the requester by the component that originally received the request.


(e) Classified information. On receipt of any request involving classified information, the component shall determine whether the information is currently and properly classified and take appropriate action to ensure compliance. Whenever a request involves a record containing information that has been classified or may be appropriate for classification by another component or agency under any applicable executive order concerning the classification of records, the receiving component shall refer the responsibility for responding to the request regarding that information to the component or agency that classified the information, or that should consider the information for classification. Whenever a component’s record contains information that has been derivatively classified (for example, when it contains information classified by another component or agency), the component shall refer the responsibility for responding to that portion of the request to the component or agency that classified the underlying information.


(f) Agreements regarding consultations and referrals. Components of SBA may establish agreements with other components of SBA or other Federal agencies to eliminate the need for consultations or referrals with respect to particular types of records.


(g) Timing of responses to consultations and referrals. All consultations and referrals received by the SBA will be handled according to the date that the FOIA request initially was received by the first component or agency.


§ 102.5 Timing of responses to requests.

(a) In general. Components ordinarily will respond to requests according to their order of receipt. In instances involving misdirected requests that are re-routed pursuant to § 102.4(c), the response time will commence on the date that the request is received by the proper component’s office that is designated to receive requests, but in any event not later than 10 working days after the request is first received by any component’s office that is designated by these regulations to receive requests.


(b) Multitrack processing. All components will designate a specific track for requests that are granted expedited processing, in accordance with the standards set forth in paragraph (e) of this section. A component may also designate additional processing tracks that distinguish between simple and more complex requests based on the estimated amount of work or time needed to process the request. Among the factors that may be considered are the number of records requested, the number of pages involved in processing the request and the need for consultations or referrals. Components shall advise requesters of the track into which their request falls and, when appropriate, should offer the requester an opportunity to narrow or modify the request so that it can be placed in a different processing track.


(c) Unusual circumstances. Whenever the statutory time limit for processing a request cannot be met because of “unusual circumstances,” as defined in the FOIA, and the component extends the time limit on that basis, the component shall, before expiration of the 20-working day period to respond, notify the requester in writing of the unusual circumstances involved and of the date by which the component estimates processing of the request will be completed. Where the extension exceeds 10 working days, the component shall, as prescribed by the FOIA, provide the requester with an opportunity to modify the request or to arrange an alternative time period for processing the original or modified request. The component shall make available its designated FOIA Contact or its FOIA Public Liaison for this purpose. The component must also alert requesters to the availability of the Office of Government Information Services (OGIS) to provide dispute resolution services.


(d) Aggregating requests. For the purposes of determining unusual circumstances under the FOIA, components may aggregate requests in cases where it reasonably appears that multiple requests, submitted either by a requester or by a group of requesters acting in concert, constitute a single request that would otherwise involve unusual circumstances. Components shall not aggregate multiple requests that involve unrelated matters.


(e) Expedited processing. (1) Requests and appeals shall be processed on an expedited basis whenever it is determined that they involve:


(i) Circumstances in which the lack of expedited processing could reasonably be expected to pose an imminent threat to the life or physical safety of an individual;


(ii) An urgency to inform the public about an actual or alleged Federal Government activity, if made by a person who is primarily engaged in disseminating information.


(iii) The loss of substantial due process rights; or


(iv) A matter of widespread and exceptional media interest in which there exist possible questions about the government’s integrity that affect public confidence.


(2) A request for expedited processing may be made at any time. Requests based on paragraphs (e)(1)(i) through (iii) of this section must be submitted to the component that maintains the records requested. When making a request for expedited processing of an administrative appeal, the request should be submitted to the FOI/PA Office. Requests for expedited processing that are based on paragraph (e)(1)(iv) of this section must be submitted to the component processing the request. A component that receives a misdirected request for expedited processing under the standard set forth in paragraph (e)(1)(iv) of this section shall forward it immediately to the FOI/PA Office for its determination. The time period for making the determination on the request for expedited processing under paragraph (e)(1)(iv) of this section shall commence on the date that the FOI/PA Office receives the request, provided that it is routed within 10 working days.


(3) A requester who seeks expedited processing must submit a notarized statement, such as an affidavit or declaration, certified to be true and correct, explaining in detail the basis for making the request for expedited processing. For example, under paragraph (e)(1)(ii) of this section, a requester who is not a full-time member of the news media must establish that the requester is a person whose primary professional activity or occupation is information dissemination, though it need not be the requester’s sole occupation. Such a requester also must establish a particular urgency to inform the public about the government activity involved in the request – one that extends beyond the public’s right to know about government activity generally. The existence of numerous articles published on a given subject can be helpful in establishing the requirement that there be an “urgency to inform” the public on the topic. As a matter of administrative discretion, the SBA may waive the formal certification requirement.


(4) A component shall notify the requester within 10 working days of the receipt of a request for expedited processing of its decision whether to grant or deny expedited processing. If expedited processing is granted, the request must be given priority, placed in the processing track for expedited requests, and must be processed as soon as practicable. If a request for expedited processing is denied, any appeal of that decision shall be acted on expeditiously.


§ 102.6 Responses to requests.

(a) In general. Components should, to the extent practicable, communicate with requesters having access to the Internet using electronic means, such as email or web portal.


(b) Acknowledgments of requests. A component shall acknowledge the request in writing and assign it an individualized tracking number. Components shall include in the acknowledgment a brief description of the records sought to allow requesters to more easily keep track of their requests.


(c) Estimated dates of completion and interim responses. Upon request, components shall provide an estimated date by which they expect to provide a response to the requester. If a request involves a voluminous amount of material, or searches in multiple locations, the SBA or component may provide interim responses, releasing the records on a rolling basis.


(d) Grants of requests. Once a component determines it will grant a request in full or in part, it will notify the requester in writing. The component shall inform the requester of any fees charged under § 102.8 and shall disclose the requested records to the requester promptly upon payment of any applicable fees. The component must inform the requester of the availability of its FOIA Public Liaison to offer assistance.


(e) Adverse determinations of requests. A component making an adverse determination denying a request in any respect shall notify the requester of that determination in writing. Adverse determinations, or denials of requests, include denials involving fees or fee waiver matters, denials of requests for expedited processing, and decisions where:


(1) The requested record is exempt, in whole or in part;


(2) The request does not reasonably describe the records sought;


(3) The information requested is not a record subject to the FOIA;


(4) The requested record does not exist, cannot be located, or has been destroyed; or


(5) The requested record is not readily reproducible in the form or format sought by the requester.


(f) Content of denial. The denial must be signed by the head of the component or designee and must include:


(1) The name and title or position of the person responsible for the denial;


(2) A brief statement of the reasons for the denial, including any FOIA exemption applied by the component in denying the request;


(3) An estimate of the volume of any records or information withheld, such as the number of pages or some other reasonable form of estimation, although such an estimate is not required if the volume is otherwise indicated by deletions marked on records that are disclosed in part or if providing an estimate would harm an interest protected by an applicable exemption;


(4) A statement that the denial may be appealed under § 102.9, and a description of the appeal requirements; and


(5) A statement notifying the requester of the assistance available from the component’s FOIA Public Liaison or designee, and the dispute resolution services offered by OGIS.


(g) Markings on released documents. Records disclosed in part must be marked clearly to show the amount of information deleted and the exemption under which the deletion was made unless doing so would harm an interest protected by an applicable exemption.


§ 102.7 Confidential commercial information.

(a) Definitions. For purposes of this section:


Confidential commercial information means commercial or financial information obtained by the SBA from a submitter that may be protected from disclosure under Exemption 4 of the FOIA, 5 U.S.C. 552(b)(4).


Submitter means any person or entity, including a corporation, State, or foreign government, but not including another Federal Government entity, that provides information, either directly or indirectly to the Federal Government.


(b) Designation of confidential commercial information. A submitter of confidential commercial information must use good faith efforts to designate by appropriate markings, either at the time of submission or within a reasonable time thereafter, any portion of its submission that it considers to be protected from disclosure under Exemption 4. These designations shall expire 10 years after the date of the submission unless the submitter requests and provides justification for a longer designation period.


(c) When notice to submitters is required. (1) A component shall promptly provide written notice to a submitter of confidential commercial information whenever records containing such information are requested under the FOIA if, after reviewing the request, the responsive records, and any appeal by the requester, the component determines that it may be required to disclose the records, provided:


(i) The requested information has been designated in good faith by the submitter as information considered protected from disclosure under Exemption 4; or


(ii) The component has a reason to believe that the requested information may be protected from disclosure under Exemption 4, but has not yet determined whether the information is protected from disclosure under that exemption or any other applicable exemption.


(2) The notice shall either describe the commercial information requested or include a copy of the requested records or portions of records containing the information. In cases involving a voluminous number of submitters, notice may be made by posting or publishing the notice in a place or manner reasonably likely to accomplish it.


(d) Exceptions to submitter notice requirements. The notice requirements of this section shall not apply if:


(1) The component determines that the information is exempt under the FOIA;


(2) The information has been lawfully published or has been officially made available to the public;


(3) Disclosure of the information is required by a statute other than the FOIA or by a regulation issued in accordance with the requirements of Executive Order 12600 of June 23, 1987; or


(4) The designation made by the submitter under paragraph (b) of this section appears obviously frivolous, except that, in such a case, the component shall give the submitter written notice of any final decision to disclose the information and must provide that notice within a reasonable number of days prior to a specified disclosure date.


(e) Opportunity to object to disclosure. (1) A component shall specify a reasonable time period within which the submitter must respond to the notice referenced above. If the submitter has any objections to disclosure, it should provide the component a detailed written statement that specifies all grounds for withholding the particular information under any exemption of the FOIA. In order to rely on Exemption 4 as the basis for nondisclosure, the submitter must explain why the information constitutes a trade secret or commercial or financial information that is privileged or confidential.


(2) A submitter who fails to respond within the time period specified in the notice shall be considered to have no objection to disclosure of the information. Information received by the component after the date of any disclosure decision shall not be considered by the component. Any information provided by a submitter under this subpart may itself be subject to disclosure under the FOIA.


(f) Analysis of objections. A component shall consider a submitter’s objections and specific grounds for nondisclosure in deciding whether to disclose the requested information.


(g) Notice of intent to disclose. Whenever a component decides to disclose information over the objection of a submitter, the component shall provide the submitter written notice, which shall include:


(1) A statement of the reasons why each of the submitter’s disclosure objections was not sustained;


(2) A description of the information to be disclosed; and


(3) A specified disclosure date, which shall be a reasonable time subsequent to the notice.


§ 102.8 Fees.

(a) In general. Components shall charge for processing requests under the FOIA in accordance with the provisions of this section and with the OMB Guidelines. In order to resolve any fee issues that arise under this section, a component may contact a requester for additional information. Components shall ensure that searches, review, and duplication are conducted in the most efficient and the least expensive manner. A component ordinarily will collect all applicable fees before sending copies of records to a requester. Requesters must pay fees by check or money order made payable to the Small Business Administration, addressed to the component assessing the fee.


(b) Categories of requesters. Different fees are assessed depending on the requester category. Requesters may seek a fee waiver. Requests for fee waivers will be considered in accordance with the requirements in paragraph (l) of this section. For purposes of assessing fees, the FOIA establishes four categories of requesters:


(1) Commercial use requesters;


(2) Non-commercial scientific/educational institutions requesters;


(3) News media requesters, and;


(4) All other requesters.


(c) Definitions. For purposes of this section:


(1) Commercial use request is a request that asks for information for a use or a purpose that furthers a commercial, trade, or profit interest, which can include furthering those interests through litigation. A component’s decision to place a requester in the commercial use category will be made on a case-by-case basis based on the requester’s intended use of the information.


(2) Direct costs are those expenses that the SBA incurs in searching for and duplicating (and, in the case of commercial use requests, reviewing) records in order to respond to a FOIA request. For example, direct costs include the salary of the employee performing the work (i.e., the basic rate of pay for the employee, plus 16 percent of that rate to cover benefits) and the cost of operating computers and other electronic equipment, such as photocopiers and scanners. Direct costs do not include overhead expenses such as the costs of space, and of heating or lighting a facility. This will be in addition to search, review, and duplication fees, and shall be paid by requesters categorized as commercial and other.


(3) Duplication is reproducing a copy of a record, or of the information contained in it, necessary to respond to a FOIA request. Copies can take the form of paper, audiovisual materials, or electronic records, among others.


(4) Educational institution is any school that operates a program of scholarly research. A requester in this fee category must show that the request is made in connection with his or her role at the educational institution. Components may seek verification from the requester that the request is in furtherance of scholarly research and will advise requesters of their placement in this category.



Example 1 to paragraph (c)(4).A request from a professor of geology at a university for records relating to soil erosion, written on letterhead of the Department of Geology, would be presumed to be from an educational institution.


Example 2 to paragraph (c)(4).A request from the same professor of geology seeking drug information from the Food and Drug Administration in furtherance of a murder mystery he is writing would not be presumed to be an institutional request, regardless of whether it was written on institutional stationery.


Example 3 to paragraph (c)(4).A student, who makes a request in furtherance of their coursework or other school-sponsored activities and provides a copy of a course syllabus or other reasonable documentation to indicate the research purpose for the request, would qualify as part of this fee category.

(5) Noncommercial scientific institution is an institution that is not operated on a

“commercial” basis, as defined in paragraph (c)(1) of this section and that is operated solely for the purpose of conducting scientific research, the results of which are not intended to promote any particular product or industry. A requester in this category must show that the request is authorized by and is made under the auspices of a qualifying institution and that the records are sought to further scientific research and are not for a commercial use.


(6) Representative of the news media is any person or entity that gathers information of potential interest to a segment of the public, uses its editorial skills to turn the raw materials into a distinct work, and distributes that work to an audience. The term “news” means information that is about current events or that would be of current interest to the public. Examples of news media entities include television or radio stations that broadcast “news” to the public at large and publishers of periodicals that disseminate “news” and make their products available through a variety of means to the general public, including news organizations that disseminate solely on the Internet. A request for records supporting the news-dissemination function of the requester will not be considered to be for a commercial use. “Freelance” journalists who demonstrate a solid basis for expecting publication through a news media entity will be considered as a representative of the news media. A publishing contract would provide the clearest evidence that publication is expected; however, a requester’s past publication record will be considered in making a determination.


(7) Review is the examination of a record located in response to a request in order to determine whether any portion of it is exempt from disclosure. Review time includes processing any record for disclosure, such as doing all that is necessary to prepare the record for disclosure, including the process of redacting the record and marking the appropriate exemptions. Review costs are properly charged even if a record ultimately is not disclosed. Review time also includes time spent both obtaining and considering any formal objection to disclosure made by a confidential commercial information submitter under § 102.7, but it does not include time spent resolving general legal or policy issues regarding the application of exemptions.


(8) Search is the process of looking for and retrieving records or information responsive to a request. Search time includes page-by-page or line-by-line identification of information within records and the reasonable efforts expended to locate and retrieve information from electronic records.


(d) Charging fees. In responding to FOIA requests, components will charge the following fees unless a waiver or reduction of fees has been granted under paragraph (l) of this section. Because the fee amounts provided below already account for the direct costs associated with a given fee type, components will not add any additional costs to charges calculated under this section.


(1) Search. (i) Requests made by educational institutions, noncommercial scientific institutions, or representatives of the news media are not subject to search fees. Search fees shall be charged for all other requesters, subject to the restrictions of paragraph (e) of this section. Components may properly charge for time spent searching even if they do not locate any responsive records or if they determine that the records are entirely exempt from disclosure.


(ii) For each hour spent by personnel searching for requested records, including electronic searches that do not require new programming, the fees will be charged as follows: Professional (GS 9-14) – $46; and managerial (GS 15 and above) – $83.


(iii) Requesters shall be charged the direct costs associated with conducting any search that requires the creation of a new computer program to locate the requested records. Requesters shall be notified of the costs associated with creating such a program and must agree to pay the associated costs before the costs may be incurred.


(iv) For requests that require the retrieval of records stored by SBA at a Federal Records Center operated by the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), additional costs shall be charged in accordance with the Transactional Billing Rate Schedule established by NARA.


(2) Duplication. Duplication fees will be assessed to all requesters, subject to the restrictions of paragraph (e) of this section. A component shall honor a requester’s preference for receiving a record in a particular form or format where it can be readily reproduced in the form or format requested. Where photocopies are supplied, SBA will provide one copy per request at the cost of $.10 per page. For copies of records produced on tapes, disks, or other media, SBA will charge the direct costs of producing the copy, including operator time. Where paper documents must be scanned in order to comply with a requester’s preference to receive the records in an electronic format, the requester must also pay the direct costs associated with scanning those materials. For other forms of duplication, components shall charge the direct costs.


(3) Review. (i) Review fees will be assessed to requesters who make commercial use requests. Review fees will be assessed in connection with the initial review of the record, i.e., the review conducted by a component to determine whether an exemption applies to a particular record or portion of a record. No charge will be made for review at the administrative appeal stage of exemptions applied at the initial review stage. However, if a particular exemption is deemed to no longer apply, any costs associated with SBA’s re-review of the records in order to consider the use of other exemptions may be assessed as review fees. Review fees will be charged at the same rates as those charged for a search under paragraph (d)(1)(ii) of this section.


(ii) The following table summarizes the fees for each type of requester.


Table 1 to § 102.8 – Summary of Fees

Requester category
Search
Review
Duplication fees
Direct costs
Commercial UseYesYesYesYes.
Educational/Noncommercial Scientific InstitutionsNoNoYes (first 100 pages, or equivalent volume free)No.
News MediaNoNoYes (first 100 pages, or equivalent volume free)No.
All OthersYes (first 2 hours free)NoYes (first 100 pages, or equivalent volume free)Yes.

(e) Restrictions on charging fees. (1) When a component determines that a requester is an educational institution, non-commercial scientific institution, or representative of the news media, and the records are not sought for commercial use, it will not charge search fees.


(i) If a component fails to comply with the time limits in which to respond to a request, it may not charge search fees, or, in the instances of requests from requesters described in paragraph (c)(1) of this section, may not charge duplication fees, except as described in paragraphs (d)(1)(ii) through (iv) of this section.


(ii) If a component has determined that unusual circumstances as defined by the FOIA apply and SBA provided timely written notice to the requester in accordance with the FOIA, a failure to comply with the time limit shall be excused for an additional 10 working days.


(iii) If a component has determined that unusual circumstances, as defined by the FOIA, apply and more than 5,000 pages are necessary to respond to the request, the component may charge search fees, or, in the case of requesters described in paragraph (c)(1) of this section, may charge duplication fees, if the following steps are taken. The component shall provide a timely written notice of unusual circumstances to the requester in accordance with the FOIA and SBA must have discussed with the requester via written mail, email, or telephone (or made not less than three good-faith attempts to do so) how the requester could effectively limit the scope of the request in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a)(6)(B)(ii). If this exception is satisfied, the component may charge all applicable fees incurred in the processing of the request.


(iv) If a court has determined that exceptional circumstances exist, as defined by the FOIA, a failure to comply with the time limits shall be excused for the length of time provided by the court order.


(2) No search or review fees will be charged for a quarter-hour period unless more than half of that period is required for search or review.


(3) Except for requesters seeking records for a commercial use, components shall provide without charge:


(i) The first 100 pages of duplication (or the cost equivalent for other media); and


(ii) The first two hours of search.


(4) No fee will be charged when the total fee, after deducting the 100 free pages (or its cost equivalent) and the first two hours of search, is equal to or less than $46.00.


(f) Notice of anticipated fees in excess of $46.00. (1) When a component determines or estimates that the fees to be assessed in accordance with this section will exceed $46.00, the component shall notify the requester of the actual or estimated amount of the fees, including a breakdown of the fees for search, review, or duplication, unless the requester has indicated a willingness to pay fees as high as those anticipated. If only a portion of the fee can be estimated readily, the component shall advise the requester accordingly. If the request is not for noncommercial use, the notice will specify that the requester is entitled to the statutory entitlements of 100 pages of duplication at no charge and, if the requester is charged search fees, two hours of search time at no charge, and will advise the requester whether those entitlements have been provided.


(2) In cases in which a requester has been notified that the actual or estimated fees are in excess of $46.00, the request shall not be considered received and further work will not be completed until the requester commits in writing to pay the actual or estimated total fee, or designates some amount of fees the requester is willing to pay, or in the case of a noncommercial use requester who has not yet been provided with the requester’s statutory entitlements, designates that the requester seeks only that which can be provided by the statutory entitlements. The requester must provide the commitment or designation in writing, and must, when applicable, designate an exact dollar amount the requester is willing to pay. Components are not required to accept payments in installments.


(3) If the requester has indicated a willingness to pay some designated amount of fees, but the component estimates that the total fee will exceed that amount, the component will toll the processing of the request when it notifies the requester of the estimated fees in excess of the amount the requester has indicated a willingness to pay. The component shall inquire whether the requester wishes to revise the amount of fees the requester is willing to pay or modify the request. Once the requester responds, the time to respond will resume from where it was at the date of the notification.


(4) Components shall make available their FOIA Public Liaison or other designee to assist any requester in reformulating a request to meet the requester’s needs at a lower cost.


(g) Charges for other services. Although not required to provide special services, if a component chooses to do so as a matter of administrative discretion, the direct costs of providing the service will be charged. Examples of such services include certifying that records are true copies, providing multiple copies of the same document, or sending records by means other than first class mail.


(h) Charging interest. Components may charge interest on any unpaid bill starting on the 31st day following the date of billing the requester. Interest charges will be assessed at the rate provided in 31 U.S.C. 3717 and will accrue from the billing date until payment is received by the component. Components shall follow the provisions of the Debt Collection Act of 1982 (Pub. L. 97-365, 96 Stat. 1749), as amended, and its administrative procedures, including the use of consumer reporting agencies, collection agencies, and offset.


(i) Aggregating requests. When a component reasonably believes that a requester or a group of requesters acting in concert is attempting to divide a single request into a series of requests for the purpose of avoiding fees, the component may aggregate those requests and charge accordingly. Components may presume that multiple requests of this type made within a 30-day period have been made in order to avoid fees. For requests separated by a longer period, components shall aggregate them only where there is a reasonable basis for determining that aggregation is warranted in view of all the circumstances involved. Multiple requests involving unrelated matters cannot be aggregated.


(j) Advance payments. (1) For requests other than those described in paragraphs (j)(2) or (j)(3) of this section, components cannot require the requester to make an advance payment before work is commenced or continued on a request. Payment owed for work already completed (i.e., payment before copies are sent to a requester) is not an advance payment.


(2) When a component determines or estimates that a total fee to be charged under this section will exceed $250.00, it may require that the requester make an advance payment up to the amount of the entire anticipated fee before beginning to process the request. Components may elect to process the request prior to collecting fees when it receives a satisfactory assurance of full payment from a requester with a history of prompt payment.


(3) Where a requester has previously failed to pay a properly charged FOIA fee to any component or SBA within 30 working days of the billing date, a component may require that the requester pay the full amount due, plus any applicable interest on that prior request, and the component may require that the requester make an advance payment of the full amount of any anticipated fee before SBA begins to process a new request or continues to process a pending request or any pending appeal. When a component has a reasonable basis to believe that a requester has misrepresented the requester’s identity in order to avoid paying outstanding fees, it may require that the requester provide proof of identity.


(4) In cases in which advanced payment is required, the request will not be considered received and further work will not be completed until the required payment is received. If the requester does not pay the advance payment within 30 working days after the date of the fee determination, the request will be closed.


(k) Other statutes specifically providing for fees. The fee schedule of this section does not apply to fees charged under any statute that specifically requires SBA to set and collect fees for particular types of records. In instances where records responsive to a request are subject to a statutorily-based fee schedule program, the requester will be informed of the contact information for that program.


(l) Requirements for waiver or reduction of fees. (1) Requesters may seek a waiver of fees by submitting written correspondence demonstrating how disclosure of the requested information is in the public interest because it is likely to contribute significantly to public understanding of the operations or activities of the government and is not primarily in the commercial interest of the requester. Records responsive to a request shall be furnished without charge or at a reduced rate below the rate established under paragraph (d) of this section, where a component determines, based on all available information, that the requester has demonstrated that:


(i) Disclosure of the requested information is in the public interest because it is likely to contribute significantly to public understanding of the operations or activities of the government, and


(ii) Disclosure of the information is not primarily in the commercial interest of the requester.


(2) Components shall furnish records responsive to a request without charge or at a reduced rate when it determines, based on all available information, that the factors described in paragraphs (l)(2)(i) through (iii) of this section are satisfied:


(i) Disclosure of the requested information would shed light on the operations or activities of the government. The subject of the request must concern identifiable operations or activities of the Federal Government with a connection that is direct and clear, not remote or attenuated.


(ii) Disclosure of the requested information is likely to contribute significantly to public understanding of those operations or activities. This factor is satisfied when the following criteria are met:


(A) Disclosure of the requested records must be meaningfully informative about government operations or activities. The disclosure of information that already is in the public domain, in either the same or a substantially identical form, would not be meaningfully informative if nothing new would be added to the public’s understanding.


(B) The disclosure must contribute to the understanding of a reasonably broad audience of persons interested in the subject, as opposed to the individual understanding of the requester. A requester’s expertise in the subject area as well as the requester’s ability and intention to effectively convey information to the public must be considered. Components shall presume that a representative of the news media will satisfy this consideration.


(iii) The disclosure must not be primarily in the commercial interest of the requester. To determine whether disclosure of the requested information is primarily in the commercial interest of the requester, the following criteria will be considered:


(A) Identify whether the requester has any commercial interest that would be furthered by the requested disclosure. A commercial interest includes any commercial, trade, or profit interest. Requesters must be given an opportunity to provide explanatory information regarding this consideration.


(B) If there is an identified commercial interest, a determination will be made whether the primary interest is furthered by the request. A waiver or reduction of fees is justified when the requirements of paragraphs (l)(2)(i) and (ii) of this section are satisfied and any commercial interest is not the primary interest furthered by the request. Ordinarily there will be a presumption, that when a news media requester has satisfied factors (l)(2)(i) and (ii) of this section, the request is not primarily in the commercial interest of the requester. Disclosure to data brokers or others who merely compile and market government information for direct economic return will not be presumed to primarily serve the public interest.


(3) Where only some of the records to be released satisfy the requirements for a waiver of fees, a waiver must be granted for those records.


(4) Requests for a waiver or reduction of fees should be made when the request is first submitted and should address the criteria referenced above. A requester may submit a fee waiver request at a later time so long as the underlying record request is pending or on administrative appeal. When a requester who has committed to pay fees subsequently asks for a waiver of those fees and that waiver is denied, the requester must pay any costs incurred up to the date the fee waiver request was received.


§ 102.9 Administrative appeals.

(a) Requirements for making an appeal. A requester may appeal any adverse determinations to the FOI/PA Office. The contact information is contained in § 102.3(a)(1). Examples of adverse determinations are provided in § 102.6(e). The requester must make the appeal in writing and to be considered timely it must be postmarked, or in the case of electronic submissions, transmitted, within 90 working days after the date of the response. The appeal should clearly identify the component’s determination that is being appealed and the assigned request number. To facilitate handling, the requester should mark both the appeal letter and envelope, or subject line of the electronic transmission, “Freedom of Information Act Appeal.”


(b) Adjudication of appeals. (1) The Chief, FOI/PA or designee will act on behalf of the SBA on all appeals under this section.


(2) An appeal ordinarily will not be adjudicated if the request becomes a matter of FOIA litigation.


(3) On receipt of any appeal involving classified information, the FOI/PA Office shall take appropriate action to ensure compliance with Executive Orders 13467 and 13526.


(c) Decisions on appeals. A decision on an appeal will be made in writing. A decision that upholds a component’s determination will contain a statement that identifies the reasons for the affirmance, including any FOIA exemptions applied. The decision will provide the requester with notification of the statutory right to file a lawsuit and will inform the requester of the mediation services offered by OGIS as a non-exclusive alternative to litigation. If a component’s decision is remanded or modified on appeal, the requester will be notified of that determination in writing. The component will thereafter, further process the request in accordance with that appeal determination and respond directly to the requester.


(d) Time limit for issuing appeal decision. The statutory time limit for responding to appeals is generally 20 working days after receipt. However, the Appeals Officer may extend the time limit for responding to an appeal provided the circumstances set forth in 5 U.S.C. 552(a)(6)(B)(i) are met.


(e) Engaging in dispute resolution services provided by OGIS. Mediation is a voluntary process. If a component agrees to participate in the mediation services provided by OGIS, it will actively engage as a partner to the process in an attempt to resolve the dispute.


(f) When an appeal is required. Before seeking review by a court of a component’s adverse determination, a requester generally must first submit a timely administrative appeal.


§ 102.10 Preservation of records.

Each component shall preserve all correspondence pertaining to the requests that it receives under this subpart, as well as copies of all requested records, until disposition or destruction is authorized pursuant to title 44 of the United States Code or the General Records Schedule 14 of the National Archives and Records Administration. Records shall not be disposed of or destroyed while they are the subject of a pending request, appeal, or lawsuit under the FOIA.


§ 102.11 Subpoenas.

(a) The person to whom the subpoena is directed must consult with SBA counsel in the relevant SBA office, who will seek approval for compliance from the Associate General Counsel for Litigation. Except where the subpoena requires the testimony of an employee of the Inspector General’s office, or records within the possession of the Inspector General, the Associate General Counsel may delegate the authorization for appropriate production of documents or testimony to local SBA counsel.


(b) If SBA counsel approves compliance with the subpoena, SBA will comply.


(c) If SBA counsel disapproves compliance with the subpoena, SBA will not comply, and will base such noncompliance on an appropriate legal basis such as privilege or a statute.


(d) SBA counsel must provide a copy of any subpoena relating to a criminal matter to SBA’s Inspector General prior to its return date.


Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 102 – Records Maintained by SBA

I. Information Generally Exempt From Disclosure

a. Non-statistical information on pending, declined, withdrawn, or canceled applications.


b. Non-statistical information on defaults, delinquencies, losses etc.


c. Loan status, other than charged-off or paid-in-full.


d. Home disaster loan status and interest rate.


e. Financial statements, credit reports, business plans, plant lay-outs, marketing strategy, advertising plans, fiscal projections, pricing information, payroll information, private sector experience and contracts, IRS forms, purchase information, banking information, corporate structure, research plans and client list of applicant/recipient.


f. Portions of: Certificate of Competency records, Requests for Size Determinations, 8(a) Business Development Plans, loan applications, SBIC applications, loan officer’s reports.


g. Internal documents not incorporated into final Agency action, pending internal recommendations on applications for assistance, SBA/attorney-client communications, pending litigation documents and investigatory documents. Discretionary disclosure policy must be utilized.


h. Personal history and financial statements, tax forms, resumes, all non-government career experience, communications regarding applicant’s character, home addresses and telephone numbers, social security numbers, birth dates and medical records. Portions of Inspector General (IG) reports, audit reports, program investigation records and any other records which, if released, would interfere with the Government’s law enforcement proceedings and/or would reveal the identity of a confidential source and documents relating to pending litigation and investigations. Requests for IG documents must be referred to the Office of the Inspector General, Counsel Division.


i. Financial information on portfolio companies.


j. Information originating from other agencies should be referred to those agencies for disclosure determinations.


II. Information Generally Disclosed

a. Names and business addresses of recipients of approved loans, SBIC licenses, Certificates of Competency, lease guarantees, surety bond guarantees and requests for counseling.


b. Names of officers, directors, stockholders or partners of recipient firms.


c. Kinds and amounts of loans, loan terms, interest rates (except on home disaster loans), maturity dates, general purpose, etc.


d. Statistical data on assistance, loans, defaults, contracts, counseling, etc.


e. Decisions, rulings and records showing final Agency actions in specific factual situations if identifying details exempt from disclosure are first deleted.


f. Awarded contracts: names, amounts, dates, contracting agencies.


g. Identity of participating banks.


h. List of 8(a) participants, date of entry, FPPT dates and NAICS codes.


i. OHA opinions and decisions.


j. Names of SBA employees, grades, titles, and duty stations.


Subpart B – Protection of Privacy and Access to Individual Records Under the Privacy Act of 1974


Source:72 FR 17369, Apr. 9, 2007, unless otherwise noted.

§ 102.20 General provisions.

(a) Purpose and scope. This subpart implements the provisions of the Privacy Act of 1974, 5 U.S.C. 552a. These regulations apply to all records which are contained in systems of records maintained by the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) and that are retrieved by an individual’s name or personal identifier. These regulations set forth the procedures by which individuals may request access to records about themselves, request amendment or correction of those records, and request an accounting of disclosures of those records by the SBA. These regulations also set forth the requirements applicable to SBA employees maintaining, collecting, using or disseminating records pertaining to individuals. This subpart applies to SBA and all of its offices and is mandatory for use by all SBA employees.


(b) Definitions. As used in this subpart:


(1) Agency means the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) and includes all of its offices wherever located;


(2) Employee means any employee of the SBA, regardless of grade, status, category or place of employment;


(3) Individual means a citizen of the United States or an alien lawfully admitted for permanent residence. This term shall not encompass entrepreneurial enterprises (e.g. sole proprietors, partnerships, corporations, or other forms of business entities);


(4) Maintain includes maintain, collect, use, or disseminate;


(5) Record means any item, collection, or grouping of information about an individual that is maintained by the SBA, including, but not limited to education, financial transactions, medical history, and criminal or employment history and that contains the individual’s name, or an identifying number, symbol, or other identifying particular assigned to the individual such as a finger or voice print or photograph;


(6) System of records means a group of any records under the control of SBA from which information is retrieved by the name of the individual or by an identifying number, symbol, or other identifying particular assigned to the individual;


(7) Statistical record means a record in a system of records maintained for statistical research or reporting purposes only and not used in whole or in part in making any determination about an identifiable individual;


(8) Routine use means, with respect to the disclosure of a record, the use of such record for a purpose which is compatible with the purpose for which it was collected;


(9) Request for access to a record means a request made under Privacy Act subsection (d)(1) allowing an individual to gain access to his or her record or to any information pertaining to him or her which is contained in a system of records;


(10) Request for amendment or correction of a record means a request made under Privacy Act subsection (d)(2), permitting an individual to request amendment or correction of a record that he or she believes is not accurate, relevant, timely, or complete;


(11) Request for an accounting means a request made under Privacy Act subsection (c)(3) allowing an individual to request an accounting of any disclosure to any SBA officers and employees who have a need for the record in the performance of their duties;


(12) Requester is an individual who makes a request for access, a request for amendment or correction, or a request for an accounting under the Privacy Act; and


(13) Authority to request records for a law enforcement purpose means that the head of an Agency or a United States Attorney, or either’s designee, is authorized to make written requests under subsection (b)(7) of the Privacy Act for records maintained by other agencies that are necessary to carry out an authorized law enforcement activity.


§ 102.21 Agency employees responsible for the Privacy Act of 1974.

(a) Program/Support Office Head is the SBA employee in each field office and major program and support area responsible for implementing and overseeing this regulation in that office.


(b) Privacy Act Systems Manager (PASM) is the designated SBA employee in each office responsible for the development and management of any Privacy Act systems of records in that office.


(c) Senior Agency Official for Privacy is SBA’s Chief Information Officer (CIO) who has overall responsibility and accountability for ensuring the SBA’s implementation of information privacy protections, including the SBA’s full compliance with Federal laws, regulations, and policies relating to information privacy such as the Privacy Act and the E-Government Act of 2002.


(d) Chief, Freedom of Information/Privacy Acts (FOI/PA) Office oversees and implements the record access, amendment, and correction provisions of the Privacy Act.


§ 102.22 Requirements relating to systems of records.

(a) In general. Each SBA office shall, in accordance with the Privacy Act:


(1) Maintain in its records only such information about an individual as is relevant and necessary to accomplish a purpose of the Agency required to be accomplished by a statute or by Executive Order of the President;


(2) Collect information to the greatest extent practicable directly from the subject individual when the information may affect an individual’s rights, benefits, and privileges under Federal programs;


(b) Requests for information from individuals. If a form is being used to collect information from individuals, either the form used to collect the information, or a separate form that can be retained by the individual, must state the following:


(1) The authority (whether granted by statute, or by Executive Order of the President) which authorizes the solicitation of the information and whether disclosure of such information is mandatory or voluntary;


(2) The principal purpose or purposes for which the information is intended to be used;


(3) The routine uses which may be made of the information; and


(4) The effects on such individual, if any, of not providing all or any part of the requested information.


(c) Report on new systems. Each SBA office shall provide adequate advance notice to Congress and OMB through the FOI/PA Office of any proposal to establish or alter any system of records in order to permit an evaluation of the probable or potential effect of such proposal on the privacy and other personal or property rights of individuals or the disclosure of information relating to such individuals.


(d) Accurate and secure maintenance of records. Each SBA office shall:


(1) Maintain all records which are used in making any determination about any individual with such accuracy, relevance, timeliness, and completeness as is reasonably necessary to assure fairness to the individual in the determination;


(2) Prior to disseminating any record from a system of records about an individual to any requestor, including an agency, make reasonable efforts to assure that such records are accurate, complete, timely, and relevant for SBA purposes; and


(3) Establish appropriate administrative, technical, and physical safeguards to insure the security and confidentiality of records and to protect against any anticipated threats or hazards to their security or integrity which could result in substantial harm, embarrassment, inconvenience, or unfairness to any individual on whom information is maintained.


(i) PASMs, with the approval of the head of their offices, shall establish administrative and physical controls, consistent with SBA regulations, to insure the protection of records systems from unauthorized access or disclosure and from physical damage or destruction. The controls instituted shall be proportional to the degree of sensitivity of the records but at a minimum must ensure that records other than those available to the general public under the FOIA, are protected from public view, that the area in which the records are stored is supervised during all business hours and physically secured during non-business hours to prevent unauthorized personnel from obtaining access to the records.


(ii) PASMs, with the approval of the head of their offices, shall adopt access restrictions to insure that only those individuals within the agency who have a need to have access to the records for the performance of their duties have access to them. Procedures shall also be adopted to prevent accidental access to, or dissemination of, records.


(e) Prohibition against maintenance of records concerning First Amendment rights. No SBA office shall maintain a record describing how any individual exercises rights guaranteed by the First Amendment (e.g. speech), unless the maintenance of such record is:


(1) Expressly authorized by statute, or


(2) Expressly authorized by the individual about whom the record is maintained, or


(3) Pertinent to and within the scope of an authorized law enforcement activity.


§ 102.23 Publication in the Federal Register – Notices of systems of records.

(a) Notices of systems of records to be published in the Federal Register. (1) The SBA shall publish in the Federal Register upon establishment or revision a notice of the existence and character of any new or revised systems of records. Unless otherwise instructed, each notice shall include:


(i) The name and location of the system;


(ii) The categories of individuals on who records are maintained in the system;


(iii) The categories of records maintained in the system;


(iv) Each routine use of the records contained in the system, including the categories of users and the purpose of such use;


(v) The policies and practices of the office regarding storage, retrievability, access controls, retention, and disposal of the records;


(vi) The title and business address of the SBA official who is responsible for the system of records;


(vii) A statement that SBA procedures allow an individual, at his or her request, to determine whether a system of records contains a record pertaining to him or her, to review such records and to contest or amend such records, located in sections 102.25 through 102.29 of these regulations.


(viii) A statement that such requests may be directed to the SBA’s FOI/PA Office, 409 3rd St., SW., Washington, DC 20416 or faxed to 202-205-7059; and


(ix) The categories of sources of records in the system.


(2) Minor changes to systems of records shall be published annually.


(b) Notice of new or modified routine uses to be published in the Federal Register. At least 30 days prior to disclosing records pursuant to a new use or modification of a routine use, as published under paragraph (a)(1)(iv) of this section, each SBA office shall publish in the Federal Register notice of such new or modified use of the information in the system and provide an opportunity for any individual or persons to submit written comments.


§ 102.24 Requests for access to records.

(a) How made and addressed. An individual, or his or her legal guardian, may make a request for access to an SBA record about himself or herself by appearing in person or by writing directly to the SBA office that maintains the record or to the FOI/PA Office by mail to 409 3rd St., SW., Washington, DC 20416 or fax to 202-205-7059. A request received by the FOI/PA Office will be forwarded to the appropriate SBA Office where the records are located.


(b) Description of records sought. A request for access to records must describe the records sought in sufficient detail to enable SBA personnel to locate the system of records containing them with a reasonable amount of effort. A request should also state the date of the record or time period in which the record was compiled, and the name or identifying number of each system of records in which the requester believes the record is kept. The SBA publishes notices in the Federal Register that describe its systems of records. A description of the SBA’s systems of records also may be found at http://www.sba.gov/foia/systemrecords.doc.


(c) Verification of identity. Any individual who submits a request for access to records must verify his or her identity. No specific form is required; however, the requester must state his or her full name, current address, and date and place of birth. The request must be signed and the requester’s signature must either be notarized or submitted under 28 U.S.C. 1746. This law permits statements to be made under penalty of perjury as a substitute for notarization, the language states:


(1) If executed outside the United States: “I declare (or certify, verify, or state) under penalty of perjury under the laws of the United States of America that the foregoing is true and correct. Executed on (date). Signature”; or


(2) If executed within the Untied States, its territories, possessions or commonwealths: “I declare (or certify, verify, or state) under penalty of perjury that the foregoing is true and correct. Executed on (date). Signature”.


(d) Verification of guardianship. When making a request as a legal agent or the parent or guardian of a minor or as the guardian of someone determined by a court to be incompetent, for access to records about that individual, the requester must establish:


(1) The identity of the individual who is the subject of the record, by stating the name, current address, date and place of birth, and, at the requester’s option, the social security number of the individual;


(2) The requester’s own identity, as required in paragraph (c) of this section;


(3) That the requester is the legal agent or parent or guardian of that individual, which may be proven by providing a copy of the individual’s birth certificate showing his parentage or by providing a court order establishing guardianship; and


(4) That the requester is acting on behalf of that individual in making the request.


§ 102.25 Responsibility for responding to requests for access to records.

(a) In general. Except as stated in paragraphs (c), (d), and (e) of this section and in § 102.24(a), the office that first receives a request for access to a record, and has possession of that record, is the office responsible for responding to the request. That office shall acknowledge receipt of the request not later than 10 days (excluding Saturdays, Sundays, and legal public holidays) after the date of receipt of the request in writing. In determining which records are responsive to a request, an office ordinarily shall include only those records in its possession as of the date the office begins its search for them. If any other date is used, the office shall inform the requester of that date.


(b) Authority to grant or deny requests. The Program/Support Office Head, or designee, is authorized to grant or deny any request for access to a record of that office.


(c) Consultations and referrals. When an office receives a request for access to a record in its possession, it shall determine whether another office, or another agency of the Federal Government, is better able to determine whether the record is exempt from access under the Privacy Act. If the receiving office determines that it is best able to process the record in response to the request, then it shall do so. If the receiving office determines that it is not best able to process the record, then it shall either:


(1) Respond to the request regarding that record, after consulting with the office or agency best able to determine whether the record is exempt from access and with any other office or agency that has a substantial interest in it; or


(2) Refer the responsibility for responding to the request to the office best able to determine whether the record is exempt from access or to another agency that originated the record (but only if that agency is subject to the Privacy Act). Ordinarily the office or agency that originated a record will be presumed to be best able to determine whether it is exempt from access.


(d) Law enforcement information. Whenever a request is made for access to a record containing information that relates to an investigation of a possible violation of law and that was originated by SBA’s Office of the Inspector General (OIG) or another agency, the receiving office shall refer the responsibility for responding to the request regarding that information to either SBA’s OIG or the other agency “depending on where the investigation originated.”


(e) Classified information. Whenever a request is made for access to a record containing information that has been classified by or may be appropriate for classification by another office or agency under Executive Order 12958 or any other executive order concerning the classification of records, the receiving office shall refer the responsibility for responding to the request regarding that information to the office or agency that classified the information, should consider the information for classification, or has the primary interest in it, as appropriate. Whenever a record contains information that has been derivatively classified by an office because it contains information classified by another office or agency, the office shall refer the responsibility for responding to the request regarding that information to the office or agency that classified the underlying information. Information determined to no longer require classification shall not be withheld from a requester on the basis of Exemption (k)(1) of the Privacy Act.


(f) Notice of referral. Whenever an office refers all or any part of the responsibility for responding to a request to another office or agency, it shall notify the requester of the referral and inform the requester of the name of each office or agency to which the request has been referred and of the part of the request that has been referred.


(g) Responses to consultations and referrals. All consultations and referrals shall be processed according to the date the access request was initially received by the first office or agency, not any later date.


(h) Agreements regarding consultations and referrals. Offices may make agreements with other offices or agencies to eliminate the need for consultations or referrals for particular types of records.


§ 102.26 Responses to requests for access to records.

(a) Acknowledgements of requests. On receipt of a request, an office shall send an acknowledgement letter to the requester.


(b) Grants of requests for access. Once an office makes a determination to grant a request for access in whole or in part, it shall notify the requester in writing. The Program/Support Office Head or designee shall inform the requester in the notice of any fee charged under § 102.31 and shall disclose records to the requester promptly on payment of any applicable fee. If a request is made in person, the office may disclose records to the requester directly, in a manner not unreasonably disruptive of its operations, on payment of any applicable fee and with a written record made of the grant of the request. If a requester is accompanied by another person, he or she shall be required to authorize in writing any discussion of the records in the presence of the other person.


(c) Adverse determinations of requests for access. A Program/Support Office Head or designee making an adverse determination denying a request for access in any respect shall notify the requester of that determination in writing. Adverse determinations, or denials of requests, consist of: a determination to withhold any requested record in whole or in part; a determination that a requested record does not exist or cannot be located; a determination that the requested information is not a record subject to the Privacy Act; a determination on any disputed fee matter; and a denial of a request for expedited treatment. The notification letter shall be signed by the Program/Support Office Head or designee, and shall include:


(1) The name and title or position of the person responsible for the denial;


(2) A brief statement of the reason(s) for the denial, including any FOIA or Privacy Act exemption(s) applied in denying the request; and


(3) A statement that the denial may be appealed under § 102.27(a) and a description of the requirements of § 102.27(a).


§ 102.27 Appeals from denials of requests for access to records.

(a) Appeals. If the requester is dissatisfied with an office’s response to his or her request for access to records, the requester may make a written appeal of the adverse determination denying the request in any respect to the SBA’s FOI/PA Office, 409 3rd St., SW., Washington, DC 20416. The appeal must be received by the FOI/PA Office within 60 days of the date of the letter denying the request. The requester’s appeal letter should include as much information as possible, including the identity of the office whose adverse determination is being appealed. Unless otherwise directed, the Chief, FOI/PA will decide all appeals under this subpart.


(b) Responses to appeals. The decision on a requester’s appeal will be made in writing not later than 30 days (excluding Saturdays, Sundays, and legal public holidays) after the date of receipt of such appeal. A decision affirming an adverse determination in whole or in part will include a brief statement of the reason(s) for the affirmation, including any Privacy Act exemption applied, and will inform the requester of the Privacy Act provisions for court review of the decision. If the adverse determination is reversed or modified on appeal in whole or in part, the requester will be notified in a written decision and his request will be reprocessed in accordance with that appeal decision.


(c) Judicial review. In order to seek judicial review by a court of any adverse determination or denial of a request, a requester must first appeal it to the FOI/PA Office under this section.


§ 102.28 Requests for amendment or correction of records.

(a) How made and addressed. Unless the record is not subject to amendment or correction as stated in paragraph (f) of this section, an individual may make a request for amendment or correction of an SBA record about himself or herself by writing directly to the office that maintains the record, following the procedures in § 102.24. The request should identify each particular record in question, state the amendment or correction sought, and state why the record is not accurate, relevant, timely, or complete. The requester may submit any documentation that he or she thinks would be helpful. If the requester believes that the same record is in more than one system of records, that should be stated and the request should be sent to each office that maintains a system of records containing the record.


(b) Office responses. Within ten (10) days (excluding Saturdays, Sundays, and legal public holidays) of receiving a request for amendment or correction of records, an office shall send the requester a written acknowledgment of receipt, and the office shall notify the requester within 30 days (excluding Saturdays, Sundays, and legal public holidays) of receipt of the request whether it is granted or denied. If the Program/Support Office Head or designee grants the request in whole or in part, the amendment or correction must be made, and the requester advised of his or her right to obtain a copy of the corrected or amended record. If the office denies a request in whole or in part, it shall send the requester a letter signed by the Program/Support Office Head or designee that shall state:


(1) The reason(s) for the denial; and


(2) The procedure for appeal of the denial under paragraph (c) of this section, including the name and business address of the official who will act on your appeal.


(c) Appeals. An individual may appeal a denial of a request for amendment or correction to the FOI/PA Office in the same manner as a denial of a request for access to records (see § 102.27), and the same procedures shall be followed. If the appeal is denied, the requester shall be advised of his or her right to file a Statement of Disagreement as described in paragraph (d) of this section and of his or her right under the Privacy Act for court review of the decision.


(d) Statement of Disagreement. If an appeal under this section is denied in whole or in part, the requester has the right to file a Statement of Disagreement that states the reason(s) for disagreeing with the SBA’s denial of his or her request for amendment or correction. A Statement of Disagreement must be concise, must clearly identify each part of any record that is disputed, and should be no longer than one typed page for each fact disputed. An individual’s Statement of Disagreement must be sent to the office that maintains the record involved, which shall place it in the system of records in which the disputed record is maintained and shall mark the disputed record to indicate that a Statement of Disagreement has been filed and where in the system of records it may be found.


(e) Notification of amendment/correction or disagreement. Within 30 days (excluding Saturdays, Sundays, and legal public holidays) of the amendment or correction of a record, the office that maintains the record shall notify all persons, organizations, or agencies to which it previously disclosed the record, if an accounting of that disclosure was made, that the record has been amended or corrected. If an individual has filed a Statement of Disagreement, the office shall append a copy of it to the disputed record whenever the record is disclosed and may also append a concise statement of its reason(s) for denying the request to amend or correct the record.


(f) Records not subject to amendment or correction. The following records are not subject to amendment or correction:


(1) Transcripts of testimony given under oath or written statements made under oath;


(2) Transcripts of grand jury proceedings, judicial proceedings, or quasi-judicial proceedings, which are the official record of those proceedings;


(3) Pre-sentence records that originated with the courts; and


(4) Records in systems of records that have been exempted from amendment and correction under Privacy Act, 5 U.S.C. 552a (j) or (k) by notice published in the Federal Register.


§ 102.29 Requests for an accounting of record disclosures.

(a) How made and addressed. Except where accountings of disclosures are not required to be kept (as stated in paragraph (b) of this section), an individual may make a request for an accounting of any disclosure that has been made by the SBA to another person, organization, or agency of any record in a system of records about him or her. This accounting contains the date, nature, and purpose of each disclosure, as well as the name and address of the person, organization, or agency to which the disclosure was made. The request for an accounting should identify each particular record in question and should be made by writing directly to the SBA office that maintains the record, following the procedures in § 102.24.


(b) Where accountings are not required. Offices are not required to provide accountings where they relate to:


(1) Disclosures for which accountings are not required to be kept; disclosures that are made to employees within the SBA and disclosures that are made under the FOIA;


(2) Disclosures made to law enforcement agencies for authorized law enforcement activities in response to written requests from those law enforcement agencies specifying the civil or criminal law enforcement activities for which the disclosures are sought; or


(3) Disclosures made from law enforcement systems of records that have been exempted from accounting requirements under Privacy Act, 5 U.S.C. 552a(j) or (k) by notice published in the Federal Register.


(c) Appeals. An individual may appeal a denial of a request for an accounting to the FOI/PA Office in the same manner as a denial of a request for access to records (see § 102.27), and the same procedures will be followed.


§ 102.30 Preservation of records.

Each office will preserve all correspondence pertaining to the requests that it receives under this subpart, as well as copies of all requested records, until disposition or destruction is authorized by title 44 of the United States Code or the National Archives and Records Administration’s General Records Schedule 14. Records will not be disposed of while they are the subject of a pending request, appeal, or lawsuit under the Privacy Act.


§ 102.31 Fees.

SBA offices shall charge fees for duplication of records under the Privacy Act in the same way in which they charge duplication fees under § 102.6(b)(3). No search or review fee may be charged for any record unless the record has been exempted from access under Exemptions (j)(2) or (k)(2) of the Privacy Act. SBA will waive fees under $25.00.


§ 102.32 Notice of court-ordered and emergency disclosures.

(a) Court-ordered disclosures. When a record pertaining to an individual is required to be disclosed by order of a court of competent jurisdiction, the office that maintains the record shall make reasonable efforts to provide notice of this to the individual. Notice shall be given within a reasonable time after the office’s receipt of the order, except that in a case in which the order is not a matter of public record, the notice shall be given only after the order becomes public. This notice shall be mailed to the individual’s last known address and shall contain a copy of the order and a description of the information disclosed. Notice shall not be given if disclosure is made from a criminal law enforcement system of records that has been exempted from the notice requirement.


(b) Emergency disclosures. Upon disclosing a record pertaining to an individual made under compelling circumstances affecting health or safety, the office shall notify that individual of the disclosure. This notice shall be mailed to the individual’s last known address and shall state the nature of the information disclosed; the person, organization, or agency to which it was disclosed; the date of disclosure; and the compelling circumstances justifying the disclosure.


§ 102.33 Security of systems of records.

(a) Each Program/Support Office Head or designee shall establish administrative and physical controls to prevent unauthorized access to its systems of records, to prevent unauthorized disclosure of records, and to prevent physical damage to or destruction of records. The stringency of these controls shall correspond to the sensitivity of the records that the controls protect. At a minimum, each office’s administrative and physical controls shall ensure that:


(1) Records are protected from public view;


(2) The area in which records are kept is supervised during business hours to prevent unauthorized persons from having access to them;


(3) Records are inaccessible to unauthorized persons outside of business hours; and


(4) Records are not disclosed to unauthorized persons or under unauthorized circumstances in either oral or written form.


(b) Each Program/Support Office Head or designee shall establish procedures that restrict access to records to only those individuals within the SBA who must have access to those records in order to perform their duties and that prevent inadvertent disclosure of records.


(c) The OCIO shall provide SBA offices with guidance and assistance for privacy and security of electronic systems and compliance with pertinent laws and requirements.


§ 102.34 Contracts for the operation of record systems.

When SBA contracts for the operation or maintenance of a system of records or a portion of a system of records by a contractor, the record system or the portion of the record affected, are considered to be maintained by the SBA, and subject to this subpart. The SBA is responsible for applying the requirements of this subpart to the contractor. The contractor and its employees are to be considered employees of the SBA for purposes of the sanction provisions of the Privacy Act during performance of the contract.


§ 102.35 Use and collection of Social Security Numbers.

Each Program/Support Office Head or designee shall ensure that collection and use of SSN is performed only when the functionality of the system is dependant on use of the SSN as an identifier. Employees authorized to collect information must be aware:


(a) That individuals may not be denied any right, benefit, or privilege as a result of refusing to provide their social security numbers, unless:


(1) The collection is authorized either by a statute; or


(2) The social security numbers are required under statute or regulation adopted prior to 1975 to verify the identity of an individual; and


(b) That individuals requested to provide their social security numbers must be informed of:


(1) Whether providing social security numbers is mandatory or voluntary;


(2) Any statutory or regulatory authority that authorizes the collection of social security numbers; and


(3) The uses that will be made of the numbers.


§ 102.36 Privacy Act standards of conduct.

Each Program/Support Office Head or designee shall inform its employees of the provisions of the Privacy Act, including its civil liability and criminal penalty provisions. Unless otherwise permitted by law, an employee of the SBA shall:


(a) Collect from individuals only the information that is relevant and necessary to discharge the responsibilities of the SBA;


(b) Collect information about an individual directly from that individual whenever practicable;


(c) Inform each individual from whom information is collected of:


(1) The legal authority to collect the information and whether providing it is mandatory or voluntary;


(2) The principal purpose for which the SBA intends to use the information;


(3) The routine uses the SBA may make of the information; and


(4) The effects on the individual, if any, of not providing the information;


(d) Ensure that the office maintains no system of records without public notice and that it notifies appropriate SBA officials of the existence or development of any system of records that is not the subject of a current or planned public notice;


(e) Maintain all records that are used by the SBA in making any determination about an individual with such accuracy, relevance, timeliness, and completeness as is reasonably necessary to ensure fairness to the individual in the determination;


(f) Except as to disclosures made to an agency or made under the FOIA, make reasonable efforts, prior to disseminating any record about an individual, to ensure that the record is accurate, relevant, timely, and complete;


(g) Maintain no record describing how an individual exercises his or her First Amendment rights, unless it is expressly authorized by statute or by the individual about whom the record is maintained, or is pertinent to and within the scope of an authorized law enforcement activity;


(h) When required by the Privacy Act, maintain an accounting in the specified form of all disclosures of records by the SBA to persons, organizations, or agencies;


(i) Maintain and use records with care to prevent the unauthorized or inadvertent disclosure of a record to anyone; and


(j) Notify the appropriate SBA official of any record that contains information that the Privacy Act does not permit the SBA to maintain.


§ 102.37 Training requirements.

All employees should attend privacy training within one year of employment with SBA. All employees with Privacy Act responsibilities must attend Privacy Act training, whenever needed, that is offered by the SBA.


§ 102.38 Other rights and services.

Nothing in this subpart shall be construed to entitle any person, as a right, to any service or to the disclosure of any record to which such person is not entitled under the Privacy Act.


§ 102.39 SBA’s exempt Privacy Act systems of records.

(a) Systems of records subject to investigatory material exemption under 5 U.S.C. 552a(k)(2), or 5 U.S.C. 552a(k)(5) or both:


(1) Office of Inspector General Records Other Than Investigation Records – SBA 4, contains records pertaining to audits, evaluations, and other non-audit services performed by the OIG;


(2) Equal Employment Opportunity Complaint Cases – SBA 13, contains complaint files, Equal Employment Opportunity counselor’s reports, investigation materials, notes, reports, and recommendations;


(3) Investigative Files – SBA 16, contains records gathered by the OIG in the investigation of allegations that are within the jurisdiction of the OIG;


(4) Investigations Division Management Information System – SBA 17, contains records gathered or created during preparation for, conduct of, and follow-up on investigations conducted by the OIG, the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), and other Federal, State, local, or foreign regulatory or law enforcement agency;


(5) Litigation and Claims Files – SBA 19, contains records relating to recipients classified as “in litigation” and all individuals involved in claims by or against the Agency;


(6) Personnel Security Files – SBA 24, contains records on active and inactive personnel security files, employee or former employee’s name, background information, personnel actions, OPM, and/or authorized contracting firm background investigations;


(7) Security and Investigations Files – SBA 27, contains records gathered or created during preparation for, conduct of, and follow-up on investigations conducted by OIG, the FBI, and other Federal, State, local, or foreign regulatory or law enforcement agencies as well as other material submitted to or gathered by OIG in furtherance of its investigative function; and


(8) Standards of Conduct Files – SBA 29, contains records on confidential employment and financial statements of employees Grade 13 and above.


(b) These systems of records are exempt from the following provisions of the Privacy Act and all regulations in this part promulgated under these provisions:


(1) 552a(c)(3) (Accounting of Certain Disclosures);


(2) 552a(d) (Access to Records);


(3) 552a(e)(1), 4G, H, and I (Agency Requirements); and


(4) 552a(f) (Agency Rules).


(c) The systems of records described in paragraph (a) of this section are exempt from the provisions of the Privacy Act described in paragraph (b) of this section in order to:


(1) Prevent the subject of investigations from frustrating the investigatory process;


(2) Protect investigatory material compiled for law enforcement purposes;


(3) Fulfill commitments made to protect the confidentiality of sources and to maintain access to necessary sources of information; or


(4) Prevent interference with law enforcement proceedings.


(d) In addition to the foregoing exemptions in paragraphs (a) through (c) of this section, the systems of records described in paragraph (a) of this section numbered SBA 4, 16, 17, 24, and 27 are exempt from the Privacy Act except for subsections (b), (c)(1) and (2), (e)(4)(A) through F, (e)(6), (7), (9), (10) and (11) and (i) to the extent that they contain:


(1) Information compiled to identify individual criminal offenders and alleged offenders and consisting only of identifying data and notations of arrests, confinement, release, and parole and probation status;


(2) Information, including reports of informants and investigators, associated with an identifiable individual compiled to investigate criminal activity; or


(3) Reports compiled at any stage of the process of enforcement of the criminal laws from arrest or indictment through release from supervision associated with an identifiable individual.


(e) The systems of records described in paragraph (d) of this section are exempt from the Privacy Act to the extent described in that paragraph because they are records maintained by the Investigations Division of the OIG, which is a component of SBA which performs as its principal function activities pertaining to the enforcement of criminal laws within the meaning of 5 U.S.C. 552a(j)(2). They are exempt in order to:


(1) Prevent the subjects of OIG investigations from using the Privacy Act to frustrate the investigative process;


(2) Protect the identity of Federal employees who furnish a complaint or information to the OIG, consistent with section 7(b) of the Inspector General Act of 1978, 5 U.S.C. app. 3;


(3) Protect the confidentiality of other sources of information;


(4) Avoid endangering confidential sources and law enforcement personnel;


(5) Prevent interference with law enforcement proceedings;


(6) Assure access to sources of confidential information, including that contained in Federal, State, and local criminal law enforcement information systems;


(7) Prevent the disclosure of investigative techniques; or


(8) Prevent the disclosure of classified information.


§ 102.40 Computer matching.

The OCIO will enforce the computer matching provisions of the Privacy Act. The FOI/PA Office will review and concur on all computer matching agreements prior to their activation and/or renewal.


(a) Matching agreements. SBA will comply with the Computer Matching and Privacy Protection Act of 1988 (5 U.S.C. 552a(o), 552a notes) . The Privacy Protection Act establishes procedures Federal agencies must use if they want to match their computer lists. SBA shall not disclose any record which is contained in a system of records to a recipient agency or non-Federal agency for use in a computer matching program except pursuant to a written agreement between SBA and the recipient agency or non-Federal agency specifying:


(1) The purpose and legal authority for conducting the program;


(2) The justification for the purpose and the anticipated results, including a specific estimate of any savings;


(3) A description of the records that will be matched, including each data element that will be used, the approximate number of records that will be matched, and the projected starting and completion dates of the matching program;


(4) Procedures for providing individualized notice at the time of application, and periodically thereafter as directed by the Data Integrity Board, that any information provided by any of the above may be subject to verification through matching programs to:


(i) Applicants for and recipients of financial assistance or payments under Federal benefit programs, and


(ii) Applicants for and holders of positions as Federal personnel.


(5) Procedures for verifying information produced in such matching program as required by paragraph (c) of this section.


(6) Procedures for the retention and timely destruction of identifiable records created by a recipient agency or non-Federal agency in such matching program;


(7) Procedures for ensuring the administrative, technical, and physical security of the records matched and the results of such programs;


(8) Prohibitions on duplication and redisclosure of records provided by SBA within or outside the recipient agency or non-Federal agency, except where required by law or essential to the conduct of the matching program;


(9) Procedures governing the use by a recipient agency or non-Federal agency of records provided in a matching program by SBA, including procedures governing return of the records to SBA or destruction of records used in such programs;


(10) Information on assessments that have been made on the accuracy of the records that will be used in such matching programs; and


(11) That the Comptroller General may have access to all records of a recipient agency or non-Federal agency that the Comptroller General deems necessary in order to monitor or verify compliance with the agreement.


(b) Agreement specifications. A copy of each agreement entered into pursuant to paragraph (a) of this section shall be transmitted to OMB, the Committee on Governmental Affairs of the Senate and the Committee on Governmental Operations of the House of Representatives and be available upon request to the public.


(1) No such agreement shall be effective until 30 days after the date on which a copy is transmitted.


(2) Such an agreement shall remain in effect only for such period, not to exceed 18 months, as the Data Integrity Board determines is appropriate in light of the purposes, and length of time necessary for the conduct, of the matching program.


(3) Within three (3) months prior to the expiration of such an agreement, the Data Integrity Board may without additional review, renew the matching agreement for a current, ongoing matching program for not more than one additional year if:


(i) Such program will be conducted without any change; and


(ii) Each party to the agreement certifies to the Board in writing that the program has been conducted in compliance with the agreement.


(c) Verification. In order to protect any individual whose records are used in matching programs, SBA and any recipient agency or non-Federal agency may not suspend, terminate, reduce, or make a final denial of any financial assistance or payment under the Federal benefit program to such individual, or take other adverse action against such individual as a result of information produced by such matching programs until such information has been independently verified.


(1) Independent verification requires independent investigation and confirmation of any information used as a basis for an adverse action against an individual including, where applicable:


(i) The amount of the asset or income involved,


(ii) Whether such individual actually has or had access to such asset or income or such individual’s own use, and


(iii) The period or periods when the individual actually had such asset or income.


(2) SBA and any recipient agency or non-Federal agency may not suspend, terminate, reduce, or make a final denial of any financial assistance or payment under a Federal benefit program, or take other adverse action as a result of information produced by a matching program,


(i) Unless such individual has received notice from such agency containing a statement of its findings and information of the opportunity to contest such findings, and


(ii) Until the subsequent expiration of any notice period provided by the program’s governing statute or regulations, or 30 days. Such opportunity to contest may be satisfied by notice, hearing, and appeal rights governing such Federal benefit program. The exercise of any such rights shall not affect rights available under the Privacy Act.


(3) SBA may take any appropriate action otherwise prohibited by the above if SBA determines that the public health or safety may be adversely affected or significantly threatened during the notice period required by paragraph (c)(2)(ii) of this section.


(d) Sanctions. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, SBA may not disclose any record which is contained in a system of records to a recipient agency or non-Federal agency for a matching program if SBA has reason to believe that the requirements of paragraph (c) of this section, or any matching agreement entered into pursuant to paragraph (b) of this section or both, are not being met by such recipient agency.


(1) SBA shall not renew a matching agreement unless,


(i) The recipient agency or non-Federal agency has certified that it has complied with the provisions of that agreement; and


(ii) SBA has no reason to believe that the certification is inaccurate.


(e) Review annually each ongoing matching program in which the Agency has participated during the year, either as a source or as a matching agency in order to assure that the requirements of the Privacy Act, OMB guidance, and any Agency regulations and standard operating procedures, operating instructions, or guidelines have been met.


(f) Data Integrity Board. SBA shall establish a Data Integrity Board (Board) to oversee and coordinate the implementation of the matching program. The Board shall consist of the senior officials designated by the Administrator, to include the Inspector General (who shall not serve as chairman), and the Senior Agency Official for Privacy. The Board shall:


(1) Review, approve and maintain all written agreements for receipt or disclosure of Agency records for matching programs to ensure compliance with paragraph (a) of this section and with all relevant statutes, regulations, and guidance;


(2) Review all matching programs in which SBA has participated during the year, determine compliance with applicable laws, regulations, guidelines, and Agency agreements, and assess the costs and benefits of such programs;


(3) Review all recurring matching programs in which SBA has participated during the year, for continued justification for such disclosures;


(4) At the instruction of OMB, compile a report to be submitted to the Administrator and OMB, and made available to the public on request, describing the matching activities of SBA, including,


(i) Matching programs in which SBA has participated;


(ii) Matching agreements proposed that were disapproved by the Board;


(iii) Any changes in membership or structure of the Board in the preceding year;


(iv) The reasons for any waiver of the requirement described below for completion and submission of a cost-benefit analysis prior to the approval of a matching program;


(v) Any violations of matching agreements that have been alleged or identified and any corrective action taken; and


(vi) Any other information required by OMB to be included in such report;


(5) Serve as clearinghouse for receiving and providing information on the accuracy, completeness, and reliability of records used in matching programs;


(6) Provide interpretation and guidance to SBA offices and personnel on the requirements for matching programs;


(7) Review Agency recordkeeping and disposal policies and practices for matching programs to assure compliance with the Privacy Act; and


(8) May review and report on any SBA matching activities that are not matching programs.


(g) Cost-benefit analysis. Except as provided in paragraphs (e)(2) and (3) of this section, the Data Integrity Board shall not approve any written agreement for a matching program unless SBA has completed and submitted to such Board a cost-benefit analysis of the proposed program and such analysis demonstrates that the program is likely to be cost effective. The Board may waive these requirements if it determines, in writing, and in accordance with OMB guidelines, that a cost-benefit analysis is not required. Such an analysis also shall not be required prior to the initial approval of a written agreement for a matching program that is specifically required by statute.


(h) Disapproval of matching agreements. If a matching agreement is disapproved by the Data Integrity Board, any party to such agreement may appeal to OMB. Timely notice of the filing of such an appeal shall be provided by OMB to the Committee on Governmental Affairs of the Senate and the Committee on Government Operations of the House of Representatives.


(1) OMB may approve a matching agreement despite the disapproval of the Data Integrity Board if OMB determines that:


(i) The matching program will be consistent with all applicable legal, regulatory, and policy requirements;


(ii) There is adequate evidence that the matching agreement will be cost-effective; and


(iii) The matching program is in the public interest.


(2) The decision of OMB to approve a matching agreement shall not take effect until 30 days after it is reported to the committees described in paragraph (h) of this section.


(3) If the Data Integrity Board and the OMB disapprove a matching program proposed by the Inspector General, the Inspector General may report the disapproval to the Administrator and to the Congress.


§ 102.41 Other provisions.

(a) Personnel records. All SBA personnel records and files, as prescribed by OPM, shall be maintained in such a way that the privacy of all individuals concerned is protected in accordance with regulations of OPM (5 CFR parts 293 and 297).


(b) Mailing lists. The SBA will not sell or rent an individual’s name or address. This provision shall not be construed to require the withholding of names or addresses otherwise permitted to be made public.


(c) Changes in systems. The SBA shall provide adequate advance notice to Congress and OMB of any proposal to establish or alter any system of records in order to permit an evaluation of the probable or potential effect of such proposal on the privacy and other personal or property rights of individuals or the disclosure of information relating to such individuals, and its effect on the preservation of the constitutional principles of federalism and separation of powers.


(d) Medical records. Medical records shall be disclosed to the individual to whom they pertain. SBA may, however, transmit such information to a medical doctor named by the requesting individual. In regard to medical records in personnel files, see also 5 CFR 297.205.


PART 103 – STANDARDS FOR CONDUCTING BUSINESS WITH SBA


Authority:15 U.S.C. 634, 642.



Source:61 FR 2681, Jan. 29, 1996, unless otherwise noted.

§ 103.1 Key definitions.

(a) Agent means an authorized representative, including an attorney, accountant, consultant, packager, lender service provider, or any other person representing an Applicant or Participant by conducting business with SBA.


(b) The term conduct business with SBA means:


(1) Preparing or submitting on behalf of an applicant an application for financial assistance of any kind, assistance from the Investment Division of SBA, or assistance in procurement and technical matters;


(2) Preparing or processing on behalf of a lender or a participant in any of SBA’s programs an application for federal financial assistance;


(3) Participating with or communicating in any way with officers or employees of SBA on an applicant’s, participant’s, or lender’s behalf;


(4) Acting as a lender service provider; and


(5) Such other activity as SBA reasonably shall determine.


(c) Applicant means any person, firm, concern, corporation, partnership, cooperative or other business enterprise applying for any type of assistance from SBA.


(d) Lender Service Provider means an Agent who carries out lender functions in originating, disbursing, servicing, or liquidating a specific SBA business loan or loan portfolio for compensation from the lender. SBA determines whether or not one is a “Lender Service Provider” on a loan-by-loan basis.


(e) Packager means an Agent who is employed and compensated by an Applicant or lender to prepare the Applicant’s application for financial assistance from SBA. SBA determines whether or not one is a “Packager” on a loan-by-loan basis.


(f) Referral Agent means a person or entity who identifies and refers an Applicant to a lender or a lender to an Applicant. The Referral Agent may be employed and compensated by either an Applicant or a lender.


(g) Participant means a person or entity that is participating in any of the financial, investment, or business development programs authorized by the Small Business Act or Small Business Investment Act of 1958.


[61 FR 2681, Jan. 29, 1996, as amended at 85 FR 7647, Feb. 10, 2020; 85 FR 80587, Dec. 14, 2020]


§ 103.2 Who may conduct business with SBA?

(a) If you are an Applicant, a Participant, a partner of an Applicant or Participant partnership, or serve as an officer of an Applicant, Participant corporation, or limited liability company, you may conduct business with SBA without a representative.


(b) If you are an Agent, you may conduct business with SBA on behalf of an Applicant, Participant or lender, unless representation is otherwise prohibited by law or the regulations in this part or any other part in this chapter. For example, persons debarred under the SBA or Government-wide debarment regulations may not conduct business with SBA. SBA may request that any Agent supply written evidence of his or her authority to act on behalf of an Applicant, Participant, or lender as a condition of revealing any information about the Applicant’s, Participant’s, or lender’s current or prior dealings with SBA.


§ 103.3 May SBA suspend or revoke an Agent’s privilege?

The Administrator of SBA or designee may, for good cause, suspend or revoke the privilege of any Agent to conduct business with SBA. Part 134 of this chapter states the procedures for appealing the decision to suspend or revoke the privilege. The suspension or revocation remains in effect during the pendency of any administrative proceedings under part 134 of this chapter.


§ 103.4 What is “good cause” for suspension or revocation?

Any unlawful or unethical activity is good cause for suspension or revocation of the privilege to conduct business. This includes:


(a) Attempting to influence any employee of SBA or a lender, by gifts, bribes or other unlawful or unethical activity, with respect to any matter involving SBA assistance.


(b) Soliciting for the provision of services to an Applicant by another entity when there is an undisclosed business relationship between the two parties.


(c) Violating ethical guidelines which govern the profession or business of the Agent or which are published at any time by SBA.


(d) Implying or stating that the work to be performed for an Applicant will include use of political or other special influence with SBA. Examples include indicating that the entity is affiliated with or paid, endorsed or employed by SBA, advertising using the words Small Business Administration or SBA in a manner that implies SBA’s endorsement or sponsorship, use of SBA’s seal or symbol, and giving a “guaranty” to an Applicant that the application will be approved.


(e) Charging or proposing to charge any fee that does not bear a necessary and reasonable relationship to the services actually rendered or expenses actually incurred in connection with a matter before SBA or which is materially inconsistent with the provisions of an applicable compensation agreement or Lender Service Provider agreement. A fee based solely on a percentage of a loan or guarantee amount can be reasonable, depending on the circumstances of a case and the services actually rendered.


(f) Engaging in any conduct indicating a lack of business integrity or business honesty, including debarment, criminal conviction, or civil judgment within the last seven years for fraud, embezzlement, theft, forgery, bribery, falsification or destruction of records, false statements, conspiracy, receiving stolen property, false claims, or obstruction of justice.


(g) Acting as both a Lender Service Provider or Referral Agent and a Packager for an Applicant on the same SBA business loan and receiving compensation for such activity from both the Applicant and lender. A limited exception to the “two master” prohibition in this paragraph (g) exists when an Agent acts as a Packager and is compensated by the Applicant for packaging services; also acts as a Referral Agent and is compensated by the lender for those activities; discloses the referral activities to the Applicant; and discloses the packaging activities to the lender.


(h) Violating materially the terms of any compensation agreement or Lender Service Provider agreement provided for in § 103.5.


(i) Violating or assisting in the violation of any SBA regulations, policies, or procedures of which the Applicant has been made aware.


[61 FR 2681, Jan. 29, 1996, as amended at 85 FR 7647, Feb. 10, 2020; 85 FR 80587, Dec. 14, 2020]


§ 103.5 How does SBA regulate an Agent’s fees and provision of service?

(a) Any Applicant, Agent, or Packager must execute and provide to SBA a compensation agreement, and any Lender Service Provider must execute and provide to SBA a Lender Service Provider agreement. Each agreement governs the compensation charged for services rendered or to be rendered to the Applicant or lender in any matter involving SBA assistance. SBA provides the form of compensation agreement and a suggested form of Lender Service Provider agreement to be used by Agents.


(b) Compensation agreements must provide that in cases where SBA deems the compensation unreasonable, the Agent or Packager must: Reduce the charge to an amount SBA deems reasonable, refund any sum in excess of the amount SBA deems reasonable to the Applicant, and refrain from charging or collecting, directly or indirectly, from the Applicant an amount in excess of the amount SBA deems reasonable.


(c) Each Lender Service Provider must enter into a written agreement with each lender for whom it acts in that capacity. SBA will review all such agreements. Such agreements need not contain each and every provision found in the SBA’s suggested form of agreement. However, each agreement must indicate that both parties agree not to engage in any sharing of secondary market premiums, that the services to be provided are accurately described, and that the agreement is otherwise consistent with SBA requirements. Subject to the prohibition on splitting premiums, lenders have reasonable discretion in setting compensation for Lender Service Providers. However, such compensation may not be directly charged to an Applicant or Borrower.


[61 FR 2681, Jan. 29, 1996, as amended at 85 FR 7647, Feb. 10, 2020; 85 FR 80587, Dec. 14, 2020]


PART 105 – STANDARDS OF CONDUCT AND EMPLOYEE RESTRICTIONS AND RESPONSIBILITIES


Authority:5 U.S.C. 7301; 15 U.S.C. 634, 637(a)(18) and (a)(19), 642, and 645(a).


Source:61 FR 2399, Jan. 26, 1996, unless otherwise noted.

Standards of Conduct

§ 105.101 Cross-reference to employee ethical conduct standards and financial disclosure regulations.

In addition to this part, Small Business Administration (SBA) employees should refer to the Standards of Ethical Conduct for Employees of the Executive Branch at 5 CFR part 2635 and the regulations at 5 CFR part 2634 entitled, Executive Branch Financial Disclosure, Qualified Trusts and Certificates of Divestiture.


[69 FR 63922, Nov. 3, 2004]


Restrictions and Responsibilities Related to SBA Employees and Former Employees

§ 105.201 Definitions.

(a) Employee means an officer or employee of the SBA regardless of grade, status or place of employment, including employees on leave with pay or on leave without pay other than those on extended military leave. Unless stated otherwise. Employee shall include those within the category of Special Government Employee.


(b) Special Government Employee means an officer or employee of SBA, who is retained, appointed or employed to perform temporary duties on a full-time or intermittent basis, with or without compensation, for not to exceed 130 days during any period of 365 consecutive days.


(c) Person means an individual, a corporation, a company, an association, a firm, a partnership, a society, a joint stock company, or any other organization or institution.


(d) Household member means spouse and minor children of an employee, all blood relations of the employee and any spouse who resides in the same place of abode with the employee.


(e) SBA Assistance means financial, contractual, grant, managerial or other aid, including size determinations, section 8(a) participation, licensing, certification, and other eligibility determinations made by SBA. The term also includes an express decision to compromise or defer possible litigation or other adverse action.


§ 105.202 Employment of former employee by person previously the recipient of SBA Assistance.

(a) No former employee, who occupied a position involving discretion over, or who exercised discretion with respect to, the granting or administration of SBA Assistance may occupy a position as employee, partner, agent, attorney or other representative of a concern which has received this SBA Assistance for a period of two years following the date of granting or administering such SBA Assistance if –


(1) The date of granting or administering such SBA Assistance was within the period of the employee’s term of employment; or


(2) The date of granting or administering such SBA Assistance was within one year following the termination of such employment.


(b) Failure of a recipient of SBA Assistance to comply with these provisions may result, in the discretion of SBA, in the requirement for immediate repayment of SBA financial Assistance, the immediate termination of other SBA Assistance involved or other appropriate action.


§ 105.203 SBA Assistance to person employing former SBA employee.

(a) SBA will not provide SBA Assistance to any person who has, as an employee, owner, partner, attorney, agent, owner of stock, officer, director, creditor or debtor, any individual who, within one year prior to the request for such SBA Assistance was an SBA employee, without the prior approval of the SBA Standards of Conduct Counselor. The Standards of Conduct Counselor will refer matters of a controversial nature to the Standards of Conduct Committee for final decision; otherwise, his or her decision is final.


(b) In reviewing requests for approval, the Standards of Conduct Counselor will consider:


(1) The relationship of the former employee with the applicant concern;


(2) The nature of the SBA Assistance requested;


(3) The position held by the former employee with SBA and its relationship to the SBA Assistance requested; and


(4) Whether an apparent conflict of interest might exist if the SBA Assistance were granted.


§ 105.204 Assistance to SBA employees or members of their household.

Without the prior written approval of the Standards of Conduct Committee, no SBA Assistance, other than Disaster loans under subparagraphs (1) and (2) of section 7(b) of the Small Business Act, shall be furnished to a person when the sole proprietor, partner, officer, director or significant stockholder of the person is an SBA employee or a household member.


§ 105.205 Duty to report irregularities.

Every employee shall immediately report to the SBA Inspector General any acts of malfeasance or misfeasance or other irregularities, either actual or suspected, arising in connection with the performance by SBA of any of its official functions.


§ 105.206 Applicable rules and directions.

Every employee shall follow all agency rules, regulations, operating procedures, instructions and other proper directions in the performance of his official functions.


§ 105.207 Politically motivated activities with respect to the Minority Small Business Program.

(a) Any employee who has authority to take, direct others to take, recommend, or approve any action with respect to any program or activity conducted pursuant to section 8(a) or section 7(j) of the Small Business Act, shall not, with respect to any such action, exercise or threaten to exercise such authority on the basis of the political activity or affiliation of any party. Employees shall expeditiously report to the SBA Inspector General any such action for which such employee’s participation has been solicited or directed.


(b) Any employee who willfully and knowingly violates this section shall be subject to disciplinary action, which may consist of separation from service, reduction in grade, suspension, or reprimand.


(c) This section shall not apply to any action taken as a penalty or other enforcement of a violation of any law, rule, or regulation prohibiting or restricting political activity.


(d) The prohibitions in and remedial measures provided for under this section with regard to such prohibitions, shall be in addition to, and not in lieu of, any other prohibitions, measures or liabilities that may arise under any other provision of law.


§ 105.208 Penalties.

Any employee guilty of violating any of the provisions in this part may be disciplined, including removal or suspension from SBA employment.


Restrictions on SBA Assistance to Other Individuals

§ 105.301 Assistance to officers or employees of other Government organizations.

(a) SBA must receive a written statement of no objection by the pertinent Department or military service before it gives any SBA Assistance, other than Disaster loans under subparagraphs (1) and (2) of section 7(b) of the Small Business Act, to a person when its sole proprietor, partner, officer, director or stockholder with a 10 percent or more interest, or a household member, is an employee of another Government Department or Agency having a grade of at least GS-13 or its equivalent.


(b) The Standards of Conduct Committee must approve an SBA contract with an entity if a sole proprietor, general partner, officer, director, or stockholder with a 10 or more percent interest (or a household member of such individuals) is an employee of a Government Department or Agency. See also 48 CFR part 35, subpart 3.6.


(c) The Standards of Conduct Committee must approve SBA Assistance, other than disaster loans under subparagraphs (1) and (2) of section 7(b) of the Small Business Act, to a person if its sole proprietor, general partner, officer, director or stockholder with a 10 percent or more interest (or a household member of such individual) is a member of Congress or an appointed official or employee of the legislative or judicial branch of the Government.


§ 105.302 Assistance to employees or members of quasi-Government organizations.

(a) The Standards of Conduct Committee must approve SBA Assistance, other than Disaster loans under subparagraphs (1) and (2) of section 7(b) of the Small Business Act, to a person if its sole proprietor, general partner, officer, director or stockholder with a 10 percent or more interest (or a household member) is a member or employee of a Small Business Advisory Council or is a SCORE volunteer.


(b) In reviewing requests for approval, factors the Standards of Conduct Committee may consider include whether the granting of the SBA Assistance might result in or create the appearance of giving preferential treatment, the loss of complete independence or impartiality, or adversely affect the confidence of the public in the integrity of the Government.


Administrative Provisions

§ 105.401 Standards of Conduct Committee.

(a) The Standards of Conduct Committee will:


(1) Advise and give direction to SBA management officials concerning the administration of this part and any other rules, regulations or directives dealing with conflicts of interest and ethical standards of SBA employees; and


(2) Make decisions on specific requests when its approval is required.


(b) The Standards of Conduct Committee will consist of:


(1) The General Counsel or, in his or her absence, the Deputy General Counsel or, in his or her absence, the Acting General Counsel who shall act as Chairman of the Committee;


(2) The Associate Administrator, Office of Management and Administration, or in his or her absence, the Director, Office of Business Operations; and


(3) The Chief Human Capital Officer, or in his or her absence, the Deputy Chief Human Capital Officer.


[61 FR 2399, Jan. 26, 1996, as amended at 72 FR 50038, Aug. 30, 2007]


§ 105.402 Standards of Conduct Counselors.

(a) The SBA Standards of Conduct Counselor is the Designated Agency Ethics Official, as appointed by the Administrator. Assistant Standards of Conduct Counselors may be designated by the Standards of Conduct Counselor.


(b) The Standards of Conduct Counselors and Assistants:


(1) Provide general advice, assistance and guidance to employees concerning this part and the regulations referred to in § 105.101;


(2) Monitor the Standards of Conduct Program within their assigned areas and provide required reports thereon; and


(3) Review Confidential Financial Disclosure reports as required under 5 CFR part 2634, subpart I, and provide an annual report on compliance with filing requirements to the SBA Standards of Conduct Counselor as of February 1 of each year.


(c) Each employee will be periodically informed of the name, address and telephone number of the Assistant Standards of Conduct Counselor to contact for advice and assistance.


(d) Employee requests for advice or rulings should be directed to the appropriate Standards of Conduct Counselor for appropriate action.


[61 FR 2399, Jan. 26, 1996, as amended at 62 FR 48477, Sept. 16, 1997; 69 FR 63922, Nov. 3, 2004]


§ 105.403 Designated Agency Ethics Officials.

The Designated Agency Ethics Official and Alternates administer the program for Financial Disclosure Statements under 5 CFR 2634.201, receive and evaluate these statements, and provide advice and counsel regarding matters relating to the Ethics in Government Act of 1978 and its implementing regulations. The duties and responsibilities of the Designated Agency Ethics Official and Alternates are set forth in more detail in 5 CFR 2638.203, which is promulgated and amended by the Office of Government Ethics.


[62 FR 2399, Jan. 26, 1996, as amended at 62 FR 48477, Sept. 16, 1997]


PART 106 – COSPONSORSHIPS, FEE AND NON-FEE BASED SBA-SPONSORED ACTIVITIES AND GIFTS


Authority:15 U.S.C. 633 (g) and (h); 15 U.S.C. 637(b)(1)(A); 15 U.S.C. 637(b)(G).


Source:70 FR 70704, Nov. 23, 2005, unless otherwise noted.

Subpart A – Scope and Definitions

§ 106.100 Scope.

The regulations in this part apply to SBA-provided assistance for the benefit of small business through Fee Based SBA-Sponsored Activities or through Cosponsored Activities with Eligible Entities authorized under section 4(h) of the Small Business Act, and to SBA assistance provided directly to small business concerns through Non-Fee Based SBA-Sponsored Activities authorized under section 8(b)(1)(A) of the Small Business Act. The regulations in this part also apply to SBA’s solicitation and acceptance of Gifts under certain sections (sections 4(g), 8(b)(1)(G), 5(b)(9) and 7(k)(2)) of the Small Business Act (15 U.S.C. 631 et seq.), including Gifts of cash, property, services and subsistence. Under section 4(g) of the Small Business Act, Gifts may be solicited and accepted for marketing and outreach purposes including the cost of promotional items and wearing apparel.


§ 106.101 Definitions.

The following definitions apply to this part. Defined terms are capitalized wherever they appear.


(a) Cosponsor means an entity or individual designated in § 106.201 that has signed a written Cosponsorship Agreement with SBA and who actively and substantially participates in planning and conducting an agreed upon Cosponsored Activity.


(b) Cosponsored Activity means an activity, event, project or initiative, designed to provide assistance for the benefit of small business as authorized by section 4(h) of the Small Business Act, which has been set forth in an approved written Cosponsorship Agreement. The Cosponsored Activity must be planned and conducted by SBA and one or more Cosponsors. Assistance for purposes of Cosponsored Activity does not include grant or any other form of financial assistance. A Participant Fee may be charged by SBA or another Cosponsor at any Cosponsored Activity.


(c) Cosponsorship Agreement means an approved written document (as outlined in §§ 106.203 and 106.204 which has been duly executed by SBA and one or more Cosponsors. The Cosponsorship Agreement shall contain the parties’ respective rights, duties and responsibilities regarding implementation of the Cosponsored Activity.


(d) Donor means an individual or entity that provides a Gift, bequest or devise (in cash or in-kind) to SBA.


(e) An Eligible Entity is a potential Cosponsor. An Eligible Entity must be a for-profit or not-for-profit entity, or a Federal, State or local government official or entity.


(f) Fee Based SBA-Sponsored Activity Record (Fee Based Record) means a written document, as outlined in § 106.302, describing a Fee Based SBA-Sponsored Activity and approved in writing pursuant to § 106.303.


(g) Fee Based SBA-Sponsored Activity means an activity, event, project or initiative designed to provide assistance for the benefit of small business, as authorized by section 4(h) of the Small Business Act, at which SBA may charge a Participant Fee. Assistance for purposes of Fee Based SBA-Sponsored Activity does not include grant or any other form of financial assistance. A Fee Based SBA-Sponsored Activity must be planned, conducted, controlled and sponsored solely by SBA.


(h) Gift (including a bequest or a device) is the voluntary transfer to SBA of something of value without the Donor receiving legal consideration.


(i) Non-Fee Based SBA-Sponsored Activity Record (Non-Fee Based Record) means a written document describing a Non-Fee Based SBA-Sponsored Activity which has been approved pursuant to § 106.403.


(j) Non-Fee Based SBA-Sponsored Activity means an activity, event, project or initiative designed to provide assistance directly to small business concerns as authorized by section 8(b)(1)(A) of the Small Business Act. Assistance for purposes of a Non-Fee Based SBA-Sponsored Activity does not include grant or any other form of financial assistance. A Non-Fee Based SBA-Sponsored Activity must be planned, conducted, controlled and sponsored solely by SBA. No fees including Participant Fees may be charged for a Non-Fee Based SBA-Sponsored Activity.


(k) Participant Fee means a minimal fee assessed against a person or entity that participates in a Cosponsored Activity or Fee Based SBA-Sponsored Activity and is used to cover the direct costs of such activity.


(l) Responsible Program Official is an SBA senior management official from the originating office who is accountable for the solicitation and/or acceptance of a Gift to the SBA; a Cosponsored Activity; a Fee Based SBA-Sponsored Activity; or a Non-Fee Based SBA-Sponsored Activity. If the originating office is a district or branch office, the Responsible Program Official is the district director or their deputy. In headquarters, the Responsible Program Official is the management board member or their deputy with responsibility for the relevant program area.


Subpart B – Cosponsored Activities

§ 106.200 Cosponsored Activity.

The Administrator (or designee), after consultation with the General Counsel (or designee), may provide assistance for the benefit of small business through Cosponsored Activities pursuant to section 4(h) of the Small Business Act.


§ 106.201 Who may be a Cosponsor?

(a) Except as specified in paragraph (b) of this section, SBA may enter into a Cosponsorship Agreement with an Eligible Entity as defined in § 106.101(e).


(b) SBA may not enter into a Cosponsorship Agreement with an Eligible Entity if the Administrator (or designee), after consultation with the General Counsel (or designee), determines that such agreement would create a conflict of interest.


§ 106.202 What are the minimum requirements applicable to Cosponsored Activities?

While SBA may subject a Cosponsored Activity to additional requirements through internal policy, procedure and the Cosponsorship Agreement, the following requirements apply to all Cosponsored Activities:


(a) Cosponsored Activities must be set forth in a written Cosponsorship Agreement signed by the Administrator (or designee) and each Cosponsor;


(b) Appropriate recognition must be given to SBA and each Cosponsor but shall not constitute or imply an endorsement by SBA of any Cosponsor or any Cosponsor’s products or services;


(c) Any printed or electronically generated material used to publicize or conduct the Cosponsored Activity, including any material which has been developed, prepared or acquired by a Cosponsor, must be approved in advance by the Responsible Program Official and must include a prominent disclaimer stating that the Cosponsored Activity does not constitute or imply an endorsement by SBA of any Cosponsor or the Cosponsor’s products or services;


(d) No Cosponsor shall make a profit on any Cosponsored Activity. SBA grantees who earn program income on Cosponsored Activities must use that program income for the Cosponsored Activity;


(e) Participant Fee(s) charged for a Cosponsored Activity may not exceed the minimal amount needed to cover the anticipated direct costs of the Cosponsored Activity and must be liquidated prior to other sources of funding for the Cosponsored Activity. If SBA charges a Participant Fee, the collection of the Participant Fees is subject to internal SBA policies and procedures as well as applicable U.S. Treasury rules and guidelines;


(f) SBA may not provide a Cosponsor with lists of names and addresses of small business concerns compiled by SBA which are otherwise protected by law or policy from disclosure; and


(g) Written approval must be obtained as outlined in § 106.204.


§ 106.203 What provisions must be set forth in a Cosponsorship Agreement?

While SBA may require additional provisions in the Cosponsorship Agreement through internal policy and procedure, the following provisions must be in all Cosponsorship Agreements:


(a) A written statement agreed to by each Cosponsor that they will abide by all of the provisions of the Cosponsorship Agreement, the requirements of this subpart as well the applicable definitions in § 106.100;


(b) A narrative description of the Cosponsored Activity;


(c) A listing of SBA’s and each Cosponsor’s rights, duties and responsibilities with regard to the Cosponsored Activity;


(d) A proposed budget demonstrating:


(1) The type and source of financial contribution(s) (including but not limited to cash, in-kind, Gifts, and Participant Fees) that the SBA and each Cosponsor will make to the Cosponsored Activity; and


(2) A reasonable estimation of all anticipated expenses;


(e) A written statement that each Cosponsor agrees that they will not make a profit on the Cosponsored Activity; and


(f) A written statement that Participant Fees, if charged, will not exceed the minimal amount needed to cover the anticipated direct costs of the Cosponsored Activity as outlined in the budget and will be liquidated prior to other sources of funding for the Cosponsored Activity.


§ 106.204 Who has the authority to approve and sign a Cosponsorship Agreement?

The Administrator, or upon his/her written delegation, the Deputy Administrator, an associate or assistant administrator, after consultation with the General Counsel (or designee), has the authority to approve each Cosponsored Activity and sign each Cosponsorship Agreement. This authority cannot be re-delegated.


Subpart C – Fee Based SBA-Sponsored Activities

§ 106.300 Fee Based SBA-Sponsored Activity.

The Administrator (or designee), after consultation with the General Counsel (or designee), may provide assistance for the benefit of small business through Fee-Based SBA-Sponsored Activities pursuant to section 4(h) of the Small Business Act.


§ 106.301 What are the minimum requirements applicable to Fee Based SBA-Sponsored Activities?

While SBA may subject a Fee Based SBA-Sponsored Activity to additional requirements through internal policy and procedure, the following requirements apply to all Fee Based SBA-Sponsored Activities:


(a) A Fee Based Record must be prepared by the Responsible Program Official in advance of the activity;


(b) Any Participant Fees charged will not exceed the minimal amount needed to cover the anticipated direct costs of the activity;


(c) Gifts of cash accepted and the collection of Participant Fees for Fee Based SBA-Sponsored Activities are subject to the applicable requirements in this part, internal SBA policies and procedures as well as applicable U.S. Treasury rules and guidelines; and


(d) Written approval must be obtained as outlined in § 106.303.


§ 106.302 What provisions must be set forth in a Fee Based Record?

A Fee Based Record must contain the following:


(a) A narrative description of the Fee Based SBA-Sponsored Activity;


(b) A certification by the Responsible Program Official that he or she will abide by the requirements contained in this part, as well as all other applicable statutes, regulations, policies and procedures for Fee Based SBA-Sponsored Activities;


(c) A proposed budget demonstrating:


(1) All sources of funding, including annual appropriations, Participant Fees and Gifts, to be used in support of the Fee Based SBA-Sponsored Activity;


(2) A reasonable estimation of all anticipated expenses, which indicates that no profit is anticipated from the Fee Based SBA-Sponsored Activity; and


(3) A provision stating that Participant Fees, if charged, will not exceed the minimal amount needed to cover the anticipated direct costs of the Fee Based SBA-Sponsored Activity as outlined in the budget;


(d) With regard to any donations made in support of the Fee Based SBA-Sponsored Activity, the Fee Based Record will reflect the following:


(1) Each Donor may receive appropriate recognition for its Gift; and


(2) Any printed or electronically generated material recognizing a Donor will include a prominent disclaimer stating that the acceptance of the Gift does not constitute or imply an endorsement by SBA of the Donor or the Donor’s products or services.


§ 106.303 Who has authority to approve and sign a Fee Based Record?

The Administrator, or upon his/her written delegation, the Deputy Administrator, an associate or assistant administrator, after consultation with the General Counsel (or designee), has the authority to approve and sign each Fee Based Record. This authority may not be re-delegated.


Subpart D – Non-Fee Based SBA-Sponsored Activities

§ 106.400 Non-Fee Based SBA-Sponsored Activity.

The Administrator (or designee) may provide assistance directly to small business concerns through Non-Fee Based SBA-Sponsored Activities under section 8(b)(1)(A) of the Small Business Act.


§ 106.401 What are the minimum requirements applicable to a Non-Fee Based SBA-Sponsored Activities?

While SBA may subject Non-Fee Based SBA-Sponsored Activities to additional requirements through internal policy and procedure, the following requirements apply to all Non-Fee Based SBA-Sponsored Activity:


(a) A Non-Fee Based Record must be prepared and approved by the Responsible Program Official in advance of the activity;


(b) Gifts of cash accepted for Non-Fee Based SBA-Sponsored Activities are subject to § 106.500, internal SBA policies and procedures as well as applicable U.S. Treasury rules and guidelines; and


(c) Written approval must be obtained as outlined in § 106.403.


§ 106.402 What provisions must be set forth in a Non-Fee Based Record?

A Non-Fee Based Record must contain the following:


(a) A narrative description of the Non-Fee Based SBA-Sponsored Activity;


(b) A certification by the Responsible Program Official that he or she will abide by the requirements contained in this part, as well as all other applicable statutes, regulations, policies and procedures for Non-Fee Based SBA-Sponsored Activities;


(c) If applicable, a list of Donors supporting the activity; and


(d) With regard to any donations made in support of a Non-Fee Based SBA-Sponsored Activity, the Non-Fee Based Record will reflect the following:


(1) Each Donor may receive appropriate recognition for its Gift; and


(2) Any printed or electronically generated material recognizing a Donor will include a prominent disclaimer stating that the acceptance of the Gift does not constitute or imply an endorsement by SBA of the Donor, or the Donor’s products or services.


§ 106.403 Who has authority to approve and sign a Non-Fee Based Record?

The appropriate Responsible Program Official, after consultation with the designated legal counsel, has authority to approve and sign each Non-Fee Based Record.


Subpart E – Gifts

§ 106.500 What is SBA’s Gift authority?

This section covers SBA’s Gift acceptance authority under sections 4(g), 8(b)(1)(G), 5(b)(9) and 7(k)(2) of the Small Business Act.


§ 106.501 What minimum requirements are applicable to SBA’s solicitation and/or acceptance of Gifts?

While SBA may subject the solicitation and/or acceptance of Gifts to additional requirements through internal policy and procedure, the following requirements must apply to all Gift solicitations and/or acceptances under the authority of the Small Business Act sections cited in § 106.500:


(a) SBA is required to use the Gift (whether cash or in-kind) in a manner consistent with the original purpose of the Gift;


(b) There must be written documentation of each Gift solicitation and/or acceptance signed by an authorized SBA official;


(c) Any Gift solicited and/or accepted must undergo a determination, prior to solicitation of the Gift or prior to acceptance of the Gift if unsolicited, of whether a conflict of interest exists between the Donor and SBA; and


(d) All cash Gifts donated to SBA under the authority cited in § 106.500 must be deposited in an SBA trust account at the U.S. Department of the Treasury.


§ 106.502 Who has authority to perform a Gift conflict of interest determination?

(a) For Gifts solicited and/or accepted under sections 4(g), 8(b)(1)(G), and 7(k)(2) of the Small Business Act, the General Counsel, or designee, must make the final conflict of interest determination. No Gift shall be solicited and/or accepted under these sections of the Small Business Act if such solicitation and/or acceptance would, in the determination of the General Counsel (or designee), create a conflict of interest.


(b) For Gifts of services and facilities solicited and/or accepted under section 5(b)(9), the conflict of interest determination may be made by designated disaster legal counsel.


§ 106.503 Are there types of Gifts which SBA may not solicit and/or accept?

Yes. SBA shall not solicit and/or accept Gifts of or for (or use cash Gifts to purchase or engage in) the following:


(a) Alcohol products;


(b) Tobacco products;


(c) Pornographic or sexually explicit objects or services;


(d) Gambling (including raffles and lotteries);


(e) Parties primarily for the benefit of Government employees; and


(f) Any other product or service prohibited by law or policy.


PART 107 – SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES


Authority:15 U.S.C. 681, 683, 687(c), 687b, 687d, 687g, 687m.


Source:61 FR 3189, Jan. 31, 1996, unless otherwise noted.

Subpart A – Introduction to Part 107

§ 107.20 Legal basis and applicability of this part 107.

(a) The regulations in this part implement Title III of the Small Business Investment Act of 1958, as amended. All Licensees must comply with all applicable regulations, accounting guidelines and valuation guidelines for Licensees.


(b) Provisions of this part which are not mandated by the Act shall not supersede existing State law. A party claiming that a conflict exists shall submit an opinion of independent counsel, citing authorities, for SBA’s resolution of the issues involved.


§ 107.30 Amendments to Act and regulations.

A Licensee shall be subject to all existing and future provisions of the Act and parts 107 and 112 of title 13 of the Code of Federal Regulations.


§ 107.40 How to read this part 107.

(a) Center Headings. All references in this part to SBA forms, and instructions for their preparation, are to the current issue of such forms. Center headings are descriptive and are used for convenience only. They have no regulatory effect.


(b) Capitalizing defined terms. Terms defined in § 107.50 are capitalized in this part 107.


(c) The pronoun “you” as used in this part 107 means a Licensee or license applicant, as appropriate, unless otherwise noted.


Subpart B – Definition of Terms Used in Part 107

§ 107.50 Definition of terms.

Accumulated Prioritized Payments has the meaning set forth in § 107.1520.


Act means the Small Business Investment Act of 1958, as amended.


Adjustments has the meaning set forth in § 107.1520.


Affiliate or Affiliates has the meaning set forth in § 121.103 of this chapter.


Articles mean articles of incorporation or charter for a Corporate Licensee and the partnership agreement or certificate for a Partnership Licensee.


Assistance or Assisted means Financing of or management services rendered to a Small Business by a Licensee pursuant to the Act and these regulations.


Associate of a Licensee means any of the following:


(1)(i) An officer, director, employee or agent of a Corporate Licensee;


(ii) A Control Person, employee or agent of a Partnership Licensee;


(iii) An Investment Adviser/Manager of any Licensee, including any Person who contracts with a Control Person of a Partnership Licensee to be the Investment Adviser/Manager of such Licensee; or


(iv) Any Person regularly serving a Licensee on retainer in the capacity of attorney at law.


(2) Any Person who owns or controls, or who has entered into an agreement to own or control, directly or indirectly, at least 10 percent of any class of stock of a Corporate Licensee or a limited partner’s interest of at least 10 percent of the partnership capital of a Partnership Licensee. However, a limited partner in a Partnership Licensee is not considered an Associate if such Person is an entity Institutional Investor whose investment in the Partnership, including commitments, represents no more than 33 percent of the partnership capital of the Licensee and no more than five percent of such Person’s net worth.


(3) Any officer, director, partner (other than a limited partner), manager, agent, or employee of any Associate described in paragraph (1) or (2) of this definition.


(4) Any Person that directly or indirectly Controls, or is Controlled by, or is under Common Control with, a Licensee.


(5) Any Person that directly or indirectly Controls, or is Controlled by, or is under Common Control with, any Person described in paragraphs (1) and (2) of this definition.


(6) Any Close Relative of any Person described in paragraphs (1),(2), (4), and (5) of this definition.


(7) Any Secondary Relative of any Person described in paragraphs (1), (2), (4), and (5) of this definition.


(8) Any concern in which –


(i) Any person described in paragraphs (1) through (6) of this definition is an officer; general partner, or managing member; or


(ii) Any such Person(s) singly or collectively Control or own, directly or indirectly, an equity interest of at least 10 percent (excluding interests that such Person(s) own indirectly through ownership interests in the Licensee).


(9) Any concern in which any Person(s) described in paragraph (7) of this definition singly or collectively own (including beneficial ownership) a majority equity interest, or otherwise have Control. As used in this paragraph (9), “collectively” means together with any Person(s) described in paragraphs (1) though (7) of this definition.


(10) For the purposes of this definition, if any Associate relationship described in paragraphs (1) through (7) of this definition exists at any time within six months before or after the date that a Licensee provides Financing, then that Associate relationship is considered to exist on the date of the Financing.


(11) If any Licensee has any ownership interest in another Licensee, the two Licensees are Associates of each other.


Capital Impairment has the meaning set forth in § 107.1830(c).


Central Registration Agent or CRA means one or more agents appointed by SBA for the purpose of issuing TCs and performing the functions enumerated in § 107.1620 and performing similar functions for Debentures and Participating Securities funded outside the pooling process.


Charge means an annual fee on Leverage issued on or after October 1, 1996 (except for Leverage issued pursuant to a commitment made by SBA before October 1, 1996), which is payable to SBA by Licensees, subject to the terms and conditions set forth in § 107.1130(d).


Close Relative of an individual means:


(1) A current or former spouse;


(2) A father, mother, guardian, brother, sister, son, daughter; or


(3) A father-in-law, mother-in-law, brother-in-law, sister-in-law, son-in-law, or daughter-in-law.


Combined Capital means the sum of Regulatory Capital and outstanding Leverage.


Commitment means a written agreement between a Licensee and an eligible Small Business that obligates the Licensee to provide Financing (except a guarantee) to that Small Business in a fixed or determinable sum, by a fixed or determinable future date. In this context the term “agreement” means that there has been agreement on the principal economic terms of the Financing. The agreement may include reasonable conditions precedent to the Licensee’s obligation to fund the commitment, but these conditions must be outside the Licensee’s control.


Common Control means a condition where two or more Persons, either through ownership, management, contract, or otherwise, are under the Control of one group or Person. Two or more Licensees are presumed to be under Common Control if they are Affiliates of each other by reason of common ownership or common officers, directors, or general partners; or if they are managed or their investments are significantly directed either by a common independent investment advisor or managerial contractor, or by two or more such advisors or contractors that are Affiliates of each other. This presumption may be rebutted by evidence satisfactory to SBA.


Control means the possession, direct or indirect, of the power to direct or cause the direction of the management and policies of a Licensee or other concern, whether through the ownership of voting securities, by contract, or otherwise.


Control Person means any Person that controls a Licensee, either directly or through an intervening entity. A Control Person includes:


(1) A general partner of a Partnership Licensee;


(2) Any Person serving as the general partner, officer, director, or manager (in the case of a limited liability company) of any entity that controls a Licensee, either directly or through an intervening entity;


(3) Any Person that –


(i) Controls or owns, directly or through an intervening entity, at least 10 percent of a Partnership Licensee or any entity described in paragraphs (1) or (2) of this definition; and


(ii) Participates in the investment decisions of the general partner of such Partnership Licensee;


(4) Any Person that controls or owns, directly or through an intervening entity, at least 50 percent of a Partnership Licensee or any entity described in paragraphs (1) or (2) of this definition.


Corporate Licensee. See definition of Licensee in this section.


Cost of Money has the meaning set forth in § 107.855.


Debenture Rate means the interest rate, as published from time to time in the Federal Register by SBA, for ten year debentures issued by Licensees and funded through public sales of certificates bearing SBA’s guarantee. User or guarantee fees, if any, paid by a Licensee are not considered in determining the Debenture Rate.


Debentures means debt obligations issued by Licensees pursuant to section 303(a) of the Act and held or guaranteed by SBA.


Debt Securities has the meaning set forth in § 107.815.


Disadvantaged Business means a Small Business that is at least 50 percent owned, and controlled and managed, on a day to day basis, by a person or persons whose participation in the free enterprise system is hampered because of social or economic disadvantages.


Distributable Securities means equity securities that are determined by SBA (with the advice of a third party expert in the marketing of securities) to meet each of the following requirements:


(1) The securities (which may include securities that are salable pursuant to the provisions of Rule 144 (17 CFR 230.144) under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended) are salable immediately without restriction under Federal and state securities laws;


(2) The securities are of a class:


(i) Which is listed and registered on a national securities exchange, or


(ii) For which quotation information is disseminated in the National Association of Securities Dealers Automated Quotation System and as to which transaction reports and last sale data are disseminated pursuant to Rule 11Aa3-1 (17 CFR 240.11Aa3-1) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended; and


(3) The quantity of such securities to be distributed to SBA can be sold over a reasonable period of time without having an adverse impact upon the price of the security.


Distribution means any transfer of cash or non-cash assets to SBA, its agent or Trustee, or to partners in a Partnership Licensee, or to shareholders in a Corporate Licensee. Capitalization of Retained Earnings Available for Distribution constitutes a Distribution to the Licensee’s non-SBA partners or shareholders.


Early Stage SBIC means a Section 301(c) Partnership Licensee, licensed pursuant to § 107.310 of this part, in which at least 50 percent of all Loans and Investments (in dollars) must be made to Small Businesses that are “early stage” companies at the time of the Licensee’s initial Financing (see also § 107.1810(f)(11)). For the purposes of this definition, an “early stage” company is one that has never achieved positive cash flow from operations in any fiscal year.


Earmarked Assets has the meaning set forth in § 107.1510(b). (See also § 107.1590.)


Earmarked Profit (Loss) has the meaning set forth in § 107.1510.


Earned Prioritized Payments has the meaning set forth in § 107.1520.


Energy Saving Activities means any of the following:


(1) Manufacturing or research and development of products, integral product components, integral material, or related software that meet one or more of the following:


(i) Improves residential energy efficiency as demonstrated by meeting Department of Energy or Environmental Protection Agency criteria for use of the Energy Star trademark label;


(ii) Improves commercial energy efficiency as demonstrated by being in the upper 25% of efficiency for all similar products as designated by the Department of Energy’s Federal Energy Management Program;


(iii) Improves automobile efficiency or reduces consumption of non-renewable fuels through the use of advanced batteries, power electronics, or electric motors; advanced combustion engine technology; alternative fuels; or advanced materials technologies, such as lightweighting;


(iv) Improves industrial energy efficiency through combined heat and power (CHP) prime mover or power generation technologies, heat recovery units, absorption chillers, desiccant dehumidifiers, packaged CHP systems, more efficient process heating equipment, more efficient steam generation equipment, heat recovery steam generators, or more efficient use of water recapture, purification and reuse for industrial application;


(v) Advances commercialization of technologies developed by recipients of awards from the Department of Energy under the Advanced Research Projects Agency – Energy, Small Business Innovation Research, or Small Business Technology Transfer programs;


(vi) Reduces the consumption of non-renewable energy by providing renewable energy sources, as demonstrated by meeting the standards, applicable to the year in which the investment is made, for receiving a Renewable Electricity Production Tax Credit as defined in Internal Revenue Code Section 45 or an Energy Credit as defined in Internal Revenue Code Section 48;


(vii) Reduces the consumption of non-renewable energy for electric power generation as described in Internal Revenue Code Section 48(c)(1)(A) by providing highly efficient energy conversion systems that can use renewable or non-renewable fuel through fuel cells; or


(viii) Improves electricity delivery efficiency by supporting one or more of the smart grid functions as identified in 42 U.S.C. 17386(d), by means of a product, service, or functionality that serves one or more of the following smart grid operational domains: Equipment manufacturing, customer systems, advanced metering infrastructure, electric distribution systems, electric transmission systems, storage systems, and cyber security.


(2) Installation and/or inspection services associated with the deployment of energy saving products as identified by meeting one or more of the following standards:


(i) Deploys products that qualify, in the year in which the investment is made, for installation-related Federal Tax Credits for Residential Consumer Energy Efficiency;


(ii) Deploys products related to commercial energy efficiency as demonstrated by deploying commercial equipment that is in the upper 25% of efficiency for all similar products as designated by the Department of Energy’s Federal Energy Management Program;


(iii) Deploys combined heat and power products, goods, or services;


(iv) Deploys products that qualify, in the year in which the investment is made, for receiving a Renewable Electricity Production Tax Credit as defined in Internal Revenue Code Section 45 or an Energy Credit as defined in Internal Revenue Code Section 48; or


(v) Deploys a product, service, or functionality that improves electricity delivery efficiency by supporting one or more of the smart grid functions as identified in 42 U.S.C. 17386(d), and that serves one or more of the following smart grid operational domains: Equipment manufacturing, customer systems, advanced metering infrastructure, electric distribution systems, electric transmission systems, or grid cyber security.


(3) Auditing or consulting services performed with the objective of identifying potential improvements of the type described in paragraph (1) or (2) of this definition.


(4) Other manufacturing, service, or research and development activities that use less energy to provide the same level of energy service or reduce the consumption of non-renewable energy by providing renewable energy sources, as determined by SBA. A Licensee must obtain such determination in writing prior to providing Financing to a Small Business. SBA will consider factors including but not limited to:


(i) Results of energy efficiency testing performed in accordance with recognized professional standards, preferably by a qualified third-party professional, such as a certified energy assessor, energy auditor, or energy engineer;


(ii) Patents or grants awarded to or licenses held by the Small Business related to Energy Saving Activities listed in subsection (1) or (2) above;


(iii) For research and development of products or services that are anticipated to reduce the consumption of non-renewable energy, written evidence from an independent, certified third-party professional of the feasibility, commercial potential, and projected energy savings of such products or services; and


(iv) Eligibility of the product or service for a Federal tax credit cited in this definition that is not available in the year in which the investment is made, but was available in a previous year.


Energy Saving Qualified Investment means a Financing which:


(1) Is made by a Licensee licensed after September 30, 2008;


(2) Is in the form of a Loan, Debt Security, or Equity Security, each as defined in this section;


(3) Is made to a Small Business that is primarily engaged in Energy Saving Activities. A Licensee must obtain a determination from SBA prior to the provision of Financing as to whether a Small Business is primarily engaged in Energy Saving Activities. SBA will consider the distribution of revenues, employees and expenditures, intellectual property rights held, and Energy Saving Activities described in a business plan presented to investors as part of a formal solicitation in making its determination. However, a Small Business is presumed to be primarily engaged in Energy Saving Activities, and no pre-Financing determination by SBA is required, if:


(i) The Small Business derived at least 50% of its revenues during its most recently completed fiscal year from Energy Saving Activities; or


(ii) The Small Business will utilize 100% of the Financing proceeds received from a Licensee to engage in Energy Saving Activities.


Equity Capital Investments means investments in a Small Business in the form of common or preferred stock, limited partnership interests, options, warrants, or similar equity instruments, including subordinated debt with equity features if such debt provides only for interest payments contingent upon and limited to the extent of earnings. Equity Capital Investments must not require amortization. Equity Capital Investments may be guaranteed; however, neither Equity Capital Investments nor such guarantee may be collateralized or otherwise secured. Investments classified as Debt Securities (see §§ 107.800 and 107.815) are not precluded from qualifying as Equity Capital Investments.


Equity Securities has the meaning set forth in § 107.800.


Financing or Financed means outstanding financial assistance provided to a Small Business by a Licensee, whether through:


(1) Loans;


(2) Debt Securities;


(3) Equity Securities;


(4) Guarantees; or


(5) Purchases of securities of a Small Business through or from an underwriter (see § 107.825).


Guaranty Agreement means the contract entered into by SBA which is a guarantee backed by the full faith and credit of the United States Government as to timely payment of principal and interest on Debentures or the Redemption Price of and Prioritized Payments on Participating Securities and SBA’s rights in connection with such guarantee.


Includible Non-Cash Gains means those non-cash gains (as reported on SBA Form 468) that are realized in the form of Publicly Traded and Marketable securities or investment grade debt instruments. For purposes of this definition, investment grade debt instruments means those instruments that are rated “BBB” or “Baa”, or better, by Standard & Poor’s Corporation or Moody’s Investors Service, respectively. Non-rated debt may be considered to be investment grade if Licensee obtains a written opinion from an investment banking firm acceptable to SBA stating that the non-rated debt instrument is equivalent in risk to the issuer’s investment grade debt.


Inflation Adjustment is the methodology used to increase SBIC administrative fees using the Consumer Price Index for Urban Consumers (CPI-U), calculated by the U.S. Bureau of Labor and Statistics (BLS), using the U.S. city average for all items, not seasonally adjusted, with the base period of 1982 − 84 = 100. To calculate the Inflation Adjustment, each year, SBA will divide the CPI-U from the most recent June by the CPI-U from June of the preceding year. If the result is greater than 1, SBA will increase the relevant fees as follows:


(1) Multiply the result by the current fee; and


(2) Round to the nearest $100.


Institutional Investor means:


(1) Entities. Any of the following entities if the entity has a net worth (exclusive of unfunded commitments from investors) of at least $1 million, or such higher amount as is specified in paragraph (1) of this definition. (See also § 107.230(b)(4) for limitations on the amount of an Institutional Investor’s commitment that may be included in Private Capital.)


(i) A State or National bank, trust company, savings bank, or savings and loan association.


(ii) An insurance company.


(iii) A 1940 Act Investment Company or Business Development Company (each as defined in the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended (15 U.S.C. 8a-1 et seq.).


(iv) A holding company of any entity described in paragraph (1)(i), (ii) or (iii) of this definition.


(v) An employee benefit or pension plan established for the benefit of employees of the Federal government, any State or political subdivision of a State, or any agency or instrumentality of such government unit.


(vi) An employee benefit or pension plan (as defined in the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974, as amended (Pub. L. 93-406, 88 Stat. 829), excluding plans established under section 401(k) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 (26 U.S.C. 401(k)), as amended).


(vii) A trust, foundation or endowment exempt from Federal income taxation under the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended.


(viii) A corporation, partnership or other entity with a net worth (exclusive of unfunded commitments from investors) of more than $10 million.


(ix) A State, a political subdivision of a State, or an agency or instrumentality of a State or its political subdivision.


(x) An entity whose primary purpose is to manage and invest non-Federal funds on behalf of at least three Institutional Investors described in paragraphs (1)(i) through (1)(ix) of this definition, each of whom must have at least a 10 percent ownership interest in the entity.


(xi) Any other entity that SBA determines to be an Institutional Investor.


(2) Individuals. (i) Any of the following individuals if he/she is also a permanent resident of the United States:


(A) An individual who is an Accredited Investor (as defined in the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (15 U.S.C. 77a-77aa)) and whose commitment to the Licensee is backed by a letter of credit from a State or National bank acceptable to SBA.


(B) An individual whose personal net worth is at least $2 million and at least ten times the amount of his or her commitment to the Licensee. The individual’s personal net worth must not include the value of any equity in his or her most valuable residence.


(C) An individual whose personal net worth (determined in accordance with paragraph (2)(i)(B) of this definition) is at least $10 million.


(ii) Any individual who is not a permanent resident of the United States but who otherwise satisfies paragraph (2)(i) of this definition provided such individual has irrevocably appointed an agent within the United States for the service of process.


Investment Adviser/Manager means any Person who furnishes advice or assistance with respect to operations of a Licensee under a written contract executed in accordance with the provisions of § 107.510.


Lending Institution means a concern that is operating under regulations of a state or Federal licensing, supervising, or examining body, or whose shares are publicly traded and listed on a recognized stock exchange or NASDAQ and which has assets in excess of $500 million; and which, in either case, holds itself out to the public as engaged in the making of commercial and industrial loans and whose lending operations are not for the purpose of financing its own or an Associate’s sales or business operations.


Leverage means financial assistance provided to a Licensee by SBA, either through the purchase or guaranty of a Licensee’s Debentures or Participating Securities, or the purchase of a Licensee’s Preferred Securities, and any other SBA financial assistance evidenced by a security of the Licensee.


Leverageable Capital means Regulatory Capital, excluding unfunded commitments.


Licensee means either a corporation (Corporate Licensee), or a limited partnership organized pursuant to § 107.160 (Partnership Licensee), to which a license has been granted pursuant to the Act. For certain purposes, the Entity General Partner of a Partnership Licensee is treated as if it were a Licensee (see § 107.160(b)(2)).


LMI Enterprise means:


(1) A Small Business that has at least 50% of its employees or tangible assets located in LMI Zone(s) or in which at least 35% of the full-time employees have primary residences in LMI Zone(s), in either case determined as of the time of application for SBIC financing; or


(2) A Small Business that does not meet the requirements of paragraph (1) of this definition as of the time of application for SBIC financing but that certifies at such time that it intends to meet the requirements within 180 days after the closing of the SBIC financing. A Small Business qualifying under this paragraph (2) will no longer be an LMI Enterprise as of the 180th day after the closing of the SBIC financing unless, on or before such date, at least 50% of its employees or tangible assets are located in LMI Zones or at least 35% of its full-time employees have primary residences in LMI Zones.


LMI Investment means a financing of an LMI Enterprise, made after September 30, 1999, in the form of equity securities or debt securities that are junior to all existing or future secured borrowings of the business. The debt securities may be guaranteed and may be secured by the assets of the LMI Enterprise, but the guarantee may not be collateralized or otherwise secured.


LMI Zone means any area located within a HUBZone (as defined in 13 CFR 126.103), an Urban Empowerment Zone or Urban Enterprise Community (as designated by the Secretary of the Department of Housing and Urban Development), a Rural Empowerment Zone or Rural Enterprise Community (as designated by the Secretary of the Department of Agriculture), an area of Low Income or Moderate Income (as recognized by the Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council), or a county with Persistent Poverty (as classified by the Economic Research Service of the Department of Agriculture).


Loan has the meaning set forth in § 107.810.


Loans and Investments means Portfolio Securities, Assets Acquired in Liquidation of Portfolio Securities, Operating Concerns Acquired, and Notes and Other Securities Received, as set forth in the Statement of Financial Position of SBA Form 468.


Management Expenses has the meaning set forth in § 107.520.


1940 Act Company means a Licensee which is registered under the Investment Company Act of 1940.


1980 Act Company means a Licensee which is registered under the Small Business Investment Incentive Act of 1980.


Original Issue Price means the price paid by the purchaser for securities at the time of issuance.


Participating Securities means preferred stock, preferred limited partnership interests, or similar instruments issued by Licensees, including debentures having interest payable only to the extent of earnings, all of which are subject to the terms set forth in §§ 107.1500 through 107.1590 and section 303(g) of the Act.


Partnership Licensee. See definition of Licensee in this section.


Payment Date means:


(1) For a Participating Securities issuer, each February 1, May 1, August 1, and November 1 during the term of a Participating Security, or


(2) For an Early Stage SBIC, each March 1, June 1, September 1, and December 1 during the term of a Debenture.


Person means a natural person or legal entity.


Pool means an aggregation of SBA guaranteed Debentures or SBA guaranteed Participating Securities approved by SBA.


Portfolio means the securities representing a Licensee’s total outstanding Financing of Small Businesses. It does not include idle funds or assets acquired in liquidation of Portfolio securities.


Portfolio Concern means a Small Business Assisted by a Licensee.


Preferred Securities means nonvoting preferred stock or nonvoting limited partnership interests issued to SBA prior to October 1, 1996, by a Section 301(d) Licensee. Such securities were issued at par value in the case of preferred stock, or at face value in the case of preferred limited partnership interests.


Prioritized Payments has the meaning set forth in § 107.1520.


Private Capital has the meaning set forth in § 107.230.


Profit Participation has the meaning set forth in § 107.1500(c)(3).


Publicly Traded and Marketable means securities that are salable without restriction or that are salable within 12 months pursuant to Rule 144 (17 CFR 230.144) of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, by the holder thereof (or in the case of an In-kind Distribution by the distributee thereof), and are of a class which is traded on a regulated stock exchange, or is listed in the Automated Quotation System of the National Association of Securities Dealers (NASDAQ), or has, at a minimum, at least two market makers as defined in the relevant sections of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (15 U.S.C. 77b et seq.), and in all cases the quantity of which can be sold over a reasonable period of time without having an adverse impact upon the price of the stock.


Qualified Non-private Funds has the meaning set forth in § 107.230.


Redemption Price means the amount required to be paid by the issuer, or successor to the issuer, of Preferred or Participating Securities to repurchase such securities from the holder. The Redemption Price shall be the Original Issue Price less any prepayments or prior redemptions.


Regulatory Capital means:


(1) General. Regulatory Capital means Private Capital, excluding non-cash assets contributed to a Licensee or a license applicant, and non-cash assets purchased by a license applicant, unless such assets have been converted to cash or have been approved by SBA for inclusion in Regulatory Capital. For purposes of this definition, sales of contributed non-cash assets with recourse or borrowing against such assets shall not constitute a conversion to cash.


(2) Exclusion of questionable commitments. An investor’s commitment to a Licensee is excluded from Regulatory Capital if SBA determines that the collectibility of the commitment is questionable.


Retained Earnings Available for Distribution means Undistributed Net Realized Earnings less any Unrealized Depreciation on Loans and Investments (as reported on SBA Form 468), and represents the amount that a Licensee may distribute to investors (including SBA) as a profit Distribution, or transfer to Private Capital.


SBA means the Small Business Administration, 409 Third Street, SW., Washington, DC 20416.


Secondary Relative of an individual means:


(1) A grandparent, grandchild, or any other ancestor or lineal descendent who is not a Close Relative;


(2) An uncle, aunt, nephew, niece, or first cousin; or


(3) A spouse of any person described in paragraph (1) or (2) of this definition.


Section 301(c) Licensee has the meaning set forth in § 107.100.


Section 301(d) Licensee means a company licensed prior to October 1, 1996 under section 301(d) of the Act as in effect on the date of licensing, that may provide Assistance only to Disadvantaged Businesses. A Section 301(d) Licensee may be organized as a for-profit corporation, as a non-profit corporation, or as a limited partnership.


Short-term Financing means Financing with a term of less than one year in accordance with the regulations.


Small Business means a small business concern as defined in section 103(5) of the Act (including its Affiliates), which for purposes of size eligibility, meets the applicable criteria set forth in part 121 of this chapter.


Smaller Enterprise has the meaning set forth in § 107.710.


Start-up Financing means an Equity Capital Investment in a Small Business that –


(1) Has not had sales exceeding $3,000,000 or positive cash flow from operations in any of its last three full fiscal years; and


(2) Was not formed to acquire any existing business, unless the acquired business satisfies paragraphs (1) and (2) of this definition.


Temporary Debt has the meaning set forth in § 107.570.


Trust means the legal entity created for the purpose of holding guaranteed Debentures or Participating Securities and the guaranty agreement related thereto, receiving, holding and making any related payments, and accounting for such payments.


Trust Certificate Rate means a fixed rate determined by the Secretary of the Treasury at the time Participating Securities or Debentures are pooled, taking into consideration the current average market yield on outstanding marketable obligations of the United States with maturities comparable to the maturities of the Trust Certificates being guaranteed by SBA, adjusted to the nearest one-eighth of one percent.


Trust Certificates (TCs) means certificates issued by SBA, its agent or Trustee and representing ownership of all or a fractional part of a Trust or Pool of Debentures or Participating Securities.


Trustee means the trustee or trustees of a Trust.


Undistributed Net Realized Earnings means Undistributed Realized Earnings less Non-cash Gains/Income, each as reported on SBA Form 468.


Unrealized Appreciation means the amount by which a Licensee’s valuation of each of its Loans and Investments, as determined by its Board of Directors or General Partner(s) in accordance with Licensee’s valuation policies, exceeds the cost basis thereof.


Unrealized Depreciation means the amount by which a Licensee’s valuation of each of its Loans and Investments, as determined by its Board of Directors or General Partner(s) in accordance with Licensee’s valuation policies, is below the cost basis thereof.


Unrealized Gain (Loss) on Securities Held means the sum of the Unrealized Appreciation and Unrealized Depreciation on all of a Licensee’s Loans and Investments, less estimated future income tax expense or estimated realizable future income tax benefit, as appropriate.


Venture Capital Financing has the meaning set forth in § 107.1160.


Wind-up Plan has the meaning set forth in § 107.590.


[61 FR 3189, Jan. 31, 1996; 61 FR 41496, Aug. 9, 1996, as amended at 62 FR 11759, Mar. 13, 1997; 63 FR 5865, Feb. 5, 1998; 64 FR 52645, Sept. 30, 1999; 64 FR 70995, Dec. 20, 1999; 69 FR 8098, Feb. 23, 2004; 77 FR 23378, Apr. 19, 2012; 77 FR 25051, Apr. 27, 2012; 79 FR 62823, Oct. 21, 2014; 82 FR 39340, Aug. 18, 2017; 82 FR 52184, Nov. 13, 2017]


Subpart C – Qualifying for an SBIC License

Organizing an SBIC

§ 107.100 Organizing a Section 301(c) Licensee.

Section 301(c) Licensee means a company licensed under section 301(c) of the Act. It may be organized as a for-profit corporation or as a limited partnership created in accordance with the special rules of § 107.160.


§ 107.115 1940 Act and 1980 Act Companies.

A 1940 Act or 1980 Act Company is eligible to apply for an SBIC license, and an existing Licensee is eligible to apply for SBA’s approval to convert to a 1940 Act or 1980 Act Company. In either case, the 1940 Act or 1980 Act Company may elect to be taxed as a regulated investment company under section 851 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (26 U.S.C. 851). However, a Licensee making such election may make Distributions only as permitted under the applicable sections of this part (see the definition of Retained Earnings Available for Distribution, § 107.585, and §§ 107.1540 through 107.1580).


§ 107.120 Special rules for a Section 301(d) Licensee owned by another Licensee.

With SBA’s prior written approval, a Section 301(d) Licensee may operate as the subsidiary of one or more Licensees (participant Licensees), subject to the following:


(a) Each participant Licensee must own at least 20 percent of the voting securities of the Section 301(d) Licensee.


(b) A participant Licensee must treat its entire capital contribution to the subsidiary as a reduction of its Leverageable Capital. The participant Licensee’s remaining Leverageable Capital must be sufficient to support its outstanding Leverage.


(c) A participant Licensee may not transfer its Leverage to a subsidiary Section 301(d) Licensee.


[63 FR 5865, Feb. 5, 1998]


§ 107.130 Requirement for qualified management.

When applying for a license, and while you have a license, you must show, to the satisfaction of SBA, that your current or proposed management team is qualified and has the knowledge, experience and capability necessary for investing in the types of businesses contemplated by the Act, the regulations in this part 107, and your business plan. You must designate at least one individual as the official responsible for contact with SBA.


[61 FR 3189, Jan. 31, 1996, as amended at 77 FR 25051, Apr. 27, 2012]


§ 107.140 SBA approval of initial Management Expenses.

If you plan to obtain Leverage, you must have your Management Expenses approved by SBA at the time of licensing. (See § 107.520 for the definition of Management Expenses.)


§ 107.150 Management-ownership diversity requirement.

(a) Diversity requirement. You must satisfy the requirements in paragraphs (b), (c) and (d) of this section:


(1) In order to obtain an SBIC license (unless you do not plan to obtain Leverage),


(2) If at the time you were licensed you did not plan to obtain Leverage, but you now wish to be eligible for Leverage, or


(3) If SBA so requires as a condition of approval of your transfer of Control under § 107.440.


(b) Percentage ownership requirement. (1) Except as provided in paragraph (b)(2) of this section, no Person or group of Persons who are Affiliates of one another may own or control, directly or indirectly, more than 70 percent of your Regulatory Capital or your Leverageable Capital.


(2) Exception. An investor that is a traditional investment company, as determined by SBA, may own and control more than 70 percent of your Regulatory Capital and your Leverageable Capital. For purposes of this section, a traditional investment company must be a professionally managed firm organized exclusively to pool capital from more than one source for the purpose of investing in businesses that are expected to generate substantial returns to the firm’s investors. In determining whether a firm is a traditional investment company for purposes of this section, SBA will also consider:


(i) Whether the managers of the firm are unrelated to and unaffiliated with the investors in the firm;


(ii) Whether the managers of the firm are authorized and motivated to make investments that, in their independent judgment, are likely to produce significant returns to all investors in the firm;


(iii) Whether the firm benefits from the use of the SBIC only through the financial performance of the SBIC; and


(iv) Other related factors.


(c) Non-affiliation requirement – (1) General rule. At least 30 percent of your Regulatory Capital and Leverageable Capital must be owned and controlled by three Persons unaffiliated with your management and unaffiliated with each other, and whose investments are significant in dollar and percentage terms as determined by SBA. Such Persons must not be your Associates (except for their status as your shareholders, limited partners, or members) and must not Control, be Controlled by, or be under Common Control with any of your Associates. A single “acceptable” Institutional Investor may be substituted for two or three of the three Persons who are otherwise required under this paragraph. The following Institutional Investors are “acceptable” for this purpose:


(i) Entities whose overall activities are regulated and periodically examined by state, Federal or other governmental authorities satisfactory to SBA;


(ii) Entities listed on the New York Stock Exchange;


(iii) Entities that are publicly-traded and that meet both the minimum numerical listing standards and the corporate governance listing standards of the New York Stock Exchange;


(iv) Public or private employee pension funds;


(v) Trusts, foundations, or endowments, but only if exempt from Federal income taxation; and


(vi) Other Institutional Investors satisfactory to SBA.


(2) Look-through for traditional investment company investors. SBA, in its sole discretion, may consider the requirement in paragraph (c)(1) of this section to be satisfied if at least 30 percent of your Regulatory Capital and Leverageable Capital is owned and controlled indirectly, through a traditional investment company, by Persons unaffiliated with your management.


(d) Voting requirement. (1) Except as provided in paragraph (d)(2) of this section, the investors required for you to satisfy diversity may not delegate their voting rights to any Person who is your Associate, or who Controls, is Controlled by, or is under Common Control with any of your Associates, without prior SBA approval.


(2) Exception. Paragraph (d)(1) of this section does not apply to investors in publicly-traded Licensees, to proxies given to vote in accordance with specific instructions for single specified meetings, or to any delegation of voting rights to a Person who is neither a diversity investor in the Licensee nor affiliated with management of the Licensee.


(e) Requirement to maintain diversity. If you were required to have management-ownership diversity at any time, you must maintain such diversity while you have outstanding Leverage or Earmarked Assets. To maintain management-ownership diversity, you may continue to satisfy the diversity requirement as in effect at the time it was first applicable to you or you may satisfy the management-ownership diversity requirement as currently in effect. If, at any time, you no longer have the required management-ownership diversity, you must:


(1) Notify SBA within 10 days; and


(2) Re-establish diversity within six months. For the consequences of failure to re-establish diversity, see §§ 107.1810(g) and 107.1820(f).


[65 FR 71055, Nov. 29, 2000]


§ 107.160 Special rules for Licensees formed as limited partnerships.

A limited partnership organized under State law solely for the purpose of performing the functions and conducting the activities contemplated under the Act may apply for a license under section 301(c) or section 301 (d) of the Act (“Partnership Licensee”).


(a) Number of Licensee’s General Partners. If you are a Partnership Licensee, you must have as your general partner(s) at least two individuals, or at least one corporation, partnership, or limited liability company (LLC), or any combination of individuals, corporations, partnerships, or LLCs.


(b) Entity General Partner of Licensee. A general partner which is a corporation, limited liability company or partnership (an “Entity General Partner”) shall be organized under state law solely for the purpose of serving as the general partner of one or more Licensees.


(1) SBA must approve any person who will serve as an officer, director, manager, or general partner of the Entity General Partner. This provision must be stated in an Entity General Partner’s Certificate of Incorporation, member agreement, Limited Partnership Agreement or other similar governing instrument which must, in each case, accompany the license application.


(2) An Entity General Partner is subject to the same examination and reporting requirements as a Licensee under section 310(b) of the Act. The restrictions and obligations imposed upon a Licensee by §§ 107.1800 through 107.1820, and 107.30, 107.410 through 107.450, 107.470, 107.475, 107.500, 107.510, 107.585, 107.600, 107.680, 107.690 through 107.692, 107.865, and 107.1910 apply also to an Entity General Partner of a Licensee.


(3) The general partner(s) of your Entity General Partner(s) will be considered your general partner.


(4) If your Entity General Partner is a limited partnership, its limited partners may be considered your Control Person(s) if they meet the definition for Control Person in § 107.50.


(5) If your Entity General Partner is a limited partnership, it is subject to paragraph (a) of this section.


(c) Other requirements for Partnership Licensees. If you are a Partnership Licensee:


(1) You must have a minimum duration of ten years or two years following the maturity of your last-maturing Leverage security, whichever is longer. After 10 years, if all Leverage has been repaid or redeemed and all amounts due SBA, its agent, or Trustee have been paid, the Partnership Licensee may be terminated by a vote of your partners. (For purposes of this provision SBA is not considered a partner.);


(2) None of your general partner(s) may be removed or replaced by your limited partners without prior written approval of SBA;


(3) Any transferee of, or successor in interest to, your general partner shall have only the rights and liabilities of a limited partner pending SBA’s written approval of such transfer or succession; and


(4) You must incorporate all the provisions in this paragraph (c) in your Limited Partnership Agreement.


(d) Obligations of a Control Person. All Control Persons are bound by the disciplinary provisions of sections 313 and 314 of the Act and by the conflict-of-interest rules under section 312 of the Act. The term Licensee, as used in §§ 107.30, 107.460, and 107.680 includes all of the Licensee’s Control Persons. The term Licensee as used in § 107.670 includes only the Licensee’s general partner(s). The conditions specified in §§ 107.1800 through 107.1820 and § 107.1910 apply to all general partners.


(e) Liability of general partner for partnership debts to SBA. Subject to section 314 of the Act, your general partner is not liable solely by reason of its status as a general partner for repayment of any Leverage or debts you owe to SBA unless SBA, in the exercise of reasonable investment prudence, and with regard to your financial soundness, determines otherwise prior to the purchase or guaranty of your Leverage.


(f) Reorganization of Licensee. A corporate Licensee wishing to reorganize as a Partnership Licensee, or a Partnership Licensee wishing to reorganize as a Corporate Licensee, may apply to SBA for approval under § 107.470.


(g) Special Leverage requirement. Before your first issuance of Leverage, you must furnish SBA with evidence that you qualify as a partnership for tax purposes, either by a ruling from the Internal Revenue Service, or by an opinion of counsel.


Capitalizing an SBIC

§ 107.200 Adequate capital for Licensees.

You must meet the requirements of this § 107.200 to qualify for a license, to continue as a Licensee, and to receive Leverage.


(a) You must have enough Regulatory Capital to provide reasonable assurance that:


(1) You will operate soundly and profitably over the long term; and


(2) You will be able to operate actively in accordance with your Articles and within the context of your business plan, as approved by SBA.


(b) In SBA’s sole discretion, you must be economically viable, taking into consideration actual and anticipated income and losses on your Loans and Investments, and the experience and qualifications of your owners and managers.


§ 107.210 Minimum capital requirements for Licensees.

(a) Companies licensed on or after October 1, 1996. A company licensed on or after October 1, 1996, must have Leverageable Capital of at least $2,500,000 and must meet the applicable minimum Regulatory Capital requirement in this paragraph (a), unless lower Leverageable Capital and Regulatory Capital amounts are approved by SBA as part of a Wind-Up Plan in accordance with § 107.590(c):


(1) Licensees other than Participating Securities issuers and Early Stage SBICs. Except for Participating Securities issuers and Early Stage SBICs, a Licensee must have Regulatory Capital of at least $5,000,000. As an exception to this general rule, SBA in its sole discretion and based on a showing of special circumstances and good cause may license an applicant with Regulatory Capital of at least $3,000,000, but only if the applicant:


(i) Has satisfied all licensing standards and requirements except the minimum capital requirement, as determined solely by SBA;


(ii) Has a viable business plan reasonably projecting profitable operations; and


(iii) Has a reasonable timetable for achieving Regulatory Capital of at least $5,000,000.


(2) Participating Securities issuers. A Licensee that wishes to be eligible to apply for Participating Securities must have Regulatory Capital of at least $10,000,000, unless it demonstrates to SBA’s satisfaction that it can be financially viable over the long term with a lower amount. Under no circumstances can the Licensee have Regulatory Capital of less than $5,000,000.


(3) Early Stage SBICs. An Early Stage SBIC must have Regulatory Capital of at least $20 million.


(b) Companies licensed before October 1, 1996. A company licensed before October 1, 1996 must meet the minimum capital requirements applicable to such company, as required by the regulations in effect on September 30, 1996. See § 107.1120(c)(2) for Leverage eligibility requirements.


[63 FR 5866, Feb. 5, 1998, as amended at 77 FR 25051, Apr. 27, 2012; 82 FR 39340, Aug. 18, 2017]


§ 107.230 Permitted sources of Private Capital for Licensees.

Private Capital means the contributed capital of a Licensee, plus unfunded binding commitments by Institutional Investors (including commitments evidenced by a promissory note) to contribute capital to a Licensee.


(a) Contributed capital. For purposes of this section, contributed capital means the paid-in capital and paid-in surplus of a Corporate Licensee, or the partners’ contributed capital of a Partnership Licensee, in either case subject to the limitations in paragraph (b) of this section.


(b) Exclusions from Private Capital. Private Capital does not include:


(1) Funds borrowed by a Licensee from any source.


(2) Funds obtained through the issuance of Leverage.


(3) Funds obtained directly or indirectly from any Federal, State, or local government agency or instrumentality, except for:


(i) Funds invested by a public pension fund;


(ii) Funds obtained from the business revenues (excluding any governmental appropriation) of any federally chartered or government-sponsored corporation established before October 1, 1987, to the extent that such revenues are reflected in the retained earnings of the corporation; and


(iii) “Qualified Non-private Funds” as defined in paragraph (d) of this section.


(4) Any portion of a commitment from an Institutional Investor with a net worth of less than $10 million that exceeds 10 percent of such Institutional Investor’s net worth and is not backed by a letter of credit from a State or National bank acceptable to SBA.


(c) Non-cash capital contributions. Capital contributions in a form other than cash are subject to the limitations in § 107.240.


(d) Qualified Non-private Funds. Private Capital includes “Qualified Non-private Funds” as defined in this paragraph (d); however, investors of Qualified Non-private Funds must not control, directly or indirectly, a Licensee’s management, or its board of directors or general partner(s). Qualified Non-private Funds are:


(1) Funds directly or indirectly invested in any Licensee on or before August 16, 1982 by any Federal agency except SBA, under a statute explicitly mandating the inclusion of such funds in “Private Capital”;


(2) Funds directly or indirectly invested in any Licensee by any Federal agency under a statute that is enacted after September 4, 1992, explicitly mandating the inclusion of such funds in “Private Capital”;


(3) Funds invested in any Licensee or license applicant by one or more State or local government entities (including any guarantee extended by such entities) in an aggregate amount that does not exceed 33 percent of Regulatory Capital; and


(4) Funds invested in or committed in writing to any Section 301(d) Licensee prior to October 1, 1996, from the following sources:


(i) A State financing agency, or similar agency or instrumentality, if the funds invested are derived from such agency’s net income and not from appropriated State or local funds; and


(ii) Grants made by a state or local government agency or instrumentality into a nonprofit corporation or institution exercising discretionary authority with respect to such funds, if SBA determines that such funds have taken on a private character and the nonprofit corporation or institution is not a mere conduit.


(e) You may not accept any capital contribution made with funds borrowed by a Person seeking to own an equity interest (whether direct or indirect, beneficial or of record) of at least 10 percent of your Private Capital. This exclusion does not apply if:


(1) Such Person’s net worth is at least twice the amount borrowed; or


(2) SBA gives its prior written approval of the capital contribution.


[61 FR 3189, Jan. 31, 1996, as amended at 63 FR 5866, Feb. 5, 1998; 64 FR 70995, Dec. 20, 1999]


§ 107.240 Limitations on including non-cash capital contributions in Private Capital.

Non-cash capital contributions to a Licensee or license applicant are included in Private Capital only if they fall into one of the following categories:


(a) Direct obligations of, or obligations guaranteed as to principal and interest by, the United States.


(b) Services rendered or to be rendered to you, priced at no more than their fair market value.


(c) Tangible assets used in your operations, priced at no more than their fair market value.


(d) Shares in a Disadvantaged Business received by a subsidiary Section 301(d) Licensee from its parent Licensee, valued at the lower of cost or fair value.


(e) Other non-cash assets approved by SBA.


§ 107.250 Exclusion of stock options issued by Licensee from Management Expenses.

Stock options issued by any Licensee, including a 1940 or 1980 Act Company, are not considered compensation and therefore do not count as part of a Licensee’s Management Expenses.


Applying for an SBIC License

§ 107.300 License application form and fee.

SBA evaluates license applicants in two review phases (initial review and final licensing), as follows:


(a) Initial review. Except as provided in this paragraph, SBIC applicants must submit a MAQ and the Initial Licensing Fee. MAQ means the Management Assessment Questionnaire in the form approved by SBA and available on SBA’s Web site at www.sba.gov/sbic. Initial Licensing Fee means a non-refundable fee of $10,000. An applicant under Common Control with one or more Licensees must submit a written request to SBA, and the Initial Licensing Fee, to be considered for a license and is exempt from the requirement in this paragraph to submit a MAQ unless otherwise determined by SBA in SBA’s discretion.


(b) Final licensing. (1) An applicant may proceed to the final licensing phase only if notified in writing by SBA that it may do so. Following receipt of such notice, in order to proceed to the final licensing phase, the applicant must submit a complete license application, in the form approved by SBA and available on SBA’s Web site at www.sba.gov/sbic, within the timeframe identified by SBA; and the Final Licensing Fee. The Final Licensing Fee means a non-refundable fee (determined as of the date SBA accepts the application) adjusted annually as follows:


Time period
Final licensing

fee
December 13, 2017 to September 30, 2018$20,000
October 1, 2018 to September 30, 201925,000
October 1, 2019 to September 30, 202030,000
October 1, 2020 to September 30, 202135,000

(2) Beginning on October 1, 2021, SBA will annually adjust both the Initial Licensing Fee and Final Licensing Fee using the Inflation Adjustment and will publish a Notice prior to such adjustment in the Federal Register identifying the amount of the fee.


[82 FR 52184, Nov. 13, 2017]


§ 107.305 Evaluation of license applicants.

SBA will evaluate a license applicant based on the submitted application materials, any interviews with the applicant’s management team, and the results of background investigations, public record searches, and other due diligence conducted by SBA and other Federal agencies. SBA’s evaluation will consider factors including the following:


(a) Management qualifications, including demonstrated investment skills and experience as a principal investor; business reputation; adherence to legal and ethical standards; record of active involvement in making and monitoring investments and assisting portfolio companies; successful history of working as a team; and experience in developing appropriate processes for evaluating investments and implementing best practices for investment firms.


(b) Performance of managers’ prior investments, including investment returns measured both in percentage terms and in comparison to appropriate industry benchmarks; the extent to which investments have been realized as a result of sales, repayments, or other exit mechanisms; and the contribution of prior investments to the growth of portfolio company revenues and number of employees.


(c) Applicant’s proposed investment strategy, including clarity of objectives; strength of management’s rationale for pursuing the selected strategy; compliance with this part 107 and applicable provisions of part 121 of this chapter; fit with management’s skills and experience; and the availability of sufficient resources to carry out the proposed strategy.


(d) Applicant’s proposed organizational structure and fund economics, including compliance with this part 107; soundness of financial projections and underlying assumptions; a compensation plan that provides managers with appropriate economic incentives; a reasonable basis for allocations of profits and fees to Persons not involved in management; and governance procedures that provide appropriate checks and balances.


[77 FR 25052, Apr. 27, 2012]


§ 107.310 When and how to apply for licensing as an Early Stage SBIC.

From time to time, SBA will publish a Notice in the Federal Register, inviting the submission of applications for licensing as an Early Stage SBIC. SBA will not consider an application from an Early Stage SBIC applicant that is under Common Control with another Early Stage SBIC applicant or an existing Early Stage SBIC (unless it has no outstanding Leverage or Leverage commitments and will not seek additional Leverage in the future). Applicants must comply with both the regulations in this part 107 and any requirements specified in the Notice, including submission deadlines. The Notice will specify procedures for a particular application period.


[77 FR 25052, Apr. 27, 2012]


§ 107.320 Evaluation of Early Stage SBICs.

SBA will evaluate an Early Stage SBIC license applicant based on the same factors applicable to other license applicants, as set forth in § 107.305, with particular emphasis on managers’ skills and experience in evaluating and investing in early stage companies. In addition, SBA reserves the right to maintain diversification among Early Stage SBICs with respect to:


(a) The year in which they commence operations, and


(b) Their geographic location.


[77 FR 25052, Apr. 27, 2012]


Subpart D – Changes in Ownership, Control, or Structure of Licensee; Transfer of License

Changes in Control or Ownership of Licensee

§ 107.400 Changes in ownership of 10 percent or more of Licensee but no change of Control.

(a) Prior approval requirements. You must obtain SBA’s prior written approval for any proposed transfer or issuance of ownership interests that results in the ownership (beneficial or of record) by any Person, or group of Persons acting in concert, of at least 10 percent of any class of your stock or partnership capital.


(b) Fee. A processing fee of $200 must accompany each such request for approval of a change of ownership.


§ 107.410 Changes in Control of Licensee (through change in ownership or otherwise).

(a) Prior approval requirements. You must obtain SBA’s prior written approval for any proposed transaction or event that results in Control by any Person(s) not previously approved by SBA.


(b) Fee. A processing fee equal to the combined Licensing Fee (Initial Licensing Fee plus the Final Licensing Fee then in effect) defined in § 107.300 must accompany any application for approval of one or more transactions or events that will result in a transfer of Control.


[61 FR 3189, Jan. 31, 1996, as amended at 82 FR 52185, Nov. 13, 2017]


§ 107.420 Prohibition on exercise of ownership or Control rights in Licensee before SBA approval.

Without prior written SBA approval, no change of ownership or Control may take effect and no officer, director, employee or other Person acting on your behalf shall:


(a) Register on your books any transfer of ownership interest to the proposed new owner(s);


(b) Permit the proposed new owner(s) to exercise voting rights with respect to such ownership interest (including directly or indirectly procuring or voting any proxy, consent or authorization as to such voting rights at any shareholders’ or partnership meeting);


(c) Permit the proposed new owner(s) to participate in any manner in the conduct of your affairs (including exercising control over your books, records, funds or other assets; participating directly or indirectly in any disposition thereof; or serving as an officer, director, partner, employee or agent); or


(d) Allow ownership or Control to pass to another Person.


§ 107.430 Notification to SBA of transactions that may change ownership or Control.

You must promptly notify SBA as soon as you have knowledge of transactions or events that may result in a transfer of Control or ownership of at least 10 percent of your capital. If there is any doubt as to whether a particular transaction or event will result in such a change, report the facts to SBA.


§ 107.440 Standards governing prior SBA approval for a proposed transfer of Control.

SBA approval is contingent upon full disclosure of the real parties in interest, the source of funds for the new owners’ interest, and other data requested by SBA. As a condition of approving a proposed transfer of control, SBA may:


(a) Require an increase in your Regulatory Capital;


(b) Require the new owners or the transferee’s Control Person(s) to assume, in writing, personal liability for your Leverage, effective only in the event of their direct or indirect participation in any transfer of Control not approved by SBA; or


(c) Require compliance with any other conditions set by SBA, including compliance with the requirements for minimum capital and management-ownership diversity as in effect at such time for new license applicants.


[61 FR 3189, Jan. 31, 1996]


§ 107.450 Notification to SBA of pledge of Licensee’s shares.

(a) You must notify SBA in writing, within 30 calendar days, of the terms of any transaction in which:


(1) Any Person, or group of Persons acting in concert, pledges shares of your stock (or equivalent ownership interests) as collateral for indebtedness; and


(2) The shares pledged are at least 10 percent of your Regulatory Capital.


(b) If the transaction creates a change of ownership or Control, you must comply with § 107.400 or § 107.410, as appropriate.


Restrictions on Common Control or Ownership of Two or More Licensees

§ 107.460 Restrictions on Common Control or ownership of two (or more) Licensees.

(a) General rule. Without SBA’s prior written approval, you must not have an officer, director, manager, Control Person, or owner (with a direct or indirect ownership interest of at least 10 percent) who is also:


(1) An officer, director, manager, Control Person, or owner (with a direct or indirect ownership interest of at least 10 percent) of another Licensee; or


(2) An officer or director of any Person that directly or indirectly controls, or is controlled by, or is under Common Control with, another Licensee.


(b) Exceptions to general rule. This § 107.460 does not apply to:


(1) Common officers, directors, managers, or owners of a Section 301(c) Licensee and its Section 301(d) subsidiary; or


(2) Common officers, directors, managers, Control Persons, or owners of two (or more) Licensees which have no Leverage.


Change in Structure of Licensee

§ 107.470 SBA approval of merger, consolidation, or reorganization of Licensee.

(a) Prior approval requirements. You may not merge, consolidate, change form of organization (corporation or partnership) or reorganize without SBA’s prior written approval. Any such merger or consolidation will be subject to § 107.440.


(b) Fee. A processing fee of $5,000 must accompany any application for approval of a change in your form of organization (from corporation to partnership or partnership to corporation).


Transfer of License

§ 107.475 Transfer of license.

You may not transfer your license in any manner without SBA’s prior written approval.


Subpart E – Managing the Operations of a Licensee

General Requirements

§ 107.500 Lawful operations under the Act.

You must engage only in the activities contemplated by the Act and in no other activities.


§ 107.501 Identification as a Licensee.

You must display your SBIC license in a prominent location. You must also have a listed telephone number. Before collecting an application fee or extending Financing to a Small Business, you must obtain a written statement from the concern acknowledging its awareness that you are “a Federal licensee under the Small Business Investment Act of 1958, as amended.”


§ 107.502 Representations to the public.

You may not represent or imply to anyone that the SBA, the U.S. Government or any of its agencies or officers has approved any ownership interests you have issued or obligations you have incurred. Be certain to include a statement to this effect in any solicitation to investors. Example: You may not represent or imply that “SBA stands behind the Licensee” or that “Your capital is safe because SBA’s experts review proposed investments to make sure they are safe for the Licensee.”


§ 107.503 Licensee’s adoption of an approved valuation policy.

(a) Valuation guidelines. You must prepare, document and report the valuations of your Loans and Investments in accordance with the Valuation Guidelines for SBICs issued by SBA. These guidelines may be obtained from SBA’s SBIC Web site at www.sba.gov/sbic.


(b) SBA approval of valuation policy. You must have a written valuation policy approved by SBA for use in determining the value of your Loans and Investments. You must either:


(1) Adopt without change the model valuation policy set forth in section III of the Valuation Guidelines for SBICs; or


(2) Obtain SBA’s prior written approval of an alternative valuation policy.


(c) Responsibility for valuations. Your board of directors or general partner(s) will be solely responsible for adopting your valuation policy and for using it to prepare valuations of your Loans and Investments for submission to SBA. If SBA reasonably believes that your valuations, individually or in the aggregate, are materially misstated, it reserves the right to require you to engage, at your expense, an independent third party, acceptable to SBA, to substantiate the valuations.


(d) Frequency of valuations. (1) If you have outstanding Leverage or Earmarked Assets, you must value your Loans and Investments at the end of the second quarter of your fiscal year, and at the end of your fiscal year.


(2) Otherwise, you must value your Loans and Investments only at your fiscal year end.


(3) On a case-by-case basis, SBA may require you to perform valuations more frequently.


(4) You must report material adverse changes in valuations at least quarterly, within thirty days following the close of the quarter.


(e) Review of valuations by independent public accountant. (1) For valuations performed as of the end of your fiscal year, your independent public accountant must review your valuation procedures and the implementation of such procedures, including adequacy of documentation.


(2) The independent public accountant’s report on your audited annual financial statements (SBA Form 468) must include a statement that your valuations were prepared in accordance with your approved valuation policy established in accordance with section 310(d)(2) of the Act.


[61 FR 3189, Jan. 31, 1996, as amended at 63 FR 5866, Feb. 5, 1998; 82 FR 39340, Aug. 18, 2017]


§ 107.504 Equipment and office requirements.

(a) Computer capability. You must have a personal computer with a modem, and be able to use this equipment to prepare reports (using SBA-provided software) and transmit them to SBA. In addition, by March 31, 2000, you must have access to the Internet and the capability to send and receive electronic mail via the Internet.


(b) Facsimile capability. You must be able to receive facsimile messages 24 hours per day at your primary office.


(c) Accessible office. You must maintain an office that is convenient to the public and is open for business during normal working hours.


[64 FR 70995, Dec. 20, 1999]


§ 107.506 Safeguarding Licensee’s assets/Internal controls.

You must adopt a plan to safeguard your assets and monitor the reliability of your financial data, personnel, Portfolio, funds and equipment. You must provide your bank and custodian with a certified copy of your resolution or other formal document describing your control procedures.


§ 107.507 Violations based on false filings and nonperformance of agreements with SBA.

The following shall constitute a violation of this part:


(a) Nonperformance. Nonperformance of any of the requirements of any Debenture, Participating Security or Preferred Security, or of any written agreement with SBA.


(b) False statement. In any document submitted to SBA:


(1) Any false statement knowingly made; or


(2) Any misrepresentation of a material fact; or


(3) Any failure to state a material fact. A material fact is any fact which is necessary to make a statement not misleading in light of the circumstances under which the statement was made.


§ 107.509 Employment of SBA officials.

Without SBA’s prior written approval, for a period of two years after the date of your most recent issuance of Leverage (or the receipt of any SBA Assistance as defined in part 105 of this chapter), you are not permitted to employ, offer employment to, or retain for professional services, any person who:


(a) Served as an officer, attorney, agent, or employee of SBA on or within one year before such date; and


(b) As such, occupied a position or engaged in activities which, in SBA’s determination, involved discretion with respect to the granting of Assistance under the Act.


Management and Compensation

§ 107.510 SBA approval of Licensee’s Investment Adviser/Manager.

You may employ an Investment Adviser/Manager who will be subject to the supervision of your board of directors or general partner. If you have Leverage or plan to seek Leverage, you must obtain SBA’s prior written approval of the management contract. SBA’s approval of an Investment Adviser/Manager for one Licensee does not indicate approval of that manager for any other Licensee.


(a) Management contract. The contract must:


(1) Specify the services the Investment Adviser/Manager will render to you and to the Small Businesses in your Portfolio; and


(2) Indicate the basis for computing Management Expenses.


(b) Material change to approved management contract. If there is a material change, both you and SBA must approve such change in advance. If you are uncertain if the change is material, submit the proposed revision to SBA.


§ 107.520 Management Expenses of a Licensee.

SBA must approve any increases in your Management Expenses if you have outstanding Leverage or Earmarked Assets.


(a) Definition of Management Expenses. Management Expenses include:


(1) Salaries;


(2) Office expenses;


(3) Travel;


(4) Business development;


(5) Office and equipment rental;


(6) Bookkeeping; and


(7) Expenses related to developing, investigating and monitoring investments.


(b) Management Expenses do not include services provided by specialized outside consultants, outside lawyers and independent public accountants, if they perform services not generally performed by a venture capital company.


(c) If your Management Expenses have not already been approved by SBA, you must submit such expenses for approval with your SBA Form 468 for your first fiscal year ending after January 31, 1996.


Cash Management by a Licensee

§ 107.530 Restrictions on investments of idle funds by leveraged Licensees.

(a) Applicability of this section. This § 107.530 applies if you have outstanding Leverage or if you have applied for Leverage.


(b) Permitted investments of idle funds. Funds not invested in Small Businesses must be maintained in:


(1) Direct obligations of, or obligations guaranteed as to principal and interest by, the United States, which mature within 15 months from the date of the investment; or


(2) Repurchase agreements with federally insured institutions, with a maturity of seven days or less. The securities underlying the repurchase agreements must be direct obligations of, or obligations guaranteed as to principal and interest by, the United States. The securities must be maintained in a custodial account at a federally insured institution; or


(3) Mutual funds, securities, or other instruments that exclusively consist of, or represent pooled assets of, investments described in paragraphs (b)(1) or (b)(2) of this section; or


(4) Certificates of deposit with a maturity of one year or less, issued by a federally insured institution; or


(5) A deposit account in a federally insured institution, subject to a withdrawal restriction of one year or less; or


(6) A checking account in a federally insured institution; or


(7) A reasonable petty cash fund.


(c) Deposit of funds in excess of the insured amount. (1) You are permitted to deposit funds in a federally insured institution in excess of the institution’s insured amount, but only if the institution is “well capitalized” in accordance with the definition set forth in regulations of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as amended (12 CFR 325.103).


(2) Exception: You may make a temporary deposit (not to exceed 30 days) in excess of the insured amount, in a transfer account established to facilitate the receipt and disbursement of funds or to hold funds necessary to honor Commitments issued.


(d) Deposit of funds in Associate institution. A deposit in, or a repurchase agreement with, a federally insured institution that is your Associate is not considered a Financing of such Associate under § 107.730, provided the terms of such deposit or repurchase agreement are no less favorable than those available to the general public.


[61 FR 3189, Jan. 31, 1996, as amended at 77 FR 20294, Apr. 4, 2012]


Borrowing by Licensees From Non-SBA Sources

§ 107.550 Prior approval of secured third-party debt of leveraged Licensees.

(a) Definition. In this § 107.550, “secured third-party debt” means any non-SBA debt secured by any of your assets, including secured guarantees and other contingent obligations that you voluntarily assume, secured lines of credit, and secured Temporary Debt of a Licensee with outstanding Participating Securities.


(b) General rule. If you have outstanding Leverage, you must get SBA’s written approval before you incur any secured third-party debt or refinance any debt with secured third-party debt, including any renewal of a secured line of credit, increase in the maximum amount available under a secured line of credit, or expansion of the scope of a security interest or lien. For purposes of this paragraph (b), “expansion of the scope of a security interest or lien” does not include the substitution of one asset or group of assets for another, provided the asset values (as reported on your most recent annual Form 468) are comparable.


(c) Additional rule for secured lines of credit in existence on April 8, 1994. If you have outstanding Leverage and you have a secured line of credit that was created on or before April 8, 1994, you must receive SBA’s written approval of the line before you increase the amounts outstanding thereunder.


(d) Conditions for SBA approval. As a condition of granting its approval under this § 107.550, SBA may impose such restrictions or limitations as it deems appropriate, taking into account your historical performance, current financial position, proposed terms of the secured debt and amount of aggregate debt you will have outstanding (including Leverage). SBA will not favorably consider any requests for approval which include a blanket lien on all your assets, or a security interest in your investor commitments in excess of 125 percent of the proposed borrowing.


(e) Thirty day approval. Unless SBA notifies you otherwise within 30 days after it receives your request, you may consider your request automatically approved if:


(1) You are in regulatory compliance;


(2) The security interest in your assets is limited to either those assets being acquired with the borrowed funds or an asset coverage ratio of no more than 2:1;


(3) Your Leverage does not exceed 150 percent of your Leverageable Capital; and


(4) Your request is for approval of a secured line of credit that would not cause your total outstanding borrowings (not including Leverage) to exceed 50 percent of your Leverageable Capital.


§ 107.560 Subordination of SBA’s creditor position.

(a) Debentures purchased or guaranteed on or before July 1, 1991. Under the terms of any Debenture purchased or guaranteed by SBA on or before July 1, 1991, SBA’s unsecured claims against you, as a Debenture-holder or as subrogee, are subordinated in favor of all your other creditors, except to the extent that such claims may be subject to equitable subordination in SBA’s favor.


(b) Debentures purchased or guaranteed after July 1, 1991, including refinancings of Debentures previously purchased or guaranteed. (1) Under the terms of any Debenture purchased or guaranteed by SBA after July 1, 1991, SBA’s unsecured claims against you, as a Debenture-holder or as subrogee, are subordinated only in favor of non-Associate lenders; and, to the extent that your indebtedness to such lenders exceeds the lesser of $10,000,000 or 200 percent of your Regulatory Capital (determined as of the date your Debentures were purchased or guaranteed), SBA’s unsecured claims enjoy parity with those of other unsecured creditors, except with respect to indebtedness created on or before July 1, 1991.


(2) In order to induce others to lend you money after your Debenture has been purchased or guaranteed, SBA may agree in writing on a case-by-case basis to subordinate its unsecured claims, on such terms as it may determine, in favor of one or more of your Associates, or in favor of other lenders in excess of the amounts mentioned in paragraph (b)(1) of this section.


(3) SBA reserves the authority to refuse to subordinate its claims if it determines, at the time you request your Debenture be purchased or guaranteed, that the exercise of reasonable investment prudence and your financial condition warrant such refusal.


§ 107.565 Restrictions on third-party debt of Early Stage SBICs.

If you are an Early Stage SBIC and you have outstanding Leverage or a Leverage commitment, you must get SBA’s prior written approval to have, incur, or refinance any third-party debt other than accounts payable from routine business operations.


[77 FR 25052, Apr. 27, 2012]


§ 107.570 Restrictions on third-party debt of issuers of Participating Securities.

(a) General. Temporary Debt is the only debt (other than Leverage) that you are permitted to incur if you have applied to issue Participating Securities or if you have outstanding Participating Securities. For additional rules governing secured Temporary Debt, see § 107.550.


(b) Definition of Temporary Debt. Temporary Debt means your short-term borrowings if:


(1) Such borrowings are for the purpose of maintaining your operating liquidity or providing funds for a particular Financing of a Small Business;


(2) The funds are borrowed from a regulated financial institution or a regulated credit company (or, if approved by SBA on a case-by-case basis, from non-regulated lenders including shareholders or partners);


(3) Your total outstanding borrowings (not including Leverage) do not exceed 50 percent of your Leverageable Capital; and


(4) All such borrowings are fully paid off for at least 30 consecutive days during your fiscal year so that you have no outstanding third-party debt for 30 days.


Voluntary Decrease in Licensee’s Regulatory Capital

§ 107.585 Voluntary decrease in Licensee’s Regulatory Capital.

You must obtain SBA’s prior written approval to reduce your Regulatory Capital by more than two percent in any fiscal year, unless otherwise permitted under §§ 107.1560 and 107.1570, provided however, that if you are an Early Stage SBIC, you must obtain SBA’s prior written approval for any reduction of your Regulatory Capital, including any reduction pursuant to a Distribution under § 107.1180 of this part. At all times, you must retain sufficient Regulatory Capital to meet the minimum capital requirements in the Act and § 107.210, and sufficient Leverageable Capital to avoid having excess Leverage in violation of section 303 of the Act and §§ 107.1150 through 107.1170.


[61 FR 3189, Jan. 31, 1996, as amended at 77 FR 25052, Apr. 27, 2012]


Requirement To Conduct Active Investment Operations

§ 107.590 Licensee’s requirement to maintain active operations.

(a) Activity test. You must conduct active operations, as determined under this § 107.590, as a condition of your license. You will be considered active if:


(1) During the eighteen months preceding your most recent fiscal year end, you made Financings totaling at least 20 percent of your Regulatory Capital; or


(2) Your idle funds did not exceed 20 percent of your total assets (at cost) at your most recent fiscal year end.


(b) Permitted exceptions to activity requirements. You are considered active if your failure to meet the requirements in paragraph (a) of this section is the result of one or more of the following factors:


(1) Your excess idle funds are the result of the receipt, within the previous nine months, of realized gains, repayments, additional capital contributions, or Leverage.


(2) It is necessary for you to maintain excess idle funds to conduct your operations because:


(i) Your unfunded commitments from investors are no more than 20 percent of your Regulatory Capital; and


(ii) You cannot receive additional Leverage, solely because SBA has insufficient funds available.


(3) You have not made sufficient Financings because of a lack of available funds, evidenced by Loans and Investments (at cost) equal to at least 90 percent of your Combined Capital as of your most recent fiscal year end.


(4) You have not made sufficient Financings solely because SBA has restricted your ability to make investments.


(c) Applicability of activity requirements. The activity requirements in paragraph (a) of this section do not apply if you have filed a “Wind-up Plan” approved by SBA. “Wind-up Plan” means a plan that you prepare when you decide that you will no longer make any Financings other than follow-on investments, and that you update annually when you file your SBA Form 468. The plan must contain your best estimates of the following:


(1) The remaining number of years you expect to operate.


(2) For each of your Loans and Investments, the expected liquidation date and anticipated proceeds.


(3) The timing of your repayment of obligations to SBA.


(4) The timing and amount of any planned reductions in your Management Expenses.


(d) Phase-in of activity requirements – (1) General rule. You must meet the activity requirements in this § 107.590 as of the end of your first full fiscal year beginning after January 31, 1996. Until then, you will be considered active if you meet the activity requirements in effect on January 30, 1996.


(2) Rule for new Licensees. If you received your license after January 31, 1996, or if you received your license less than eighteen months before the fiscal year end determined under paragraph (d)(1) of this section, you must meet the activity requirements in this § 107.590 as of the end of your second full fiscal year beginning after the date you received your license.


Subpart F – Recordkeeping, Reporting, and Examination Requirements for Licensees

Recordkeeping Requirements for Licensees

§ 107.600 General requirement for Licensee to maintain and preserve records.

(a) Maintaining your accounting records. You must establish and maintain your accounting records using SBA’s standard chart of accounts for Licensees, unless SBA approves otherwise.


(b) Location of records. You must keep the following records at your principal place of business or, in the case of paragraph (b)(3) of this section, at the branch office that is primarily responsible for the transaction:


(1) All your accounting and other financial records;


(2) All minutes of meetings of directors, stockholders, executive committees, partners, or other officials; and


(3) All documents and supporting materials related to your business transactions, except for any items held by a custodian under a written agreement between you and a Portfolio Concern or non-SBA lender, or any securities held in a safe deposit box, or by a licensed securities broker in an amount not exceeding the broker’s per-account insurance coverage.


(c) Preservation of records. You must retain all the records that are the basis for your financial reports. Such records must be preserved for the periods specified in this paragraph (c), and must remain accessible for the first two years of the preservation period.


(1) You must preserve for at least 15 years or, in the case of a Partnership Licensee, at least two years beyond the date of liquidation:


(i) All your accounting ledgers and journals, and any other records of assets, asset valuations, liabilities, equity, income, and expenses.


(ii) Your Articles, bylaws, minute books, and license application.


(iii) All documents evidencing ownership of the Licensee including ownership ledgers, and ownership transfer registers.


(2) You must preserve for at least six years all supporting documentation (such as vouchers, bank statements, or canceled checks) for the records listed in paragraph (b)(1) of this section.


(3) After final disposition of any item in your Portfolio, you must preserve for at least six years:


(i) Financing applications and Financing instruments.


(ii) All loan, participation, and escrow agreements.


(iii) Size status declarations (SBA Form 480) and Financing Eligibility Statements (SBA Form 1941).


(iv) Any capital stock certificates and warrants of the Portfolio Concern that you did not surrender or exercise.


(v) All other documents and supporting material relating to the Portfolio Concern, including correspondence.


(4) You may substitute a computer-scanned or generated copy for the original of any record covered by this paragraph (c).


[61 FR 3189, Jan. 31, 1996, as amended at 79 FR 62823, Oct. 21, 2014]


§ 107.610 Required certifications for Loans and Investments.

For each of your Loans and Investments, you must have the documents listed in this section. Except for information and documentation prepared under paragraphs (f)(2) and (3) of this section, you must keep these documents in your files and make them available to SBA upon request.


(a) SBA Form 480, the Size Status Declaration, executed both by you and by the concern you are financing. By executing this document, both parties certify that the concern is a Small Business. For securities purchased from an underwriter in a public offering, you may substitute a prospectus showing that the concern is a Small Business.


(b) SBA Form 652, a certification by the concern you are financing that it will not illegally discriminate (see part 112 of this chapter).


(c) SBA Form 1941 (for Section 301(d) Licensees only), executed both by you and by the concern you are financing. By executing this document, both parties certify that the concern is a Disadvantaged Business.


(d) A certification by the concern you are financing of the intended use of the proceeds. For securities purchased from an underwriter in a public offering, you may substitute a prospectus indicating the intended use of proceeds.


(e) For each LMI Investment:


(1) A certification by the concern, dated as of the date of application for SBIC financing, as to the basis for its qualification as an LMI Enterprise,


(2) If the concern qualifies as an LMI Enterprise as defined in paragraph (2) of the definition of LMI Enterprise in § 107.50, an additional certification dated no later than the date 180 days after the closing of the LMI Investment, as to the location of the concern’s employees or tangible assets or the principal residences of its full-time employees as of the date of such certification, and


(3) Certification(s) by the SBIC, made contemporaneously with the certification(s) of the concern, that the concern qualifies as an LMI Enterprise as of the date(s) of the concern’s certification(s) and the basis for such qualification.


(f) For each Energy Saving Qualified Investment:


(1) If a pre-Financing determination of eligibility by SBA is not required under the definition of Energy Saving Activities or Energy Saving Qualified Investment:


(i) A certification by you, dated as of the closing date of the Financing, as to the basis for the qualification of the Financing as an Energy Saving Qualified Investment;


(ii) Supporting documentation of the Energy Saving Activities engaged in by the concern;


(iii) Supporting documentation of either the percentage of its revenues derived from Energy Saving Activities during the concern’s most recently completed fiscal year, which must be at least 50 percent, or the concern’s intended use of the Financing proceeds, all of which must be used for Energy Saving Activities; and


(iv) A certification by the concern, dated as of the closing date of the Financing, that any information it provided to you in connection with this paragraph (f)(1) is true and correct to the best of its knowledge.


(2) If, prior to providing Financing, you must obtain a determination from SBA that the activities in which a concern is engaged are Energy Saving Activities, submit to SBA in writing a description of the product or service being provided or developed, including all available documentation of the energy savings produced or anticipated, addressing the factors considered under paragraph (4) of the definition of “Energy Saving Activities” in § 107.50 and certified by the concern to be true and correct to the best of its knowledge.


(3) If, prior to providing Financing, you must obtain a determination from SBA that the concern is “primarily engaged” in Energy Saving Activities, submit to SBA in writing all available information concerning the factors considered under paragraph (3) of the definition of “Energy Saving Qualified Investment” in § 107.50, certified by the concern to be true and correct to the best of its knowledge.


(4) For each Financing closed after you obtain a determination from SBA under paragraph (f)(2) or (3) of this section, a certification by you, dated as of the closing date of the Financing, that to the best of your knowledge, you have no reason to believe that the materials submitted are incorrect.


(5) For each Financing closed based on supporting documentation of the concern’s intended use of proceeds for Energy Saving Activities under paragraph (f)(1)(iii) of this section:


(i) Documentation by the concern, dated no later than six months after the closing of the Financing, of the proceeds used to date for Energy Saving Activities, with further updates provided at six month intervals until 100 percent of the Financing proceeds have been accounted for; and


(ii) Documentation that you have reviewed the information submitted by the concern under paragraph (f)(5)(i) of this section and have reasonably determined that 100 percent of the Financing proceeds were used for Energy Saving Activities.


(g) For each passive business financed under § 107.720(b)(3), a certification by you, dated as of the closing date of the Financing, as to the basis for the qualification of the Financing under § 107.720(b)(3) and identifying one or more limited partners for which a direct Financing would cause those investors:


(1) To incur “unrelated business taxable income” under section 511 of the Internal Revenue Code (26 U.S.C. 511); or


(2) To incur “effectively connected income” to foreign investors under sections 871 and 882 of the Internal Revenue Code (26 U.S.C. 871 and 882).


[61 FR 3189, Jan. 31, 1996, as amended at 64 FR 52646, Sept. 30, 1999; 77 FR 23379, Apr. 19, 2012; 82 FR 39340, Aug. 18, 2017]


§ 107.620 Requirements to obtain information from Portfolio Concerns.

All the information required by this section is subject to the requirements of § 107.600 and must be in English.


(a) Information for initial Financing decision. Before extending any Financing, you must require the applicant to submit such financial statements, plans of operation (including intended use of financing proceeds), cash flow analyses and projections as are necessary to support your investment decision. The information submitted must be consistent with the size and type of the business and the amount of the proposed Financing.


(b) Updated financial information. (1) The terms of each Financing must require the Portfolio Concern to provide, at least annually, sufficient financial information to enable you to perform the following required procedures:


(i) Evaluate the financial condition of the Portfolio Concern for the purpose of valuing your investment;


(ii) Determine the continued eligibility of the Portfolio Concern; and


(iii) Verify the use of Financing proceeds.


(2) The information submitted to you must be certified by the president, chief executive officer, treasurer, chief financial officer, general partner, or proprietor of the Portfolio Concern.


(3) For financial and valuation purposes, you may accept a complete copy of the Federal income tax return filed by the Portfolio Concern (or its proprietor) in lieu of financial statements, but only if appropriate for the size and type of the business involved.


(4) The requirements in this paragraph (b) do not apply when you acquire securities from an underwriter in a public offering (see § 107.825). In that case, you must keep copies of all reports furnished by the Portfolio Concern to the holders of its securities.


(c) Information required for examination purposes. You must obtain any information requested by SBA’s examiners for the purpose of verifying the certifications made by a Portfolio Concern under § 107.610. In this regard, your Financing documents must contain provisions requiring the Portfolio Concern to give you and/or SBA’s examiners access to its books and records for such purpose.


Reporting Requirements for Licensees

§ 107.630 Requirement for Licensees to file financial statements with SBA (Form 468).

(a) Annual filing of Form 468. For each fiscal year, you must submit to SBA financial statements and supplementary information prepared on SBA Form 468. You must file Form 468 on or before the last day of the third month following the end of your fiscal year, except for the information required under paragraph (e) of this section, which must be filed on or before the last day of the fifth month following the end of your fiscal year.


(1) Audit of Form 468. The annual Form 468 must be audited by an independent public accountant acceptable to SBA.


(2) Insurance requirement for public accountant. Unless SBA approves otherwise, your independent public accountant must carry at least $1,000,000 of Errors and Omissions insurance, or be self-insured and have a net worth of at least $1,000,000.


(b) Interim filings of Form 468. When requested by SBA, you must file interim reports on Form 468. SBA may require you to file the entire form or only certain statements and schedules. You must file such reports on or before the last day of the month following the end of the reporting period. If you have an outstanding Leverage commitment from SBA, see the filing requirements in § 107.1220.


(c) Standards for preparation of Form 468. You must prepare SBA Form 468 in accordance with SBA’s Accounting Standards and Financial Reporting Requirements for Small Business Investment Companies.


(d) Reporting of economic impact information on Form 468. Your annual filing of SBA Form 468 must include an assessment of the economic impact of each Financing, specifying the full-time equivalent jobs created or retained, and the impact of the Financing on the revenues and profits of the business and on taxes paid by the business and its employees.


[61 FR 3189, Jan. 31, 1996, as amended at 82 FR 39340, Aug. 18, 2017]


§ 107.640 Requirement to file Portfolio Financing Reports (SBA Form 1031).

For each Financing of a Small Business (excluding guarantees), you must submit a Portfolio Financing Report on SBA Form 1031 within 30 days of the closing date.


§ 107.650 Requirement to report portfolio valuations to SBA.

You must determine the value of your Loans and Investments in accordance with § 107.503. You must report such valuations to SBA within 90 days of the end of the fiscal year in the case of annual valuations, and within 30 days following the close of other reporting periods. You must report material adverse changes in valuations at least quarterly, within thirty days following the close of the quarter.


§ 107.660 Other items required to be filed by Licensee with SBA.

(a) Reports to owners. You must give SBA a copy of any report you furnish to your investors, including any prospectus, letter, or other publication concerning your financial operations or those of any Portfolio Concern.


(b) Documents filed with SEC. You must give SBA a copy of any report, application or document you file with the Securities and Exchange Commission.


(c) Litigation reports. When you become a party to litigation or other proceedings, you must give SBA a report within 30 days that describes the proceedings and identifies the other parties involved and your relationship to them.


(1) The proceedings covered by this paragraph (c) include any action by you, or by your security holder(s) in a personal or derivative capacity, against an officer, director, Investment Adviser or other Associate of yours for alleged breach of official duty.


(2) SBA may require you to submit copies of the pleadings and other documents SBA may specify.


(3) Where proceedings have been terminated by settlement or final judgment, you must promptly advise SBA of the terms.


(4) This paragraph (c) does not apply to collection actions or proceedings to enforce your ordinary creditors’ rights.


(d) Notification of criminal charges. If any officer, director, or general partner of the Licensee, or any other person who was required by SBA to complete a personal history statement in connection with your license, is charged with or convicted of any criminal offense other than a misdemeanor involving a minor motor vehicle violation, you must report the incident to SBA within 5 calendar days. Such report must fully describe the facts which pertain to the incident.


(e) Other reports. You must file any other reports that SBA may require by written directive.


[61 FR 3189, Jan. 31, 1996, as amended at 63 FR 5866, Feb. 5, 1998]


§ 107.665 Civil penalties.

Except as provided in § 107.670, a Licensee that violates any regulation or written directive issued by SBA, requiring the filing of any regular or special report pursuant to this part, shall be fined a civil penalty of not more than $291 for each day the Licensee fails to file such report. The civil penalties provided for in this section shall accrue to the United States and may be recovered in a civil action brought by the SBA.


[81 FR 31491, May 19, 2016, as amended at 82 FR 9969, Feb. 9, 2017; 83 FR 7363, Feb. 21, 2018; 84 FR 12061, Apr. 1, 2019; 85 FR 13727, Mar. 10, 2020; 86 FR 52957, Sept. 24, 2021; 87 FR 28758, May 11, 2022]


§ 107.670 Application for exemption from civil penalty for late filing of reports.

(a) If it is impracticable to submit any required report within the time allowed, you may apply for an extension. The request for an extension must:


(1) Be filed before the reporting deadline;


(2) Certify to an extraordinary occurrence, not within your control, that makes timely filing of the report impracticable; and


(3) Be accompanied by written evidence of such occurrence, where appropriate.


(b) Upon receipt of your request, SBA may exempt you from the civil penalty stated in § 107.665, in such manner and under such conditions as SBA determines.


[61 FR 3189, Jan. 31, 1996, as amended at 81 FR 31491, May 19, 2016]


§ 107.680 Reporting changes in Licensee not subject to prior SBA approval.

(a) Changes to be reported for post approval. (1) This section applies to any changes in your Articles, ownership, capitalization, management, operating area, or investment policies that do not require SBA’s prior approval. You must report such changes to SBA within 30 days for post approval. A processing fee of $200 must accompany each request for post approval of new officers, directors, or Control Persons.


(2) Exception for non-leveraged Licensees. If you do not have outstanding Leverage or Earmarked Assets, you are not required to obtain post approval of new directors or new officers other than your chief operating officer; however, you must notify SBA of the new directors or officers within 30 days.


(b) Approval by SBA. You may consider any change submitted under this section § 107.680 to be approved unless SBA notifies you to the contrary within 90 days after receiving it. SBA’s approval is contingent upon your full disclosure of all relevant facts and is subject to any conditions SBA may prescribe.


Examinations of Licensees by SBA for Regulatory Compliance

§ 107.690 Examinations.

SBA will examine all Licensees for the purpose of evaluating regulatory compliance.


§ 107.691 Responsibilities of Licensee during examination.

You must make all books, records and other pertinent documents and materials available for the examination, including any information required by the examiner under § 107.620(c). In addition, the agreement between you and the independent public accountant performing your audit must provide that any information in the accountant’s working papers be made available to SBA upon request.


§ 107.692 Examination fees.

(a) General. SBA will assess fees for examinations in accordance with this § 107.692. Unless SBA determines otherwise on a case by case basis, SBA will not assess fees for special examinations to obtain specific information.


(b) Base Fee. (1) The Base Fee will be assessed based on your total assets (at cost) as of the date of your latest certified financial statement, including if requested by SBA in connection with the examination, a more recently submitted interim statement. For purposes of this section, Base Fee means the Minimum Base Fee plus 0.024% of assets at cost, rounded to the nearest $100, not to exceed the Maximum Base Fee. The Minimum and Maximum Base Fees are adjusted annually as follows:


Time period

(Based on the examination start date)
Minimum

base fee
Maximum

base fee for

non-leveraged

SBICs
Maximum

base fee for

leveraged

SBICs
December 13, 2017 to September 30, 2018$6,000$22,500$26,000
October 1, 2018 to September 30, 20197,00025,00032,000
October 1, 2019 to September 30, 20208,00027,50038,000
October 1, 2020 to September 30, 20219,00030,00044,000

(2) In the table in paragraph (b)(1) of this section, a Non-leveraged SBIC means any SBIC that, as of the date of the examination, has no outstanding Leverage or Leverage commitment, has no Earmarked Assets, and certifies to SBA that it will not seek Leverage in the future. Beginning on October 1, 2021, SBA will annually adjust the Minimum Base Fee and Maximum Base Fees using the Inflation Adjustment and will publish a Notice prior to such adjustment in the Federal Register identifying the amount of the fees.


(c) Adjustments to Base Fee. In order to determine the amount of your examination fee, your Base Fee, as determined in paragraph (b) of this section, will be increased based on the following criteria:


(1) If you were not fully responsive to the letter of notification of examination (that is, you did not provide all requested documents and information within the time period stipulated in the notification letter in a complete and accurate manner, or you did not prepare or did not have available all information requested by the examiner for on-site review) after a written warning by the SBA, you will pay an additional charge equal to 15% of your Base Fee;


(2) If you maintain your records/files in multiple locations (as permitted under § 107.600(b)), you will pay an additional charge equal to 10% of your Base Fee; and


(3) For any regulatory violation that remains unresolved 90 days from the date SBA notified you that you must take corrective action (as established by the date of the notification letter) or such later date as SBA sets forth in the notice, you will pay an additional charge equal to 5% of the Base Fee for every 30 days or portion thereof that the violation remains unresolved after the cure period, unless SBA resolves the finding in your favor.


(d) Fee additions table. The following table summarizes the additions noted in paragraph (c) of this section:


Examination fee additions
Amount of addition − % of base fee
Non-responsive15%.
Records/Files at multiple locations10%.
Unresolved Findings5% of Base Fee for every 30 days or portion thereof beyond the 90 day cure period or such later date as SBA sets forth in the notice for each unresolved finding.

(e) Delay fee. If, in the judgment of SBA, the time required to complete your examination is delayed due to your lack of cooperation or the condition of your records, SBA may assess an additional fee of $700 per day. Beginning on October 1, 2021, SBA will annually adjust this fee using the Inflation Adjustment and will publish a Notice prior to such adjustment in the Federal Register identifying the amount of the fee.


[62 FR 23338, Apr. 30, 1997, as amended at 77 FR 25052, Apr. 27, 2012; 82 FR 52185, Nov. 13, 2017]


Subpart G – Financing of Small Businesses by Licensees

Determining the Eligibility of a Small Business for SBIC Financing

§ 107.700 Compliance with size standards in part 121 of this chapter as a condition of Assistance.

You are permitted to provide financial assistance and management services only to a Small Business. To determine whether an applicant is a Small Business, you may use either the financial size standards in § 121.301(c)(2) of this chapter or the industry standard covering the industry in which the applicant is primarily engaged, as set forth in § 121.301(c)(1) of this chapter.


[61 FR 3189, Jan. 31, 1996, as amended at 74 FR 33915, July 14, 2009]


§ 107.710 Requirement to finance smaller enterprises.

Your Portfolio must include Financings to Smaller Enterprises.


(a) Definition of Smaller Enterprise. A Smaller Enterprise means any small business concern that:


(1) Both together with its Affiliates, and by itself, meets the size standard of § 121.201 of this chapter at the time of Financing for the industry in which it is then primarily engaged; or


(2) Together with its affiliates has a net worth of not more than $6 million and average net income after Federal income taxes (excluding any carry-over losses) for the preceding two years no greater than $2 million. If the applicant is not required by law to pay Federal income taxes at the enterprise level, but is required to pass income through to its shareholders, partners, beneficiaries, or other equitable owners, the applicant’s “net income after Federal income taxes” will be its net income reduced by an amount computed as follows:


(i) If the applicant is not required by law to pay State (and local, if any) income taxes at the enterprise level, multiply its net income by the marginal State income tax rate (or by the combined State and local income tax rates, as applicable) that would have applied if it were a taxable corporation.


(ii) Multiply the applicant’s net income, less any deduction for State and local income taxes calculated under paragraph (a)(2)(i) of this section, by the marginal Federal income tax rate that would have applied if the applicant were a taxable corporation.


(iii) Add the results obtained in paragraphs (a)(2)(i) and (a)(2)(ii) of this section.


(b) Smaller Enterprise Financings. At the close or each of your fiscal years, and at the time of any application to draw Leverage, you must satisfy the Smaller Enterprise financing requirement in this paragraph (b) that applies to you.


(1) If you were licensed after February 17, 2009, at least 25 percent (in dollars) of your Financings must have been invested in Smaller Enterprises.


(2) If you were licensed on or before February 17, 2009, and you have received no SBA Leverage commitment issued after February 17, 2009, at least 20 percent (in dollars) of your Financings, excluding Financings made in whole or in part with Leverage in excess of $90 million, must have been invested in Smaller Enterprises. In addition, 100 percent of all Financings made in whole or in part with Leverage in excess of $90 million (including aggregate Leverage over $90 million issued by two or more Licensees under Common Control) must have been invested in Smaller Enterprises.


(3) If you were licensed on or before February 17, 2009, and you have received an SBA Leverage commitment after February 17, 2009:


(i) For all Financings made after the date of the first Leverage commitment issued after February 17, 2009, at least 25 percent (in dollars) of your Financings must have been invested in Smaller Enterprises, and


(ii) For all Financings made before February 17, 2009, at least 20 percent (in dollars) of your Financings, excluding Financings made in whole or in part with Leverage in excess of $90 million, must have been invested in Smaller Enterprises. In addition, 100 percent of all Financings made in whole or in part with Leverage in excess of $90 million (including aggregate Leverage over $90 million issued by two or more Licensees under Common Control) must have been invested in Smaller Enterprises.


(c) Special requirement for certain leveraged Licensees. (1) This paragraph (c) applies if you were licensed on or before September 30, 1996, and you issued Leverage after that date, and you have Regulatory Capital of:


(i) Less than $10,000,000 if such Leverage included Participating Securities; or


(ii) Less than $5,000,000 if such Leverage was Debentures only.


(2) At the close of each of your fiscal years, at least 50 percent of the total dollar amount of the Financings you extended after September 30, 1996 must have been invested in Smaller Enterprises.


(d) Financing a change of ownership which results in the creation of a Smaller Enterprises. The Financing of a change of ownership under § 107.750 which results in the creation of a Smaller Enterprise qualifies as a Smaller Enterprise Financing.


(e) Non-compliance with this section. If you have not reached the required percentage of Smaller Enterprise Financings at the end of any fiscal year, then you must be in compliance by the end of the following fiscal year. However, you will not be eligible for additional Leverage until you reach the required percentage (see § 107.1120(c) and (g)).


[62 FR 11760, Mar. 13, 1997, as amended at 63 FR 5866, Feb. 5, 1998; 64 FR 70995, Dec. 20, 1999; 66 FR 30647, June 7, 2001; 74 FR 33915, July 14, 2009]


§ 107.720 Small Businesses that may be ineligible for financing.

(a) Relenders or reinvestors. You are not permitted to finance any business that is a relender or reinvestor.


(1) Definition. Relenders or reinvestors are businesses whose primary business activity involves, directly or indirectly, providing funds to others, purchasing debt obligations, factoring, or long-term leasing of equipment with no provision for maintenance or repair.


(2) Exception. You may provide Venture Capital Financing to Disadvantaged Businesses that are relenders or reinvestors (except banks or savings and loans not insured by agencies of the federal government, and agricultural credit companies). Without SBA’s prior written approval, total Financings under this paragraph (a)(2) that are outstanding as of the close of your fiscal year must not exceed your Regulatory Capital.


(b) Passive Businesses. You are not permitted to finance a passive business.


(1) Definition. A business is passive if:


(i) It is not engaged in a regular and continuous business operation (for purposes of this paragraph (b), the mere receipt of payments such as dividends, rents, lease payments, or royalties is not considered a regular and continuous business operation); or


(ii) Its employees are not carrying on the majority of day to day operations, and the company does not provide effective control and supervision, on a day to day basis, over persons employed under contract; or


(iii) It passes through substantially all of the proceeds of the Financing to another entity.


(2) Exception for pass-through of proceeds to subsidiary. You may provide Financing directly to a passive business, including a passive business that you have formed, if it is a Small Business and it passes substantially all the proceeds through to (or uses substantially all the proceeds to acquire) one or more subsidiary companies, each of which is an eligible Small Business that is not passive. For the purpose of this paragraph (b)(2), “subsidiary company” means a company in which the financed passive business either:


(i) Directly owns, or will own as a result of the Financing, at least 50 percent of the outstanding voting securities; or


(ii) Indirectly owns, or will own as a result of the Financing, at least 50 percent of the outstanding voting securities (by directly owning the outstanding voting securities of another passive Small Business that is the direct owner of the outstanding voting securities of the subsidiary company).


(3) Exception for certain Partnership Licensees. If you are a Partnership Licensee, you may form one or more blocker entities in accordance with this paragraph (b)(3). For the purposes of this paragraph, a “blocker entity” means a corporation or a limited liability company that elects to be taxed as a corporation for Federal income tax purposes. The sole purpose of a blocker entity must be to provide Financing to one or more eligible, unincorporated Small Businesses. You may form such blocker entities only if a direct Financing to such Small Businesses would cause any of your investors to incur “unrelated business taxable income” under section 511 of the Internal Revenue Code (26 U.S.C. 511) or to incur “effectively connected income” to foreign investors under sections 871 and 882 of the Internal Revenue Code (26 U.S.C. 871 and 882). Your ownership and investment of funds in such blocker entities will not constitute a violation of § 107.730(a). For each passive business financed under this section 107.720(b)(3), you must provide a certification to SBA as required under § 107.610(g). A blocker entity formed under this paragraph may provide Financing:


(i) Directly to one or more eligible non-passive Small Businesses; or


(ii) Directly to a passive Small Business that passes substantially all the proceeds directly to (or uses substantially all the proceeds to acquire) one or more eligible non-passive Small Businesses in which the passive Small Business directly owns, or will own as a result of the Financing, at least 50% of the outstanding voting securities.


(4) Additional conditions for permitted passive business financings. Financings permitted under paragraphs (b)(2) or (3) of this section must meet all of the following conditions:


(i) For the purposes of this paragraph (b), “substantially all” means at least 99 percent of the Financing proceeds after deduction of actual application fees, closing fees, and expense reimbursements, which may not exceed those permitted by § 107.860.


(ii) If you and/or your Associate charge fees permitted by § 107.860 and/or § 107.900, the total amount of such fees charged to all passive and non-passive businesses that are part of the same Financing may not exceed the fees that would have been permitted if the Financing had been provided directly to a non-passive Small Business. Any such fees received by your Associate must be paid to you in cash within 30 days of the receipt of such fees.


(iii) For the purposes of this part 107, each passive and non-passive business included in the Financing is a Portfolio Concern. The terms of the financing must provide SBA with access to Portfolio Concern information in compliance with this part 107, including without limitation §§ 107.600 and 107.620.


(c) Real Estate Businesses. (1) You are not permitted to finance any business classified under North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) codes 531110 (lessors of residential buildings and dwellings), 531120 (lessors of nonresidential buildings except miniwarehouses), 531190 (lessors of other real estate property), 237210 (land subdivision), or 236117 (new housing for-sale builders). You are not permitted to finance any business classified under NAICS codes 236118 (residential remodelers), 236210 (industrial building construction), or 236220 (commercial and institutional building construction), if such business is primarily engaged in construction or renovation of properties on its own account rather than as a hired contractor. You are permitted to finance a business classified under NAICS codes 531210 (offices of real estate agents and brokers), 531311 (residential property managers), 531312 (nonresidential property managers), 531320 (offices of real estate appraisers), or 531390 (other activities related to real estate), only if such business derives at least 80 percent of its revenue from non-Affiliate sources.


(2) You are not permitted to finance a Small Business, regardless of NAICS classification, if the Financing is to be used to acquire or refinance real property, unless the Small Business:


(i) Is acquiring an existing property and will use at least 51 percent of the usable square footage for an eligible business purpose; or


(ii) Is building or renovating a building and will use at least 67 percent of the usable square footage for an eligible business purpose; or


(iii) Occupies the subject property and uses at least 67 percent of the usable square footage for an eligible business purpose.


(d) Project Financing. You are not permitted to finance a business if:


(1) The assets of the business are to be reduced or consumed, generally without replacement, as the life of the business progresses, and the nature of the business requires that a stream of cash payments be made to the business’s financing sources, on a basis associated with the continuing sale of assets. Examples include real estate development projects and oil and gas wells; or


(2) The primary purpose of the Financing is to fund production of a single item or defined limited number of items, generally over a defined production period, and such production will constitute the majority of the activities of the Small Business. Examples include motion pictures and electric generating plants.


(e) Farm land purchases. You are not permitted to finance the acquisition of farm land. Farm land means land which is or is intended to be used for agricultural or forestry purposes, such as the production of food, fiber, or wood, or is so taxed or zoned.


(f) Public interest. You are not permitted to finance any business if the proceeds are to be used for purposes contrary to the public interest, including but not limited to activities which are in violation of law, or inconsistent with free competitive enterprise.


(g) Foreign investment – (1) General rule. You are not permitted to finance a business if:


(i) The funds will be used substantially for a foreign operation; or


(ii) At the time of the Financing or within one year thereafter, more than 49 percent of the employees or tangible assets of the Small Business are located outside the United States (unless you can show, to SBA’s satisfaction, that the Financing was used for a specific domestic purpose).


(2) Exception. This paragraph (g) does not prohibit a Financing used to acquire foreign materials and equipment or foreign property rights for use or sale in the United States.


(h) Associated supplier. You are not permitted to finance a business that purchases, or will purchase, goods or services from a supplier who is your Associate, except under the following conditions:


(1) The amount of goods and services purchased (or to be purchased) from your Associate with the proceeds of the Financing, or with funds released as a result of the Financing, is less than 50 percent of the total amount of the Financing (75 percent for a Section 301(d) Licensee);


(2) The price of such goods and services is no higher than that charged other customers of your Associate; and


(3) The Small Business purchases no capital goods from your Associate.


(i) Financing Licensees. You are not permitted to provide funds, directly or indirectly, that the Small Business will use:


(1) To purchase stock in or provide capital to a Licensee; or


(2) To repay an indebtedness incurred for the purpose of investing in a Licensee.


[61 FR 3189, Jan. 31, 1996, as amended at 63 FR 5867, Feb. 5, 1998; 64 FR 70995, Dec. 20, 1999; 79 FR 62823, Oct. 21, 2014; 82 FR 39340, Aug. 18, 2017]


§ 107.730 Financings which constitute conflicts of interest.

(a) General rule. You must not self-deal to the prejudice of a Small Business, the Licensee, its shareholders or partners, or SBA. Unless you obtain a prior written exemption from SBA for special instances in which a Financing may further the purposes of the Act despite presenting a conflict of interest, you must not directly or indirectly:


(1) Provide Financing to any of your Associates, except for a Financing to an Associate that meets all of the following conditions:


(i) The Small Business that receives the Financing is your Associate, pursuant to paragraph (8)(ii) of the Associate definition in § 107.50, only because an investment fund that is your Associate holds a 10% or greater equity interest in the Small Business.


(ii) You and the Associate investment fund previously invested in the Small Business at the same time and on the same terms and conditions.


(iii) You and the Associate investment fund are providing follow-on financing to the Small Business at the same time, on the same terms and conditions, and in the same proportionate dollar amounts as your respective investments in the previous round(s) of financing (for example, if you invested $2 million and your Associate invested $1 million in the previous round, your respective follow-on investments would be in the same 2:1 ratio).


(2) Provide Financing to an Associate of another Licensee if one of your Associates has received or will receive any direct or indirect Financing or a Commitment from that Licensee or a third Licensee (including Financing or Commitments received under any understanding, agreement, or cross dealing, reciprocal or circular arrangement).


(3) Borrow money from:


(i) A Small Business Financed by you;


(ii) An officer, director, or owner of at least a 10 percent equity interest in such business; or


(iii) A Close Relative of any such officer, director, or equity owner.


(4) Provide Financing to a Small Business to discharge an obligation to your Associate or free other funds to pay such obligation. This paragraph (a)(4) does not apply if the obligation is to an Associate Lending Institution and is a line of credit or other obligation incurred in the normal course of business.


(5) Provide Financing to a Small Business for the purpose of purchasing property from your Associate, except as permitted under § 107.720(h).


(b) Rules applicable to Associates. Without SBA’ s prior written approval, your Associates must not, directly or indirectly:


(1) Borrow money from any Person described in paragraph (a)(3) of this section.


(2) Receive from a Small Business any compensation in connection with Assistance you provide (except as permitted under §§ 107.825(c) and 107.900), or anything of value for procuring, attempting to procure, or influencing your action with respect to such Assistance.


(c) Applicability of other laws. You are also bound by any restrictions in Federal or State laws governing conflicts of interest and fiduciary obligations.


(d) Financings with Associates – (1) Financings with Associates requiring prior approval. Without SBA’s prior written approval, you may not Finance any business in which your Associate has either a voting equity interest, or total equity interests (including potential interests), of at least five percent.


(2) Other Financings with Associates. If you and an Associate provide Financing to the same Small Business, either at the same time or at different times, you must be able to demonstrate to SBA’s satisfaction that the terms and conditions are (or were) fair and equitable to you, taking into account any differences in the timing of each party’s financing transactions.


(3) Exceptions to paragraphs (d)(1) and (d)(2) of this section. A Financing that falls into one of the following categories is exempt from the prior approval requirement in paragraph (d)(1) of this section or is presumed to be fair and equitable to you for the purposes of paragraph (d)(2) of this section, as appropriate:


(i) Your Associate is a Lending Institution that is providing financing under a credit facility in order to meet the operational needs of the Small Business, and the terms of such financing are usual and customary.


(ii) Your Associate invests in the Small Business on the same terms and conditions and at the same time as you.


(iii) Both you and your Associate are leveraged Licensees, and both have outstanding Participating Securities or neither has outstanding Participating Securities.


(iv) You have no outstanding Leverage and do not intend to issue Leverage in the future, and your Associate either is not a Licensee or has no outstanding Leverage and does not intend to issue Leverage in the future.


(e) Use of Associates to manage Portfolio Concerns. To protect your investment, you may designate an Associate to serve as an officer, director, or other participant in the management of a Small Business. You must identify any such Associate in your records available for SBA’s review under § 107.600. Without SBA’s prior written approval, the Associate must not:


(1) Have any other direct or indirect financial interest in the Portfolio Concern that exceeds, or has the potential to exceed, 5 percent of the Portfolio Concern’s equity.


(2) Have served for more than 30 days as an officer, director or other participant in the management of the Portfolio Concern before you provided Financing.


(3) Receive any income or anything of value from the Portfolio Concern unless it is for your benefit, with the exception of director’s fees, expenses, and distributions based upon the Associate’s ownership interest in the Concern.


(f) 1940 and 1980 Act Companies: SEC exemptions. If you are a 1940 or 1980 Act Company and you receive an exemption from the Securities and Exchange Commission for a transaction described in this § 107.730, you need not obtain SBA’s approval of the transaction. However, you must promptly notify SBA of the transaction and satisfy the public notice requirements in paragraph (g) of this section.


(g) Public notice. Before granting an exemption under this § 107.730, SBA will publish notice of the transaction in the Federal Register.


[61 FR 3189, Jan. 31, 1996, as amended at 63 FR 5867, Feb. 5, 1998; 64 FR 70996, Dec. 20, 1999; 77 FR 20294, Apr. 4, 2012]


§ 107.740 Portfolio diversification (“overline” limitation).

(a) General rule. This § 107.740 applies if you have outstanding Leverage or intend to issue Leverage in the future. Unless SBA approved your license application based upon a plan to issue less than two tiers of Leverage, you may provide Financing or a Commitment to a Small Business if the resulting amount of your aggregate Financings and Commitments to such Small Business and its Affiliates does not exceed 30 percent of the sum of:


(1) Your Regulatory Capital as of the date of the Financing or Commitment; plus


(2) Any Distribution(s) you made under § 107.1570(b), during the five years preceding the date of the Financing or Commitment, which reduced your Regulatory Capital; plus


(3) Any Distribution(s) you made under § 107.585, during the five years preceding the date of the Financing or Commitment, which reduced your Regulatory Capital by no more than two percent or which SBA approves for inclusion in the sum determined in this paragraph (a).


(b) Lower overline limit. If SBA approved your license application based upon a plan to issue less than two tiers of Leverage, the applicable percentage of the amount computed in paragraphs (a)(1) though (a)(3) of this section will be:


(1) 20 percent if the plan contemplates one tier of Leverage.


(2) 25 percent if the plan contemplates 1.5 tiers of Leverage.


(c) Outstanding Financings. For the purposes of paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section, you must measure each outstanding Financing at its original cost (including any amount of the Financing that was previously written off).


[74 FR 33915, July 14, 2009]


§ 107.750 Conditions for financing a change of ownership of a Small Business.

You may finance a change of ownership of a Small Business only under the conditions set forth in this section.


(a) The Financing must:


(1) Promote the sound development or preserve the existence of the Small Business;


(2) Help create a Small Business as a result of a corporate divestiture; or


(3) Facilitate ownership in a Disadvantaged Business.


(b) The Resulting Concern (as defined in paragraph (c) of this section) must:


(1) Be a Small Business under § 107.700;


(2) Have 500 or fewer full-time equivalent employees; or meet one of the appropriate debt/equity ratio tests:


(i) If you have outstanding Leverage, the Resulting Concern’s ratio of debt to equity must be no more than 5 to 1; or


(ii) If you have no outstanding Leverage, the Resulting Concern’s ratio of debt to equity must be no more than 8 to 1.


(c) Definitions. (1) The “Resulting Concern” is determined by viewing the business as though the change of ownership had already occurred, giving effect to all contemplated financing, mergers, and acquisitions.


(2) For purposes of this section, “debt” means long-term debt, including contingent liabilities, but excluding accounts payable, operating leases, letters of credit, subordinated notes payable to the seller, any other liabilities approved for exclusion by SBA and short-term working capital loans (so long as the loans carry a zero balance for 30 consecutive days during the concern’s fiscal year).


(3) For purposes of this section, “equity” means common and preferred stock (corporation), contributed capital (partnership), or membership interests (limited liability company).


§ 107.760 How a change in size or activity of a Portfolio Concern affects the Licensee and the Portfolio Concern.

(a) Effect on Licensee of a change in size of a Portfolio Concern. If a Portfolio Concern no longer qualifies as a Small Business you may keep your investment in the concern and:


(1) Subject to the overline limitations of § 107.740, you may provide additional Financing to the concern up to the time it makes a public offering of its securities.


(2) Even after the concern makes a public offering, you may exercise any stock options, warrants, or other rights to purchase Equity Securities which you acquired before the public offering, or fund Commitments you made before the public offering.


(b) Effect of a change in business activity occurring within one year of Licensee’s initial Financing – (1) Retention of Investment. Unless you receive SBA’s written approval, you may not keep your investment in a Portfolio Concern, small or otherwise, which becomes ineligible by reason of a change in its business activity within one year of your initial investment.


(2) Request for SBA’s approval to retain investment. If you request that SBA approve the retention of your investment, your request must include sufficient evidence to demonstrate that the change in business activity was caused by an unforeseen change in circumstances and was not contemplated at the time the Financing was made.


(3) Additional Financing. If SBA approves your request to retain an investment under paragraph (b)(2) of this section, you may provide additional Financing to the Portfolio Concern to the extent necessary to protect against the loss of the amount of your original investment, subject to the overline limitations of § 107.740.


(c) Effect of a change in business activity occurring more than one year after the initial Financing. If a Portfolio Concern becomes ineligible because of a change in business activity more than one year after your initial Financing you may:


(1) Retain your investment; and


(2) Provide additional Financing to the Portfolio Concern to the extent necessary to protect against the loss of the amount of your original investment, subject to the overline limitations of § 107.740.


Structuring Licensee’s Financing of Eligible Small Businesses: Types of Financing

§ 107.800 Financings in the form of Equity Securities.

(a) You may purchase the Equity Securities of a Small Business. You may not, inadvertently or otherwise:


(1) Become a general partner in any unincorporated business; or


(2) Become jointly or severally liable for any obligations of an unincorporated business.


(b) Definition. Equity Securities means stock of any class in a corporation, stock options, warrants, limited partnership interests in a limited partnership, membership interests in a limited liability company, or joint venture interests. If the Financing agreement contains debt-type acceleration provisions or includes redemption provisions, other than those permitted under § 107.850, the security will be considered a Debt Security for purposes of § 107.855 and § 107.1150(c)(1).


[61 FR 3189, Jan. 31, 1996, as amended at 74 FR 33915, July 14, 2009]


§ 107.810 Financings in the form of Loans.

You may make Loans to Small Businesses. A Loan means a transaction evidenced by a debt instrument with no provision for you to acquire Equity Securities.


§ 107.815 Financings in the form of Debt Securities.

You may purchase Debt Securities from Small Businesses.


(a) Definitions. Debt Securities are instruments evidencing a loan with an option or any other right to acquire Equity Securities in a Small Business or its Affiliates, or a loan which by its terms is convertible into an equity position, or a loan with a right to receive royalties that are excluded from the Cost of Money pursuant to § 107.855(g)(12). Consideration must be paid for all options that you acquire.


(b) Restriction on options obtained by Licensee’s management and employees. If you have outstanding Leverage or plan to obtain Leverage, your employees, officers, directors or general partners, or the general partners of the management company that is providing services to you or to your general partner, may obtain options in a Financed Small Business only if:


(1) They participate in the Financing on a pari passu basis with you; or


(2) SBA gives its prior written approval; or


(3) The options received are compensation for service as a member of the board of directors of the Small Business, and such compensation does not exceed that paid to other outside directors. In the absence of such directors, fees must be reasonable when compared with amounts paid to outside directors of similar companies.


[61 FR 3189, Jan. 31, 1996, as amended at 65 FR 69432, Nov. 17, 2000]


§ 107.820 Financings in the form of guarantees.

At the request of a Small Business or where necessary to protect your existing investment, you may guarantee the monetary obligation of a Small Business to any non-Associate creditor.


(a) You may not issue a guaranty if:


(1) You would become subject to State regulation as an insurance, guaranty or surety business;


(2) The amount of the guaranty plus any direct Financings to the Small Business exceed the overline limitations of § 107.740, except that a pledge of the Equity Securities of the issuer or a subordination of your lien or creditor position does not count toward your overline; or


(3) The total financing cost to the Small Business exceeds the cost of money limits of § 107.855.


(b) Pledge of Licensee’s assets as guaranty. For purposes of this section, a guaranty with recourse only to specific asset(s) you have pledged is equal to the fair market value of such asset(s) or the amount of the debt guaranteed, whichever is less.


§ 107.825 Purchasing securities from an underwriter or other third party.

(a) Securities purchased through or from an underwriter. You may purchase the securities of a Small Business through or from an underwriter if:


(1) You purchase such securities within 90 days of the date the public offering is first made;


(2) Your purchase price is no more than the original public offering price; and


(3) The amount paid by you for the securities (less ordinary and reasonable underwriting charges and commissions) has been, or will be, paid to the Small Business, and the underwriter certifies in writing that this requirement has been met.


(b) Recordkeeping requirements. If you have outstanding Leverage or plan to obtain Leverage, you must keep records available for SBA’s inspection which show the relevant details of the transaction, including, but not limited to, date, price, commissions, and the underwriter’s certifications required under paragraph (c) of this section.


(c) Underwriter’s requirements. If you have outstanding Leverage or plan to obtain Leverage, the underwriter must certify whether it is your Associate. You may pay reasonable and customary commissions and expenses to an Associate underwriter for the portion of an offering that you purchase, provided it is no more than 25 percent of the total offering. If you buy more than 25 percent of the offering, the amount you pay to the Associate underwriter must not exceed the total of the application and closing fees and reimbursable expenses permitted by § 107.860.


(d) Securities purchased from another Licensee or from SBA. You may purchase from, or exchange with, another Licensee, Portfolio securities (or any interest therein). Such purchase or exchange may only be made on a non-recourse basis. You may not have more than one-third of your total assets(valued at cost) invested in such securities. If you have previously sold Portfolio Securities (or any interest therein) on a recourse basis, you shall include the amount for which you may be contingently liable in your overline computation.


(e) Purchases of securities from other non-issuers. You may purchase securities of a Small Business from a non-issuer not previously described in this § 107.825 if:


(1) Such acquisition is a reasonably necessary part of the overall sound Financing of the Small Business under the Act; or


(2) The securities are acquired to finance a change of ownership under § 107.750.


Structuring Licensee’s Financing of an Eligible Small Business: Terms and Conditions of Financing

§ 107.830 Minimum duration/term of financing.

(a) General rule. The duration/term of all your Financings must be for a minimum period of one year.


(b) Restrictions on mandatory redemption of Equity Securities. If you have acquired Equity Securities, options or warrants on terms that include redemption by the Small Business, you must not require redemption by the Small Business within the first year of your acquisition except as permitted in § 107.850.


(c) Special rules for Loans and Debt Securities – (1) Term. The minimum term for Loans and Debt Securities starts with the first disbursement of the Financing.


(2) Prepayment. You must permit voluntary prepayment of Loans and Debt Securities by the Small Business. You must obtain SBA’s prior written approval of any restrictions on the ability of the Small Business to prepay other than the imposition of a reasonable prepayment penalty under paragraph (c)(3) of this section.


(3) Prepayment penalties. You may charge a reasonable prepayment penalty which must be agreed upon at the time of the Financing. If SBA determines that a prepayment penalty is unreasonable, you must refund the entire penalty to the Small Business. A prepayment penalty equal to 5 percent of the outstanding balance during the first year of any Financing, declining by one percentage point per year through the fifth year, is considered reasonable.


[61 FR 3189, Jan. 31, 1996, as amended at 69 FR 8098, Feb. 23, 2004]


§ 107.835 Exceptions to minimum duration/term of Financing.

You may make a Short-term Financing for a term less than one year if the Financing is:


(a) An interim Financing in contemplation of long-term Financing. The contemplated long-term Financing must be in an amount at least equal to the short-term Financing, and must be made by you alone or in participation with other investors; or


(b) For protection of your prior investment(s); or


(c) For the purpose of Financing a change of ownership under § 107.750. The total amount of such Financings may not exceed 20 percent of your Loans and Investments (at cost) at the end of any fiscal year; or


(d) For the purpose of aiding a Small Business in performing a contract awarded under a Federal, State, or local government set-aside program for “minority” or “disadvantaged” contractors.


[61 FR 3189, Jan. 31, 1996, as amended at 64 FR 52646, Sept. 30, 1999; 69 FR 8098, Feb. 23, 2004]


§ 107.840 Maximum term of Financing.

The maximum term of any Loan or Debt Security Financing must be no longer than 20 years.


§ 107.845 Maximum rate of amortization on Loans and Debt Securities.

The principal of any Loan (or the loan portion of any Debt Security) with a term of one year or less cannot be amortized faster than straight line. If the term is greater than one year, the principal cannot be amortized faster than straight line for the first year.


[69 FR 8098, Feb. 23, 2004]


§ 107.850 Restrictions on redemption of Equity Securities.

(a) A Portfolio Concern cannot be required to redeem Equity Securities earlier than one year from the date of the first closing unless:


(1) The concern makes a public offering, or has a change of management or control, or files for protection under the provisions of the Bankruptcy Code, or materially breaches your Financing agreement; or


(2) You make a follow-on investment, in which case the new securities may be redeemed in less than one year, but no earlier than the redemption date associated with your earliest Financing of the concern.


(b) The redemption price must be either:


(1) A fixed amount that is no higher than the price you paid for the securities; or


(2) An amount that cannot be fixed or determined before the time of redemption. In this case, the redemption price must be based on:


(i) A reasonable formula that reflects the performance of the concern (such as one based on earnings or book value); or


(ii) The fair market value of the concern at the time of redemption, as determined by a professional appraisal performed under an agreement acceptable to both parties.


(c) Any method for determining the redemption price must be agreed upon no later than the date of the first (or only) closing of the Financing.


[61 FR 3189, Jan. 31, 1996, as amended at 64 FR 52646, Sept. 30, 1999; 69 FR 8098, Feb. 23, 2004]


§ 107.855 Interest rate ceiling and limitations on fees charged to Small Businesses (“Cost of Money”).

“Cost of Money” means the interest and other consideration that you receive from a Small Business. Subject to lower ceilings prescribed by local law, the Cost of Money to the Small Business must not exceed the ceiling determined under this section.


(a) Financings to which the Cost of Money rules apply. This section applies to all Loans and Debt Securities. As required by § 107.800(b), you must include as Debt Securities any equity interests with redemption provisions that do not meet the restrictions in § 107.850.


(b) When to determine the Cost of Money ceiling for a Financing. You may determine your Cost of Money ceiling for a particular Financing as of the date you issue a Commitment or as of the date of the first closing of the Financing. Once determined, the Cost of Money ceiling remains fixed for the duration of the Financing.


(c) How to determine the Cost of Money ceiling for a Financing. At a minimum, you may use a Cost of Money ceiling of 19 percent for a Loan and 14 percent for a Debt Security. To determine whether you may charge more, do the following:


(1) Choose a base rate for your Cost of Money computation. The base rate may be either the Debenture Rate currently in effect plus the applicable Charge determined under § 107.1130(d)(1), or your own “Cost of Capital” as determined under paragraph (d) of this section.


(2) For a Loan, add 11 percentage points to the base rate; for a Debt Security, add 6 percentage points. In either case, round the sum down to the nearest eighth of one percent.


(3) If the result is more than 19 percent (for a Loan) or 14 percent (for a Debt Security), you may use it as your Cost of Money ceiling.


(4) If two or more Licensees participate in the same Financing of a Small Business, the base rate used in this paragraph (c) is the highest of the following:


(i) The current Debenture Rate plus the applicable Charge determined under § 107.1130(d)(1);


(ii) The Cost of Capital of the lead Licensee; or


(iii) The weighted average of the Cost of Capital for all Licensees participating in the Financing.


(d) How to determine your Cost of Capital. “Cost of Capital” is an optional computation of the weighted average interest rate you pay on your “qualified borrowings”. “Qualified borrowings” means your Debentures together with your borrowings at or below the usual interest rate charged by banks in your locality on the date your loan was made.


(1) For any fiscal year, you may compute your Cost of Capital:


(i) As of the first day of your fiscal year, to remain in effect for the entire year; or


(ii) As of the first day of every fiscal quarter during the fiscal year, to remain in effect for the duration of the quarter.


(2) For each qualified borrowing outstanding at your last fiscal year or fiscal quarter end, multiply the ending principal balance (net of related unamortized fees) by the number of days during the past four fiscal quarters that the borrowing was outstanding, and divide the result by 365.


(3) Add together the amounts computed for all borrowings under paragraph (d)(2) of this section. The result is your weighted average borrowings.


(4) For all qualified borrowings outstanding at your last fiscal year or fiscal quarter end, determine the aggregate interest expense for the past four fiscal quarters, excluding amortization of loan fees. For the purposes of this paragraph (d)(4):


(i) Interest expense on Debentures includes the 1 percent Charge paid by a Licensee under § 107.1130(d)(1); and


(ii) Section 301(d) Licensees with outstanding subsidized Debentures are presumed to have paid interest at the rate stated on the face of such Debentures, without regard to any subsidy paid by SBA.


(5) Divide the interest expense from paragraph (d)(4) of this section by the weighted average borrowings from paragraph (d)(3) of this section, and multiply by 100. The result is your Cost of Capital, which you may use to compute a Cost of Money ceiling under paragraph (c) of this section.


(e) SBA review of Cost of Capital computation. You must keep your Cost of Capital computations in a separate file available for SBA’s review.


(1) A computation that is kept in such a file and is audited by your independent public accountant is considered correct unless SBA demonstrates otherwise.


(2) If a computation is not kept in such a file or is unaudited, you must prove its accuracy to SBA’s satisfaction.


(f) Charges included in the Cost of Money. The Cost of Money includes all interest, points, discounts, fees, royalties, profit participation, and any other consideration you receive from a Small Business, except for the specific exclusions in paragraph (g) of this section. For equity interests subject to the Cost of Money rules (see paragraph (a) of this section), you must include:


(1) The portion of the fixed redemption price that exceeds your original cost.


(2) Any amount of a redemption that is paid out of accounts other than the Small Business’s capital accounts (capital, paid-in surplus, or retained earnings of a corporation; or partners’ capital of a partnership).


(g) Charges excluded from the Cost of Money. You may exclude from the Cost of Money:


(1) Discount on the loan portion of a Debt Security, if such discount exists solely as the result of the allocation of value to detachable stock purchase warrants in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles.


(2) Closing fees, application fees, and expense reimbursements, each as permitted under § 107.860.


(3) Reasonable prepayment penalties permitted under § 107.830(d)(3).


(4) Out-of-pocket conveyance and/or recordation fees and taxes.


(5) Reasonable closing costs.


(6) Fees for management services as permitted under § 107.900.


(7) Reasonable and necessary out-of-pocket expenses you incur to monitor the Financing.


(8) Board of director fees not in excess of those paid to other outside directors, if your board representation meets the requirements of § 107.730(e).


(9) A reasonable fee for arranging financing for a Small Business from a source that is neither a Licensee nor an Associate of yours. The Small Business must agree in writing to pay such a fee before you arrange the financing.


(10) The difference between the contractual interest rate of the Financing and a default rate of interest permitted as follows:


(i) If a Small Business is in default, you may charge a default rate of interest as much as 7 percentage points higher than the contractual rate until the default is cured.


(ii) For this purpose, “default” means either failure to pay an amount when due or failure to provide information required under the Financing documents.


(11) Royalty payments based on improvement in the performance of the Small Business after the date of the Financing.


(12) Gains realized on the disposition of Equity Securities issued by the Small Business.


(h) How to evaluate compliance with the Cost of Money ceiling. You must determine whether a Financing is within the Cost of Money ceiling based on its discounted cash flows, as follows:


(1) Beginning with the date of the first disbursement (“period zero”), identify your cash inflows and cash outflows for each period of the Financing. The appropriate period to use (such as years, quarters, or months) depends on how you have structured the disbursements and payments.


(2) Discount the cash flows back to the first disbursement date using the Cost of Money ceiling from paragraph (d) of this section as the discount rate.


(3) If the result is zero or less, the Financing is within the Cost of Money ceiling; if it is greater than zero, the Financing exceeds the Cost of Money ceiling.


[61 FR 3189, Jan. 31, 1996, as amended at 63 FR 5867, Feb. 5, 1998; 64 FR 52646, Sept. 30, 1999; 65 FR 69432, Nov. 17, 2000; 77 FR 20294, Apr. 4, 2012]


§ 107.860 Financing fees and expense reimbursements a Licensee may receive from a Small Business.

You may collect Financing fees and receive expense reimbursements from a Small Business only as permitted under this § 107.860.


(a) Application fee. You may collect a nonrefundable application fee from a Small Business to review its Financing application. The application fee may be collected at the same time as the closing fee under paragraph (c) or (d) of this section, or earlier. The fee must be:


(1) No more than 1 percent of the amount of Financing requested (or, if two or more Licensees participate in the Financing, their combined application fees are no more than 1 percent of the total Financing requested); and


(2) Agreed to in writing by the Financing applicant.


(b) SBA review of application fees. For any fiscal year, if the number of application fees you collect is more than twice the number of Financings closed, SBA in its sole discretion may determine that you are engaged in activities not contemplated by the Act, in violation of § 107.500.


(c) Closing fee – Loans. You may charge a closing fee on a Loan if:


(1) The fee is no more than 2 percent of the Financing amount (or, if two or more Licensees participate in the Financing, their combined closing fees are no more than 2 percent of the total Financing amount); and


(2) You charge the fee no earlier than the date of the first disbursement.


(d) Closing fee – Debt or Equity Financings. You may charge a Closing Fee on a Debt Security or Equity Security Financing if:


(1) The fee is no more than 4 percent of the Financing amount (or, if two or more Licensees participate in the Financing, their combined closing fees are no more than 4 percent of the total Financing amount); and


(2) You charge the fee no earlier than the date of the first disbursement.


(e) Limitation on dual fees. If another Licensee or an Associate of yours collects a transaction fee under § 107.900(e) in connection with your Financing of a Small Business, the sum of the transaction fee and your application and closing fees cannot exceed the maximum application and closing fees permitted under this § 107.860.


(f) Expense reimbursements. You may charge a Small Business for the reasonable out-of-pocket expenses, other than Management Expenses, that you incur to process its Financing application. If SBA determines that any of your reimbursed expenses are unreasonable or are Management Expenses, SBA will require you to include such amounts in the Cost of Money or refund them to the Small Business.


(g) Breakup fee. If a Small Business accepts your Commitment and then fails to close the Financing because it has accepted funds from another source, you may charge a “breakup fee” equal to the closing fee that you would have been permitted to charge under paragraph (c) or (d) of this section.


[61 FR 3189, Jan. 31, 1996; 61 FR 41496, Aug. 9, 1996]


§ 107.865 Control of a Small Business by a Licensee.

(a) In general. You, or you and your Associates (in the latter case, the “Investor Group”), may exercise Control over a Small Business for purposes connected to your investment, through ownership of voting securities, management agreements, voting trusts, majority representation on the board of directors, or otherwise. The period of such Control will be limited to the seventh anniversary of the date on which such Control was initially acquired, or any earlier date specified by the terms of any investment agreement.


(b) Presumption of control. Control over a Small Business based on ownership of voting securities will be presumed to exist whenever you or the Investor Group own or control, directly or indirectly:


(1) At least 50 percent of the outstanding voting securities, if there are fewer than 50 shareholders; or


(2) More than 25 percent of the outstanding voting securities, if there are 50 or more shareholders; or


(3) At least 20 percent of the outstanding voting securities, if there are 50 or more shareholders and no other party holds a larger block.


(c) Rebuttals to presumption of Control. A presumption of Control under paragraph (b) of this section is rebutted if:


(1) The management of the Small Business owns at least a 25 percent interest in the voting securities of the business; and


(2) The management of the Small Business can elect at least 40 percent of the board members of a corporation, general partners of a limited partnership, or managers of a limited liability company, as appropriate, and the Investor Group can elect no more than 40 percent. The balance of such officials may be elected through mutual agreement by management and the Investor Group.


(d) Extension of Control. With SBA’s prior written approval you, or the Investor Group, may retain Control for such additional period as may be reasonably necessary to complete divestiture of Control or to ensure the financial stability of the portfolio company.


(e) Additional Financing for businesses under Licensee’s Control. If you assume Control of a Small Business, you may later provide additional Financing, without an exemption under § 107.730(a)(1).


[61 FR 3189, Jan. 31, 1996, as amended at 63 FR 5867, Feb. 5, 1998; 64 FR 52646, Sept. 30, 1999; 67 FR 64790, Oct. 22, 2002]


§ 107.880 Assets acquired in liquidation of Portfolio securities.

You may acquire assets in full or partial liquidation of a Small Business’s obligation to you under the conditions permitted by this § 107.880. The assets may be acquired from the Small Business, a guarantor of its obligation, or another party.


(a) Timely disposition of assets. You must dispose of assets acquired in liquidation of a Portfolio security within a reasonable period of time.


(b) Permitted expenditures to preserve assets. (1) You may incur reasonably necessary expenditures to maintain and preserve assets acquired.


(2) You may incur reasonably necessary expenditures for improvements to render such assets saleable.


(3) You may make payments of mortgage principal and interest (including amounts in arrears when you acquired the asset), pay taxes when due, and pay for necessary insurance coverage.


(c) SBA approval of expenditures. This paragraph (c) applies if you have outstanding Leverage or are applying for Leverage. Any application for SBA approval under this paragraph must specify all expenses estimated to be necessary pending disposal of the assets. Without SBA’s prior written approval:


(1) Your total expenditures under paragraphs (b)(1) and (b)(2) of this section plus your total Financing(s) to the Small Business must not exceed your overline limit under § 107.740; and


(2) Your total expenditures under paragraph (b) of this section plus your total Financing(s) to the Small Business must not exceed 35 percent of your Regulatory Capital.


Limitations on Disposition of Assets

§ 107.885 Disposition of assets to Licensee’s Associates or to competitors of Portfolio Concern.

Sale of assets to Associate. Except with SBA’s prior written approval, you are not permitted to dispose of assets (including assets acquired in liquidation) to any Associate if you have outstanding Leverage or Earmarked Assets. As a prerequisite to such approval, you must demonstrate that the proposed terms of disposal are at least as favorable to you as the terms obtainable elsewhere.


[61 FR 3189, Jan. 31, 1996, as amended at 67 FR 64791, Oct. 22, 2002]


Management Services and Fees

§ 107.900 Management fees for services provided to a Small Business by Licensee or its Associate.

This § 107.900 applies to management services that you or your Associate provide to a Small Business during the term of a Financing or prior to Financing. It does not apply to management services that you or your Associate provide to a Small Business that you do not finance. Fees permitted under this section are not included in the Cost of Money (see § 107.855).


(a) Permitted management fees. You or your Associate may provide management services to a Small Business financed by you if:


(1) You or your Associate have entered into a written contract with the Small Business;


(2) The fees charged are for services actually performed;


(3) Services are provided on an hourly fee, project fee, or other reasonable basis; and


(4) You can demonstrate to SBA, upon request, that the rate does not exceed the prevailing rate charged for comparable services by other organizations in the geographic area of the Small Business.


(b) Fees for service as a board member. You or your Associate may receive fees in the form of cash, warrants, or other payments, for services provided as members of the board of directors of a Small Businesses Financed by you. The fees must not exceed those paid to other outside board members. In the absence of such board members, fees must be reasonable when compared with amounts paid to outside directors of similar companies.


(c) SBA approval required. You must obtain SBA’s prior written approval of any management contract that does not satisfy paragraphs (a) or (b) of this section.


(d) Recordkeeping requirements. You must keep a record of hours spent and amounts charged to the Small Business, including expenses charged.


(e) Transaction fees. (1) You may charge reasonable transaction fees for work you or your Associate perform to prepare a client for a public offering, private offering, or sale of all or part of the business, and for assisting with the transaction. Compensation may be in the form of cash, notes, stock, and/or options.


(2) Your Associate may charge market rate investment banking fees to a Small Business on that portion of a Financing that you do not provide.


Subpart H – Non-leveraged Licensees – Exceptions to Regulations

§ 107.1000 Licensees without Leverage – exceptions to the regulations.

The regulatory exceptions in this section apply to Licensees with no outstanding Leverage or Earmarked Assets.


(a) You are exempt from the following provisions (but you must come into compliance with them to become eligible for Leverage):


(1) The overline limitation in § 107.740.


(2) The restrictions in § 107.530 on investments of idle funds, provided you do not engage in activities not contemplated by the Act.


(3) The restrictions in § 107.550 on third-party debt.


(4) The restrictions in § 107.880 on expenses incurred to maintain or improve assets acquired in liquidation of Portfolio securities.


(5) The recordkeeping requirements and fee limitations in § 107.825 (b) and (c), respectively, for securities purchased through or from an underwriter.


(b) You are exempt from the requirements to obtain SBA’s prior approval for:


(1) A decrease in your Regulatory Capital of more than two percent under § 107.585 (but not below the minimum required under the Act or these regulations). You must report the reduction to SBA within 30 days.


(2) Disposition of any asset to your Associate under § 107.885.


(3) A contract to employ an Investment Adviser/Manager under § 107.510. However, you must notify SBA of the Management Expenses to be incurred under such contract, or of any subsequent material changes in such Management Expenses, within 30 days of execution. In order to become eligible for Leverage, you must have the contract approved by SBA.


(4) Your initial Management Expenses under § 107.140 and increases in your Management Expenses under § 107.520. However, you must have your Management Expenses approved by SBA in order to become eligible for Leverage.


(5) Options obtained from a Small Business by your management or employees under § 107.815(b).


(c) You are exempt from the requirement in § 107.680 to obtain SBA’s post approval of new directors and new officers, other than your chief operating officer. However, you must notify SBA of the new directors or officers within 30 days, and you must have all directors and officers approved by SBA in order to become eligible for Leverage.


Subpart I – SBA Financial Assistance for Licensees (Leverage)

General Information About Obtaining Leverage

§ 107.1100 Types of Leverage and application procedures.

(a) Types of Leverageable available. You may apply for Leverage from SBA in one or both of the following forms:


(1) The purchase or guarantee of your Debentures.


(2) The purchase or guarantee of your Participating Securities.


(b) Applying for Leverage. The Leverage application process has two parts. You must first apply for SBA’s conditional commitment to reserve a specific amount of Leverage for your future use. You may then apply to draw down Leverage against the commitment. See §§ 107.1200 through 107.1240.


[63 FR 5868, Feb. 5, 1998, as amended at 64 FR 70996, Dec. 20, 1999; 82 FR 39341, Aug. 18, 2017]


§ 107.1120 General eligibility requirements for Leverage.

To be eligible for Leverage, you must:


(a) Demonstrate a need for Leverage, evidenced by your investment activity and a lack of sufficient funds for investment. For your first issuance of Leverage, if you have invested at least 50 percent of your Leverageable Capital, you are presumed to lack sufficient funds for investment.


(b) Have adequate Private Capital to satisfy the requirements for financial viability under § 107.200.


(c) Meet the minimum capital requirements of § 107.210, subject to the following additional conditions:


(1) If you were licensed after September 30, 1996 under the exception in § 107.210(a)(1), you will not be eligible for Leverage until you have Regulatory Capital of at least $5,000,000.


(2) If you were licensed on or before September 30, 1996, and have Regulatory Capital of less than $5,000,000 (less than $10,000,000 if you wish to issue Participating Securities):


(i) You must certify in writing that at least 50 percent of the aggregate dollar amount of your Financings extended after September 30, 1996 will be provided to Smaller Enterprises (as defined in § 107.710(a)); and


(ii) You must demonstrate to SBA’s satisfaction that the approval of Leverage will not create or contribute to an unreasonable risk of default or loss to the United States government, based on such measurements of profitability and financial viability as SBA deems appropriate.


(d) For any Leverage draw that would cause you and any other Licensees under Common Control to have aggregate outstanding Leverage in excess of $150 million, certify that none of the Licensees has a condition of Capital Impairment. See also § 107.1150(b).


(e) For any Leverage request pursuant to § 107.1150(d)(2)(i), certify that at least 50 percent (in dollars) of your Financings made on or after the date of such request will be invested in Small Businesses located in low-income geographic areas.


(f) For any Leverage request pursuant to § 107.1150(d)(2)(ii), certify that at least 50 percent (in dollars) of the Financings made by each Licensee under Common Control on or after the date of such request will be invested in Small Businesses located in low-income geographic areas.


(g) Certify in writing that you are in compliance with the requirement to finance Smaller Enterprises in § 107.710(b).


(h) Show, to the satisfaction of SBA, that your management is qualified and has the knowledge, experience, and capability necessary for investing in the types of businesses contemplated by the Act, the regulations in this part and your business plan.


(i) Be in compliance with the regulations in this part.


(j) If required by SBA, have your Control Person(s) assume, in writing, personal responsibility for your Leverage, effective only if such Control Person(s) participate (directly or indirectly) in a transfer of Control not approved by SBA.


(k) If you are an Early Stage SBIC, certify in writing that in accordance with § 107.1810(f)(11), at least 50 percent of the aggregate dollar amount of your Financings will be provided to “early stage” companies as defined under the definition of Early Stage SBIC in § 107.50 of this part.


[61 FR 3189, Jan. 31, 1996, as amended at 63 FR 5868, Feb. 5, 1998; 64 FR 70996, Dec. 20, 1999; 74 FR 33916, July 14, 2009; 77 FR 25053, Apr. 27, 2012; 79 FR 62824, Oct. 21, 2014]


§ 107.1130 Leverage fees and additional charges payable by Licensee.

(a) Leverage fee. You must pay a leverage fee to SBA for each issuance of a Debenture or Participating Security. The fee is 3 percent of the face amount of the Leverage issued.


(b) Payment of leverage fee. (1) If you issue a Debenture or Participating Security to repay or redeem existing Leverage, you must pay the leverage fee before SBA will guarantee or purchase the new Leverage security.


(2) If you issue a Debenture or Participating Security that is not used to repay or redeem existing Leverage, SBA will deduct the leverage fee from the proceeds remitted to you, unless you prepaid the fee under § 107.1210.


(c) Refundability. The leverage fee is not refundable under any circumstances.


(d) Additional charge for Leverage – (1) Debentures. You must pay to SBA a Charge, not to exceed 1.38 percent per annum, on the outstanding amount of your Debentures issued on or after October 1, 1996, payable under the same terms and conditions as the interest on the Debentures. This Charge does not apply to Debentures issued pursuant to a Leverage commitment obtained from SBA on or before September 30, 1996.


(2) Participating Securities. You must pay to SBA a Charge, not to exceed 1.46 percent per annum, on the outstanding amount of your Participating Securities issued on or after October 1, 1996, payable under the same terms and conditions as the Prioritized Payments on the Participating Securities. This Charge does not apply to Participating Securities issued pursuant to a Leverage commitment obtained from SBA on or before September 30, 1996.


(e) Other Leverage fees. SBA may establish a fee structure for services performed by the CRA. SBA will not collect any fee for its guarantee of TCs.


[61 FR 3189, Jan. 31, 1996, as amended at 63 FR 5868, Feb. 5, 1998; 77 FR 25053, Apr. 27, 2012]


§ 107.1140 Licensee’s acceptance of SBA remedies under §§ 107.1800 through 107.1820.

If you issue Leverage after April 25, 1994, you automatically agree to the terms and conditions in §§ 107.1800 through 107.1820 as they exist at the time of issuance. The effect of these terms and conditions is the same as if they were fully incorporated in the terms of your Leverage.


Maximum Amount of Leverage for Which a Licensee Is Eligible

§ 107.1150 Maximum amount of Leverage for a Section 301(c) Licensee.

A Section 301(c) Licensee, other than an Early Stage SBIC, may have maximum outstanding Leverage as set forth in paragraphs (a), (b), (d), and (e) of this section. An Early Stage SBIC may have maximum outstanding Leverage as set forth in paragraph (c) of this section. In general, SBA will approve Leverage commitment requests in excess of 200 percent of Regulatory Capital and draw requests in excess of 200 percent of Leverageable Capital only after a Licensee has demonstrated consistent, sustainable profitability based on a conservative investment strategy that limits downside risk. Any such Leverage request must be supported by an up-to-date business plan that reflects continuation of the Licensee’s successful investment strategy and demonstrates the Licensee’s ability to pay all SBA obligations in accordance with their terms.


(a) Individual Licensee. Subject to SBA’s credit policies, if you are a Section 301(c) Licensee, the maximum amount of Leverage you may have outstanding at any time is the lesser of:


(1) 300 percent of your Leverageable Capital, or


(2) $150 million.


(b) Multiple Licensees under Common Control. Subject to SBA’s credit policies, two or more Licenses under Common Control may have maximum aggregate outstanding Leverage of $350 million. However, for any Leverage draw(s) by one or more such Licensees that would cause the aggregate outstanding Leverage to exceed $150 million, each of the Licensees under Common Control must certify that it does not have a condition of Capital Impairment. See also § 107.1120(d).


(c) Early Stage SBICs. Subject to SBA’s credit policies, if you are an Early Stage SBIC:


(1) The total amount of any and all Leverage commitments you receive from SBA shall not exceed 100 percent of your highest Regulatory Capital or $50 million, whichever is less;


(2) On a cumulative basis, the total amount of Leverage you have issued shall not exceed the total amount of capital paid in by your investors; and


(3) The maximum amount of Leverage you may have outstanding at any time is the lesser of:


(i) 100 percent of your Leverageable Capital, or


(ii) $50 million.


(d) Additional Leverage based on investment in low-income geographic areas. Subject to SBA’s credit policies, you may have outstanding Leverage in excess of the amounts permitted by paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section in accordance with this paragraph (d). If you were licensed before October 1, 2009, you may seek additional Leverage under paragraph (d)(1) only. If you were licensed on or after October 1, 2009, you may seek additional Leverage under paragraph (d)(1) or (2), but not both. In this paragraph (d), “low income geographic areas” are as defined in § 108.50 of this chapter. Any investment that you use as a basis to seek additional leverage under this paragraph (d) cannot also be used to seek additional leverage under paragraph (e) of this section.


(1) Investment in Smaller Enterprises located in low-income geographic areas. To determine whether you may request a draw that would cause you to have outstanding Leverage in excess of the amount determined under paragraph (a) of this section:


(i) Determine the cost basis, as reported on your most recent filing of SBA Form 468, of any investments in the Equity Securities of a Smaller Enterprise located in a low-income geographic area.


(ii) Calculate the amount that equals 50 percent of your Leverageable Capital.


(iii) Subtract from your outstanding Leverage the lesser of paragraph (d)(1)(i) or (ii).


(iv) If the amount calculated in paragraph (d)(1)(iii) is less than the maximum leverage determined under paragraph (a) of this section, the difference between the two amounts equals your additional Leverage availability.


(2) Investment in Small Businesses located in low-income geographic areas. This paragraph (d)(2) applies only to Licensees licensed on or after October 1, 2009. You may substitute a maximum Leverage amount of $175,000,000 for the $150,000,000 set forth in paragraph (a)(2) of this section, and a maximum Leverage amount of $250,000,000 for the $225,000,000 set forth in paragraph (b) of this section, if you satisfy the following conditions:


(i) At least 50 percent (in dollars) of your Financings preceding the date of such request must have been invested in Small Businesses located in low-income geographic areas. In addition, you must certify that at least 50 percent (in dollars) of your Financings on or after the date of such request will be invested in Small Businesses located in low-income geographic areas.


(ii) If you are requesting a draw that would cause you and any other Licensees under Common Control to have aggregate outstanding Leverage in excess of $225,000,000, at least 50 percent (in dollars) of the Financings made by each Licensee under Common Control preceding the date of such request must have been invested in Small Businesses located in low-income geographic areas. In addition, each such Licensee must certify that at least 50 percent (in dollars) of its Financings on or after the date of such request will be invested in Small Businesses located in low-income geographic areas.


(e) Additional Leverage based on Energy Saving Qualified Investments in Smaller Enterprises. (1) Subject to SBA’s credit policies, if you were licensed on or after October 1, 2008, you may have outstanding Leverage in excess of the amounts permitted by paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section in accordance with this paragraph (e). Any investment that you use as a basis to seek additional Leverage under this paragraph (e) cannot also be used to seek additional Leverage under paragraph (d) of this section.


(2) To determine whether you may request a draw that would cause you to have outstanding Leverage in excess of the amount determined under paragraph (a) of this section:


(i) Determine the cost basis, as reported on your most recent filing of SBA Form 468, of any Energy Saving Qualified Investments in a Smaller Enterprise that individually do not exceed 20% of your Regulatory Capital.


(ii) Calculate the amount that equals 33% of your Leverageable Capital.


(iii) Subtract from your outstanding Leverage the lesser of paragraph (e)(2)(i) or (ii).


(iv) If the amount calculated in paragraph (e)(2)(iii) is less than the maximum Leverage determined under paragraph (a) of this section, the difference between the two amounts equals your additional Leverage availability.


[74 FR 33916, July 14, 2009, as amended at 77 FR 23380, Apr. 19, 2012; 77 FR 25053, Apr. 27, 2012; 79 FR 62824, Oct. 21, 2014; 82 FR 39341, Aug. 18, 2017]


§ 107.1160 Maximum amount of Leverage for a Section 301(d) Licensee.

This section applies to Leverage issued by a Section 301(d) Licensee on or before September 30, 1996. Effective October 1, 1996, a Section 301(d) Licensee may apply to issue new Leverage, or refinance existing Leverage, only on the same terms permitted under § 107.1150.


(a) Maximum amount of subsidized Leverage. (1) “Subsidized Leverage” means Debentures with a reduced interest rate and Preferred Securities. If you are a Section 301(d) Licensee:


(i) The maximum amount of subsidized Leverage you may have outstanding at any time is the lesser of 400 percent of your Leverageable Capital, or $35,000,000. The same limit applies to a group of Section 301(d) Licensees under Common Control.


(ii) The maximum amount of Preferred Securities you may have outstanding at any time is 200 percent of your Leverageable Capital.


(2) Certain types and amounts of subsidized Leverage have special eligibility requirements (see paragraphs (c) and (d) of this section).


(b) Maximum amount of total Leverage. Use § 107.1150 to determine your maximum amount of Leverage as if you were a Section 301(c) Licensee. If the result is more than your maximum subsidized Leverage, then this is your maximum total (subsidized plus non-subsidized) Leverage. Otherwise, your maximum total Leverage is the same as your maximum subsidized Leverage. For Participating Securities, see § 107.1170.


(c) Special eligibility requirements for fourth tier of Leverage. A “fourth tier of Leverage” is any amount of outstanding Leverage in excess of 300 percent of your Leverageable Capital.


(1) To qualify for a fourth tier of Leverage, you must have invested (or have Commitments to invest) at least 30 percent of your “Total Funds Available for Investment” in “Venture Capital Financings” (see the definitions in paragraphs (e) and (f) of this section).


(2) While you have a fourth tier of Leverage, you must maintain Venture Capital Financings (at cost) that equal at least 30 percent of your Total Funds Available for Investment.


(d) Special eligibility requirements for second tier of Preferred Securities. A “second tier of Preferred Securities” is any amount of outstanding Preferred Securities in excess of 100 percent of your Leverageable Capital.


(1) To qualify for a second tier of Preferred Securities:


(i) If your license was issued after October 13, 1971, you must have at least $500,000 of Leverageable Capital.


(ii) You must have invested (or have Commitments to invest) at least the same dollar amount in Venture Capital Financings.


(2) While you have a second tier of Preferred Securities, you must maintain at least the same dollar amount of Venture Capital Financings (at cost).


(e) Definition of “Total Funds Available for Investment”. Total Funds Available for Investment means the result obtained from the following formula:


T = .90 × (CA + LI)


Where:

T = Total funds available for investment

CA = Total current assets

LI = Total Loans and Investment at cost (as reported on SBA Form 468), net of current maturities

(f) Definition of “Venture Capital Financing”. Venture Capital Financing means an investment represented by common or preferred stock, a limited partnership interest, or a similar ownership interest; or by an unsecured debt instrument that is subordinated by its terms to all other borrowings of the issuer.


(1) A debt secured by any agreement with a third party is not a Venture Capital Financing, whether or not you have a security interest in any asset of the third party or have recourse against the third party.


(2) A Financing that originally qualified as a Venture Capital Financing will continue to qualify (at its original cost), even if you later must report it on SBA Form 468 under either Assets Acquired in Liquidation of Portfolio Securities or Operating Concerns Acquired.


[61 FR 3189, Jan. 31, 1996, as amended at 63 FR 5868, Feb. 5, 1998; 74 FR 33916, July 14, 2009]


§ 107.1170 Maximum amount of Participating Securities for any Licensee.

The maximum amount of Participating Securities you may have outstanding at any time is 200 percent of your Leverageable Capital. If you are a Section 301(d) Licensee, the maximum combined amount of Participating Securities and Preferred Securities you may have outstanding at any time is 200 percent of your Leverageable Capital.


Special Rules for Leverage Issued by an Early Stage SBIC

§ 107.1180 Required distributions to SBA by Early Stage SBICs.

(a) Distribution requirement. If you are an Early Stage SBIC with outstanding Leverage, you may make Distributions to your investors and to SBA only as permitted under this section. See also § 107.585. For the purposes of this section, “Distributions” do not include required payments to SBA of interest and Charges and payments of Leverage principal at maturity, all of which shall be paid in accordance with the terms of the Leverage. You may make a Distribution on any Payment Date. Unless SBA permits otherwise, you must notify SBA in writing of any planned distribution under this section, including computations of the amounts distributable to SBA and your investors, at least 10 business days before the distribution date.


(b) How SBA will apply Distributions. Any amounts you distribute to SBA, or its designated agent or Trustee, under this section will be applied to repayment of principal of outstanding Debentures in order of issue. You may prepay any Debenture in whole, but not in part, on any Payment Date without penalty.


(c) Condition for making a Distribution. You may make a Distribution under this section only if you have paid all interest and Charges on your outstanding Debentures that are due and payable, or will pay such interest and Charges simultaneously with your Distribution.


(d) SBA’s share of Distribution. For each proposed Distribution, determine SBA’s share of the Distribution as follows:


(1) Determine the highest ratio of outstanding Leverage to Leverageable Capital that you have ever attained (your “Highest Leverage Ratio”). For the purpose of determining your Highest Leverage Ratio, any deferred interest Debentures issued at a discount must be included in the computation at their face value.


(2) Determine SBA’s percentage share of cumulative Distributions:


(i) If your Capital Impairment Percentage under § 107.1840 is less than 50 percent as of the Distribution date or your Highest Leverage Ratio equals 0.5 or less, except as provided in paragraph (d)(2)(iii) of this section, SBA’s percentage share of cumulative Distributions equals:


[Highest Leverage Ratio/(Highest Leverage Ratio + 1)] × 100

For example, if your Highest Leverage Ratio equals 1, then SBA’s share of any distribution you make will be 50 percent.

(ii) If your Capital Impairment Percentage under § 107.1840 is 50 percent or greater as of the Distribution date and your Highest Leverage Ratio is greater than 0.5, SBA’s percentage share of cumulative Distributions equals 100 percent.


(iii) If you have a condition of Capital Impairment under § 107.1830 and your Highest Leverage Ratio equals 0.5 or less as of the Distribution date, SBA’s percentage share of cumulative Distributions equals 100 percent.


(3) Multiply the sum of all your prior Distributions and your current proposed Distribution (including Distributions to SBA, your limited partners and your General Partner) by SBA’s percentage share of cumulative Distributions as determined in paragraph (d)(2) of this section.


(4) From the result in paragraph (d)(3) of this section, subtract the sum of all your prior Distributions to SBA under this § 107.1180.


(5) The amount of your Distribution to SBA will be the least of:


(i) The result in paragraph (d)(4) of this section;


(ii) Your current proposed Distribution; or


(iii) Your outstanding Leverage.


(e) Additional Leverage prepayment. On any Payment Date, subject to the terms of your Leverage, you may make a payment to SBA to be applied to repayment of the principal of one or more outstanding Debentures in order of issue, without making any Distribution to your investors.


[77 FR 25053, Apr. 27, 2012]


§ 107.1181 Interest reserve requirements for Early Stage SBICs.

(a) Reserve requirement. If you are an Early Stage SBIC with outstanding Leverage, for each Debenture which requires periodic interest payments to SBA during the first five years of its term, you must maintain a reserve sufficient to pay the interest and Charges on such Debenture for the first 21 Payment Dates following the date of issuance. This reserve may consist of any combination of the following:


(1) Binding unfunded commitments from your Institutional Investors that cannot be called for any purpose other than the payment of interest and Charges to SBA, or the payment of any amounts due to SBA; and


(2) Cash maintained in a separate bank account or separate investment account permitted under § 107.530 of this part and separately identified in your financial statements as “restricted cash” available only for the purpose of paying interest and Charges to SBA, or for the payment of any amounts due to SBA.


(b) The required reserve associated with an individual Debenture shall be reduced on each Payment Date upon payment of the required interest and Charges. If you prepay a Debenture prior to the 21st Payment Date following its date of issuance, the reserve requirement associated with that Debenture shall be correspondingly eliminated.


(c) Your limited partnership agreement must incorporate the reserve requirement in paragraph (a) of this section.


[77 FR 25053, Apr. 27, 2012]


§ 107.1182 Valuation requirements for Early Stage SBICs based on Capital Impairment Percentage.

(a) If you are an Early Stage SBIC, you must compute your Capital Impairment Percentage and determine whether you have a condition of Capital Impairment in accordance with §§ 107.1830 and 107.1840 of this part.


(b) You must promptly notify SBA in writing if your Capital Impairment Percentage is at least 50 percent, even if your maximum permitted Capital Impairment Percentage is higher.


(c) Upon receipt of your notification under paragraph (b) of this section, or upon making its own determination that your Capital Impairment Percentage is at least 50 percent, SBA has the right to require you to engage, at your expense, an independent third party, acceptable to SBA, to prepare valuations of some or all of your Loans and Investments, as designated by SBA.


[77 FR 25053, Apr. 27, 2012]


Conditional Commitments by SBA To Reserve Leverage for a Licensee

§ 107.1200 SBA’s Leverage commitment to a Licensee – application procedure, amount, and term.

(a) General. Under the provisions in §§ 107.1200 through 107.1240, you may apply for SBA’s conditional commitment to reserve a specific amount and type of Leverage for your future use. You may then apply to draw down Leverage against the commitment.


(b) Applying for a Leverage commitment. SBA will notify you when it is accepting requests for Leverage commitments. Upon receipt of your request, SBA will send you a complete application package.


(c) Limitations on the amount of a Leverage commitment. The amount of a Leverage commitment must be a multiple of $5,000.


(d) Term of Leverage commitment. SBA’s Leverage commitment will automatically lapse on the expiration date stated in the commitment letter issued to you by SBA.


[61 FR 3189, Jan. 31, 1996, as amended at 63 FR 5868, Feb. 5, 1998]


§ 107.1210 Payment of leverage fee upon receipt of commitment.

(a) Partial prepayment of leverage fee. As a condition of SBA’s Leverage commitment, and before you draw any Leverage under such commitment, you must pay to SBA a non-refundable fee equal to 1 percent of the face amount of the Debentures or Participating Securities reserved under the commitment. This amount represents a partial prepayment of the 3 percent leverage fee established under § 107.1130(a).


(b) Automatic cancellation of commitment. Unless you pay the fee required under paragraph (a) of this section by 5:00 P.M. Eastern Time on the 30th calendar day following the issuance of SBA’s Leverage commitment, the commitment will be automatically canceled.


[63 FR 5868, Feb. 5, 1998]


§ 107.1220 Requirement for Licensee to file quarterly financial statements.

As long as any part of SBA’s Leverage commitment is outstanding, you must give SBA a Financial Statement on SBA Form 468 (Short Form) as of the close of each quarter of your fiscal year (other than the fourth quarter, which is covered by your annual filing of Form 468 under § 107.630(a)). You must file this form within 30 days after the close of the quarter. You will not be eligible for a draw if you are not in compliance with this § 107.1220.


[64 FR 70996, Dec. 20, 1999]


§ 107.1230 Draw-downs by Licensee under SBA’s Leverage commitment.

(a) Licensee’s authorization of SBA to purchase or guarantee securities. By submitting a request for a draw against SBA’s Leverage commitment, you authorize SBA, or any agent or trustee SBA designates, to guarantee your Debenture or Participating Security and to sell it with SBA’s guarantee.


(b) Limitations on amount of draw. The amount of a draw must be a multiple of $5,000. SBA, in its discretion, may determine a minimum dollar amount for draws against SBA’s Leverage commitments. Any such minimum amounts will be published in Notices in the Federal Register from time to time.


(c) Effect of regulatory violations on Licensee’s eligibility for draws – (1) General rule. You are eligible to make a draw against SBA’s Leverage commitment only if you are in compliance with all applicable provisions of the Act and SBA regulations (i.e., no unresolved statutory or regulatory violations).


(2) Exception to general rule. If you are not in compliance, you may still be eligible for draws if:


(i) SBA determines that your outstanding violations are of non-substantive provisions of the Act or regulations and that you have not repeatedly violated any non-substantive provisions; or


(ii) You have agreed with SBA on a course of action to resolve your violations and such agreement does not prevent you from issuing Leverage.


(d) Procedures for funding draws. You may request a draw at any time during the term of the commitment. With each request, submit the following documentation:


(1) A statement certifying that there has been no material adverse change in your financial condition since your last filing of SBA Form 468 (see also § 107.1220 for SBA Form 468 filing requirements).


(2) If your request is submitted more than 30 days following the end of your fiscal year, but before you have submitted your annual filing of SBA Form 468 (Long Form) in accordance with § 107.630(a), a preliminary unaudited annual financial statement on SBA Form 468 (Short Form).


(3) A statement certifying that to the best of your knowledge and belief, you are in compliance with all provisions of the Act and SBA regulations (i.e., no unresolved regulatory or statutory violations), or a statement listing any specific violations you are aware of. Either statement must be executed by one of the following:


(i) An officer of the Licensee;


(ii) An officer of a corporate general partner of the Licensee; or


(iii) An individual who is authorized to act as or for a general partner of the Licensee.


(4) A statement that the proceeds are needed to fund one or more particular Small Businesses or to provide liquidity for your operations. If required by SBA, the statement must include the name and address of each Small Business, and the amount and anticipated closing date of each proposed Financing.


(e) Reporting requirements after drawing funds. (1) Within 30 calendar days after the actual closing date of each Financing funded with the proceeds of your draw, you must file an SBA Form 1031 confirming the closing of the transaction.


(2) If SBA required you to provide information concerning a specific planned Financing under paragraph (d)(3) of this section, and such Financing has not closed within 60 calendar days after the anticipated closing date, you must give SBA a written explanation of the failure to close.


(3) If you do not comply with this paragraph (e), you will not be eligible for additional draws. SBA may also determine that you are not in compliance with the terms of your Leverage under §§ 107.1810 or 107.1820.


[61 FR 3189, Jan. 31, 1996, as amended at 63 FR 5868, Feb. 5, 1998; 64 FR 70996, Dec. 20, 1999]


§ 107.1240 Funding of Licensee’s draw request through sale to short-term investor.

(a) Licensee’s authorization of SBA to arrange sale of securities to short-term investor. By submitting a request for a draw of Debenture or Participating Security Leverage, you authorize SBA, or any agent or trustee SBA designates, to enter into any agreements (and to bind you to such agreements) necessary to accomplish:


(1) The sale of your Debenture or Participating Security to a short-term investor at a rate that may be different from the Trust Certificate Rate which will be established at the time of the pooling of your security;


(2) The purchase of your security from the short-term investor, either by you or on your behalf; and


(3) The pooling of your security with other securities with the same maturity date.


(b) Sale of Debentures to a short-term investor. If SBA sells your Debenture to a short-term investor:


(1) The sale price will be the face amount.


(2) At the next scheduled date for the sale of Debenture Trust Certificates, whether or not the sale actually occurs, you must pay interest to the short-term investor for the short-term period. If the actual sale of Trust Certificates takes place after the scheduled date, you must pay the short-term investor interest from the scheduled sale date to the actual sale date. This additional interest is due on the actual sale date.


(3) Failure to pay the interest constitutes noncompliance with the terms of your Leverage (see § 107.1810).


(c) Sale of Participating Securities to a short-term investor. If SBA sells your Participating Security to a short-term investor, the sale price will be the face amount.


(d) Licensee’s right to repurchase its Debentures before pooling. You may repurchase your Debentures from the short-term investor before they are pooled. To do so, you must:


(1) Give SBA written notice at least 10 days before the cut-off date for the pool in which your Debenture is to be included; and


(2) Pay the face amount of the Debenture, plus interest, to the short-term investor.


[61 FR 3189, Jan. 31, 1996, as amended at 63 FR 5868, Feb. 5, 1998]


Preferred Securities Leverage – Section 301(d) Licensees

§ 107.1400 Dividends or partnership distributions on 4 percent Preferred Securities.

If you issued Preferred Securities to SBA on or after November 21, 1989, you must pay SBA a dividend or partnership distribution of 4 percent per year, from the date you issued Preferred Securities to the date you repay them, both inclusive. The dividend or partnership distribution is:


(a) Computed on the par value of the outstanding stock or the face value of the outstanding limited partnership interest.


(b) Cumulative. This means that if you do not pay the entire dividend or partnership distribution for a given fiscal year, the unpaid balance accumulates as a distribution in arrears. You do not have to pay interest on distributions in arrears.


(c) Preferred. This means that you must pay SBA in full (including distributions in arrears) before setting aside or paying any amount to any other equity holder.


(d) Payable at the discretion of your Board of Directors or General Partner(s), except that all distributions in arrears must be paid in full when you redeem the Preferred Securities.


[61 FR 3189, Jan. 31, 1996, as amended at 63 FR 5869, Feb. 5, 1998]


§ 107.1410 Requirement to redeem 4 percent Preferred Securities.

You must redeem 4 percent Preferred Securities not later than 15 years from the date of issuance. At the redemption date, you must pay to SBA:


(a) The par value (of preferred stock) or face value (of a preferred limited partnership interest); plus


(b) Any unpaid dividends or partnership distributions accrued to the redemption date.


§ 107.1420 Articles requirements for 4 percent Preferred Securities.

If you have outstanding 4 percent Preferred Securities, your Articles must contain all the provisions in §§ 107.1400 and 107.1410.


[63 FR 5869, Feb. 5, 1998]


§ 107.1430 Redeeming 4 percent Preferred Securities with proceeds of non-subsidized Debentures.

If SBA approves, a Section 301(d) Licensee may use the proceeds of a Debenture to redeem Preferred Securities at their mandatory redemption date, including any accrued unpaid dividends or partnership distributions.


[61 FR 3189, Jan. 31, 1996, as amended at 63 FR 5869, Feb. 5, 1998]


§ 107.1440 Three percent preferred stock issued before November 21, 1989.

Before November 21, 1989, Preferred Securities were available only in the form of preferred stock and had a preferred and cumulative dividend of 3 percent. If you have such preferred stock outstanding, you must follow § 107.1400 (except for § 107.1400(d)), substituting “3 percent” for “4 percent” throughout.) Dividends on 3 percent preferred stock are payable at the discretion of your Board of Directors or General Partner(s), except that all dividends in arrears must be paid in full before any non-SBA investor receives any distribution. Upon your liquidation, SBA is entitled to payment of all dividends in arrears even if you have no Retained Earnings Available for Distribution at such time.


§ 107.1450 Optional redemption of Preferred Securities.

(a) Redemption at par or face value. A Section 301(d) Licensee may redeem Preferred Securities at any time, provided you give SBA at least 30 days written notice. You may redeem all or only part of your Preferred Securities, but the par value or face value of the securities being redeemed must be at least $50,000. At the redemption date, you must pay to SBA:


(1) The par value (of preferred stock) or face value (of a preferred limited partnership interest); plus


(2) Any unpaid dividends or partnership distributions accrued to the redemption date.


(b) Repurchase of 3 percent preferred stock for less than par value. If you issued 3 percent preferred stock to SBA, you may ask SBA to sell it back to you at a price less than its par value. The terms and conditions of any such transaction will be as set forth in the Notice published in the Federal Register on April 1, 1994 (Copies of this notice are available from SBA, 409 3rd Street, SW., Washington, DC, 20416). SBA has sole discretion to:


(1) Approve or disapprove the sale.


(2) Determine the sale price after considering any factors SBA considers appropriate.


(3) Determine the form of payment SBA will accept. SBA is not authorized to accept the proceeds of a subsidized Debenture as payment.


Participating Securities Leverage

§ 107.1500 General description of Participating Securities.

(a) Types of Participating Securities. Participating Securities are redeemable, preferred, equity-type securities. SBA may purchase or guarantee Participating Securities issued by Licensees in the form of limited partnership interests, preferred stock, or debentures with interest payable only to the extent of earnings. The structure, terms and conditions of Participating Securities are set forth in detail in §§ 107.1500 through 107.1590.


(b) Special eligibility requirements for Participating Securities. In addition to the general eligibility requirements for Leverage under § 107.1120, Participating Securities issuers must also comply with special rules on:


(1) Minimum capital (see § 107.210).


(2) Liquidity (see § 107.1505).


(3) Non-SBA borrowing (see § 107.570).


(4) Equity investing, as set forth in this paragraph (b)(4). If you issue Participating Securities, you must invest an amount equal to the Original Issue Price of such securities solely in Equity Capital Investments, as defined in § 107.50.


(c) Special features of Participating Securities – Prioritized Payments, Adjustments, and Profit Participation. When you issue Participating Securities, you agree to make the following payments:


(1) Prioritized Payments. Depending upon the type of Participating Security you issue, Prioritized Payments may be preferred partnership distributions, preferred dividends, or interest. Your obligation to pay Prioritized Payments is contingent upon your profits as determined under § 107.1520.


(2) Adjustments to Prioritized Payments. If you have unpaid Prioritized Payments, you must compute Adjustments, which are additional contingent obligations determined under § 107.1520. The conditions for paying Adjustments are the same as for Prioritized Payments.


(3) SBA Profit Participation. Profit Participation is an amount payable to SBA under § 107.1530 in consideration for SBA’s guarantee of your Participating Securities.


(d) Distributions by Licensees issuing Participating Securities. Sections 107.1540 through 107.1580 govern both required and optional Distributions by Participating Securities issuers. Distributions include both profit distributions and returns of capital, paid either to SBA or to your non-SBA investors.


(e) Mandatory redemption of Participating Securities. You must redeem Participating Securities at the redemption date, which is the same as the maturity date of the Trust Certificates for the Trust containing such securities. The redemption date can never be later than 15 years after the issue date. You must pay the Redemption Price plus any unpaid Earned Prioritized Payments and any earned Adjustments and earned Charges (see § 107.1520).


(f) Priority of Participating Securities in liquidation of Licensee. In the event of your liquidation, the following are senior in priority, for all purposes, to all other equity interests you have issued at any time:


(1) The Redemption Price of Participating Securities;


(2) Any Earned Prioritized Payments and any earned Adjustments and earned Charges (see § 107.1520); and


(3) Any Profit Participation allocated to SBA under § 107.1530.


[61 FR 3189, Jan. 31, 1996, as amended at 63 FR 5869, Feb. 5, 1998]


§ 107.1505 Liquidity requirements for Licensees issuing Participating Securities.

If you have outstanding Participating Securities, you must maintain sufficient liquidity to avoid a condition of Liquidity Impairment. Such a condition will constitute noncompliance with the terms of your Leverage under § 107.1820(e).


(a) Definition of Liquidity Impairment. A condition of Liquidity Impairment exists when your Liquidity Ratio, as determined in paragraph (b) of this section, is less than 1.20. You are responsible for calculating whether you have a condition of Liquidity Impairment:


(1) As of the close of your fiscal year;


(2) At the time you apply for Leverage, unless SBA permits otherwise; and


(3) At such time as you contemplate making any Distribution.


(b) Computation of Liquidity Ratio. Your Liquidity Ratio equals your Total Current Funds Available (A) divided by your Total Current Funds Required (B), as determined in the following table:


Calculation of Liquidity Ratio

Financial account
Amount reported

on SBA form 468
Weight
Weighted amount
(1) Cash and invested idle funds × 1.00
(2) Commitments from investors × 1.00
(3) Current maturities × 0.50
(4) Other current assets × 1.00
(5) Publicly Traded and Marketable Securities × 1.00
(6) Anticipated operating revenue for next 12 months
1
× 1.00
(7) Total Current Funds AvailableA
(8) Current liabilities × 1.00
(9) Commitments to Small Businesses × 0.75
(10) Anticipated operating expense for next 12 months
1
× 1.00
(11) Anticipated interest expense for next 12 months
1
× 1.00
(12) Contingent liabilities (guarantees) × 0.25
(13) Total Current Funds RequiredB


1 As determined by Licensee’s management under its business plan.


[61 FR 3189, Jan. 31, 1996, as amended at 63 FR 5869, Feb. 5, 1998]


§ 107.1510 How a Licensee computes Earmarked Profit (Loss).

Computing your Earmarked Profit (Loss) is the first step in determining your obligations to pay Prioritized Payments, Adjustments and Charges under § 107.1520 and Profit Participation under § 107.1530.


(a) Requirement to compute your Earmarked Profit (Loss). While you have Participating Securities outstanding or have Earmarked Assets (as defined in paragraph (b) of this section), you must compute your Earmarked Profit (Loss) for:


(1) Each full fiscal year.


(2) Any interim period (consisting of one or more fiscal quarters) for which you want to make a Distribution.


(b) How to determine your Earmarked Assets. “Earmarked Assets” means all the Loans and Investments that you have when you issue Participating Securities or that you acquire while you have Participating Securities outstanding, and any non-cash assets that you receive in exchange for such Loans and Investments.


(1) An Earmarked Asset remains earmarked until you dispose of it, even if you no longer have any outstanding Participating Securities.


(2) Investments you make after redeeming all your Participating Securities are not Earmarked Assets. However, if you issue new Participating Securities, all of your Loans and Investments again become Earmarked Assets.


(3) If you were licensed before March 31, 1993, you may be permitted to exclude Loans and Investments held at that date from Earmarked Assets under § 107.1590.


(c) How to compute your Earmarked Asset Ratio. You must determine your Earmarked Asset Ratio each time you compute Earmarked Profit (Loss). If all your Loans and Investments are Earmarked Assets, your Earmarked Asset Ratio equals 100 percent. Otherwise, compute your Earmarked Asset Ratio using the following formula:


EAR = (EA ÷ LI) × 100


where:

EAR = Earmarked Asset Ratio.

EA = Average Earmarked Assets (at cost) for the fiscal year or interim period.

LI = Average Loans and Investments (at cost) for the fiscal year or interim period.

(d) How to compute your Earmarked Profit (Loss) if Earmarked Asset Ratio is 100 percent. (1) (i) If your Earmarked Asset Ratio from paragraph (b) of this section is 100 percent, use the following formula to compute your Earmarked Profit (Loss):


EP = NI + IK + EME


where:

EP = Earmarked Profit (Loss)

NI = Net Income (Loss), as reported on SBA Form 468 except as otherwise provided in this paragraph (d)(1)

IK = Unrealized Appreciation (Depreciation) on Earmarked Assets that you are distributing as an In-Kind Distribution under § 107.1580

EME = Excess Management Expenses

(ii) For the purpose of determining Net Income (Loss), leverage fees paid to SBA and partnership syndication costs that you incur must be capitalized and amortized on a straight-line basis over not less than five years.


(2) “Excess Management Expenses” are those that exceed the following limit:


(i) For a full fiscal year, the limit is the lower of:


(A) 2.5 percent of your weighted average Combined Capital for the year, plus $125,000 if Combined Capital is below $20,000,000; or


(B) Your Management Expenses approved by SBA.


(ii) For less than a full fiscal year, you must prorate the annual amounts in paragraph (d)(2)(i) of this section to determine the limit.


(e) How to compute your Earmarked Profit (Loss) if Earmarked Asset Ratio is less than 100 percent. If your Earmarked Asset Ratio is less than 100 percent, compute your Earmarked Profit (Loss) as follows:


(1) Do the Earmarked Profit (Loss) computation in paragraph (d) of this section.


(2) Subtract your net realized gain (loss) (as reported on SBA Form 468) on Loans and Investments that are not Earmarked Assets.


(3) Separate the result from paragraph (e)(2) of this section into:


(i) Net realized gain (loss) (as reported on SBA Form 468) on Earmarked Assets (“EGL”); and


(ii) The remainder (“R”).


(4) Your Earmarked Profit (Loss) equals:


EGL + (R × Earmarked Asset Ratio)

(f) How to compute your cumulative Earmarked Profit (Loss). Sum your Earmarked Profit (Loss) for all fiscal years and for any interim period following the end of your last fiscal year. The total is your cumulative Earmarked Profit (Loss), which you must use in the Prioritized Payment computations under § 107.1520.


[61 FR 3189, Jan. 31, 1996, as amended at 63 FR 5870, Feb. 5, 1998]


§ 107.1520 How a Licensee computes and allocates Prioritized Payments to SBA.

This section tells you how to compute Prioritized Payments, Adjustments and Charges on Participating Securities and determine the amounts you must pay. To distribute these amounts, see § 107.1540.


(a) How to compute Prioritized Payments and Adjustments – (1) Prioritized Payments. For a full fiscal year, the Prioritized Payment on an outstanding Participating Security equals the Redemption Price times the related Trust Certificate Rate. For an interim period, you must prorate the annual Prioritized Payment. If your Participating Security was sold to a short-term investor in accordance with § 107.1240, the Prioritized Payment for the short-term period equals the Redemption Price times the short-term rate.


(2) Adjustments. Compute Adjustments using paragraph (f) of this section.


(3) Charges. Compute Charges in accordance with § 107.1130(d)(2).


(b) Licensee’s obligation to pay Prioritized Payments, Adjustments and Charges. You are obligated to pay Prioritized Payments, Adjustments and Charges only if you have profit as determined in paragraph (d) of this section.


(1) Prioritized Payments that you must pay (or have already paid) because you have sufficient profit are “Earned Prioritized Payments”.


(2) Prioritized Payments that have not become payable because you lack sufficient profit are “Accumulated Prioritized Payments”. Treat all Prioritized Payments as “Accumulated” until they become “Earned” under this section.


(3) Adjustments (computed under paragraph (f) of this section) and Charges (computed under § 107.1130(d)(2)) are “earned” according to the same criteria applied to Prioritized Payments.


(c) How to keep track of Prioritized Payments. You must establish three accounts to record your Accumulated and Earned Prioritized Payments:


(1) Accumulation Account. The Accumulation Account is a memorandum account. Its balance represents your Accumulated Prioritized Payments, unearned Adjustments and unearned Charges.


(2) Distribution Account. The Distribution Account is a liability account. Its balance represents your unpaid Earned Prioritized Payments, earned Adjustments and earned Charges.


(3) Earned Payments Account. The Earned Payments Account is a memorandum account. Each time you add to the Distribution Account balance, add the same amount to the Earned Payments Account. Its balance represents your total (paid and unpaid) Earned Prioritized Payments, earned Adjustments and earned Charges.


(d) How to determine your profit for Prioritized Payment purposes. As of the end of each fiscal year and any interim period for which you want to make a Distribution:


(1) Bring the Accumulation Account up to date by adding to it all Prioritized Payments and Charges through the end of the appropriate fiscal period.


(2) Determine whether you have profit for the purposes of this section by doing the following computation:


(i) Cumulative Earmarked Profit (Loss) under § 107.1510(f); minus


(ii) The Earned Payments Account balance; minus


(iii) All Distributions previously made under §§ 107.1550, 107.1560 and 107.1570(a); minus


(iv) Any Profit Participation previously allocated to SBA under § 107.1530, but not yet distributed.


(3) The amount computed in paragraph (d)(2) of this section, if greater than zero, is your profit. If the amount is zero or less, you have no profit.


(4) If you have a profit, continue with paragraph (e) of this section. Otherwise, continue with paragraph (f) of this section.


(e) Allocating Prioritized Payments to the Distribution Account. (1) If you have a profit under paragraph (d) of this section, determine the lesser of:


(i) Your profit; or


(ii) The balance in your Accumulation Account.


(2) Subtract the result in paragraph (e)(1) of this section from the Accumulation Account and add it to the Distribution Account and the Earned Payments Account.


(f) How to compute Adjustments. You must compute Adjustments as of the end of each fiscal year if you have a balance greater than zero in either your Accumulation Account or your Distribution Account, after giving effect to any Distribution that will be made no later than the second Payment Date following the fiscal year end.


(1) Determine the combined average Accumulation Account and Distribution Account balances for the fiscal year, assuming that Prioritized Payments accumulate on a daily basis without compounding.


(2) Multiply the average balance computed in paragraph (f)(1) of this section by the average of the Trust Certificate Rates for all the Participating Securities poolings during the fiscal year.


(3) Add the amounts computed in this paragraph (f) to your Accumulation Account.


(g) Licensee’s obligation to pay Prioritized Payments after redeeming Participating Securities. This paragraph (g) applies if you have redeemed all your Participating Securities, but you still hold Earmarked Assets and still have a balance in your Accumulation Account.


(1) You must continue to perform all the procedures in this section as of the end of each fiscal quarter and prior to making any Distribution. You must distribute any Earned Prioritized Payments, earned Adjustments and earned Charges in accordance with § 107.1540.


(2) After you dispose of all your Earmarked Assets and make any required Distributions in accordance with § 107.1540, your obligation to pay any remaining Accumulated Prioritized Payments, unearned Adjustments and unearned Charges will be extinguished.


[63 FR 5870, Feb. 5, 1998]


§ 107.1530 How a Licensee computes SBA’s Profit Participation.

This section tells you how to compute SBA’s Profit Participation. Profit Participation is included in the Distributions you make to SBA under §§ 107.1550 and 107.1560.


(a) How to compute Profit Participation. Profit Participation equals your “Base” times your “Profit Participation Rate” (if the Base is zero or less, you do not owe SBA Profit Participation). Compute the Base using paragraph (c) of this section and the Profit Participation Rate using paragraphs (d) through (g) of this section. You must compute your Earmarked Profit (Loss) under § 107.1510 and your Prioritized Payments and Adjustments under § 107.1520 before you can compute Profit Participation.


(b) How to keep track of Profit Participation. You must establish a Profit Participation Account to record your computations under this section and payments under §§ 107.1550 and 107.1560. Its balance represents your unpaid Profit Participation.


(c) How to compute the Base. As of the end of each fiscal year and any year-to-date interim period for which you want to make a Distribution, compute your Base using the following formula:


B = EP − PPA − UL


where:

B = Base.

EP = Earmarked Profit (Loss) for the period from § 107.1510.

PPA = Prioritized Payments for the period from § 107.1520(a)(1), Adjustments (if applicable) from § 107.1520(f), and Charges (if applicable) from § 107.1130(d)(2).

UL = “Unused Loss” from prior periods as determined in this paragraph (c).

(1) If the Base computed as of the end of your previous fiscal year (your “Previous Base”) was less than zero, your Unused Loss equals your Previous Base.


(2) If your Previous Base was zero or greater, your Unused Loss equals zero, with the following exception: If you made an interim Distribution of Profit Participation during your previous fiscal year, and your Previous Base was lower than the interim Base on which your Distribution was computed, then your Unused Loss equals the difference between the interim Base and the Previous Base. For example, assume you are computing your Base as of December 31, 1997, your fiscal year end. Your Previous Base, computed as of December 31, 1996, was $3,000,000. During 1996, you made an interim Distribution which was computed on a Base of $3,500,000 as of June 30, 1996. The $500,000 difference between the 1996 interim and year-end Bases would be carried forward as Unused Loss in the computation of your Base as of December 31, 1997.


(3) If you had no Participating Securities outstanding as of the end of your last fiscal year, you may request SBA’s approval to treat your Undistributed Net Realized Loss, as reported on SBA Form 468 for that year, as Unused Loss. If you did not file SBA Form 468 because you were not yet licensed as of the end of your last fiscal year, you may request SBA’s approval to treat pre-licensing losses as Unused Loss.


(d) How to compute the Profit Participation Rate. You must determine your Profit Participation Rate each time you compute a Base that is greater than zero. Compute the Rate by following the steps in paragraphs (e) through (g) of this section.


(e) Compute the “PLC ratio” – (1) General rule. The “PLC ratio” is the highest ratio of outstanding Participating Securities to Leverageable Capital that you have ever attained.


(2) Exception. You may reduce the ratio computed under paragraph (e)(1) of this section if you have increased your Leverageable Capital above its highest previous level. The increase must have taken place at least 120 days before the date as of which your Base is computed. In addition, the increase must have been expressly provided for in a plan of operations submitted to and approved by SBA in writing, or must be the result of the takedown of commitments or the conversion of non-cash assets that were included in your Private Capital. If these conditions are satisfied, compute your reduced PLC ratio as follows:


(i) Divide the highest dollar amount of Participating Securities you have ever had outstanding by your increased Leverageable Capital.


(ii) If the result in paragraph (e)(2)(i) of this section is lower than your PLC ratio currently in effect, such result will become your new PLC ratio.


(f) Compute the Profit Participation Rate (before indexing). Compute the Profit Participation Rate (before indexing) using the table in this paragraph (f). Then go to paragraph (g) of this section to determine whether to index the Profit Participation Rate.


If your PLC ratio is:
Then your Profit Participation Rate is:
1 or less9% × PLC Ratio.
More than 19% + [3% × (PLC ratio-1)].

(g) Indexing the Profit Participation Rate. The Profit Participation Rate is indexed, up or down, to the yield-to-maturity on Treasury bonds with a remaining term of ten (10) years (the “Treasury Rate”). You must perform the indexing procedures in this paragraph (g) unless the Treasury Rate was exactly 8 percent on every date that you issued Participating Securities.


(1) Licensees that have issued Participating Securities on only one occasion. Determine the Treasury Rate for the date you issued your Participating Security. Adjust the Profit Participation Rate from paragraph (f) of this section by the percentage difference between the Treasury Rate and 8 percent. For example, assume that you issued Participating Securities when the Treasury Rate was 10 percent. The percentage difference between 10 percent and 8 percent is 25 percent. If you had a PLC ratio of 1, the Profit Participation Rate before indexing would be 9 percent. You would increase this rate by 25 percent, giving you a Profit Participation Rate of 11.25 percent.


(2) Licensees that have issued Participating Securities on more than one occasion. Determine the Treasury Rate for each of the dates you issued Participating Securities.


(i) Compute an average of all such Treasury Rates, weighted to reflect the dollar amount of each issuance (ignoring any redemptions) and the number of days from the date of each issuance to the date as of which you are computing the Profit Participation Rate.



Example to paragraph (g)(2)(i) of this section.If you issued $10 million of Participating Securities on the 60th day of Fiscal Year 1 when the Treasury Rate was 8 percent, and another $15 million on the 100th day of Fiscal Year 3 when the Treasury Rate was 10 percent, then the weighted average Treasury Rate computed as of the end of Fiscal Year 3 would be 8.55 percent. [Days elapsed since first issuance of Participating Securities = 1,035; days elapsed since second issuance of Participating Securities = 265; weighted amount of first issuance = $10,000,000 × 1,035/1,035 = $10,000,000; weighted amount of second issuance = $15,000,000 × 265/1035 = $3,840,579; weighted average amount of Participating Securities issued = $10,000,000 + $3,840,579 = $13,840,579; weighted average Treasury Rate= {(.08 × $10,000,000) + (.10 × $3,840,579)} / $13,840,579 = 8.55%]

(ii) Adjust the Profit Participation Rate from paragraph (f) of this section by the percentage difference between the weighted average Treasury Rate and 8 percent. In the example given in paragraph (g)(2)(i) of this section, if the PLC ratio were equal to 2, the Profit Participation Rate for the fiscal year would be 12.83 percent. [{((.0855−.08) ÷ .08) + 1} × .12 × 100 = 12.83%]


(h) Computing SBA’s Profit Participation. If the Base from paragraph (c) of this section is greater than zero, you must compute SBA’s Profit Participation as follows:


(1) Multiply the Base from paragraph (c) of this section by the Profit Participation Rate from paragraph (g) of this section.


(2) If your last Profit Participation computation was for an interim period during the same fiscal year and used a higher Profit Participation Rate than the Rate you just used in paragraph (h)(1) of this section, you must adjust the amount computed in paragraph (h)(1) of this section as follows:


(i) Determine the difference between the Profit Participation Rate you just used in paragraph (h)(1) of this section and the Rate used in your previous computation;


(ii) Multiply the difference by the Base from your last Profit Participation computation; and


(iii) Add the result to the amount you computed in paragraph (h)(1) of this section.


(3) Reduce the Profit Participation computed in paragraphs (h)(1) and (h)(2) of this section by any amounts of Profit Participation that you distributed or reserved for distribution to SBA, or its designated agent or Trustee, for any previous interim period(s) during the fiscal year. The result is SBA’s Profit Participation (unless it is less than zero, in which case SBA’s Profit Participation is zero).


(i) Allocation of Profit Participation. Before any Distribution and in any case within 120 days following the end of your fiscal year, you must add the amount of Profit Participation computed under this § 107.1530 to the Profit Participation Account. You must reserve funds equal to this amount for distribution to SBA, or its designated agent or Trustee; you may not reinvest these funds or use them for any other purpose.


[61 FR 3189, Jan. 31, 1996; 61 FR 41496, Aug. 9, 1996, as amended at 63 FR 5871, Feb. 5, 1998]


§ 107.1540 Distributions by Licensee – Prioritized Payments and Adjustments.

After you compute Prioritized Payments and Adjustments under § 107.1520, you must distribute them in accordance with this § 107.1540. You must notify SBA of any planned distribution under this section 10 business days before the distribution date, unless SBA permits otherwise.


(a) Requirement to distribute Prioritized Payments and Adjustments. This paragraph (a) applies only if you satisfy the liquidity requirement in § 107.1505. All Distributions under this paragraph (a) go to SBA or its designated agent or trustee.


(1) You must distribute the balance in your Distribution Account from § 107.1520 annually on the first or second Payment Date following your fiscal year end, and on any date when you are making any other Distribution.


(2) You may distribute all or part of the balance in your Distribution Account on any Payment Date regardless of whether you are making any other Distribution on that date.


(b) Additional requirement for Licensees with undistributed Prioritized Payments. This paragraph (b) applies if you do not distribute the full amount in your Distribution Account by the second Payment Date following the end of your fiscal year. At the end of each fiscal quarter, until you reduce the balance in your Distribution Account to zero, you must:


(1) Do all the steps in § 107.1520; and


(2) Distribute the balance in your Distribution Account on the next Payment Date following the end of your fiscal quarter, provided you satisfy the liquidity requirement in § 107.1505.


[61 FR 3189, Jan. 31, 1996, as amended at 63 FR 5871, Feb. 5, 1998]


§ 107.1550 Distributions by Licensee – permitted “tax Distributions” to private investors and SBA.

If you have outstanding Participating Securities or Earmarked Assets, and you are a limited partnership, “S Corporation,” or equivalent pass-through entity for tax purposes, you may make “tax Distributions” to your investors in accordance with this § 107.1550, whether or not they have an actual tax liability. SBA receives a share of any tax Distribution you make. This section tells you when you may make a “tax Distribution” and how to compute it. You must notify SBA of any planned distribution under this section 10 business days before the distribution date, unless SBA permits otherwise.


(a) Conditions for making a tax Distribution. You may make a tax Distribution only if:


(1) You have paid all your Prioritized Payments, Adjustments, and Charges, so that the balance in both your Distribution Account and your Accumulation Account is zero (see § 107.1520).


(2) You satisfy the liquidity requirement in § 107.1505.


(3) The tax Distribution does not exceed your Retained Earnings Available for Distribution.


(4) The tax Distribution does not exceed the Maximum Tax Liability from paragraph (b) of this section.


(b) How to compute the Maximum Tax Liability. (1) You may compute your Maximum Tax Liability for a full fiscal year or for any calendar quarter. Use the following formula:


M = (TOI × HRO) + (TCG × HRC)


where:

M = Maximum Tax Liability

TOI = Net ordinary income allocated to your partners or other owners for Federal income tax purposes for the fiscal year or calendar quarter for which the Distribution is being made, excluding Prioritized Payments allocated to SBA.

HRO = The highest combined marginal Federal and State income tax rate for corporations or individuals on ordinary income, determined in accordance with paragraphs (b)(2) through (b)(4) of this section.

TCG = Net capital gains allocated to your partners or other owners for Federal income tax purposes for the fiscal year or calendar quarter for which the Distribution is being made, excluding Prioritized Payments allocated to SBA.

HRC = The highest combined marginal Federal and State income tax rate for corporations or individuals on capital gains, determined in accordance with paragraphs (b)(2) through (b)(4) of this section.

(2) You may compute the highest combined marginal Federal and State income tax rate on ordinary income and capital gains using either individual or corporate rates. However, you must apply the same type of rate, either individual or corporate, to both ordinary income and capital gains.


(3) In determining the combined Federal and State income tax rate, you must assume that State income taxes are deductible from Federal income taxes. For example, if the Federal tax rate was 35 percent and the State tax rate was 5 percent, the combined tax rate would be [35% × (1−.05)] + 5% = 38.25%.


(4) For purposes of this paragraph (b), the “State income tax” is that of the State where your principal place of business is located, and does not include any local income taxes.


(c) SBA’s share of the tax Distribution. (1) SBA’s percentage share of the tax Distribution is equal to the Profit Participation Rate computed under § 107.1530.


(2) SBA may direct you to pay its share of the tax Distribution to its designated agent or Trustee.


(3) SBA will apply its share of the tax Distribution in the order set forth in § 107.1560(g).


(d) Paying a tax Distribution. You may make an annual tax Distribution on the first or second Payment Date following the end of your fiscal year. You may make a quarterly tax Distribution on the first Payment Date following the end of the calendar quarter for which the Distribution is being made. See also § 107.1575(a).


(e) Excess tax Distributions. (1) As of the end of your fiscal year, you must determine whether you made any excess tax Distributions for the year in accordance with paragraph (e)(2) of this section. Any tax Distributions that you make for a subsequent period must be reduced by the excess amount distributed.


(2) Determine your excess tax Distributions by adding together all your quarterly tax Distributions for the year (ignoring any required reductions for excess tax Distributions made in prior years), and subtracting the maximum tax Distribution that you would have been permitted to make based upon a single computation performed for the entire fiscal year. The result, if greater than zero, is your excess tax Distribution for the year.


[61 FR 3189, Jan. 31, 1996, as amended at 63 FR 5871, Feb. 5, 1998; 64 FR 70996, Dec. 20, 1999]


§ 107.1560 Distributions by Licensee – required Distributions to private investors and SBA.

You must make Distributions under this § 107.1560 if you have outstanding Participating Securities or Earmarked Assets and you satisfy the conditions in paragraph (a) of this section. Distributions under this section are determined as of the end of each fiscal year. You must notify SBA of any planned distribution under this section 10 business days before the distribution date, unless SBA permits otherwise.


(a) Conditions for making Distributions. Distributions under this section are subject to the following conditions:


(1) You must have paid all Prioritized Payments, Adjustments and Charges, so that the balance in both your Distribution Account and your Accumulation Account is zero (see §§ 107.1520 and 107.1540).


(2) You must have made any permitted tax Distribution that you choose to make under § 107.1550.


(3) You must satisfy the liquidity requirement in § 107.1505.


(4) The amount you distribute under this section must not exceed your remaining Retained Earnings Available for Distribution.


(b) Total amount you must distribute. Unless SBA permits otherwise, the total amount you must distribute equals the result (if greater than zero) of the following computation:


(1) Your Retained Earnings Available for Distribution as of the end of your fiscal year, after giving effect to any Distribution under §§ 107.1540 and 107.1550; minus


(2) All previous Distributions under this section and § 107.1570(a) that were applied as redemptions or repayments of Leverage; plus


(3) All previous Distributions under § 107.1570(b) that reduced your Retained Earnings Available for Distribution.


(c) When you must make Distributions. You must make the required Distributions on either the first or second Payment Date following the end of your fiscal year.


(d) Effect of Distributions on Retained Earnings Available for Distribution. Distributions under this § 107.1560 have the following effect on your Retained Earnings Available for Distribution:


(1) All Distributions to private investors reduce Retained Earnings Available for Distribution.


(2) Distributions to SBA, or its designated agent or Trustee, reduce Retained Earnings Available for Distribution if they are applied as payments of Profit Participation or distributions on Preferred Securities (see paragraph (g) of this section).


(3) Distributions to SBA, or its designated agent or Trustee, do not reduce Retained Earnings Available for Distribution if they are applied as a repayment or redemption of Leverage (see paragraph (g) of this section).


(e) SBA’s share of the total Distribution. Use the following table to determine the percentage share of the total Distribution (from paragraph (b) of this section) that goes to SBA (or its designated agent or Trustee):


SBA’s Percentage Share of Total Distribution

If your ratio of Leverage to Leverageable Capital as of the fiscal period end is:
Then SBA’s percentage share of the Distribution is:
Over 200%[Leverage / (Leverage + Leverageable Capital)] × 100.
Over 100% but not over 200%50%.
100% or lessProfit Participation Rate from § 107.1530.

(f) Exceptions to the Distribution requirement. (1) With SBA’s prior written approval, you may withhold from distribution reasonable reserves necessary to protect your investments or relative position in Loans and Investments and to meet contingent liabilities.


(i) If you submit a written request for SBA approval, you may consider it approved unless SBA notifies you otherwise within 30 days from receipt.


(ii) Reserves that you withhold from distribution may not be used to make investments in additional portfolio companies.


(iii) Withholding of reserves under this paragraph (f)(1) is not a “payment failure” in violation of § 107.1820(e)(6).


(2) SBA may restrict Distributions under this § 107.1560 if SBA determines that the value of your assets is materially overstated. SBA must give you notice of such a determination in advance of your proposed Distribution.


(g) How SBA will apply your Distributions. Your Distributions to SBA (or its designated agent or Trustee) under this § 107.1560 will be applied in the following order:


(1) First, to Profit Participation;


(2) Second, to the extent there remain any Retained Earnings Available for Distribution, to distributions on Preferred Securities;


(3) Third, as a redemption of Participating Securities in order of issue;


(4) Fourth, as a redemption of Preferred Securities; and


(5) Fifth, as the repayment of principal of any outstanding Debentures, with such repayment to be made into escrow on terms and conditions SBA determines.


[61 FR 3189, Jan. 31, 1996, as amended at 63 FR 5872, Feb. 5, 1998]


§ 107.1570 Distributions by Licensee – optional Distribution to private investors and SBA.

If you have outstanding Participating Securities or Earmarked Assets, you may make two types of optional Distributions under this § 107.1570: quarterly Distributions determined the same way as the required annual Distributions in § 107.1560, and Distributions allocated between SBA and your private investors in proportion to the capital contributions of each. You must notify SBA of any planned distribution under this section 10 business days before the distribution date, unless SBA permits otherwise.


(a) Quarterly Distributions subject to conditions in § 107.1560. (1) You may make Distributions under this paragraph (a) as of the end of any fiscal quarter, giving SBA (or its designated agent or Trustee) a percentage share determined under § 107.1560(e).


(2) Such Distributions are subject to all the provisions in § 107.1560 (a)(1), (a)(3), (a)(4), (d), (f)(2), and (g).


(3) You may make such Distributions only on the next Payment Date following the end of your fiscal quarter.


(4) The total amount of such Distributions may not exceed the result of the following computation:


(i) Your Retained Earnings Available for Distribution as of the end of your fiscal quarter; minus


(ii) All previous Distributions under this paragraph (a) or § 107.1560 that were applied as redemptions or repayments of Leverage; plus


(iii) All previous Distributions under paragraph (b) of this section that reduced your Retained Earnings Available for Distribution.


(b) Other optional Distributions. On any Payment Date, you may make additional Distributions to your private investors and to SBA (or its designated agent or Trustee) under this paragraph (b).


(1) Conditions for making a Distribution. You may make a Distribution under this paragraph (b) only if:


(i) You have distributed all Earned Prioritized Payments, earned Adjustments, and earned Charges, so that the balance in your Distribution Account is zero (see § 107.1520).


(ii) You have distributed all Profit Participation computed under § 107.1530 which you are required to distribute under § 107.1560 or permitted to distribute under paragraph (a) of this section, as appropriate, and you have made all required Distributions under § 107.1560.


(iii) You satisfy the liquidity requirement in § 107.1505 or obtain SBA’s prior written approval of the Distribution.


(iv) You do not have a condition of Capital Impairment.


(v) The Distribution does not reduce your Regulatory Capital (excluding commitments from Institutional Investors) below the minimum required under § 107.210, unless SBA approves the reduction as part of a plan of liquidation.


(vi) The Distribution does not cause you to have excess Leverage contrary to section 303 of the Act.


(2) SBA’s share of Distribution. (i) If your Capital Impairment Percentage under § 107.1840 is zero, SBA’s percentage share of any Distribution under this paragraph (b) equals:


[Leverage /(Leverage + Leverageable Capital)] × 100

In this formula, use Leverage and Leverageable Capital as of the date of the Distribution, after giving effect to any Distribution under § 107.1560 and paragraph (a) of this section.

(ii) If your Capital Impairment Percentage under § 107.1840 is greater than zero, you must modify the formula in paragraph (b)(2)(i) of this section by replacing Leverageable Capital with:


Leverageable Capital × (100% − CIP)


where “CIP” is your Capital Impairment Percentage or 100 percent, whichever is less.

(3) How SBA will apply Distributions. Any amounts you distribute to SBA, or its designated agent or Trustee, under this paragraph (b) will be applied as a repayment or redemption of Leverage in the order set forth in § 107.1560(g)(3) through (g)(5).


(4) Effect of Distributions on Retained Earnings Available for Distribution. Any amounts you distribute to non-SBA investors under this paragraph (b) must reduce your Retained Earnings Available for Distribution to zero before reducing your Private Capital.


(5) Permitted exception to § 107.585. You may make any Distribution permitted by this paragraph (b), even if the result is a reduction in your Regulatory Capital that would otherwise be prohibited under § 107.585.


[61 FR 3189, Jan. 31, 1996, as amended at 63 FR 5872, Feb. 5, 1998]


§ 107.1575 Distributions on other than Payment Dates.

(a) Permitted Distributions on other than Payment Dates. Notwithstanding any provisions to the contrary in §§ 107.1540 through 107.1570, you may make Distributions on dates other than Payment Dates as follows:


(1) Required annual Distributions under § 107.1540(a)(1), annual Distributions under § 107.1550, and any Distributions under § 107.1560 must be made no later than the second Payment Date following the end of your fiscal year.


(2) Required Distributions under § 107.1540(b) must be made no later than the first Payment Date following the end of the applicable fiscal quarter;


(3) Optional Distributions under § 107.1540(a)(2) and § 107.1570 may be made on any date.


(4) Quarterly Distributions under § 107.1550 must be made no earlier than the last day of the calendar quarter for which the Distribution is being made and no later than the first Payment Date following the end of such calendar quarter.


(b) Conditions for making Distribution. All Distributions under this section are subject to the following conditions:


(1) You must obtain SBA’s written approval before the distribution date;


(2) The ending date of the period for which you compute your Earmarked Profits, Prioritized Payments, Adjustments, Charges, Profit Participation, Retained Earnings Available for Distribution, liquidity ratio, Capital Impairment, and any other applicable computations required under §§ 107.1500 through 107.1570, must be:


(i) The distribution date, or


(ii) If your Distribution includes annual Distributions under §§ 107.1540(a)(1), 107.1550 and/or 107.1560, your most recent fiscal year end;


(3) If your Distribution includes an amount which SBA will apply as a redemption of Participating Securities, the effective date of such redemption, for all purposes including future computations of Prioritized Payments, will be the next Payment Date following the distribution date.


[63 FR 5872, Feb. 5, 1998, as amended at 64 FR 70997, Dec. 20, 1999]


§ 107.1580 Special rules for In-Kind Distributions by Licensees.

(a) In-Kind Distributions while Licensee has outstanding Participating Securities. A Distribution under §§ 107.1540, 107.1560 or 107.1570 may consist of securities (an “In-Kind Distribution”). Such a Distribution must satisfy the conditions in this paragraph (a).


(1) You may distribute only Distributable Securities.


(2) You must distribute each security pro-rata to all investors and to SBA or its designated agent or Trustee, based on the amounts that each party would receive if the Distribution were in cash.


(3) You must impute a gain (loss) on each security being distributed as if it were being sold, using the value of the security as of the declaration date of the Distribution (if you are a Corporate Licensee) or the distribution date (if you are a Partnership Licensee).


(4) You must deposit SBA’s share of securities being distributed with a disposition agent designated by SBA. As an alternative, if you agree, SBA may direct you to dispose of its shares. In this case, you must promptly remit the proceeds to SBA.


(b) In-Kind Distributions after Licensee has redeemed all Participating Securities. This paragraph (b) applies from the time you redeem all your Participating Securities until you dispose of all your Earmarked Assets.


(1) You may make an In-Kind Distribution of an Earmarked Asset only if you pay SBA the lower of:


(i) An amount equal to the Unrealized Appreciation on the asset; or


(ii) The full amount of your Accumulated Prioritized Payments and unpaid Adjustments.


(2) You must obtain SBA’s prior written approval of any In-Kind Distribution of Earmarked Assets that are not Distributable Securities, specifically including approval of the valuation of the assets.


[61 FR 3189, Jan. 31, 1996, as amended at 63 FR 5872, Feb. 5, 1998; 64 FR 70997, Dec. 20, 1999]


§ 107.1585 Exchange of Debentures for Participating Securities.

You may, in SBA’s discretion, retire a Debenture through the issuance of Participating Securities. To do so, you must:


(a) Obtain SBA’s approval to issue Participating Securities;


(b) Pay all unpaid accrued interest on the Debenture, plus any applicable prepayment penalties, fees, and other charges;


(c) Have outstanding Equity Capital Investments (at cost) equal to the amount of the Debenture being refinanced; and


(d) Classify all your existing Loans and Investments as Earmarked Assets.


[63 FR 5869, Feb. 5, 1998]


§ 107.1590 Special rules for companies licensed on or before March 31, 1993.

This section applies to companies licensed on or before March 31, 1993 that apply to issue Participating Securities.


(a) Election to exclude pre-existing portfolio. You may choose to exclude all (but not a portion) of your Loans and Investments as of March 31, 1993, from classification as Earmarked Assets if:


(1) The proceeds of your first issuance of Participating Securities are not used to refinance outstanding Debentures (see § 107.1585(a)). SBA will consider payment or prepayment of any outstanding Debenture to be a refinancing unless you demonstrate to SBA’s satisfaction that you can pay the Debenture principal without relying on the proceeds of the Participating Securities.


(2) SBA, in its sole discretion, approves the exclusion.


(b) Treatment of pre-existing portfolio if not excluded. If you do not choose to exclude your Loans and Investments as of March 31, 1993, they will be Earmarked Assets for all purposes.


(c) Requirements for Licensee’s first issuance of Participating Securities. When you apply for your first issuance of Participating Securities, you must comply with the following:


(1) For each of your Loans and Investments, you must submit:


(i) The most recent annual report (or fiscal year-end financial statements) and the most recent interim financial statements of the Small Business; and


(ii) Your valuation reports on the Small Business, prepared as of the end of each of your last three fiscal years. If you have applied for Participating Securities on the basis of interim financial statements, you must also submit a valuation report as of your interim financial statement date.


(2) If you have negative Undistributed Net Realized Earnings and/or a net Unrealized Loss on Securities Held, SBA may require you to undergo a quasi-reorganization in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles.


(3) If your financial statements accompanying the Participating Securities application are for an interim period, you must have your SBA-approved independent public accountant perform a limited-scope audit of the statements. For purposes of this paragraph (d)(3), “limited scope audit” means auditing procedures sufficient to enable the independent public accountant to express an opinion on the Statement of Financial Position and the accompanying Schedule of Loans and Investments.


[61 FR 3189, Jan. 31, 1996, as amended at 63 FR 5873, Feb. 5, 1998]


Funding Leverage by Use of SBA-Guaranteed Trust Certificates (“TCs”)

§ 107.1600 SBA authority to issue and guarantee Trust Certificates.

(a) Authorization. Sections 319(a) and (b) of the Act authorize SBA or its CRA to issue TCs, and SBA to guarantee the timely payment of the principal and interest thereon. Any guarantee by SBA of such TC is limited to the principal and interest due on the Debentures or the Redemption Price of and Prioritized Payments on Participating Securities in any Trust or Pool backing such TC. The full faith and credit of the United States is pledged to the payment of all amounts due under the guarantee of any TC.


(b) Periodic exercise of authority. SBA will issue guarantees of Debentures and Participating Securities under section 303 and of TCs under section 319 of the Act at six month intervals, or at shorter intervals, taking into account the amount and number of such guarantees or TCs.


(c) SBA authority to arrange public or private fundings of Leverage. SBA in its discretion may arrange for public or private financing under its guarantee authority. Such financing arranged by SBA may be accomplished by the sale of individual Debentures or Participating Securities, aggregations of Debentures or Participating Securities, or Pools or Trusts of Debentures or Participating Securities.


(d) Pass-through provisions. TCs shall provide for a pass-through to their holders of all amounts of principal and interest paid on the Debentures, or the Redemption Price of and Prioritized Payments on the Participating Securities, in the Pool or Trust against which they are issued.


(e) Formation of a Pool or Trust holding Leverage Securities. SBA shall approve the formation of each Pool or Trust. SBA may, in its discretion, establish the size of the Pools and their composition, the interest rate on the TCs issued against Trusts or Pools, fees, discounts, premiums and other charges made in connection with the Pools, Trusts, and TCs, and any other characteristics of a Pool or Trust it deems appropriate.


[61 FR 3189, Jan. 31, 1996, as amended at 63 FR 5873, Feb. 5, 1998]


§ 107.1610 Effect of prepayment or early redemption of Leverage on a Trust Certificate.

(a) The rights, if any, of a Licensee to prepay any Debenture or make early redemption of any Participating Security are established by the terms of such securities, and no such right is created or denied by the regulations in this part.


(b) SBA’s rights to purchase or prepay any Debenture without premium are established by the terms of the Guaranty Agreement relating to the Debenture. SBA’s rights to redeem, at any time, any Participating Security without premium are established by the terms of the Guaranty Agreement relating to the Participating Security.


(c) Any prepayment of a Debenture or early redemption of a Participating Security pursuant to the terms of the Guaranty Agreement relating to such securities, shall reduce the SBA guarantee of timely payment of principal and interest on a TC in proportion to the amount of principal or Redemption Price that such prepaid Debenture or redeemed Participating Security represents in the Trust or Pool backing such TC.


(d) SBA shall be discharged from its guarantee obligation to the holder or holders of any TC, or any successor or transferee of such holder, to the extent of any such prepayment, whether or not such successor or transferee shall have notice of any such prepayment.


(e) Interest on prepaid Debentures and Prioritized Payments on Participating Securities shall accrue only through the date of such voluntary prepayment or SBA payment, as the case may be.


(f) In the event that all Debentures or Participating Securities constituting a Trust or Pool are prepaid, the TCs backed by such Trust or Pool shall be redeemed by payment of the unpaid principal and interest on the TCs; Provided, however, that in the case of the prepayment of a Debenture pursuant to the provisions of the Guaranty Agreement relating to the Debenture, the CRA shall pass through pro rata to the holders of the TCs any such prepayments including any prepayment penalty paid by the obligor Licensee pursuant to the terms of the Debenture.


§ 107.1620 Functions of agents, including Central Registration Agent, Selling Agent and Fiscal Agent.

(a) Agents. SBA will appoint or cause to be appointed agent(s) to perform functions necessary to market and service Debentures, Participating Securities, or TCs pursuant to this part.


(1) Selling Agent. As a condition of guaranteeing a Debenture or Participating Security, SBA shall cause each Licensee to appoint a Selling Agent to perform functions which include, but are not limited to:


(i) Selecting qualified entities to become pool or Trust assemblers (“Poolers”).


(ii) Receiving guaranteed Debentures and Participating Securities as well as negotiating the terms and conditions of periodic offerings of Debentures and/or TCs with Poolers on behalf of Licensees.


(iii) Directing and coordinating periodic sales of Debentures and Participating Securities and/or TCs.


(iv) Arranging for the production of the Offering Circular, certificates, and such other documents as may be required from time to time.


(2) Fiscal Agent. SBA shall appoint a Fiscal Agent to:


(i) Establish performance criteria for Poolers.


(ii) Monitor and evaluate the financial markets to determine those factors that will minimize or reduce the cost of funding Debentures or Participating Securities.


(iii) Monitor the performance of the Selling Agent, Poolers, CRA, and the Trustee.


(iv) Perform such other functions as SBA, from time to time, may prescribe.


(3) Central Registration Agent. Pursuant to a contract entered into with SBA, the CRA, as SBA’s agent, will do the following with respect to the Pools or Trust Certificates for the Debentures or Participating Securities:


(i) Form an SBA-approved Pool or Trust;


(ii) Issue the TCs in the form prescribed by SBA;


(iii) Transfer the TCs upon the sale of original issue TCs in any secondary market transaction;


(iv) Receive payments from Licensees;


(v) Make periodic payments as scheduled or required by the terms of the TCs, and pay all amounts required to be paid upon prepayment of Debentures or redemption of Participating Securities;


(vi) Hold, safeguard, and release all Debentures and Participating Securities constituting Trusts or Pools upon instructions from SBA;


(vii) Remain custodian of such other documentation as SBA shall direct by written instructions;


(viii) Provide for the registration of all pooled Debentures and Participating Securities, all Pools and Trusts, and all TCs;


(ix) Perform such other functions as SBA may deem necessary to implement the provisions of this section.


(b) Functions. The function of locating purchasers, and negotiating and closing the sale of Debentures, Participating Securities and TCs, may be performed either by SBA or an agent appointed by SBA. Nothing in the regulations in this part shall be interpreted to prevent the CRA from acting as SBA’s agent for this purpose.


§ 107.1630 SBA regulation of Brokers and Dealers and disclosure to purchasers of Leverage or Trust Certificates.

(a) Disclosure to purchasers. Prior to any sale of a Debenture, Participating Security, or TC, SBA shall require the seller, or the broker or dealer as agent for the seller, to disclose to the purchaser, in a form prescribed or approved by SBA, specified information on the terms, conditions, and yield of such instrument.


(b) Brokers and Dealers. Each broker, dealer, and Pool or Trust assembler approved by SBA pursuant to these regulations shall either be regulated by a Federal financial regulatory agency, or be a member of the National Association of Securities Dealers (NASD), and shall be in good standing in respect to compliance with the financial, ethical, and reporting requirements of such body. They also shall be in good standing with SBA as determined by the SBA Associate Administrator for Investment (see paragraph (d) of this section) and shall provide a fidelity bond or insurance in such amount as SBA may require.


(c) Suspension and/or termination of Broker or Dealer. SBA shall exclude from the sale and all other dealings in Debentures, Participating Securities or TCs any broker or dealer:


(1) If such broker’s or dealer’s authority to engage in the securities business has been revoked or suspended by a supervisory agency. When such authority has been suspended, such broker or dealer will be suspended by SBA for the duration of such suspension by the supervisory agency.


(2) If such broker or dealer has been indicted or otherwise formally charged with a misdemeanor or felony bearing on its fitness, such broker or dealer may be suspended while the charge is pending. Upon conviction, participation may be terminated.


(3) If such broker or dealer has suffered an adverse final civil judgment, holding that such broker or dealer has committed a breach of trust or violation of law or regulation protecting the integrity of business transactions or relationships, participation in the market for Debentures, Participating Securities or TCs may be terminated.


(4) If such broker or dealer has failed to make full disclosure of the information required by SBA in paragraph (a) of this section, such broker’s or dealer’s participation in the market for Debentures, Participating Securities or TCs may be terminated.


(d) Termination/suspension proceedings. A broker’s or dealer’s participation in the market for Debentures, Participating Securities or TCs will be conducted in accordance with part 134 of this chapter. SBA may, for any of the reasons stated in paragraphs (b)(1) through (b)(4) of this section, suspend the privilege of any broker or dealer to participate in this market. SBA shall give written notice at least ten (10) business days prior to the effective date of such suspension. Such notice shall inform the broker or dealer of the opportunity for a hearing pursuant to part 134 of this chapter.


§ 107.1640 SBA access to records of the CRA, Brokers, Dealers and Pool or Trust assemblers.

The CRA and any broker, dealer and Pool or Trust assembler operating under the regulations in this part shall make all books, records and related materials associated with Debentures, Participating Securities and TCs available to SBA for review and copying purposes. Such access shall be at such party’s primary place of business during normal business hours.


Miscellaneous

§ 107.1700 Transfer by SBA of its interest in Licensee’s Leverage security.

Upon such conditions and for such consideration as it deems reasonable, SBA may sell, assign, transfer, or otherwise dispose of any Preferred Security, Debenture, Participating Security, or other security held by or on behalf of SBA in connection with Leverage. Upon notice by SBA, Licensee will make all payments of principal, dividends, interest, Prioritized Payments, and redemptions as shall be directed by SBA. Licensee will be liable for all damage or loss which SBA may sustain by reason of such disposal, up to the amount of Licensee’s liability under such security, plus court costs and reasonable attorney’s fees incurred by SBA.


§ 107.1710 SBA authority to collect or compromise its claims.

SBA may, upon such conditions and for such consideration as it deems reasonable, collect or compromise all claims relating to Preferred or Participating Securities or obligations held or guaranteed by SBA, and all legal or equitable rights accruing to SBA.


§ 107.1720 Characteristics of SBA’s guarantee.

If SBA agrees to guarantee a Licensee’s Debentures or Participating Securities, such guarantee will be unconditional, irrespective of the validity, regularity or enforceability of the Debentures or Participating Securities or any other circumstances which might constitute a legal or equitable discharge or defense of a guarantor. Pursuant to its guarantee, SBA will make timely payments of principal and interest on the Debentures or the Redemption Price of and Prioritized Payments on the Participating Securities.


[63 FR 5873, Feb. 5, 1998]


Subpart J – Licensee’s Noncompliance With Terms of Leverage

§ 107.1800 Licensee’s agreement to terms and conditions in §§ 107.1810 and 107.1820.

Any Licensee that violates the terms and conditions of its Leverage is subject to SBA remedies. The terms, conditions and remedies in § 107.1810 apply to outstanding Debentures issued after April 25, 1994. The terms, conditions and remedies in § 107.1820 apply to outstanding Preferred Securities and Participating Securities issued after April 25, 1994, or if you have Earmarked Assets in your portfolio.


§ 107.1810 Events of default and SBA’s remedies for Licensee’s noncompliance with terms of Debentures.

(a) Applicability of this section. This § 107.1810 applies to Debentures issued after April 25, 1994. By issuing such Debentures, you automatically agree to the terms, conditions and remedies in this section, as in effect at the time of issuance and as if fully set forth in the Debentures. Debentures issued before April 25, 1994 continue to be governed by the remedies in effect at the time of their issuance.


(b) Automatic events of default. The occurrence of one or more of the events in this paragraph (b) causes the remedies in paragraph (c) of this section to take effect immediately.


(1) Insolvency. You become equitably or legally insolvent.


(2) Voluntary assignment. You make a voluntary assignment for the benefit of creditors without SBA’s prior written approval.


(3) Bankruptcy. You file a petition to begin any bankruptcy or reorganization proceeding, receivership, dissolution or other similar creditors’ rights proceeding, or such action is initiated against you and is not dismissed within 60 days.


(c) SBA remedies for automatic events of default. Upon the occurrence of one or more of the events in paragraph (b) of this section:


(1) Without notice, presentation or demand, the entire indebtedness evidenced by your Debentures, including accrued interest, and any other amounts owed SBA with respect to your Debentures, is immediately due and payable; and


(2) You automatically consent to the appointment of SBA or its designee as your receiver under section 311(c) of the Act.


(d) Events of default with notice. For any occurrence (as determined by SBA) of one or more of the events in this paragraph (d), SBA may avail itself of one or more of the remedies in paragraph (e) of this section.


(1) Fraud. You commit a fraudulent act which causes detriment to SBA’s position as a creditor or guarantor.


(2) Fraudulent transfers. You make any transfer or incur any obligation that is fraudulent under the terms of 11 U.S.C. 548.


(3) Willful conflicts of interest. You willfully violate § 107.730.


(4) Willful non-compliance. You willfully violate one or more of the substantive provisions of the Act, specifically including but not limited to the provisions summarized in section 310(c) of the Act, or any substantive regulation promulgated under the Act.


(5) Repeated Events of Default. At any time after being notified by SBA of the occurrence of an event of default under paragraph (f) of this section, you engage in similar behavior which results in another occurrence of the same event of default.


(6) Transfer of Control. You violate § 107.475 and/or willfully violate § 107.410, and as a result of such violation you undergo a transfer of Control.


(7) Non-cooperation under § 107.1810(h). You fail to take appropriate steps, satisfactory to SBA, to accomplish any action SBA may have required under paragraph (h) of this section.


(8) Non-notification of Events of Default. You fail to notify SBA as soon as you know or reasonably should have known that any event of default exists under this section.


(9) Non-notification of defaults to others. You fail to notify SBA in writing within ten days from the date of a declaration of an event of default or nonperformance under any note, debenture or indebtedness of yours, issued to or held by anyone other than SBA.


(e) SBA remedies for events of default with notice. Upon written notice to you of the occurrence (as determined by SBA) of one or more of the events in paragraph (d) of this section:


(1) SBA may declare the entire indebtedness evidenced by your Debentures, including accrued interest, and/or any other amounts owed SBA with respect to your Debentures, immediately due and payable; and


(2) SBA may avail itself of any remedy available under the Act, specifically including institution of proceedings for the appointment of SBA or its designee as your receiver under section 311(c) of the Act.


(f) Events of default with opportunity to cure. For any occurrence (as determined by SBA) of one or more of the events in this paragraph (f), SBA may avail itself of one or more of the remedies in paragraph (g) of this section.


(1) Excessive Management Expenses. Without the prior written consent of SBA, you incur Management Expenses in excess of those permitted under § 107.520.


(2) Improper Distributions. You make any Distribution to your shareholders or partners, except with the prior written consent of SBA, other than:


(i) Distributions permitted under § 107.585;


(ii) Payments from Retained Earnings Available for Distribution based on either the shareholders’ pro-rata interests or the provisions for profit distributions in your partnership agreement, as appropriate;


(iii) Distributions by Participating Securities issuers as permitted under §§ 107.1540 through 107.1580; and


(iv) Distributions by Early Stage SBICs as permitted under § 107.1180.


(3) Failure to make payment. Unless otherwise approved by SBA, you fail to make timely payment of any amount due under any security or obligation of yours that is issued to, held or guaranteed by SBA.


(4) Failure to maintain Regulatory Capital. You fail to maintain the minimum Regulatory Capital required under these regulations or, without the prior written consent of SBA, you reduce your Regulatory Capital, except as permitted by §§ 107.585 and 107.1560 through 107.1580.


(5) Capital Impairment. You have a condition of Capital Impairment as determined under § 107.1830.


(6) Cross-default. An obligation of yours that is greater than $100,000 becomes due or payable (with or without notice) before its stated maturity date, for any reason including your failure to pay any amount when due. This provision does not apply if you pay the amount due within any applicable grace period or contest the payment of the obligation in good faith by appropriate proceedings.


(7) Nonperformance. You violate or fail to perform one or more of the terms and conditions of any security or obligation of yours that is issued to, held or guaranteed by SBA, or of any agreement with or conditions imposed by SBA in its administration of the Act and the regulations promulgated under the Act.


(8) Noncompliance. Except as otherwise provided in paragraph (d)(5) of this section, SBA determines that you have violated one or more of the substantive provisions of the Act, specifically including but not limited to the provisions summarized in section 310(c) of the Act, or any substantive regulation promulgated under the Act.


(9) Failure to maintain investment ratio. You fail to maintain the investment ratio for Leverage in excess of 300 percent of Leverageable Capital (see § 107.1160(c)), if applicable to you, as of the end of each fiscal year. In determining whether you have maintained the ratio, SBA will disregard any prepayment, sale, or disposition of Venture Capital Financing, any increase in Leverageable Capital, and any receipt of additional Leverage, within 120 days prior to the end of your fiscal year.


(10) Failure to maintain diversity. You fail to maintain diversity between management and ownership as required by § 107.150, if applicable to you.


(11) Failure by an Early Stage SBIC to meet investment requirements. You are an Early Stage SBIC and, beginning on the first fiscal quarter end when your cumulative total Financings (in dollars) are at least equal to your Regulatory Capital, you have not made at least 50 percent of such Financings to Small Businesses that at the time of your initial Financing were “early stage” companies, as defined under the definition of Early Stage SBIC in § 107.50 of this part.


(12) Failure by an Early Stage SBIC to maintain required interest reserve. You are an Early Stage SBIC and you fail to maintain a sufficient reserve to pay interest and Charges on your Debentures as required under § 107.1181 of this part.


(g) SBA remedies for events of default with opportunity to cure. (1) Upon written notice to you of the occurrence (as determined by SBA) of one or more of the events of default in paragraph (f) of this section, and subject to the conditions in paragraph (g)(2) of this section:


(i) SBA may declare the entire indebtedness evidenced by your Debentures, including accrued interest, and/or any other amounts owed SBA with respect to your Debentures, immediately due and payable; and


(ii) SBA may avail itself of any remedy available under the Act, specifically including institution of proceedings for the appointment of SBA or its designee as your receiver under section 311(c) of the Act.


(2) SBA may invoke the remedies in paragraph (g)(1) of this section only if:


(i) It has given you at least 15 days to cure the default(s); and


(ii) You fail to cure the default(s) to SBA’s satisfaction within the allotted time.


(h) Repeated non-substantive violations. If you repeatedly fail to comply with one or more of the non-substantive provisions of the Act or any non-substantive regulation promulgated under the Act, SBA, after written notification to you and until you cure such condition to SBA’s satisfaction, may deny you additional Leverage and/or require you to take such actions as SBA may determine to be appropriate under the circumstances.


(i) Consent to removal of officers, directors, or general partners and/or appointment of receiver. The Articles of any Licensee issuing Debentures after April 25, 1994 must include the following provisions as a condition to the purchase or guarantee by SBA of such Leverage. Upon the occurrence of any of the events specified in paragraphs (d)(1) through (d)(6) or (f)(1) through (f)(3) of this section as determined by SBA, SBA shall have the right, and your consent to SBA’s exercise of such right:


(1) With respect to a Corporate Licensee, upon written notice, to require you to replace, with individuals approved by SBA, one or more of your officers and/or such number of directors of your board of directors as is sufficient to constitute a majority of such board; or


(2) With respect to a Partnership Licensee, upon written notice, to require you to remove the person(s) responsible for such occurrence and/or to remove the general partner of Licensee, which general partner shall then be replaced in accordance with Licensee’s Articles by a new general partner approved by SBA; and/or


(3) With respect to either a Corporate or Partnership Licensee, to obtain the appointment of SBA or its designee as your receiver under section 311(c) of the Act for the purpose of continuing your operations. The appointment of a receiver to liquidate a Licensee is not within such consent, but is governed instead by the relevant provisions of the Act.


(j) Additional SBA remedies applicable to Debentures issued by Early Stage SBICs. If you are an Early Stage SBIC, upon SBA’s payment pursuant to its guarantee of any of your Debentures, SBA shall have the following additional rights and you consent to SBA’s exercise of any or all of such rights:


(1) To prohibit you from making any additional investments except for investments under legally binding commitments you entered into before such payment by SBA and, subject to SBA’s prior written approval, investments that are necessary to protect your investments;


(2) Until all Leverage is repaid and amounts related thereto are paid in full, to prohibit Distributions by you to any party other than SBA, its agent or Trustee;


(3) To require all your commitments from investors to be funded at the earliest time(s) permitted in accordance with your Articles;


(4) To review and re-determine your approved Management Expenses; and


(5) To the appointment of SBA or its designee as your receiver under section 311(c) of the Act for the purpose of continuing your operations.


[61 FR 3189, Jan. 31, 1996, as amended at 74 FR 33916, July 14, 2009; 77 FR 25054, Apr. 27, 2012]


§ 107.1820 Conditions affecting issuers of Preferred Securities and/or Participating Securities.

(a) Applicability of this section. This section applies if you have Preferred Securities issued after April 25, 1994, or if you issue Participating Securities or have Earmarked Assets in your portfolio. Your Articles must include the provisions of this § 107.1820 as a condition to SBA’s purchase of Preferred Securities or guarantee of Participating Securities and for as long as you own Earmarked Assets. Preferred Securities issued before April 25, 1994 continue to be governed by the remedies in effect at the time of their issuance.


(b) Removal Conditions. Upon the occurrence (as determined by SBA) of any of the following conditions (“Removal Conditions”), SBA may avail itself of one or more of the remedies in paragraph (d) of this section:


(1) Insolvency or extreme Capital Impairment. You become equitably or legally insolvent, or have a Capital Impairment Percentage of 100 percent or more (“extreme Capital Impairment”) and have not cured such Capital Impairment within the time limits set by SBA in writing. In this regard:


(i) You are not considered to have a condition of extreme Capital Impairment during the first eight years following your first issuance of Participating Securities.


(ii) This paragraph (b)(1) does not give you an additional opportunity to cure if you have already had an opportunity to cure your Capital Impairment under paragraph (e)(3) of this section.


(2) Voluntary assignment. You make a voluntary assignment for the benefit of creditors.


(3) Bankruptcy. You begin any bankruptcy or reorganization proceeding, receivership, dissolution or other similar creditors’ rights proceeding, or such action is initiated against you and is not dismissed within 60 days.


(4) Transfer of Control. You violate § 107.475 and/or willfully violate § 107.410, and such violation results in a transfer of Control.


(5) Fraud. You commit a fraudulent act which causes serious detriment to SBA’s position as a guarantor or investor.


(6) Fraudulent transfers. You make any transfer or incur any obligation that is fraudulent under the terms of 11 U.S.C. 548.


(c) Contingent Removal Conditions. Upon the occurrence (as determined by SBA) of any of the following conditions (“Contingent Removal Conditions”), SBA may avail itself of one or more of the remedies in paragraph (d) of this section, but only if you fail to remove the person(s) SBA identifies as responsible for such occurrence and/or cure such occurrence to SBA’s satisfaction within a time period determined by SBA (but not less than 15 days):


(1) Willful conflicts of interest. You willfully violate § 107.730.


(2) Willful or repeated noncompliance. You willfully or repeatedly violate one or more of the substantive provisions of the Act, specifically including but not limited to the provisions summarized in section 310(c) of the Act, or any substantive regulation promulgated under the Act.


(3) Failure to comply with restrictions under paragraph (f) of this section. You fail to comply with the restrictions imposed by SBA under paragraph (f) of this section.


(d) SBA remedies for Removal Conditions and Contingent Removal Conditions. Upon the occurrence (as determined by SBA) of any Removal Condition, or any Contingent Removal Condition accompanied by your failure to act as set forth in paragraph (c) of this section, SBA has the following rights, and you consent to SBA’s exercise of any or all of such rights:


(1) With respect to a Corporate Licensee, upon written notice, to require you to replace, with individuals approved by SBA, one or more of your officers and/or such number of directors as is sufficient to constitute a majority of your board of directors; or


(2) With respect to a Partnership Licensee, upon written notice, to require you to remove the person(s) responsible for such occurrence and/or to remove your general partner, who shall then be replaced in accordance with your Articles by a new general partner approved by SBA; and/or


(3) With respect to either a Corporate or Partnership Licensee, to the appointment of SBA or its designee as your receiver under section 311(c) of the Act for the purpose of continuing your operations. The appointment of a receiver to liquidate a Licensee is not within such consent, but is governed instead by the relevant provisions of the Act.


(e) Restricted Operations Conditions. Upon the occurrence (as determined by SBA) of any of the following conditions (“Restricted Operations Conditions”), SBA may avail itself of any of the remedies in paragraph (f) of this section.


(1) Removal Conditions or Contingent Removal Conditions. Any condition occurs which is listed in paragraphs (b) or (c) of this section.


(2) Failure to maintain Regulatory Capital. You fail to maintain the minimum Regulatory Capital required by this part.


(3) Capital or Liquidity Impairment. You have a condition of Capital Impairment as determined under § 107.1830 or, if applicable, a condition of Liquidity Impairment as determined under § 107.1505, and you fail to cure the impairment within time limits set by SBA in writing.


(4) Improper Distributions. You make any Distribution to your shareholders or partners other than those permitted by §§ 107.585 and 107.1560 through 107.1580.


(5) Excessive Management Expenses. Without the prior written consent of SBA, you incur Management Expenses in excess of those permitted under § 107.520.


(6) Failure to make payment. You fail to pay any amounts due under Preferred Securities or required by §§ 107.1500 through 107.1590, unless otherwise permitted by SBA.


(7) Noncompliance. Except as otherwise provided for in paragraphs (c)(1) and (c)(2) of this section, SBA determines that you have failed to comply with one or more of the substantive provisions of the Act, specifically including but not limited to the provisions summarized in section 310(c) of the Act, or any substantive regulation promulgated under the Act.


(8) Failure to maintain diversity. You fail to maintain diversity between management and ownership as required by § 107.150, if applicable to you.


(9) Failure to meet investment requirements. You fail to make the amount of Equity Capital Investments required for Participating Securities (§ 107.1500(b)(4)), if applicable to you; or you fail to maintain as of the end of each fiscal year the investment ratios or amounts required for Leverage in excess of 300 percent of Leverageable Capital (§ 107.1160(c)) or Preferred Securities in excess of 100 percent of Leverageable Capital (§ 107.1160(d)), if applicable to you. In determining whether you have met the maintenance requirements in § 107.1160(c) or (d), SBA will disregard any prepayment, sale, or disposition of Venture Capital Financings, any increase in Leverageable Capital, and any receipt of additional Leverage, within 120 days prior to the end of your fiscal year.


(10) Nonperformance. You violate or fail to perform one or more of the terms and conditions of any Participating Security or Preferred Security or of any agreement with or condition imposed by SBA in its administration of the Act and the regulations promulgated thereunder.


(11) Noncooperation under paragraph (g) of this section. You fail to take appropriate steps, satisfactory to SBA, to accomplish such action as SBA may have required under paragraph (g) of this section.


(f) SBA remedies for Restricted Operations Conditions. Upon the occurrence of any Restricted Operations Condition, and until such condition(s) are cured to SBA’s satisfaction within a time period determined by SBA (but not less than 15 days), upon written notice SBA shall have the following rights, and you consent to SBA’s exercise of any or all of such rights:


(1) To prohibit you from making any additional investments except for investments under legally binding commitments you entered into before such notice and, subject to SBA’s prior written approval, investments that are necessary to protect your investments;


(2) Until all Leverage is redeemed and amounts due are paid, to prohibit Distributions by you to any party other than SBA, its agent or Trustee;


(3) To require all your commitments from investors to be funded at the earliest time(s) permitted in accordance with your Articles; and


(4) To review and re-determine your approved Management Expenses.


(g) Repeated non-substantive violations. If you repeatedly fail to comply with one or more of the non-substantive provisions of the Act or any non-substantive regulation promulgated thereunder, SBA, after written notification to you and until such condition is cured to SBA’s satisfaction, will deny you additional Leverage and/or require you to take such actions as SBA may determine to be appropriate under the circumstances.


[61 FR 3189, Jan. 31, 1996, as amended at 63 FR 5873, Feb. 5, 1998]


Computation of Licensee’s Capital Impairment

§ 107.1830 Licensee’s Capital Impairment – definition and general requirements.

(a) Applicability of this section. This section applies to Leverage issued on or after April 25, 1994. For Leverage issued before April 25, 1994, you must comply with paragraphs (e) and (f) of this section and the Capital Impairment regulations in this part in effect when you issued your Leverage. For all Leverage issued, you must also comply with any contractual provisions to which you have agreed.


(b) Significance of Capital Impairment condition. If you have a condition of Capital Impairment, you are not in compliance with the terms of your Leverage. As a result, SBA has the right to impose the applicable remedies for noncompliance in §§ 107.1810(g) and 107.1820(f).


(c) Definition of Capital Impairment condition. You have a condition of Capital Impairment if your Capital Impairment Percentage, as computed in § 107.1840, exceeds:


(1) For Section 301(d) Licensees, 75 percent.


(2) For Section 301(c) Licensees, the appropriate percentage from the following table:


Maximum Permitted Capital Impairment Percentages for Section 301(c) Licensees

If the percentage of equity capital investments (at cost) in your portfolio is:
And your ratio of outstanding leverage to leverageable capital is:
Then your maximum permitted capital impairment percentage is:
67%100% or less70
Over 100% but not over 200%60
Over 200%50
At least 40% but under 67%100% or less55
Over 100% but not over 200%50
Over 200%40
Under 40%100% or less45
Over 100% but not over 200%40
Over 200%35

(d) Phase-in of maximum permitted Capital Impairment Percentages for Section 301(c) Licensees. If you are a Section 301(c) Licensee, regardless of your maximum permitted Capital Impairment Percentage under paragraph (c) of this section, you will not have a condition of Capital Impairment if:


(1) Your Capital Impairment Percentage does not exceed 50 percent; and


(2) You have not reached your first fiscal year end occurring after April 25, 1995.


(e) Quarterly computation requirement and procedure. You must determine whether you have a condition of Capital Impairment as of the end of each fiscal quarter. You must notify SBA promptly if you are capitally impaired.


(f) SBA’s right to determine Licensee’s Capital Impairment condition. SBA may make its own determination of your Capital Impairment condition at any time.


[61 FR 3189, Jan. 31, 1996, as amended at 63 FR 5873, Feb. 5, 1998]


§ 107.1840 Computation of Licensee’s Capital Impairment Percentage.

(a) General. This section contains the procedures you must use to determine your Capital Impairment Percentage if you have outstanding Leverage issued after April 25, 1994. You must compare your Capital Impairment Percentage to the maximum permitted under § 107.1830(c) to determine whether you have a condition of Capital Impairment.


(b) Preliminary impairment test. If you satisfy the preliminary impairment test, your Capital Impairment Percentage is zero and you do not have to perform any more procedures in this § 107.1840. Otherwise, you must continue with paragraph (c) of this section. You satisfy the test if the following amounts are both zero or greater:


(1) The sum of Undistributed Net Realized Earnings, as reported on SBA Form 468, and Includible Non-Cash Gains.


(2) Unrealized Gain (Loss) on Securities Held.


(c) How to compute your Capital Impairment Percentage. (1) If you have an Unrealized Gain on Securities Held, compute your Adjusted Unrealized Gain using paragraph (d) of this section. If you have an Unrealized Loss on Securities Held, continue with paragraph (c)(2) of this Section.


(2) Add together your Undistributed Net Realized Earnings, your Includible Non-cash Gains, and either your Unrealized Loss on Securities Held or your Adjusted Unrealized Gain.


(3) If the sum in paragraph (c)(2) of this section is zero or greater, your Capital Impairment Percentage is zero.


(4) If the sum in paragraph (c)(2) of this section is less than zero, drop the negative sign, divide by your Regulatory Capital (excluding Treasury Stock), and multiply by 100. The result is your Capital Impairment Percentage.


(d) How to compute your Adjusted Unrealized Gain. (1) Subtract Unrealized Depreciation from Unrealized Appreciation. This is your “Net Appreciation”.


(2) Determine your Unrealized Appreciation on Publicly Traded and Marketable securities. This is your “Class 1 Appreciation”.


(3) Determine your Unrealized Appreciation on securities that are not Publicly Traded and Marketable and meet the following criteria, which must be substantiated to the satisfaction of SBA (this is your “Class 2 Appreciation”):


(i) The Small Business that issued the security received a significant subsequent equity financing by an investor whose objectives were not primarily strategic and at a price that conclusively supports the Unrealized Appreciation;


(ii) Such financing represents a substantial investment in the form of an arm’s length transaction by a sophisticated new investor in the issuer’s securities; and


(iii) Except as provided for Early Stage SBICs in § 107.1845, such financing occurred within 24 months of the date of the Capital Impairment computation, or the Small Business’s pre-tax cash flow from operations for its most recent fiscal year was at least 10 percent of the Small Business’s average contributed capital for such fiscal year.


(4) Except as provided for Early Stage SBICs in § 107.1845, perform the appropriate computation from the following table:


Adjusted Unrealized Gain Before Estimated Tax Effects

If:
And:
Then adjusted unrealized gain

before taxes is:
Class 1 Appreciation ≤Net AppreciationClass 1 Appreciation + Class 2 Appreciation ≤Net Appreciation(80% × Class 1 Appreciation) + (50% × Class 2 Appreciation).
Class 1 Appreciation ≤Net AppreciationClass 1 Appreciation + Class 2 Appreciation >Net Appreciation(80% × Class 1 Appreciation) + [(50% × (Net Appreciation − Class 1 Appreciation)].
Class 1 Appreciation >Net Appreciation80% × Net Appreciation.

(5) Reduce the gain computed in paragraph (d)(4) of this section by your estimate of related future income tax expense. Subject to any adjustment required by paragraph (d)(6) of this section, the result is your Adjusted Unrealized Gain for use in paragraph (c)(2) of this section.


(6) If any securities that are the source of either Class 1 or Class 2 Appreciation are pledged or encumbered in any way, you must reduce the Adjusted Unrealized Gain computed in paragraph (d)(5) of this section by the amount of the related borrowing or other obligation, up to the amount of the Unrealized Appreciation on the securities.


[61 FR 3189, Jan. 31, 1996, as amended at 77 FR 25054, Apr. 27, 2012]


§ 107.1845 Determination of Capital Impairment Percentage for Early Stage SBICs.

This section applies to Early Stage SBICs only. Except as modified by this section, all provisions of § 107.1840 apply to an Early Stage SBIC.


(a) To determine your Class 2 Appreciation under § 107.1840(d)(3), use the following provisions instead of § 107.1840(d)(3)(iii):


(1) Such financing occurred within 24 months of the date of the Capital Impairment computation. At the end of the 24 month period following the financing, you may request SBA’s written approval to retain the use of the original Class 2 Appreciation on the investment for up to 24 additional months.


(2) In considering your request, SBA may obtain its own valuation of the investment, require you to obtain a valuation performed by an independent third party acceptable to SBA, and may consider any other information that it deems relevant. To the extent that the valuation and any other relevant information conclusively support the original Class 2 appreciation, SBA may approve an extension to use all or part of the original Class 2 Appreciation for up to an additional 24 months (the “extension period”).


(3) At the end of any extension period, you may submit a new request to retain the use of the original Class 2 Appreciation, repeating the steps in paragraphs (a)(1) and (2) of this section.


(4) SBA may reconsider its approval to retain the use of the original Class 2 Appreciation at any time based on information that may affect the value of an investment.


(b) Any time you submit a request for SBA approval to retain the use of the original Class 2 Appreciation under paragraph (a) of this section, you may also request SBA’s written approval to modify your computation of Adjusted Unrealized Gain under § 107.1840(d)(4) as provided in paragraph (c) of this section.


(c) If SBA determines that the appreciation on an investment, based on its current fair value, is at least two times the original Class 2 Appreciation on the investment, SBA may allow you, based on relevant information, to compute your Adjusted Unrealized Gain for the duration of the extension period as follows:


(1) Compute Adjusted Unrealized Gain in accordance with § 107.1840(d)(4).


(2) If your result in paragraph (c)(1) of this section was computed using the first line of the table in § 107.1840(d)(4):


(i) Calculate 50 percent of the original Class 2 Appreciation on the individual investment that is the subject of this paragraph (c), and


(ii) Add it to the result from paragraph (c)(1) of this section to determine your Adjusted Unrealized Gain.


(3) If your result in paragraph (c)(1) of this section was computed using the second line of the table in § 107.1840(d)(4):


(i) Calculate 50 percent of the original Class 2 Appreciation on the individual investment that is the subject of this paragraph (c).


(ii) Subtract your Class 1 Appreciation from your Net Appreciation, and multiply the result by 50 percent.


(iii) Add the lesser of (c)(3)(i) and (ii) of this section to the result from paragraph (c)(1) of this section to determine your Adjusted Unrealized Gain.


[77 FR 25054, Apr. 27, 2012]


§ 107.1850 Exceptions to Capital Impairment provisions for Licensees with outstanding Participating Securities.

The provisions in this § 107.1850 apply only if at least two-thirds of your outstanding Leverage consists of Participating Securities, and at least two-thirds of your Loans and Investments (at cost) consist of Equity Capital Investments.


(a) Forbearance period for Participating Securities issuers. During the first forty-eight (48) months following your first issuance of Participating Securities, you will not have a condition of Capital Impairment if your Capital Impairment Percentage is below 85 percent.


(b) Extended forbearance period for early stage investors. If at least two-thirds of your Loans and Investments (at cost) are in Start-Up Financings, the forbearance period in paragraph (a) of this section is extended to 60 months.


(c) Forbearance based on actions by Licensee. The provisions of this paragraph (c) apply only during the fifth and sixth years following your first issuance of Participating Securities. If your Capital Impairment Percentage, as determined either by you or by SBA, exceeds the maximum permitted under § 107.1830(c) but is below 85 percent, you will not have a condition of Capital Impairment if you do either of the following within thirty (30) days of such determination:


(1) Increase your Regulatory Capital by a cash contribution placed in an escrow account or other account satisfactory to SBA, for its benefit. The contribution must equal, during the fifth year, 15 percent of your outstanding Leverage or, during the sixth year, 30 percent.


(2) Provide a guarantee, satisfactory to SBA and for its benefit, for the amount of the cash contribution required in paragraph (c)(1) of this section. SBA will credit any escrowed funds or guarantee received in the fifth year toward the requirements for the sixth year.


(d) Conditions for forbearance under paragraph (c) of this section. (1) You cannot count any funds placed in an escrow or other account under paragraph (c) of this section as Leverageable Capital.


(2) Any fee and/or any claim to repayment by the party making the capital contribution or by the guarantor must be deferred and subordinate to all outstanding Leverage plus any unpaid Earned Prioritized Payments and earned Adjustments.


(3) If there is an acceleration or mandatory redemption under § 107.1810 or § 107.1820, any funds in the escrow account and/or any guarantee received under paragraph (c) of this section will be applied toward repaying any amounts due SBA.


(4) If you reduce your Capital Impairment Percentage to zero, SBA will release and return any escrowed funds and/or any guarantee received under paragraph (c) of this section.


Subpart K – Ending Operations as a Licensee

§ 107.1900 Surrender of license.

You may not surrender your license without SBA’s prior written approval. Your request for approval must be accompanied by an offer of immediate repayment of all of your outstanding Leverage (including any prepayment penalties thereon), or by a plan satisfactory to SBA for the orderly liquidation of the Licensee.


Subpart L – Miscellaneous

§ 107.1910 Non-waiver of SBA’s rights or terms of Leverage security.

SBA’s failure to exercise or delay in exercising any right or remedy under the Act or the regulations in this part does not constitute a waiver of such right or remedy. SBA’s failure to require you to perform any term or provision of your Leverage does not affect SBA’s right to enforce such term or provision. Similarly, SBA’s waiver of, or failure to enforce, any term or provision of your Leverage or of any event or condition set forth in § 107.1810 or § 107.1820 does not constitute a waiver of any succeeding breach of such term or provision or condition.


§ 107.1920 Licensee’s application for exemption from a regulation in this part 107.

You may file an application in writing with SBA to have a proposed action exempted from any procedural or substantive requirement, restriction, or prohibition to which it is subject under this part, unless the provision is mandated by the Act. SBA may grant an exemption for such applicant, conditionally or unconditionally, provided the exemption would not be contrary to the purposes of the Act. Your application must be accompanied by supporting evidence which demonstrates to SBA’s satisfaction that:


(a) The proposed action is fair and equitable; and


(b) The exemption requested is reasonably calculated to advance the best interests of the SBIC program in a manner consonant with the policy objectives of the Act and the regulations in this part.


§ 107.1930 Effect of changes in this part 107 on transactions previously consummated.

The legality of a transaction covered by the regulations in this part is governed by the regulations in this part in effect at the time the transaction was consummated, regardless of later changes. Nothing in this part bars SBA enforcement action with respect to any transaction consummated in violation of provisions applicable at the time, but no longer in effect.


PART 108 – NEW MARKETS VENTURE CAPITAL (“NMVC”) PROGRAM


Authority:15 U.S.C. 689-689q.


Source:66 FR 28609, May 23, 2001, unless otherwise noted.

Subpart A – Introduction to Part 108

§ 108.10 Description of the New Markets Venture Capital Program.

The New Markets Venture Capital (“NMVC”) Program is a developmental venture capital program for the purpose of promoting economic development and the creation of wealth and job opportunities in low-income geographic areas and among individuals living in such areas. SBA selects and then enters into participation agreements with selected newly formed venture capital companies, and provides leverage in the form of debenture guarantees to such companies to allow them to make equity capital investments in smaller enterprises located in low-income geographic areas. SBA also awards grants to such companies and to Specialized Small Business Investment Companies so that they can provide operational assistance to such smaller enterprises in connection with such investments.


§ 108.20 Legal basis and applicability of this part 108.

The regulations in this part implement Part B of Title III of the Small Business Investment Act of 1958, as amended (15 U.S.C. 661 et seq.). All NMVC Companies must comply with all applicable SBA regulations, accounting guidelines and valuation guidelines for NMVC Companies, available from SBA.


§ 108.30 Amendments to Act and regulations.

A NMVC Company is subject to all provisions of the Act and parts 108 and 112 of title 13 of the Code of Federal Regulations.


§ 108.40 How to read this part 108.

(a) Center headings. All references in this part to SBA forms, and instructions for their preparation, are to the current issue of such forms (available from Investment Division, SBA). Center headings are descriptive and are used for convenience only. They have no regulatory effect.


(b) Capitalizing defined terms. Terms defined in § 108.50 have initial capitalization in this part 108.


(c) “You.” The pronoun “you” as used in this part 108 means a NMVC Company unless otherwise noted.


Subpart B – Definition of Terms Used in This Part 108

§ 108.50 Definition of terms.

The following definitions apply to this part 108:


Act means the Small Business Investment Act of 1958, as amended (15 U.S.C. 661 et seq.).


Affiliate or Affiliates has the meaning set forth in § 121.103 of this chapter.


Applicant means any entity submitting an application to SBA for designation as a NMVC Company under this part.


Articles mean articles of incorporation or charter for a Corporate NMVC Company, the partnership agreement or certificate for a Partnership NMVC Company, and the operating agreement or other organizational documents for a LLC NMVC Company.


Assistance or Assisted means Financing of or management services rendered to a Small Business by or through a NMVC Company pursuant to the Act and this part.


Associate of a NMVC Company means any of the following:


(1)(i) An officer, director, employee or agent of a Corporate NMVC Company;


(ii) A Control Person, employee or agent of a Partnership NMVC Company;


(iii) A managing member of a LLC NMVC Company;


(iv) An Investment Adviser/Manager of any NMVC Company, including any Person who contracts with a Control Person of a Partnership NMVC Company to be the Investment Adviser/Manager of such NMVC Company; or


(v) Any Person regularly serving a NMVC Company on retainer in the capacity of attorney at law.


(2) Any Person who owns or controls, or who has entered into an agreement to own or control, directly or indirectly, at least 10 percent of any class of stock of a Corporate NMVC Company or 10 percent of the membership interests of an LLC NMVC Company, or a limited partner’s interest of at least 10 percent of the partnership capital of a Partnership NMVC Company. However, neither a limited partner in a Partnership NMVC Company nor a non-managing member in an LLC NMVC Company is considered an Associate if such Person is an entity Institutional Investor whose investment in the Partnership, including commitments, represents no more than 33 percent of the capital of the NMVC Company and no more than five percent of such Person’s net worth.


(3) Any officer, director, partner (other than a limited partner), manager, agent, or employee of any Associate described in paragraph (1) or (2) of this definition.


(4) Any Person that directly or indirectly Controls, or is Controlled by, or is under Common Control with, a NMVC Company.


(5) Any Person that directly or indirectly Controls, or is Controlled by, or is under Common Control with, any Person described in paragraphs (1) and (2) of this definition.


(6) Any Close Relative of any Person described in paragraphs (1), (2), (4), and (5) of this definition.


(7) Any Secondary Relative of any Person described in paragraphs (1), (2), (4), and (5) of this definition.


(8) Any concern in which –


(i) Any person described in paragraphs (1) through (6) of this definition is an officer; general partner, or managing member; or


(ii) Any such Person(s) singly or collectively Control or own, directly or indirectly, an equity interest of at least 10 percent (excluding interests that such Person(s) own indirectly through ownership interests in the NMVC Company).


(9) Any concern in which any Person(s) described in paragraph (7) of this definition singly or collectively own (including beneficial ownership) a majority equity interest, or otherwise have Control. As used in this paragraph (9), “collectively” means together with any Person(s) described in paragraphs (1) though (7) of this definition.


(10) For the purposes of this definition, if any Associate relationship described in paragraphs (1) through (7) of this definition exists at any time within six months before or after the date that a NMVC Company provides Financing, then that Associate relationship is considered to exist on the date of the Financing.


(11) If any NMVC Company has any ownership interest in another NMVC Company, the two NMVC companies are Associates of each other.


Capital Impairment has the meaning set forth in § 108.1830(b).


Central Registration Agent or CRA means one or more agents appointed by SBA for the purpose of issuing TCs and performing the functions enumerated in § 108.1620 and performing similar functions for Debentures funded outside the pooling process.


Close Relative of an individual means:


(1) A current or former spouse;


(2) A father, mother, guardian, brother, sister, son, daughter; or


(3) A father-in-law, mother-in-law, brother-in-law, sister-in-law, son-in-law, or daughter-in-law.


Commitment means a written agreement between a NMVC Company and an eligible Small Business that obligates the NMVC Company to provide Financing (except a guarantee) to that Small Business in a fixed or determinable sum, by a fixed or determinable future date. In this context the term “agreement” means that there has been agreement on the principal economic terms of the Financing. The agreement may include reasonable conditions precedent to the NMVC Company’s obligation to fund the commitment, but these conditions must be outside the NMVC Company’s control.


Common Control means a condition where two or more Persons, either through ownership, management, contract, or otherwise, are under the Control of one group or Person. Two or more NMVC companies are presumed to be under Common Control if they are Affiliates of each other by reason of common ownership or common officers, directors, or general partners; or if they are managed or their investments are significantly directed either by a common independent investment advisor or managerial contractor, or by two or more such advisors or contractors that are Affiliates of each other. This presumption may be rebutted by evidence satisfactory to SBA.


Community Development Finance means debt and equity-type investments in low-income communities.


Conditionally Approved NMVC Company means a company that –


(1) Has applied for participation as a NMVC Company, and


(2) SBA has conditionally approved to participate in the NMVC program for a specified period of time not to exceed two years, subject to the company fulfilling the requirements to be a NMVC Company within that specified period of time.


Control means the possession, direct or indirect, of the power to direct or cause the direction of the management and policies of a NMVC Company or other concern, whether through the ownership of voting securities, by contract, or otherwise.


Control Person means any Person that controls a NMVC Company, either directly or through an intervening entity. A Control Person includes:


(1) A general partner of a Partnership NMVC Company;


(2) Any Person serving as the general partner, officer, director, or manager (in the case of a limited liability company) of any entity that controls a NMVC Company, either directly or through an intervening entity;


(3) Any Person that –


(i) Controls or owns, directly or through an intervening entity, at least 10 percent of a Partnership NMVC Company or any entity described in paragraphs (1) or (2) of this definition; and


(ii) Participates in the investment decisions of the general partner of such Partnership NMVC Company;


(4) Any Person that controls or owns, directly or through an intervening entity, at least 50 percent of a Partnership NMVC Company or any entity described in paragraphs (1) or (2) of this definition.


Corporate NMVC Company. See definition of NMVC Company in this section.


Debentures means debt obligations issued by NMVC companies pursuant to section 355 of the Act and held or guaranteed by SBA.


Debt Securities are instruments evidencing a loan with an option or any other right to acquire Equity Securities in a Small Business or its Affiliates, or a loan which by its terms is convertible into an equity position. Consideration must be paid for all options that you acquire.


Developmental Venture Capital means capital in the form of Equity Capital Investments in Smaller Enterprises made with a primary objective of fostering economic development in Low-Income Geographic Areas.


Distribution means any transfer of cash or non-cash assets to SBA, its agent or Trustee, or to partners in a Partnership NMVC Company, or to shareholders in a Corporate NMVC Company, or to members in an LLC NMVC Company. Capitalization of Retained Earnings Available for Distribution constitutes a Distribution to the NMVC Company’s non-SBA partners, shareholders, or members.


Equity Capital Investments means investments in the form of common or preferred stock, limited partnership interests, options, warrants, or similar equity instruments, including subordinated debt with equity features if such debt provides only for interest payments contingent upon and limited to the extent of earnings. Equity Capital Investments must not require amortization. Equity Capital Investments may be guaranteed by one or more third parties; however, neither Equity Capital Investments nor such guarantee may be collateralized or otherwise secured. Investments classified as Debt Securities are not precluded from qualifying as Equity Capital Investments. Equity Capital Investments may provide for royalty payments only if the royalty payments are based on the earnings of the concern.


Equity Securities means stock of any class in a corporation, stock options, warrants, limited partnership interests in a limited partnership, membership interests in a limited liability company, or joint venture interests.


Financing or Financed means outstanding financial assistance provided to a Small Business by a NMVC Company, whether through:


(1) Loans;


(2) Debt Securities;


(3) Equity Securities;


(4) Guarantees; or


(5) Purchases of securities of a Small Business through or from an underwriter (see § 108.825).


Guaranty Agreement means the contract entered into by SBA which is a guarantee backed by the full faith and credit of the United States Government as to timely payment of principal and interest on Debentures and SBA’s rights in connection with such guarantee.


Includible Non-Cash Gains means those non-cash gains (as reported on SBA Form 468) that are realized in the form of Publicly Traded and Marketable securities or investment grade debt instruments. For purposes of this definition, investment grade debt instruments means those instruments that are rated “BBB” or “Baa”, or better, by Standard & Poor’s Corporation or Moody’s Investors Service, respectively. Non-rated debt may be considered to be investment grade if a NMVC Company obtains a written opinion from an investment banking firm acceptable to SBA stating that the non-rated debt instrument is equivalent in risk to the issuer’s investment grade debt.


Institutional Investor means:


(1) Entities. Any of the following entities if the entity has a net worth (exclusive of unfunded commitments from investors) of at least $1 million, or such higher amount as is specified in this paragraph (1). (See also § 108.230(c)(4) for limitations on the amount of an Institutional Investor’s commitment that may be included in Private Capital.)


(i) A State or National bank, trust company, savings bank, or savings and loan association.


(ii) An insurance company.


(iii) A 1940 Act Investment Company or Business Development Company (each as defined in the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended (15 U.S.C. 8a-1 et seq.).


(iv) A holding company of any entity described in paragraph (l)(i), (ii) or (iii) of this definition.


(v) An employee benefit or pension plan established for the benefit of employees of the Federal government, any State or political subdivision of a State, or any agency or instrumentality of such government unit.


(vi) An employee benefit or pension plan (as defined in the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974, as amended (Public Law 93-406, 88 Stat. 829), excluding plans established under section 401(k) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 (26 U.S.C. 401(k)), as amended).


(vii) A trust, foundation or endowment exempt from Federal income taxation under the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended.


(viii) A corporation, partnership or other entity with a net worth (exclusive of unfunded commitments from investors) of more than $10 million.


(ix) A State, a political subdivision of a State, or an agency or instrumentality of a State or its political subdivision.


(x) An entity whose primary purpose is to manage and invest non-Federal funds on behalf of at least three Institutional Investors described in paragraphs (l)(i) through (l)(ix) of this definition, each of whom must have at least a 10 percent ownership interest in the entity.


(xi) Any other entity that SBA determines to be an Institutional Investor.


(2) Individuals. (i) Any of the following individuals if he/she is also a permanent resident of the United States:


(A) An individual who is an Accredited Investor (as defined in the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (15 U.S.C. 77a-77aa)) and whose commitment to the NMVC Company is backed by a letter of credit from a State or National bank acceptable to SBA.


(B) An individual whose personal net worth is at least $2 million and at least ten times the amount of his or her commitment to the NMVC Company. The individual’s personal net worth must not include the value of any equity in his or her most valuable residence.


(C) An individual whose personal net worth, not including the value of any equity in his or her most valuable residence, is at least $10 million.


(ii) Any individual who is not a permanent resident of the United States but who otherwise satisfies paragraph (2)(i) of this definition provided such individual has irrevocably appointed an agent within the United States for the service of process.


Investment Adviser/Manager means any Person who furnishes advice or assistance with respect to operations of a NMVC Company under a written contract executed in accordance with the provisions of § 108.510.


Lending Institution means a concern that is operating under regulations of a state or Federal licensing, supervising, or examining body, or whose shares are publicly traded and listed on a recognized stock exchange or NASDAQ and which has assets in excess of $500 million; and which, in either case, holds itself out to the public as engaged in the making of commercial and industrial loans and whose lending operations are not for the purpose of financing its own or an Associate’s sales or business operations.


Leverage means financial assistance provided to a NMVC Company by SBA through the guaranty of a NMVC Company’s Debentures, and any other SBA financial assistance evidenced by a security of the NMVC Company.


Leverageable Capital means Regulatory Capital, excluding unfunded commitments.


LLC NMVC Company. See definition of NMVC Company in this section.


Loan means a transaction evidenced by a debt instrument with no provision for you to acquire Equity Securities.


Loans and Investments means Portfolio securities, assets acquired in liquidation of Portfolio securities, operating concerns acquired, and notes and other securities received, as set forth in the Statement of Financial Position of SBA Form 468.


Low-Income Enterprise means a Smaller Enterprise that, as of the time of the initial Financing, has its Principal Office located in a Low-Income Geographic Area.


Low-Income Geographic Area (“LI Area”) means –


(1) Any population census tract (or in the case of an area that is not tracted for population census tracts, the equivalent county division, as defined by the Bureau of the Census of the United States Department of Commerce for purposes of defining poverty areas), if –


(i) The poverty rate for that census tract is not less than 20 percent;


(ii) In the case of a tract –


(A) That is located within a metropolitan area, 50 percent or more of the households in that census tract have an income equal to less than 60 percent of the area median gross income; or


(B) That is not located within a metropolitan area, the median household income for such tract does not exceed 80 percent of the statewide median household income; or


(C) As determined by the Administrator in accordance with § 108.1940 of this part, a substantial population of Low-Income Individuals reside, an inadequate access to investment capital exists, or other indications of economic distress exist in that census tract; or


(2) Any area located within –


(i) A Historically Underutilized Business Zone (“HUBZone”) as defined in section 3(p) of the Small Business Act and 13 CFR 126.103;


(ii) An Urban Empowerment Zone or Urban Enterprise Community (as designated by the Secretary of the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development); or


(iii) A Rural Empowerment Zone or Rural Enterprise Community (as designated by the Secretary of the United States Department of Agriculture).


Low-Income Individual means an individual whose income (adjusted for family size) does not exceed –


(1) For metropolitan areas, 80 percent of the area median income; and


(2) For nonmetropolitan areas, the greater of –


(i) 80 percent of the area median income, or


(ii) 80 percent of the statewide nonmetropolitan area median income.


Low-Income Investment means an Equity Capital Investment in a Low-Income Enterprise.


Management Expenses has the meaning set forth in § 108.520.


NAICS Manual means the latest issue of the North American Industrial Classification System Manual, prepared by the Office of Management and Budget, and available from the U.S. Government Printing Office, Superintendent of Documents, P.O. Box 371954, Pittsburgh, Pa., 15250-7954.


New Markets Tax Credit program means the tax credit created by the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2001, Public Law 106-554 (114 Stat. 2762A), enacted December 21, 2000, to be implemented by the Internal Revenue Service, United States Department of Treasury.


New Markets Venture Capital Company or NMVC Company means a corporation (Corporate NMVC Company), a limited partnership organized as required by § 108.160 (Partnership NMVC Company), or a limited liability company (LLC NMVC Company) that –


(1) Has been granted final approval by SBA under § 108.380, and


(2) Has entered into a Participation Agreement with SBA. For certain purposes, the Entity General Partner of a Partnership NMVC Company is treated as if it were a NMVC Company (see § 108.160(a)).


1940 Act Company means a NMVC Company which is registered under the Investment Company Act of 1940 (15 U.S.C. 80a-1 et seq.).


1980 Act Company means a NMVC Company which is registered under the Small Business Investment Incentive Act of 1980 (Public Law 96-447, 94 Stat. 2275).


Operational Assistance means management, marketing, and other technical assistance that assists a Small Business with its business development.


Original Issue Price means the price paid by the purchaser for securities at the time of issuance.


Participation Agreement means an agreement between SBA and a company to which SBA has granted final approval under § 108.380, that –


(1) Details the company’s operating plan and investment criteria; and


(2) Requires the company to make investments in Smaller Enterprises at least 80 percent of which Smaller Enterprises are located in LI Areas.


Partnership NMVC Company. See definition of NMVC Company in this section.


Person means a natural person or legal entity.


Pool means an aggregation of SBA guaranteed Debentures approved by SBA.


Portfolio means the securities representing a NMVC Company’s total outstanding Financing of Smaller Enterprises. It does not include idle funds or assets acquired in liquidation of Portfolio securities.


Portfolio Concern means a Small Business Assisted by a NMVC Company.


Principal Office means the location where the greatest number of the concern’s employees at any one location perform their work. However, for those concerns whose “primary industry” (see 13 CFR 121.107) is service or construction (see 13 CFR 121.201), the determination of principal office excludes the concern’s employees who perform the majority of their work at job-site locations to fulfill specific contract obligations.


Private Capital has the meaning set forth in § 108.230.


Publicly Traded and Marketable means securities that are salable without restriction or that are salable within 12 months pursuant to Rule 144 (17 CFR 230.144) of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, by the holder thereof, and are of a class which is traded on a regulated stock exchange, or is listed in the Automated Quotation System of the National Association of Securities Dealers (NASDAQ), or has, at a minimum, at least two market makers as defined in the relevant sections of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (15 U.S.C. 77b et seq.), and in all cases the quantity of which can be sold over a reasonable period of time without having an adverse impact upon the price of the stock.


Regulatory Capital means Private Capital, excluding any portion of Private Capital that is designated as matching resources in accordance with § 108.2030(b)(3).


Relevant Venture Capital Finance means Equity Capital Investments in small businesses in low-income communities or benefiting low-income communities.


Retained Earnings Available for Distribution means Undistributed Net Realized Earnings less any Unrealized Depreciation on Loans and Investments (as reported on SBA Form 468), and represents the amount that a NMVC Company may distribute to investors (including SBA) as a profit Distribution, or transfer to Private Capital.


SBA means the Small Business Administration, 409 Third Street, SW., Washington, DC 20416.


Secondary Relative of an individual means:


(1) A grandparent, grandchild, or any other ancestor or lineal descendent who is not a Close Relative;


(2) An uncle, aunt, nephew, niece, or first cousin; or


(3) A spouse of any person described in paragraph (1) or (2) of this definition.


Small Business means a small business concern as defined in section 103(5) of the Act (including its Affiliates), and which meets the criteria applicable to the Small Business Investment Company program as set forth in part 121 of this chapter.


Small Business Investment Company (SBIC) means a Licensee, as that term is defined in § 107.50 of this chapter.


Smaller Enterprise means any Small Business that:


(1) Together with its Affiliates has a net worth of not more than $6.0 million and average net income after Federal income taxes (excluding any carry-over losses) for the preceding two years no greater than $2.0 million; or


(2) Both together with its Affiliates, and by itself, meets the size standard of § 121.201 of this chapter at the time of Financing for the industry in which it is then primarily engaged.


Specialized Small Business Investment Companies (SSBICs) means any Small Business Investment Company that –


(1) Invests solely in small business concerns that contribute to a well-balanced national economy by facilitating ownership in such concerns by persons whose participation in the free enterprise system is hampered because of social or economic disadvantages; and


(2) Was licensed under section 301(d) of the Small Business Investment Act, as in effect before September 30, 1996.


Trust means the legal entity created for the purpose of holding guaranteed Debentures and the guaranty agreement related thereto, receiving, holding and making any related payments, and accounting for such payments.


Trust Certificate Rate means a fixed rate determined at the time Debentures are pooled.


Trust Certificates (TCs) means certificates issued by SBA, its agent or Trustee and representing ownership of all or a fractional part of a Trust or Pool of Debentures.


Trustee means the trustee or trustees of a Trust.


Undistributed Net Realized Earnings means Undistributed Realized Earnings less Non-cash Gains/Income, each as reported on SBA Form 468.


Unrealized Appreciation means the amount by which a NMVC Company’s valuation of each of its Loans and Investments, as determined by its Board of Directors or General Partner(s) in accordance with NMVC Company’s valuation policies, exceeds the cost basis thereof.


Unrealized Depreciation means the amount by which a NMVC Company’s valuation of each of its Loans and Investments, as determined by its Board of Directors or General Partner(s) in accordance with NMVC Company’s valuation policies, is below the cost basis thereof.


Unrealized Gain (Loss) on Securities Held means the sum of the Unrealized Appreciation and Unrealized Depreciation on all of a NMVC Company’s Loans and Investments, less estimated future income tax expense or estimated realizable future income tax benefit, as appropriate.


[66 FR 28609, May 23, 2001, as amended at 67 FR 68502, Nov. 12, 2002]


Subpart C – Qualifications for the NMVC Program

Organizing a NMVC Company

§ 108.100 Business form.

A NMVC Company must be a newly formed for-profit entity or, subject to § 108.150, a newly formed for-profit subsidiary of an existing entity. It must be organized under State law solely for the purpose of performing the functions and conducting the activities contemplated under the Act. It may be organized as a corporation (“Corporate NMVC Company”), a limited partnership (“Partnership NMVC Company”), or a limited liability company (“LLC NMVC Company”).


§ 108.110 Qualified management.

An Applicant must show, to the satisfaction of SBA, that its current or proposed management team is qualified and has the knowledge, experience, and capability in Community Development Finance or Relevant Venture Capital Finance, necessary for investing in the types of businesses contemplated by the Act, the regulations in this part and its business plan. In determining whether an Applicant’s current or proposed management team has sufficient qualifications, SBA will consider information provided by the Applicant and third parties concerning the background, capability, education, training and reputation of its general partners, managers, officers, key personnel, and investment committee and governing board members. The Applicant must designate at least one individual as the official responsible for contact with SBA.


§ 108.120 Economic development primary mission.

The primary mission of a NMVC Company must be economic development of one or more LI Areas.


§ 108.130 Identified Low Income Geographic Areas.

A NMVC Company must identify the specific LI Areas in which it intends to make Developmental Venture Capital investments and provide Operational Assistance under the NMVC program.


§ 108.140 SBA approval of initial Management Expenses.

A NMVC Company must have its Management Expenses approved by SBA at the time of designation as a NMVC Company. (See § 108.520 for the definition of Management Expenses.)


§ 108.150 Management and ownership diversity requirement.

(a) Diversity requirement. You must have diversity between management and ownership in order to be a NMVC Company. To establish diversity, you must meet the requirements in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section.


(b) Percentage ownership requirement. No Person or group of Persons who are Affiliates of one another may own or control, directly or indirectly, more than 70 percent of your Regulatory Capital or your Leverageable Capital.


(c) Non-affiliation requirement. At least 30 percent of your Regulatory Capital and Leverageable Capital must be owned and controlled by three Persons unaffiliated with your management and unaffiliated with each other, whose investments are significant in dollar and percentage terms as determined by SBA. Such Persons must not be your Associates (except for their status as your shareholders, limited partners or members) and must not Control, be Controlled by, or be under Common Control with any of your Associates. A single “acceptable” Institutional Investor may be substituted for two or three of the three investors who are otherwise required. The following Institutional Investors are “acceptable” for this purpose:


(1) Entities whose overall activities are regulated and periodically examined by state, Federal or other governmental authorities satisfactory to SBA;


(2) Entities listed on the New York Stock Exchange;


(3) Entities that are publicly-traded and that meet both the minimum numerical listing standards and the corporate governance listing standards of the New York Stock Exchange:


(4) Public or private employee pension funds;


(5) Trusts, foundations, or endowments, but only if exempt from Federal income taxation; and


(6) Other Institutional Investors satisfactory to SBA.


(d) Voting requirement. The investors required for you to satisfy diversity may not delegate their voting rights to any Person who is your Associate, or who Controls, is Controlled by, or is under Common Control with any of your Associates, without prior SBA approval.


(e) Requirement to maintain diversity. You must maintain management-ownership diversity while you are a NMVC Company. If, at any time, you no longer have the required management-ownership diversity, you must:


(1) Notify SBA within 10 days; and


(2) Re-establish diversity within six months.


[66 FR 28609, May 23, 2001; 66 FR 32894, June 19, 2001]


§ 108.160 Special rules for NMVC Companies formed as limited partnerships.

(a) Entity General Partner. (1) A general partner which is a corporation, limited liability company or partnership (an “Entity General Partner”) shall be organized under state law solely for the purpose of serving as the general partner of one or more NMVC companies.


(2) SBA must approve any person who will serve as an officer, director, manager, or general partner of the Entity General Partner. This provision must be stated in an Entity General Partner’s Certificate of Incorporation, operating agreement, limited partnership agreement or other similar governing instrument.


(3) An Entity General Partner is subject to the same examination and reporting requirements as a NMVC Company under sections 361 and 362 of the Act. The restrictions and obligations imposed upon a NMVC Company by §§ 108.1810, 108.30, 108.410 through 108.450, 108.470, 108.500, 108.510, 108.585, 108.600, 108.680, 108.690 through 108.692, and 108.1910 apply also to an Entity General Partner of a NMVC Company.


(4) The general partner(s) of your Entity General Partner(s) will be considered your general partner.


(5) If your Entity General Partner is a limited partnership, its limited partners may be considered your Control Person(s) if they meet the definition for Control Person in § 108.50.


(b) Other requirements for Partnership NMVC Companies. If you are a Partnership NMVC Company:


(1) You must have a minimum duration of 10 years or two years following the maturity of your last-maturing Leverage security, whichever is longer. After 10 years, if all Leverage has been repaid or redeemed and all amounts due SBA, its agent, or Trustee have been paid, the Partnership NMVC Company may be terminated by a vote of your partners;


(2) None of your general partner(s) may be removed or replaced by your limited partners without prior written approval of SBA;


(3) Any transferee of, or successor in interest to, your general partner shall have only the rights and liabilities of a limited partner pending SBA’s written approval of such transfer or succession; and


(4) You must incorporate all the provisions in this paragraph (b) in your limited partnership agreement.


(c) Obligations of a Control Person. All Control Persons are bound by the disciplinary provisions of sections 365 and 366 of the Act and by the conflict-of-interest rules under § 108.730. The term NMVC Company, as used in §§ 108.30, 108.460, and 108.680, includes all of the NMVC Company’s Control Persons. The conditions specified in § 108.1810 and § 108.1910 apply to all general partners.


(d) Liability of general partner for partnership debts to SBA. Subject to section 365 of the Act, your general partner is not liable solely by reason of its status as a general partner for repayment of any Leverage or debts you owe to SBA unless SBA, in the exercise of reasonable investment prudence, and with regard to your financial soundness, determines otherwise prior to the purchase or guaranty of your Leverage.


(e) Special Leverage requirement. Before your first issuance of Leverage, you must furnish SBA with evidence that you qualify as a partnership for tax purposes, either by a ruling from the Internal Revenue Service or by an opinion of counsel.


Capitalizing a NMVC Company

§ 108.200 Adequate capital for NMVC Companies.

You must meet the requirements of §§ 108.200-108.230 in order to qualify for designation as a NMVC Company and to receive Leverage.


§ 108.210 Minimum capital requirements for NMVC Companies.

You must have Regulatory Capital of at least $5,000,000 and Leverageable Capital of at least $500,000 to become a NMVC Company.


§ 108.230 Private Capital for NMVC Companies.

(a) General. Private Capital means the contributed capital of a NMVC Company, plus unfunded binding commitments by Institutional Investors (including commitments evidenced by a promissory note) to contribute capital to a NMVC Company.


(b) Contributed capital. For purposes of this section, contributed capital means the paid-in capital and paid-in surplus of a Corporate NMVC Company, the members’ paid-in capital of a LLC NMVC Company, or the partners’ paid-in capital of a Partnership NMVC Company, in each case subject to the limitations in paragraph (c) of this section.


(c) Exclusions from Private Capital. Private Capital does not include:


(1) Funds borrowed by a NMVC Company from any source.


(2) Funds obtained through the issuance of Leverage.


(3) Funds obtained directly from any Federal agency or department.


(4) Any portion of a commitment from an Institutional Investor with a net worth of less than $10 million that exceeds 10 percent of such Institutional Investor’s net worth.


(5) A commitment from an investor if SBA determines that the collectability of the commitment is questionable.


(d) Limitations on including non-cash capital contributions in Private Capital. Private Capital does not include capital contributions in a form other than cash, except as provided in this paragraph (d). Subject to SBA’s prior approval, Private Capital may include payments made on behalf of an Applicant or Conditionally Approved NMVC Company before the Applicant or Conditionally Approved NMVC Company becomes a NMVC Company for organizational expenses and Management Expenses incurred by the Applicant or the Conditionally Approved NMVC Company prior to its becoming a NMVC Company.


(e) Contributions with borrowed funds. You may not accept any capital contribution made with funds borrowed by a Person seeking to own an equity interest (whether direct or indirect, beneficial or of record) of at least 10 percent of your Private Capital. This exclusion does not apply if:


(1) Such Person’s net worth is at least twice the amount borrowed; or


(2) SBA gives its prior written approval of the capital contribution.


[66 FR 28609, May 23, 2001, as amended at 67 FR 68502, Nov. 12, 2002]


Subpart D – Application and Approval Process for NMVC Company Designation

§ 108.300 When and how to apply for designation as a NMVC Company.

(a) Notice of Funds Availability (“NOFA”). SBA will publish a NOFA in the Federal Register, advising potential applicants of the availability of funds for the NMVC program. An entity may then submit an application for designation as a NMVC Company. When submitting its application, an Applicant must comply with both these regulations and any requirements specified in the NOFA, including submission deadlines. The NOFA may specify limitations, special rules, procedures, and restrictions for a particular funding round.


(b) Application form. An Applicant must apply for designation as a NMVC Company using the application packet provided by SBA. Upon receipt of an application, SBA may request clarifying or technical information on the materials submitted as part of the application.


§ 108.310 Contents of application.

Each Applicant must submit a complete application, including the following:


(a) Amounts. The Applicant must indicate –


(1) The specific amount of Regulatory Capital it proposes to raise (which amount must be at least $5,000,000); and


(2) The specific amount of binding commitments for contributions in cash or in-kind it proposes to raise, and/or an annuity it proposes to purchase, in accordance with the requirements of § 108.2030, as its matching resources for its Operational Assistance grant award (the aggregate of which must be not less than $1,500,000 or 30 percent of the Regulatory Capital it proposes to raise under paragraph (a)(1) of this section, whichever is greater).


(b) Comprehensive business plan. The Applicant must submit a comprehensive business plan covering at least a five-year period, addressing the specific items described in § 108.320, and which demonstrates that the Applicant has the capacity to operate successfully as a NMVC Company.


(c) New Markets Tax Credit program. Applicant must address if and to what extent it intends to conform its activities to the New Markets Tax Credit laws. If Applicant plans to seek a New Markets Tax Credit, Applicant also must state the amount of tax credit allocation it intends to seek.


[66 FR 28609, May 23, 2001, as amended at 67 FR 68502, Nov. 12, 2002]


§ 108.320 Contents of comprehensive business plan.

(a) Executive summary. The executive summary must include a description of –


(1) The Applicant;


(2) Its strategy for how it proposes to make successful Developmental Venture Capital investments in identified LI Areas;


(3) The markets in the LI Areas it proposes to serve; and


(4) How it intends to work with community organizations in and be accountable to the residents of identified LI Areas in order to facilitate its Developmental Venture Capital investments.


(b) Capacity, skills, and experience of the management team. An Applicant must provide information generally as to the background, capability, education, reputation and training of its general partners, managers, officers, key personnel, investment committee and governing board members. The Applicant also must provide information specifically on these individuals’ qualifications and reputation in the areas of Community Development Finance and/or Relevant Venture Capital Finance, including the impact of these individuals’ activities in these areas.


(c) Market analysis. An Applicant must provide an analysis of the LI Areas in which it intends to focus its Developmental Venture Capital investments and Operational Assistance to Smaller Enterprises, demonstrating that the Applicant understands the market and the unmet capital needs in such areas and how its activities will meet these unmet capital needs through Developmental Venture Capital investments and will have a positive economic impact on those areas. The analysis must include a description of the extent of the economic distress in the identified LI Areas. An Applicant also must analyze the extent of the demand in such areas for Developmental Venture Capital investments and any factors or trends that may affect the Applicant’s ability to make effective Developmental Venture Capital investments.


(d) Operational capacity and investment strategies. An Applicant must submit information concerning its policies and procedures for underwriting and approving its Developmental Venture Capital investments, monitoring its portfolio, and maintaining internal controls and operations.


(e) Regulatory Capital. An Applicant must include a detailed description of how it plans to raise its Regulatory Capital. An Applicant must discuss its potential sources of Regulatory Capital, the estimated timing on raising such funds, and the extent of the expressions of interest to commit such funds to the Applicant.


(f) Plan for providing Operational Assistance. An Applicant must describe how it plans to use its grant funds to provide Operational Assistance to Smaller Enterprises in which it will make Developmental Venture Capital investments. Its plan must address the types of Operational Assistance it proposes to provide, and how it plans to provide the Operational Assistance through the use of licensed professionals, when necessary, either from its own staff or from outside entities.


(g) Matching resources for Operational Assistance grant. An Applicant must include a detailed description of how it plans to obtain binding commitments for cash or in-kind contributions, and/or to purchase an annuity, to match the funds requested from SBA for the Applicant’s Operational Assistance grant. If it proposes to obtain commitments for cash and in-kind contributions, it also must estimate the ratio of cash to in-kind contributions (in no event may in-kind contributions exceed 50 percent of the total contributions). Applicant must discuss its potential sources of matching resources, the estimated timing on raising such funds, and the extent of the expressions of interest to commit such funds to the Applicant. Potential sources of matching resources must satisfy the requirements in § 108.2030(b)(1).


(h) Projected amount of investment in LI Areas. An Applicant must describe the amount of its total Regulatory Capital and Leverage that it proposes to invest in Smaller Enterprises located in LI Areas, as compared to the amount that it proposes to invest in Small Businesses located outside of LI Areas.


(i) Projected impact. An Applicant must describe the criteria and economic measurements to be used to evaluate whether and to what extent it has met the objectives of the NMVC program. It must include:


(1) A description of the extent to which it will concentrate its Developmental Venture Capital investments and Operational Assistance activities in identified LI Areas;


(2) An estimate of the social, economic, and community development benefits to be created within identified LI Areas over the next five years or more as a result of its activities;


(3) A description of the criteria to be used to measure the benefits created as a result of its activities;


(4) A discussion about the amount of such benefits created that it will consider to constitute successfully meeting the objectives of the NMVC program.


(j) Affiliates and business relationships. Applicant must submit information regarding the management and financial strength of any parent or holding entity, affiliated firm or entity, or any other firm or entity essential to the success of the Applicant’s business plan.


[66 FR 28609, May 23, 2001, as amended at 67 FR 68503, Nov. 12, 2002]


§ 108.330 Grant issuance fee.

An Applicant must pay to SBA a grant issuance fee of $5,000. An Applicant must submit this fee in advance, at the time of application submission. If SBA does not select an Applicant as a Conditionally Approved NMVC Company or designate an Applicant as a NMVC Company, SBA will refund this fee to the Applicant.


Subpart E – Evaluation and Selection of NMVC Companies

§ 108.340 Evaluation and selection – general.

SBA will evaluate and select an Applicant to participate in the NMVC program solely at SBA’s discretion, based on SBA’s review of the Applicant’s application materials, interviews or site visits with the Applicant (if any), and background investigations conducted by SBA and other Federal agencies. SBA’s evaluation and selection process is intended to –


(a) Ensure that Applicants are evaluated on a competitive basis and in a fair and consistent manner;


(b) Take into consideration the unique proposals presented by Applicants;


(c) Ensure that each Applicant that SBA designates as a NMVC Company can fulfill successfully the goals of its comprehensive business plan; and


(d) Ensure that SBA selects Applicants in such a way as to promote Developmental Venture Capital investments nationwide and in both urban and rural areas.


§ 108.350 Eligibility and completeness.

SBA will not consider any application that is not complete or that is submitted by an Applicant that does not meet the eligibility criteria described in subpart C of this part. SBA, at its sole discretion, may request from an Applicant additional information concerning eligibility criteria or easily completed portions of the application in order to allow SBA to consider that Applicant’s application.


§ 108.360 Evaluation criteria.

SBA will evaluate and select an Applicant for participation in the NMVC program by considering the following criteria –


(a) The quality of the Applicant’s comprehensive business plan in terms of meeting the objectives of the NMVC program;


(b) The likelihood that the Applicant will fulfill the goals described in its comprehensive business plan;


(c) The capability of the Applicant’s management team;


(d) The strength and likelihood for success of the Applicant’s operations and investment strategies;


(e) The need for Developmental Venture Capital investments in the LI Areas in which the Applicant intends to invest;


(f) The extent to which the Applicant will concentrate its activities on serving the LI Areas in which it intends to invest, including the ratio of resources that it proposes to invest in such areas as compared to other areas;


(g) The Applicant’s demonstrated understanding of the markets in the LI Areas in which it intends to focus its activities;


(h) The likelihood that and the time frame within which the Applicant will be able to –


(1) Raise the Regulatory Capital it proposes to raise for its investments, and


(2) Obtain the binding commitments for contributions in cash or in-kind and/or an annuity it proposes to obtain as its matching resources for its Operational Assistance grant award;


(i) The strength of the Applicant’s proposal to provide Operational Assistance to Smaller Enterprises in which it plans to invest;


(j) The extent to which the activities proposed by the Applicant will promote economic development and the creation of wealth and job opportunities in the LI Areas in which it intends to invest and among individuals living in LI Areas; and


(k) The strength of the Applicant’s application compared to applications submitted by other Applicants and by SSBICs intending to invest in the same or proximate LI Areas.


[66 FR 28609, May 23, 2001, as amended at 67 FR 68503, Nov. 12, 2002]


§ 108.370 Conditional approval.

From among the Applicants submitting eligible and complete applications, SBA will select a number of Applicants and will conditionally approve such selected Applicants to participate in the NMVC program. SBA will give each such Conditionally Approved NMVC Company a specific period of time, not to exceed two years, to satisfy the requirements to become a NMVC Company.


§ 108.380 Final approval as a NMVC Company.

(a) General rule. With respect to each Conditionally Approved NMVC Company, SBA will either:


(1) Grant final approval to participate in the NMVC program and designate such company as a NMVC Company, if such Conditionally Approved NMVC Company:


(i) Within the specific period of time SBA gave to it when SBA conditionally approved it for participation in the NMVC program, has raised:


(A) The amount of Regulatory Capital set forth in its application, pursuant to § 108.310(a)(1); and


(B) The amount of matching resources for its Operational Assistance grant award set forth in its application, pursuant to § 108.310(a)(2); and


(ii) Enters into a Participation Agreement with SBA; or


(2) Revoke SBA’s conditional approval of the company, at which time it is no longer a Conditionally Approved NMVC Company and must not participate in the NMVC program or represent itself as a Conditionally Approved NMVC Company.


(b) Exception to requirement to raise matching resources – (1) General. At its discretion and based upon a showing of good cause, SBA may consider a Conditionally Approved NMVC Company to have satisfied the requirement in paragraph (a)(1)(i)(B) of this section to raise matching resources in the amount of at least 30 percent of its Regulatory Capital if the Conditionally Approved NMVC Company –


(i) Already has raised at least 20 percent of the total amount of required matching resources; and


(ii) Has a viable plan that reasonably projects its capacity to raise the remainder of the required amount of matching resources.


(2) Request for exception. Before the expiration of the time period given to it by SBA to meet the requirements to become a NMVC Company, a Conditionally Approved NMVC Company may submit to SBA a request that SBA grant the exception described in paragraph (b)(1) of this section. Such Conditionally Approved NMVC must present to SBA evidence of good cause for such request, as well as evidence supporting the elements of the exception described in paragraph (b)(1) of this section.


(3) No applicability to Regulatory Capital. The exception described in this section applies only to matching resources for the Operational Assistance grant award. Under no circumstances will SBA designate a Conditionally Approved NMVC Company as a NMVC Company if such Conditionally Approved NMVC Company does not raise the required amount of Regulatory Capital within the time period SBA gave it to do so.


[66 FR 28609, May 23, 2001, as amended at 67 FR 68503, Nov. 12, 2002]


Subpart F – Changes in Ownership, Structure, or Control

Changes in Control or Ownership of NMVC Company