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Title 22 – Foreign Relations–Volume 2

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Title 22 – Foreign Relations–Volume 2


Part


chapter iii – Peace Corps

301

chapter iv – International Joint Commission, United States and Canada

401

chapter v – United States Agency for Global Media

501

chapter vii – US International Development Finance Corporation

705

chapter ix – Foreign Service Grievance Board

901

chapter x – Inter-American Foundation

1001

chapter xi – International Boundary and Water Commission, United States and Mexico, United States Section

1100

chapter xii – United States International Development Cooperation Agency

1201

chapter xiii – Millennium Challenge Corporation

1301

chapter xiv – Foreign Service Labor Relations Board; Federal Labor Relations Authority; General Counsel of the Federal Labor Relations Authority; and the Foreign Service Impasse Disputes Panel

1411

chapter xv – African Development Foundation

1500

chapter xvi – Japan-United States Friendship Commission

1600

chapter xvii – United States Institute of Peace

1701

CHAPTER III – PEACE CORPS

PART 300 [RESERVED]

PART 301 – PUBLIC ACCESS TO CLASSIFIED MATERIAL


Authority:E.O. 12356, 43 FR 14874 dated April 2, 1982.


Source:49 FR 13692, Apr. 6, 1984, unless otherwise noted.

§ 301.1 Introduction.

The following regulations implement Executive Order 12356 and provide guidance for members of the public desiring a review for declassification of a document of the Peace Corps.


§ 301.2 Requests for mandatory declassification review.

(a) All information originally classified by the Peace Corps shall be subject to review for declassification.


(b) Requests for review of such information for declassification shall be in writing, addressed to the Peace Corps Director of Security, Peace Corps, Washington, DC 20526, and reasonably describe the information sought with sufficient specificity to enable its location with a reasonable amount of effort. Only requests made by a United States citizen or a permanent resident alien, a Federal agency or a State or local government will be considered.


(c) Requests relating to information, either derivatively classified by the Peace Corps or originally classified by another agency but in the possession of the Peace Corps, shall be forwarded, together with a copy of the record, to the originating agency. The transmittal may contain in Peace Corps recommendation for action.


§ 301.3 Action on requests for declassification review.

(a) The Director of Security shall present each request for declassification to the Peace Corps Classification Review Committee, which shall consist of the Associate Director for International Operations, the Associate Director for Management and the General Counsel, or their designees, together with his or her recommendation for action.


(b) Every effort will be made to complete action on each request within 60 days of receipt thereof.


(c) Information shall be declassified or downgraded as soon as national security considerations permit. If the Classification Review Committee determines that the material for which review is requested no longer requires this protection, it shall be declassified and made available to the requester unless withholding is otherwise authorized by law.


(d) If the Peace Corps Classification Review Committee determines that requested information must remain classified, the requester shall be given prompt notice of the decision and, if possible, a brief explanation of why the information cannot be declassified.


(e) The Peace Corps may refuse to confirm or deny the existence or non-existence of requested information whenever the fact of its existence or non-existence is itself classified under E.O. 12356.


(f) A requester may appeal a refusal to declassify information to the Director of the Peace Corps, or the Director’s designee. Appeals shall be in writing, addressed to the Director of the Peace Corps, Washington, DC 20526, and shall briefly state the reasons why the requester believes that the Peace Corps Classification Review Committee decision is in error. Appeals must be submitted within 30 days after receipt of notice of the Classification Review Committee decision. The decision of the Peace Corps Director, or designee, will be based on the entire record, and will be rendered in writing within 60 days after receipt of an appeal. The decision of the Director or Director’s designee is the final Peace Corps action on a request.


PART 303 – PROCEDURES FOR DISCLOSURE OF INFORMATION UNDER THE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT


Authority:5 U.S.C. 552; 22 U.S.C. 2501, et. seq.; E.O. 12137, 44 FR 29023, 3 CFR, 1979 Comp., p. 389; E.O. 12600, 52 FR 23781, 3 CFR, 1987 Comp., p. 235.


Source:68 FR 66008, Nov. 25, 2003, unless otherwise noted.

§ 303.1 Purpose.

This part sets out the rules and procedures the Peace Corps follows in making records available to the public under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA).


§ 303.2 Definitions.

As used in this part –


(a) Commercial use request means a request from or on behalf of one who seeks information for a use or purpose that furthers the commercial, trade, or profit interests of the requester or the person on whose behalf the request is made. In determining whether a requester has made a commercial use request, the Peace Corps will look to the use to which a requester will put the documents requested. When the Peace Corps has reasonable cause to doubt the requester’s stated use of the records sought, or where the use is not clear from the request itself, it will seek additional clarification before assigning the request to a category.


(b) Duplication means the process of making a copy of a record requested pursuant to this part. Such copies can take the form of paper copy, microform, audio-visual materials, or machine readable electronic documents, among others.


(c) Educational institution means a preschool, a public or private elementary or secondary school, an institution of undergraduate or graduate higher education, or an institution of professional or vocational education which operates a program or programs of scholarly research.


(d) Expedited processing means the process set forth in the FOIA that allows requesters to ask for expedited processing of their FOIA request if they can demonstrate a compelling need.


(e) Fee waiver means the waiver or reduction of processing fees if a requester can demonstrate that certain statutory standards are satisfied including that the information is in the public interest and is not requested for a commercial interest.


(f) FOIA Public Liaison means an agency official who is responsible for assisting in reducing delays, increasing transparency and understanding of the status of requests, and assisting in the resolution of disputes.


(g) Non-commercial scientific institution means an institution that is not operated on a “commercial” basis and which is operated solely for the purpose of conducting scientific research, the results of which are not intended to promote any particular product or industry.


(h) OIG records means those records as defined generally in this section which originated with or are in the possession and control of the Office of Inspector General (OIG) of the Peace Corps which have been compiled for law enforcement, audit, and investigative functions and/or any other purpose authorized under the IG Act of 1978, as amended.


(i) Records means books, papers, maps, photographs, or other documentary materials, regardless of whether the format is physical or electronic, made or received by the Peace Corps in connection with the transaction of Peace Corps’ business and preserved by the Peace Corps as evidence of the organization, functions, policies, decisions, procedures, operations, or other activities of the Peace Corps, or because of the informational value of data in them. The term does not include, inter alia, books, magazines, or other materials acquired solely for library purpose, or that are otherwise publicly available.


(j) Representative of the news media means any person actively gathering news for an entity that is organized and operated to publish or broadcast news to the public. The term “news” means information that is about current events or that would be of current interest to the public. Examples of news media entities include television or radio stations broadcasting to the public at large and publishers of periodicals (but only in those instances when they can qualify as disseminators of “news”) who make their products available for purchase or subscription by the general public. These examples are not intended to be all-inclusive. Moreover, as traditional methods of news delivery evolve (e.g., electronic dissemination of newspapers through telecommunications services), such alternative media would be included in this category. In the case of “freelance” journalists, they will be regarded as working for a news organization if they can demonstrate a solid basis for expecting publication through that organization, even though not actually employed by it.


(k) Requester category means one of the three categories that agencies place requesters in for the purpose of determining whether a requester will be charged fees for search, review and duplication, including commercial requesters; non-commercial scientific or educational institutions or news media requesters, and all other requesters.


(l) Review means the process of examining a document located in response to a request to determine whether any portion of such document is exempt from disclosure. It also includes processing any such document for disclosure. Review does not include time spent resolving general legal or policy issues regarding the application of exemptions.


(m) Search means the process of looking for and retrieving records that are responsive to a request for records. It includes page-by-page or line-by-line identification of material within documents and also includes reasonable efforts to locate and retrieve information from records maintained in electronic form or format. Searches may be conducted manually or by automated means and will be conducted in the most efficient and least expensive manner. If the Agency cannot identify the requested records after a 2 hour search, it can determine that the records were not adequately described and ask the requester to provide a more specific request.


(n) Submitter means any person or entity providing potentially confidential commercial information to an agency, which information may be subject to a FOIA request. The term submitter includes, but is not limited to, individuals, corporations, state governments, and foreign governments.


[68 FR 66008, Nov. 25, 2003, as amended at 79 FR 19818, Apr. 10, 2014]


§ 303.3 Policy.

The Peace Corps will make its records concerning its operations, activities, and business available to the public consistent with the requirements of the FOIA. As a matter of policy, the Peace Corps makes discretionary disclosures of records or information that may be exempt from disclosure under the FOIA whenever disclosure would not foreseeably harm an interest protected by a FOIA exemption, but this policy does not create any right enforceable in court.


[79 FR 19818, Apr. 10, 2014]


§ 303.4 Records published in the Federal Register.

The Peace Corps publishes its notices and substantive regulations in the Federal Register. It also publishes information on its basic structure and operations necessary to inform the public how to deal effectively with the Peace Corps in the United States Government Manual, a special publication of the Federal Register. The Peace Corps will make reasonable efforts to currently update such information, which includes information on Peace Corps’ location and functions, and how the public may obtain information or forms, or make submittals or requests. The Peace Corps’ published regulations are at 22 CFR Chapter III.


§ 303.5 Public reading room.

(a) The Peace Corps maintains a public reading room at its headquarters at 1111 20th Street NW., Washington DC 20526. This room is supervised and is open to the public during Peace Corps’ regular business hours for inspecting and copying records described in paragraph (b) of this section.


(b) Subject to the limitation stated in paragraph (c) of this section, the Peace Corps makes the following records available in the public reading room:


(1) All final public opinions, including concurring and dissenting opinions, and orders issued in the adjudication of cases that involve the Peace Corps;


(2) Statements of policy and interpretations adopted by the Peace Corps that are not published in the Federal Register;


(3) Administrative staff manuals and instructions to the staff that affect the public;


(4) Copies of records, regardless of form or format, released to any person in response to a public request for records which the Peace Corps determines are likely to become subject to subsequent requests for substantially the same records, and a general index of such records;


(5) The index required by § 303.7; and


(6) Other records the Peace Corps has determined are of general interest to members of the public in understanding activities of the Peace Corps or in dealing with the Peace Corps in connection with those activities.


(c) Certain records otherwise required by FOIA to be available in the public reading room may be exempt from mandatory disclosure pursuant to § 552(b) of the FOIA. Such record will not be made available in the public reading room. Other records maintained in the public reading room may be edited by the deletion of identifying details concerning individuals to prevent a clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. In such cases, the record shall have attached to it an explanation of the deletion. The extent of the deletion shall be indicated, unless doing so would harm an interest protected by the exemption under which the deletion is made. It technically feasible, the extent of the deletion shall be indicated at the place in the record where the deletion was made.


(d) Electronic reading room. Records required by the FOIA to be maintained and made available in the public reading room created by the Peace Corps on or after November 1, 1996, are made available electronically on the Peace Corps Web site at http://www.peacecorps.gov.


[68 FR 66008, Nov. 25, 2003, as amended at 79 FR 19818, Apr. 10, 2014]


§ 303.6 Procedures for use of public reading room.

Any member of the public may inspect or copy records described in § 303.5(b) in the public reading room during regular business hours. Because it will sometimes be impossible to produce records or copies of records on short notice, a person who wishes to inspect or copy records shall arrange a time in advance, by telephone or letter request made to the Peace Corps FOIA Officer. Persons submitting a request by telephone for a record in the public reading room will be notified whether a written request would be advisable to aid in the identification and expeditious processing of the records sought. Written requests should identify the records sought in the manner described in § 303.8(b) and should request a specific date for inspecting the records. The requester will be advised as promptly as possible if, for any reason, it may not be possible to make the records sought available on the date requested.


[79 FR 19818, Apr. 10, 2014]


§ 303.7 Index of records.

The Peace Corps will maintain a current index identifying any matter within the scope of § 303.4 or § 303.5(b)(1) through (5). The index will be maintained and made available for public inspection and copying at the Peace Corps’ headquarters in Washington, DC. The cost of a copy of the index will not exceed the standard charge for duplication set out in § 303.13(e). The Peace Corps will also make the index available on its public Web site.


§ 303.8 Requests for records.

(a) Except for records required by the FOIA to be published in the Federal Register or to be made available in the public reading room, the Peace Corps will make its records promptly available, upon request, to any person in accordance with this section, unless it is determined that such records should be withheld and are exempt from mandatory disclosure under the FOIA.


(b) Requests. Requests for records under this section shall be made in writing via regular mail, email, facsimile, or online web portal and, as applicable, the envelope and the letter or other form of request should be clearly marked “Freedom of Information Request.” All requests shall be addressed to the FOIA Officer. Requests by letter shall use the address given in § 303.5(a). Requests by email must be sent to the FOIA electronic mailbox, [email protected] Regarding requests submitted via online web portal (accessible on the agency Web site, www.peacecorps.gov), requesters shall fill in all of the fields as required. Any request not marked and addressed as specified in this paragraph will be so marked by Peace Corps personnel as soon as the request is properly identified. The request will be forwarded immediately to the FOIA Officer. A request improperly addressed will not be deemed to have been received for purposes of the time period set out in paragraph (h) of this section until it has been received by the FOIA Officer. Upon receipt of an improperly addressed request, the FOIA Officer shall notify the requester of the date on which the time period began. Requests by letter shall be stamped “received” on the date received by the FOIA Office. Requests by email shall be “received” on the date the email arrived, if a business day, or on the next business day. Requests by online web portal will be entered automatically in the FOIA tracking system. Requests sent via mail or email will be entered manually in the FOIA tracking system. Requesters may utilize the online web portal for purpose of checking status of requests (open/closed) for requests from all sources.


(c) A request must reasonably describe the records requested so that employees of the Peace Corps who are familiar with the subject area of the request are able, with a reasonable amount of effort, to determine which particular records are within the scope of the request. If it is determined that a request does not reasonably describe the records sought, the requester shall be so informed and provided an opportunity to confer with Peace Corps personnel in order to attempt to reformulate the request in a manner that will meet the needs of the requester and the requirements of this paragraph (c). If the Agency cannot identify the requested records after a 2 hour search, it may determine that the records were not adequately described and ask the requester to provide a more specific request.


(d) To facilitate the location of records by the Peace Corps, a requester should try to provide the following kinds of information, if known;


(1) The specific event or action to which the record refers;


(2) The unit or program of the Peace Corps which may be responsible for or may have produced the record;


(3) The date of the record or the date or period to which it refers or relates;


(4) The type of record, such as an application, a particular form, a contract, or a report;


(5) Personnel of the Peace Corps who may have prepared or have knowledge of the record; or


(6) Citations to newspapers or publications which have referred to the record.


(e) The Peace Corps is not required to create a record or to perform research to satisfy a request.


(f) Any request for a waiver or reduction of fees should be included in the FOIA request, and any such request should indicate the grounds for a waiver or reduction of fees, as set out in § 303.13(f). The Peace Corps shall respond to such request as promptly as possible.


(g) Format. The Peace Corps will provide records in the form or format indicated by the requester to the extent such records are readily reproducible in the requested form or format.


(h) Initial response/delays. (1) The FOIA Officer, upon request for any records made in accordance with this section, except in the case of a request for OIG records, shall assign a tracking number to each individual request and send an acknowledgement letter or email to each requester. The acknowledgement letter or email will inform the requester of the assigned tracking number. The FOIA Officer will make an initial determination of whether to comply with or deny such request and dispatch such determination to the requester within 20 business days after receipt of such request. Peace Corps will acknowledge all FOIA requests within 20 working days, except for unusual circumstances, in which case the time limit may be extended for up to 10 business days by written notice to the requester setting forth the reasons for such extension and the date on which a determination is expected to be dispatched.


(2) If the FOIA Officer determines that a request or portion thereof is for OIG records, the FOIA Officer shall promptly refer the request or portion thereof to the OIG and send notice of such referral to the requester. In such case, the OIG FOIA Officer shall make an initial determination of whether to comply with or deny such request and dispatch such determination to the requester within 20 business days after receipt of such request, except for unusual circumstances, in which case the time limit may be extended for up to 10 business days by written notice to the requester setting forth the reasons for such extension and the date on which a determination is expected to be dispatched. If for any reason, a request for Agency information goes directly to the OIG rather than through the FOIA Officer, the OIG shall provide notice to the FOIA Officer of its receipt of the request. The FOIA Office and the OIG should normally consult with each other whenever they receive requests for the same or similar records.


(3) Unusual circumstances. As used in this part, “unusual circumstances” are limited to the following, but only to the extent reasonably necessary for the proper processing of the particular request:


(i) The need to search for and collect the requested records from components or locations that are separate from the office processing the request;


(ii) The need to search for, collect, and appropriately examine a voluminous amount of separate and distinct records which are demanded in a single request; or


(iii) The need for consultation, which shall be conducted with all practicable speed, with another agency or organization having a substantial interest in the determination of the request or among two or more components of the Peace Corps having a substantial subject matter interest therin.


(i) If a request is particularly broad or complex so that it cannot be completed within the time periods stated in paragraph (h) of this section, the Peace Corps may ask the requester to narrow the request or agree to an additional delay.


(j) When no determination can be dispatched within the applicable time limit, the FOIA Officer or the OIG FOIA Officer shall inform the requester of the reason for the delay, the date on which a determination may be expected to be dispatched, and the requester’s right to treat the delay as a denial and to appeal to the Associate Director for the Office of Management or the Inspector General, in accordance with § 303.12. If no determination has been dispatched by the end of the 20-day period, or the last extension thereof, the requester may deem the request denied, and exercise a right of appeal in accordance with § 303.12. The FOIA Officer or the OIG FOIA Officer may ask the requester to forego an appeal until a determination is made.


(k) After it has been determined that a request will be granted, the responsible official will act with due diligence in providing a prompt response.


(l) Expedited treatment. (1) Requests and appeals will be taken out of order and given expedited treatment whenever the requester demonstrates a compelling need. A compelling need means:


(i) Circumstances in which the lack of expedited treatment could reasonably be expected to pose an imminent threat to the life or physical safety of an individual;


(ii) An urgency to inform the public about an actual or alleged Peace Corps or Federal government activity and the request is made by a person primarily engaged in disseminating information;


(iii) The loss of substantial due process rights; or


(iv) A matter of widespread and exceptional media interest in which there exist possible questions about the Peace Corps’ or the Federal government’s integrity which affect public confidence.


(2) A request for expedited processing may be made at the time of the initial request for records or at any later time. For a prompt determination, a request for expedited processing must be properly addressed and marked and received by the Peace Corps pursuant to paragraph (b) of this section.


(3) A requester who seeks expedited processing must submit a statement demonstrating a compelling need that is certified by the requester to be true and correct to the best of that person’s knowledge and belief, explaining in detail the basis for requesting expedited processing.


(4) Within ten business days of its receipt of a request for expedited processing, the FOIA Officer or the OIG FOIA Officer shall decide whether to grant the request and shall notify the requester of the decision. If a request for expedited treatment is granted, the request shall be given priority and shall be processed as soon as practicable. If a request for expedited processing is denied, any appeal of that decision shall be acted on expeditiously by the Peace Corps.


(5) Appeals shall be made to the Associate Director for the Office of Management, who shall respond within 10 business days of receipt of the appeal.


[68 FR 66008, Nov. 25, 2003, as amended at 72 FR 27055, May 14, 2007; 79 FR 19818, Apr. 10, 2014]


§ 303.9 Exemptions for withholding records.

(a) The Peace Corps may withhold a requested record from public disclosure only if the record fits within one or more of the following FOIA exemptions:


(1) Matter specifically authorized under criteria established by an Executive Order to be kept secret in the interest of national defense or foreign policy and is in fact properly classified pursuant to such Executive Order;


(2) Matter which is related solely to the internal personnel rules and practices of the Peace Corps;


(3) Matter which is specifically exempted from disclosure by statute (other than exemptions under FOIA at 5 U.S.C. 552(b)), provided that such statute requires that the matter be withheld from the public in such a manner as to leave no discretion on the issue, or establishes particular criteria for withholding, or refers to particular types of matters to be withheld;


(4) Trade secrets and commercial or financial information obtained from a person and privileged or confidential;


(5) Inter-agency or intra-agency memoranda or letters which would not be available by law to a party other than an agency in litigation with the Peace Corps;


(6) Personnel and medical files and similar files, the disclosure of which would constitute a clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy;


(7) Records or information compiled for law enforcement purposes including enforcing the Peace Corps Act or any other law, but only to the extent that the production of such law enforcement records or information:


(i) Could reasonably be expected to interfere with enforcement proceedings;


(ii) Would deprive a person or a recipient of a right to a fair trial or an impartial adjudication;


(iii) Could reasonably be expected to constitute an unwarranted invasion of personal privacy;


(iv) Could reasonably be expected to disclose the identity of a confidential source, including a State, local, or foreign agency or authority or any private institution which furnished information on a confidential basis; and, in the case of a record or information compiled by a criminal law enforcement authority in the course of a criminal investigation, information furnished by a confidential source;


(v) Would disclose techniques and procedures for law enforcement investigations or prosecutions, or would disclose guidelines for law enforcement investigations or prosecutions if such disclosure could reasonably be expected to risk circumvention of the law; or


(vi) Could reasonably be expected to endanger the life or physical safety of any individual.


(8) Contained in or related to examination, operating, or condition reports prepared by, on behalf of, or for the use of an agency responsible for the regulation or supervision of financial institutions; or


(9) Geological and geophysical information and data, including maps, concerning wells.


(b) In the event that one or more of the above exemptions in paragraph (a) of this section apply, any reasonably segregable portion of a record shall be provided to the requester after deletion of the portions that are exempt. The Peace Corps shall indicate, if technically feasible, the precise amount of information deleted and the exemption under which the deletion is made at the place in the record where the deletion is made, and indicate the exemption under which a deletion is made on the released portion of the record, unless including that indication would harm an interest protected by the exemption. At the discretion of the Peace Corps officials authorized to grant or deny a request for records, it may be possible to provide a requester with:


(1) A summary of information in the exempt portion of a record; or


(2) An oral description of the exempt portion of a record.


(c) No requester shall have a right to insist that any or all of the techniques in paragraph (b) of this section should be employed in order to satisfy a request.


(d) Records that may be exempt from disclosure pursuant to paragraph (a) of this section may be made available at the discretion of the Peace Corps.


(e) Proprietary information. (1) It is the policy of the Peace Corps to withhold proprietary information that falls within the protection of paragraph (a)(4) of this section. Proprietary information includes trade secrets, or commercial or financial information obtained from a person, the disclosure of which could reasonably be expected to cause substantial competitive harm.


(2) It is also the policy of the Peace Corps to give submitters of arguably proprietary information an adequate opportunity to provide information to the Peace Corps to establish that the information constitutes protected proprietary information.


(3) A person submitting arguably proprietary information to the Peace Corps will be notified in writing by the Peace Corps if there is a FOIA request for the information, unless:


(i) The Peace Corps has already decided that the information should be withheld;


(ii) The information has been lawfully published or has been officially made available to the public; or


(iii) Disclosure of the information is required by law.


(4) The notice shall afford the submitter at least ten business days in which to object to the disclosure of any requested information. Whenever the Peace Corps provides such notice to the submitter, it shall also notify the requester that notice and an opportunity to comment are being provided to the submitter.


(5) A submitter’s request for protection for information under paragraph (a)(4) of this section shall:


(i) Specifically identify the exact material claimed to be confidential proprietary information;


(ii) State whether the information identified has ever been released to a person who is not in a confidential relationship with the submitter;


(iii) State the basis for the submitter’s belief that the information is not commonly known or readily ascertainable by outside persons; and


(iv) State how release of the information would cause harm to the submitter’s competitive position.


(6) The Peace Corps shall consider the submitter’s objections and specific grounds for non-disclosure when deciding whether to disclose the information. If the Peace Corps decides to disclose the information, it shall, to the extent permitted by law, provide the submitter at least ten business days notice of its decision before the information is disclosed and a statement of its reasons for not sustaining the objection to disclosure. Whenever the Peace Corps notifies the submitter of its final decision, it shall also notify the requester.


(7) Whenever a FOIA requester brings suit seeking to compel disclosure of proprietary information, the Peace Corps shall promptly notify the submitter.


[68 FR 66008, Nov. 25, 2003; 69 FR 68695, Dec. 9, 2003; 79 FR 19819, Apr. 10, 2014]


§ 303.10 Responsibilities and authorities.

(a) Legal counsel. The General Counsel (GC) shall furnish legal advice to Peace Corps officials and staff as to their obligations under this part and shall take such other actions as may be necessary or appropriate to assure a consistent and equitable application of the provisions of this part by and within the Peace Corps. The OIG Legal Counsel will coordinate with GC, as appropriate and necessary, when furnishing legal advice to the OIG FOIA Officer and Inspector General.


(b) Authority to grant or deny requests. The FOIA Officer is authorized to grant or deny requests for records, except for OIG records, under this part. The OIG FOIA Officer is authorized to grant or deny requests for OIG records under this part. The FOIA Officer and the OIG FOIA Officer shall consult with each other when a request includes both Peace Corps and OIG records in order to ensure consistency and lack of duplication in processing the request.


(c)(1) Records received from other agencies. When the Peace Corps receives a request for a record in its possession that it has received from another agency, it shall determine whether the other agency is better qualified to decide whether the record is exempt from disclosure and, if so, whether it should be disclosed as a matter of discretion. If the Peace Corps determines it is better qualified to process the record in response to the request, then it shall do so. If the Peace Corps determines it is not better qualified to process the request, it shall either:


(i) Consult with the other agency before responding to the request; or


(ii) Refer the responsibility for responding to the request for the record to the other agency (but only if the agency is subject to FOIA). Ordinarily, the agency that originated a record will be presumed to be best able to determine whether to disclose it.


(2) Law enforcement and classified information. Notwithstanding paragraph (c)(1) of this section:


(i) Whenever the Peace Corps receives a request for a record containing information that relates to an investigation of a possible violation of law that was originated by another agency, the Peace Corps will either consult with the other agency before responding or refer the responsibility for responding to the request to the other agency; and


(ii) Whenever a request is made for a record containing information that has been classified by another agency or may be appropriate for classification under Executive Order 13525 or any other executive order concerning the classification of records, the Peace Corps shall refer the responsibility for responding to the request regarding that information to the agency that classified the information, should consider the information for classification, or has the primary interest in the information, as appropriate.


(3) Notice of referral. Whenever the Peace Corps refers all or any part of the responsibility for responding to a request to another agency, it ordinarily shall notify the requester of the referral and inform the requester of the name of the agency to which the request has been referred and the part of the request that has been referred and provide the requester with a point of contact within the receiving agency to whom the requester can speak regarding the referral.


(4) Effect of consultations and referrals on timing of response. All consultations and referrals will be handled according to the date the FOIA request was initially received by the Peace Corps.


(5) Agreements with other agencies. The Peace Corps may make agreements with other agencies to eliminate the need for consultations or referrals for particular types of records.


[68 FR 66008, Nov. 25, 2003, as amended at 79 FR 19819, Apr. 10, 2014]


§ 303.11 Denials.

(a) A denial of a written request for a record that complies with the requirements of § 303.8 shall be in writing and shall include, as applicable:


(1) A reference to the applicable exemption or exemptions in § 303.9(a) upon which the denial is based;


(2) An explanation of how the exemption applies to the requested records;


(3) A statement explaining why it is deemed unreasonable to provide segregable portions of the record after deleting the exempt portions;


(4) An estimate of the volume of requested matter denied unless providing such estimate would harm the interest protected by the exemption under which the denial is made, if other than the FOIA Officer;


(5) The name and title of the person or persons responsible for denying the request, if other than the FOIA Officer; and


(6) An explanation of the right to appeal the denial and the procedures for submitting an appeal, including the address of the official to whom appeals should be submitted.


(b) A partial deletion of a record made available to a requester shall be deemed a denial of a record for purposes of paragraph (a) of this section. All denials shall be treated as final opinions under § 303.5(b).


§ 303.12 Appeals.

(a) Any person whose written request has been denied is entitled to appeal the denial within 30 business days by writing to the Associate Director of the Office of Management or, in the case of a denial of a request for OIG Records, the Inspector General, at the address given in 303.5(a). An appeal need not be in any particular form, but should adequately identify the denial, if possible, by describing the requested record, identifying the official who issued the denial, and providing the date on which the denial was issued. If the appeal is sent via mail, the envelope and the letter should be clearly marked “Freedom of Information Appeal” and the appeal shall be addressed to the Associate Director, Office of Management. Appeals by letter shall use the address given in § 303.5(a). Appeals are accepted via email. Appeals by email must be sent to the FOIA electronic mailbox, [email protected] In appeals submitted via online web portal (accessible on the agency Web site, www.peacecorps.gov), requesters shall fill in all of the fields as required. Appeals by online web portal will be entered automatically in the FOIA tracking system. Persons submitting an appeal may utilize the online web portal for purpose of checking status of requests (open/closed) for requests from all sources.


(b) A response to an appeal will advise the requester that the 2007 FOIA amendments created the Office of Government Information Services (OGIS) to offer mediation services to resolve disputes between FOIA requesters and Federal agencies as a non-exclusive alternative to litigation. A requester may contact OGIS in any of the following ways:


Office of Government Information Services, National Archives and Records Administration, 8601 Adelphi Road – OGIS, College Park, MD 20740, ogis.archives.gov, Email: [email protected], Telephone: 202-741-5770, Facsimile: 202-741-5769, Toll-free: 1-877-684-6448.

(c) The decision of the Associate Director for the Office of Management or the Inspector General on an appeal shall be in writing and, in the event the denial is in whole or in part upheld, shall contain an explanation responsive to the arguments advanced by the requester, the matters described in § 303.11(a)(1) through (4), and the provisions for judicial review of such decision under section 552(a)(4) of the FOIA. The decision shall be dispatched to the requester within 20 business days after receipt of the appeal, unless an additional period is justified pursuant to § 303.8(i) and such period taken together with any earlier extension does not exceed 10 business days. The decision by the Associate Director for the Office of Management or the Inspector General shall constitute the final action of the Peace Corps. All such decisions shall be treated as final opinions under § 303.5(b).


[68 FR 66008, Nov. 25, 2003, as amended at 79 FR 19819, Apr. 10, 2014]


§ 303.13 Fees.

(a) For information routinely provided by the Peace Corps to the public in the normal course of doing business, such as informational or recruiting brochures, no fees will be charged.


(b) For each commercial use request, fees will be limited to reasonable standard charges for document search, review, and duplication.


(c) For each request for records sought by a representative of the news media or by an educational or non-commercial scientific institution, fees shall be limited to reasonable standard charges for document duplication after the first 100 pages.


(d) For all other requests, fees shall be limited to reasonable standard charges for search time after the first 2 hours and duplication after the first 100 pages.


(e) The schedule of reasonable standard charges for services regarding the production or disclosure of the Peace Corps records is as follows:


(1) Manual search and review of records: Salary rate of employee[s] performing the search and review plus 16%. Charges for search and review time less than a full hour will be billed by quarter-hour segments;


(2) Computer time: Actual costs as incurred;


(3) Duplication by paper copy: 15 cents per page;


(4) Duplication by other methods: Actual costs as incurred;


(5) Certification of true copies: $1.00 each;


(6) Packing and mailing records: Actual costs as incurred; and


(7) Special delivery or express mail: Actual charges as incurred.


(f) Fee waivers: Fees will be waived or reduced below the fees established under paragraph (e) of this section if disclosure of the information is in the public interest because it is likely to contribute significantly to public understanding of the operations or activities of the Peace Corps or Federal government and is not primarily in the commercial interest of the requester.


(1) In order to determine whether the disclosure of the information is in the public interest because it is likely to contribute significantly to public understanding of the operations or activities of the Federal government, the Peace Corps shall consider the following four criteria:


(i) The subject of the request: Whether the subject of the requested records concerns the operations or activities of the Peace Corps or Federal government;


(ii) The informative value of the information to be disclosed: Whether the disclosure is “likely to contribute” to an understanding of Peace Corps or Federal government operations or activities;


(iii) The contribution to an understanding of the subject by the general public likely to result from disclosure: Whether disclosure of the requested information will contribute to “public understanding;” and


(iv) The significance of the contribution to public understanding: Whether the disclosure is likely to contribute “significantly” to public understanding of Peace Corps or Federal government operations or activities.


(2) In order to determine whether disclosure of the information is not primarily in the commercial interest of the requester, the Peace Corps shall consider the following two factors:


(i) The existence and magnitude of a commercial interest: Whether the requester has a commercial interest that would be furthered by the requested disclosure; and if so,


(ii) The primary interest in disclosure: Whether the magnitude of the identified commercial interest of the requester is sufficiently large, in comparison with the public interest in disclosure, that disclosure is “primarily in the commercial interest of the requester.”


(3) These fee waiver/reduction provisions will be subject to appeal in the same manner as appeals from denial under § 303.12.


(g) No fee will be charged under this section unless the cost of routine collection and processing of the fee payment is likely to exceed the average cost of processing a payment.


(h) Requesters must agree to pay all fees charged for services associated with their requests. The Peace Corps will assume that requesters agree to pay all charges for services associated with their requests up to $25 unless otherwise indicated by the requester.


(i) No requester will be required to make an advance payment of any fee unless:


(1) The requester has previously failed to pay a required fee to another federal agency or to Peace Corps within 30 days of the date of billing, in which case an advance deposit of the full amount of the anticipated fee together with the fee then due plus interest accrued may be required. (The request will not be deemed to have been received by the Peace Corps until such payment is made.); or


(2) The Peace Corps determines that an estimated fee will exceed $250, in which case the requester shall be notified of the amount of the anticipated fee or such portion thereof as can readily be estimated. Such notification shall be transmitted as soon as possible, but in any event within 5 business days of receipt of the request by the Peace Corps. The notification shall offer the requester the opportunity to confer with appropriate representatives of the Peace Corps for the purpose of reformulating the request so as to meet the needs of the requester at a reduced cost. The request will not be deemed to have been received by the Peace Corps for purposes of the initial 20-day response period until the requester makes a deposit on the fee in an amount determined by the Peace Corps.


(j) Interest may be charged to those requesters who fail to pay the fees charged. Interest will be assessed on the amount billed, starting on the 31st day following the day on which the billing was sent. The rate charged will be as prescribed in 31 U.S.C. 3717.


(k) The Agency is not required to process a request for a requester who has not paid FOIA fees owed to another Federal agency.


(l) If the Peace Corps reasonably believes that a requester or group of requesters is attempting to break a request into a series of requests for the purpose of evading the assessment of fees, the Peace Corps shall aggregate such requests and charge accordingly. Likewise, the Peace Corps will aggregate multiple requests for documents received from the same requester within 45 business days.


(m) The Peace Corps reserves the right to limit the number of copies of any document that will be provided to any one requester or to require that special arrangements for duplication be made in the case of bound volumes or other records representing unusual problems of handling or reproduction.


[68 FR 66008, Nov. 25, 2003, as amended at 72 FR 27056, May 14, 2007; 79 FR 19820, Apr. 10, 2014]


§ 303.14 Procedures for responding to a subpoena.

(a) Purpose and scope. (1) This part sets forth the procedures to be followed in proceedings in which the Peace Corps is not a party, whenever a subpoena, order or other demand (collectively referred to as a “demand”) of a court or other authority is issued for:


(i) The production or disclosure of any material contained in the files of the Agency;


(ii) The production or disclosure of any information relating to material contained in the files of the Agency;


(iii) The production or disclosure of any information or material acquired by any person while such person was an employee of the Agency as a part of the performance of his official duties or because of his official status, or


(iv) The production of an employee of the Agency for the deposition or an appearance as a witness in a legal action or proceeding.


(2) For purposes of this part, the term “employee of the Agency” includes all officers and employees of the Agency appointed by, or subject to the supervision, jurisdiction or control of, the director of the Agency, including personal services contractors. Also for purposes of this part, records of the Agency do not include records of the Office of Inspector General.


(3) This part is intended to provide instructions regarding the internal operations of the Agency, and is not intended, and does not and may not be relied upon, to create any right or benefit, substantive or procedural, enforceable at law by a party against the Agency.


(4) This part applies to:


(i) State and local court, administrative and legislative proceedings; and


(ii) Federal court and administrative proceedings.


(5) This part does not apply to:


(i) Congressional requests or subpoenas for testimony or documents;


(ii) Employees or former employees making appearances solely in their private capacity in legal or administrative proceedings that do not relate to the Agency (such as cases arising out of traffic accidents or domestic relations). Any question regarding whether the appearance relates solely to the employee’s or former employee’s private capacity should be referred to the Office of the General Counsel.


(6) Nothing in this part otherwise permits disclosure of information by the Agency except as is provided by statute or other applicable law.


(b) Procedure in the event of a demand for production or disclosure. (1) No employee or former employee of the Agency shall, in response to a demand of a court or other authority set forth in § 303.14(a) produce any material, disclose any information or appear in any proceeding, described in § 303.14(a) without the approval of the General Counsel or designee.


(2) Whenever an employee or former employee of the Peace Corps receives a demand for the production of material or the disclosure of information described in § 303.14(a) he shall immediately notify and provide a copy of the demand to the General Counsel or designee. The General Counsel, or designee, shall be furnished by the party causing the demand to be issued or served a written summary of the information sought, its relevance to the proceeding in connection with which it was served and why the information sought is unavailable by any other means or from any other sources.


(3) The General Counsel, or designee, in consultation with appropriate Agency officials, including the Agency’s FOIA Officer, or designee, and in light of the considerations listed in § 303.14(d), will determine whether the person on whom the demand was served should respond to the demand.


(4) To the extent he deems it necessary or appropriate, the General Counsel or designee, may also require from the party causing such demand to be issued or served a plan of all reasonably foreseeable demands, including but not limited to names of all employees and former employees from whom discovery will be sought, areas of inquiry, length of time of proceedings requiring oral testimony and identification of documents to be used or whose production is sought.


(c) Considerations in determining whether production or disclosure should be made pursuant to a demand. (1) In deciding whether to make disclosures pursuant to a demand, the General Counsel or designee, may consider, among things:


(i) Whether such disclosure is appropriate under the rules of procedure governing the case or matter in which the demand arose; and


(ii) Whether disclosure is appropriate under the relevant substantive law concerning privilege.


(2) Among the demands in response to which disclosure will not be made are those demands with respect to which any of the following factors exist:


(i) Disclosure would violate a statute or a rule of procedure;


(ii) Disclosure would violate the privacy rights of an individual;


(iii) Disclosure would violate a specific regulation;


(iv) Disclosure would reveal classified information, unless appropriately declassified by the originating agency;


(v) Disclosure would reveal trade secrets or proprietary information without the owner’s consent;


(vi) Disclosure would otherwise adversely affect the interests of the United States or the Peace Corps; or


(vii) Disclosure would impair an ongoing Inspector General or Department of Justice investigation.


[68 FR 66008, Nov. 25, 2003, as amended at 79 FR 19820, Apr. 10, 2014]


PART 304 – CLAIMS AGAINST GOVERNMENT UNDER FEDERAL TORT CLAIMS ACT


Authority:28 U.S.C. 2672; 22 U.S.C. 2503(b); E.O. 12137, as amended.


Source:34 FR 5840, Mar. 28, 1969, unless otherwise noted.

General Provisions

§ 304.1 Scope; definitions.

(a) This subpart applies to claims asserted under the Federal Tort Claims Act, as amended, accruing on or after January 18, 1967, for money damages against the United States for injury to or loss of property or personal injury or death caused by the negligent or wrongful act or omission of an officer or employee of the Peace Corps, a person serving the Peace Corps under invitational travel orders, or a Peace Corps Volunteer or trainee while acting within the scope of his office or employment.


(b) This subpart is not applicable to claims arising in a foreign country; it is applicable to claims arising in Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands.


(c) This subpart is issued subject to and consistent with applicable regulations on administrative claims under the Federal Tort Claims Act issued by the Attorney General (28 CFR part 14).


(d) For the purposes of this subpart, the term “General Counsel” means the General Counsel of the Peace Corps or his designee.


[34 FR 5840, Mar. 28, 1969, as amended at 72 FR 4205, Jan. 30, 2007]


Procedures

§ 304.2 Administrative claim; when presented; appropriate Peace Corps Office.

(a) For purposes of this subpart, a claim shall be deemed to have been presented when the Peace Corps receives, at a place designated in paragraph (b) of this section, an executed “Claim for Damages or Injury,” Standard Form 95, or other written notification of an incident, accompanied by a claim for money damages in a sum certain for injury to or loss of property, for personal injury, or for death alleged to have occurred by reason of the incident. A claim which should have been presented to the Peace Crops, but which was mistakenly addressed to or filed with another Federal agency, is deemed to have been presented to the Peace Corps as of the date that the claim is received by the Peace Corps. If a claim is mistakenly addressed to or filed with the Peace Corps, the Peace Corps shall forthwith transfer it to the appropriate Federal agency, if ascertainable, or return it to the claimant.


(b) A claimant shall mail or deliver his claim to the General Counsel, Peace Corps, 1111 20th Street, NW., Washington, DC 20526.


[34 FR 5840, Mar. 28, 1969, as amended at 72 FR 4206, Jan. 30, 2007]


§ 304.3 Administrative claim; who may file.

(a) A claim for injury to or loss of property may be presented by the owner of the property, his duly authorized agent, or his legal representative.


(b) A claim for personal injury may be presented by the injured person, his duly authorized agent, or his legal representative.


(c) A claim based on death may be presented by the executor or administrator of the decedent’s estate, or by any other person legally entitled to assert such a claim in accordance with applicable State law.


(d) A claim for loss wholly compensated by an insurer with the rights of a subrogee may be presented by the insurer. Claim for loss partially compensated by an insurer with the rights of a subrogee may be presented by the insurer or the insured individually, as their respective interests appear, or jointly. Whenever an insurer presents a claim asserting the rights of a subrogee, he shall present with his claim appropriate evidence that he has the rights of a subrogee.


(e) A claim presented by an agent or legal representative shall be presented in the name of the claimant, be signed by the agent or legal representative, show the title or legal capacity of the person signing, and be accompanied by evidence of his authority to present a claim on behalf of the claimant.


§ 304.4 Administrative claim; evidence and information to be submitted.

(a) Personal injury. In support of a claim for personal injury, including pain and suffering, the claimant may be required to submit the following evidence or information:


(1) A written report by his attending physician or dentist setting forth the nature and extent of the injury, nature and extent of treatment, any degree of temporary or permanent disability, the prognosis, period of hospitalization, and any diminished earning capacity. In addition, the claimant may be required to submit to a physical or mental examination by a physician employed or designated by the Peace Corps or another Federal agency. A copy of the report of the examining physician shall be made available to the claimant upon the claimant’s written request provided that he has, upon request, furnished the report referred to in the first sentence of this paragraph and has made or agrees to make available to the Peace Corps any other physician’s report previously or thereafter made of the physical or mental condition which is the subject matter of his claim.


(2) Itemized bills for medical, dental, and hospital expenses incurred, or itemized receipts of payment for such expenses.


(3) If the prognosis reveals the necessity for future treatment, a statement of expected expenses for such treatment.


(4) If a claim is made for loss of time from employment, a written statement from his employer showing actual time lost from employment, whether he is a full-or part-time employee, and wages or salary actually lost;


(5) If a claim is made for loss of income and the claimant is self-employed, documentary evidence showing the amount of earnings actually lost.


(6) Any other evidence or information which may have a bearing on either the responsibility of the United States for the personal injury or the damages claimed.


(b) Death. In support of a claim based on death, the claimant may be required to submit the following evidence or information:


(1) An authenticated death certificate or other competent evidence showing cause of death, date of death, and age of the decedent.


(2) Decedent’s employment or occupation at the time of death, including his monthly or yearly salary or earnings (if any), and the duration of his last employment or occupation.


(3) Full names, addresses, birth dates, kinship, and marital status of decedent’s survivors, including identification of those survivors who were dependent for support upon decedent at the time of his death.


(4) Degree of support afforded by decedent to each survivor dependent upon him for support at the time of his death.


(5) Decedent’s general physical and mental condition before death.


(6) Itemized bills for medical and burial expenses incurred by reason of the incident causing death, or itemized receipts of payment for such expenses.


(7) If damages for pain and suffering prior to death are claimed, a physician’s detailed statement specifying the injuries suffered, duration of pain and suffering, any drugs administered for pain, and decedent’s physical condition in the interval between injury and death.


(8) Any other evidence or information which may have a bearing on either the responsibility of the United States for the death or the damages claimed.


(c) Property damage. In support of a claim for injury to or loss of property, real or personal, the claimant may be required to submit the following evidence or information.


(1) Proof of ownership.


(2) A detailed statement of the amount claimed with respect to each item of property.


(3) Two or more itemized written estimates of the cost of such repairs and any itemized receipt of payment for necessary repairs.


(4) A statement listing date of purchase, purchase price, and salvage value where repair is not economical.


(5) Any other evidence or information which may have a bearing on either the responsibility of the United States for the injury to or loss of property or the damages claimed.


§ 304.5 Investigations.

The Peace Corps may investigate, or the General Counsel may request any other Federal agency to investigate, a claim filed under this subpart.


§ 304.6 Claims investigation.

(a) When a claim has been filed with the Peace Corps, the General Counsel will send a copy of the claim to the head of the office concerned and ask him to designate one employee of that office who shall act as, and who shall be referred to herein as, the Claims Investigating Officer for that particular claim. The Claims Investigating Officer shall, with the advice of the General Counsel, where necessary:


(1) Investigate as completely as is practicable the nature and circumstances of the occurrence causing the loss or damage of the claimant’s property.


(2) Ascertain the extent of loss or damage to the claimant’s property.


(3) Assemble the necessary forms with required data contained therein.


(4) Prepare a brief statement setting forth the facts relative to the claim (in the case of motor vehicle accidents, facts should be recorded on Standard Form 91-A), a statement whether the claim satisfies the requirements of this subpart, and a recommendation as to the amount to be paid in settlement of the claim.


(5) The head of the office concerned will be responsible for assuring that all necessary forms, statements, and all supporting papers have been procured for the file and will transmit the entire file to the General Counsel.


§ 304.7 Authority to adjust, determine, compromise, and settle claims.

The authority to consider, ascertain, adjust, determine, compromise and settle claims of less than $5,000 under 28 U.S.C. 2672, and this subpart, rests with the Chief Financial Officer, as the designee of the head of the agency. For claims under 28 U.S.C. 2672 and this subpart, subject to § 304.8, the Director of the Peace Corps retains authority to consider, ascertain, adjust, determine, compromise and settle claims of $5,000 or more.


[72 FR 4206, Jan. 30, 2007]


§ 304.8 Limitations on authority.

(a) An award, compromise, or settlement of a claim under section 2672 of title 28, United States Code, and this subpart in excess of $25,000 may be effected only with the prior written approval of the Attorney General or his designee. For the purpose of this paragraph, a principal claim and any derivative or subrogated claim shall be treated as a single claim.


(b) An administrative claim may be adjusted, determined, compromised, or settled only after consultation with the Department of Justice when, in the opinion of the General Counsel:


(1) A new precedent or a new point of law is involved; or


(2) A question of policy is or may be involved; or


(3) The United States is or may be entitled to indemnity or contribution from a third party, and the Peace Corps is unable to adjust the third party claim; or


(4) The compromise of a particular claim, as a practical matter, will or may control the disposition of a related claim in which the amount to be paid may exceed $25,000.


(c) An administrative claim may be adjusted, determined, compromised, or settled only after consultation with the Department of Justice when the Peace Corps is informed or is otherwise aware that the United States or an officer, employee, agent, or cost-type contractor of the United States is involved in litigation based on a claim arising out of the same incident or transaction.


§ 304.9 Referral to the Department of Justice.

When Department of Justice approval or consultation is required under § 304.8, the referral or request shall be transmitted to the Department of Justice by the General Counsel.


[72 FR 4206, Jan. 30, 2007]


§ 304.10 Review of claim.

(a) Upon receipt of the claim file from the head of the office concerned, the General Counsel will ascertain that all supporting papers are contained in the file.


(b) After legal review and recommendation by the General Counsel, the Director of the Peace Corps will make a written determination on the claim, unless the claim is worth less than $5,000, in which case the Chief Financial Officer will make the written determination.


[34 FR 5840, Mar. 28, 1969, as amended at 73 FR 21528, Apr. 22, 2008; 73 FR 49943, Aug. 25, 2008]


§ 304.11 Final denial of claim.

The General Counsel will send notification of the final denial of an administrative claim to the claimant, his attorney, or legal representative by certified or registered mail. The notification of final denial may include a statement of the reasons for the denial and shall include a statement that, if the claimant is dissatisfied with the Peace Corps action, he may file suit in an appropriate U.S. District Court not later than 6 months after the date of mailing of the notification.


§ 304.12 Action on approved claim.

(a) Payment of a claim approved under this subpart is contingent on claimant’s execution of (1) a “Claim for Damage or Injury,” Standard From 95; and (2) a “Voucher for Payment,” Standard Form 1145, as appropriate. When a claimant is represented by an attorney, the voucher for payment shall designate the claimant and his attorney as copayees, and the check shall be delivered to the attorney, whose address shall appear on the voucher.


(b) Acceptance by the claimant, his agent, or legal representative of an award, compromise, or settlement made under section 2672 or 2677 of title 28, United States Code, is final and conclusive on the claimant, his agent or legal representative, and any other person on whose behalf or for whose benefit the claim has been presented, and constitutes a complete release of any claim against the United States and against any officer or employee of the Government whose act or omission gave rise to the claim, by reason of the same subject matter.


PART 305 – ELIGIBILITY AND STANDARDS FOR PEACE CORPS VOLUNTEER SERVICE


Authority:22 U.S.C. 2503, 2504 2521; 29 U.S.C. 794; E.O. 12137, 44 FR 29023, 3 CFR, 1979 Comp., p. 389; E.O. 13160, 65 FR 39775, 3 CFR, 2000 Comp., p. 1461.



Source:82 FR 1188, Jan. 5, 2017, unless otherwise noted.

§ 305.1 Purpose and general guidelines.

This part states the requirements for eligibility for Peace Corps Volunteer service and the factors considered in the assessment and selection of eligible applicants for Peace Corps Volunteer service.


(a) Definitions. For purposes of this part:


(1) Applicant means an individual for enrollment as a Volunteer, who has completed and submitted the Peace Corps Volunteer application form.


(2) Trainee means an individual for enrollment as a Volunteer during any period of training occurring prior to such enrollment.


(3) Volunteer means an individual who has taken the prescribed oath and enrolled for service in the Peace Corps.


(4) Enrollment means the act by which an individual becomes a Volunteer upon successful completion of training and taking the prescribed oath of office pursuant to Section 5 of the Peace Corps Act, 22 U.S.C. 2504.


(5) Dependent means an individual for whom an applicant or Volunteer has a legal or familial obligation to provide financial support.


(6) Family member means any individual related by blood or affinity whose close association with the applicant or Volunteer is the equivalent of a family relationship.


(b) Selection. Invitations to serve in the Peace Corps are the result of a highly competitive application process. Many more individuals apply for Peace Corps Volunteer service than can be accepted. Because the Peace Corps cannot accept all eligible and qualified applicants who wish to serve, it evaluates applicants to select the best qualified among eligible applicants. The Peace Corps determines Applicants’ eligibility, and assesses their relative skills, qualifications, and personal attributes, such as motivation, aptitude, fitness for service, emotional maturity, adaptability, productive competence, and ability to serve effectively as a Volunteer in a foreign country and culture.


(c) Authority. Under section 5(a) of the Peace Corps Act, 22 U.S.C. 2504(a), the President may enroll in the Peace Corps for service abroad qualified citizens and nationals of the United States. The terms and conditions of the enrollment of Volunteers are exclusively those set forth in the Peace Corps Act and those consistent therewith which the President may prescribe. The President has delegated his authority under section 5(a) of the Peace Corps Act to the Director of the Peace Corps pursuant to Executive Order 12137 (May 16, 1979), as amended.


(d) Non-discrimination. The Peace Corps does not discriminate against any person on account of race, color, religion, sex (including but not limited to gender identity and gender expression), national origin, age (40 and over), disability, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, pregnancy, marital status, parental status, political affiliation, union membership, genetic information, or history of participation in the EEO process, any grievance procedure or any authorized complaint procedure. Anyone who feels he or she has been discriminated against should contact the Office of Civil Rights and Diversity, 202.692.2139, [email protected], Peace Corps, 1111 20th Street NW., Washington, DC 20526.


(e) Failure to disclose requested information. In order for the Peace Corps to be able to make appropriate selection and placement decisions, it is critical that Applicants provide complete and accurate information throughout the application process, including information provided for a mandatory background investigation. The Peace Corps may disqualify an Applicant or separate a Volunteer or Trainee from Peace Corps service at any time if the Peace Corps determines that the Applicant, Volunteer, or Trainee provided materially false, misleading, inaccurate or incomplete information during the Peace Corps application process.


§ 305.2 Eligibility.

In order to be eligible for enrollment as a Volunteer, Applicants must meet mandatory citizenship and age requirements.


(a) Citizenship. The Applicant must be a citizen or national of the United States prior to entering on duty as a Trainee.


(b) Age. The Applicant must be at least 18 years old at the time of entry on duty as a Trainee.


§ 305.3 Selection standards.

(a) General. To qualify for selection for overseas service as a Volunteer, an Applicant must demonstrate that he or she is suitable, possessing the requisite personal and professional attributes required for Peace Corps service generally, and for the particular Volunteer assignment for which he or she is considered. The Peace Corps assesses each Applicant’s personal, professional, educational, and legal qualifications in order to select those Applicants most likely to be successful in a Peace Corps assignment, serving under conditions of hardship if necessary to achieve the goals of the Peace Corps. Meeting these qualifications does not in and of itself entitle any individual to serve in the Peace Corps. The Peace Corps endeavors to select the best qualified individuals from among all eligible Applicants.


(b) Personal attributes. Applicants must adequately demonstrate the following personal attributes to Peace Corps:


(1) Motivation. A sincere desire to carry out the goals of Peace Corps service, and a commitment to serve a full term as a Volunteer.


(2) Productive competence. The intelligence and professional experience or educational background to meet the needs of the individual’s assignment.


(3) Emotional maturity and adaptability. The maturity, flexibility, cultural sensitivity, and self-sufficiency to adapt successfully to life in another culture, and to interact and communicate with other people regardless of cultural, social, and economic differences.


(4) Skills. In addition to any educational, professional or other qualifications and prerequisites that an individual must possess in order to be selected for a given assignment, a Trainee must demonstrate competence in the following areas by the end of pre-service training:


(i) Language. The ability to communicate effectively in the appropriate language or languages of the country of service with the fluency required to meet the needs of the overseas assignment.


(ii) Technical competence. Proficiency in the technical skills needed to carry out the Trainee’s assignment as a Volunteer.


(iii) Knowledge. Adequate knowledge of the culture and history of the country of assignment to ensure a successful adjustment to, and acceptance by, the host country society, as well as an appropriate understanding of the history and government of the United States which qualifies the individual to represent the United States abroad.


(c) Failure to meet standards. Failure to meet initial selection standards, failure to attain any of the selection standards by the completion of training, or failure to maintain these standards during service, may be grounds for de-selection and disqualification from Peace Corps service.


§ 305.4 Medical status eligibility standard.

(a) Requirements. Under the Peace Corps Act (22 U.S.C. 2504(e)), the Peace Corps is responsible for ensuring that Peace Corps Volunteers receive all necessary or appropriate health care during their service. To ensure that the Peace Corps will be capable of doing so, Applicants must be medically qualified for Peace Corps Volunteer service. An Applicant who is otherwise qualified must meet the following requirements:


(1) The Applicant, with or without reasonable accommodation, removal of architectural, communication or transportation barriers, or the provision of auxiliary aids or services, must have the physical and mental capacity required to meet the essential eligibility requirements for a Volunteer. In this context, the essential eligibility requirements for a Volunteer include, without limitation, the capability to:


(i) Live and work independently in an isolated location overseas at the same socio-economic level and in similar conditions as members of the community to which the Applicant is assigned;


(ii) Perform the job to which the Applicant is assigned; and


(iii) Complete a specified tour of service without undue disruption.


(2) The Peace Corps must be capable of providing the Applicant with such health care as the Peace Corps deems to be necessary or appropriate.


(3) The Applicant must not pose a direct threat (as defined in paragraph (c) of this section).


(b) Individualized assessment. In determining whether an Applicant is medically qualified, an individualized assessment is required regarding each of the requirements set forth in paragraph (a) of this section.


(c) Direct threat. (1) A “direct threat” is a significant risk to the health or safety of others that cannot be eliminated by a reasonable accommodation to policies, practices or procedures, removal of architectural, communication or transportation barriers, or the provision of auxiliary aids or services.


(2) In determining whether an applicant poses a direct threat, the Peace Corps will make an individualized assessment based on reasonable judgment that relies on current medical knowledge or on the best available objective evidence to ascertain:


(i) The nature, duration and severity of the risk;


(ii) The probability that the potential injury will actually occur; and


(iii) Whether reasonable accommodations, removal of architectural, communication or transportation barriers, or the provision of auxiliary aids or services will mitigate the risk.


(d) Reasonable accommodation. (1) The term “accommodation” means modifications to the Peace Corps’ policies, practices or procedures.


(2) An accommodation is not reasonable if:


(i) It would modify the essential eligibility requirements for a Volunteer;


(ii) It would modify, among other things, the Applicant’s Volunteer assignment or the Peace Corps’ medical program in a way that would result in a fundamental alteration in the nature of the service, program, or activity; or


(iii) It would impose an undue financial and administrative burden on the operations of the Peace Corps, including its medical program.


(3) In determining whether an accommodation would impose an undue financial and administrative burden on the operations of the Peace Corps, the Peace Corps may take into account, among other things:


(i) The size and composition of the Peace Corps staff at the post of assignment;


(ii) The adequacy of local medical facilities and the availability of other medical facilities;


(iii) The nature and cost of the accommodation compared to the overall number of Volunteers and the overall size of the Peace Corps budget; and


(iv) The capacities of the host country agency and of the host community to which the Applicant would be assigned.


(e) Medical status eligibility review. (1) An Applicant who is determined by medical screening staff not to be medically qualified for Peace Corps Volunteer service may request review of that decision by submitting any relevant information to the Office of Medical Services (OMS). The information submitted by the Applicant will be reviewed by a physician, and, unless the physician determines that the Applicant is medically qualified, by a Pre-Service Review Board (PSRB) composed of medical personnel in OMS and advised by the General Counsel. Procedures for such review are subject to approval by the General Counsel.


(2) The PSRB will include as voting members at least one physician as well as other medical professionals in OMS. In any case involving review of issues involving mental health, at least one mental health professional from the Counseling and Outreach Unit will also participate as a voting member.


(3) The decision of the PSRB will be reviewed by the General Counsel for legal sufficiency. Subject to that review, it will constitute the final agency action.


§ 305.5 Legal status eligibility standard.

(a) General requirements. The existence of an arrest or conviction record may, but will not automatically, exclude an Applicant from consideration for Peace Corps service. The Peace Corps will consider the nature of the offense, how long ago the offense occurred, whether the Applicant was acquitted of the offense, the terms of any applicable parole or probation, and other relevant facts or indications of rehabilitation.


(b) Drug and alcohol related offenses. (1) An Applicant with any drug-related conviction, with a conviction for public intoxication, driving under the influence (DUI), or driving while intoxicated (DWI), with a conviction for reckless driving after having been initially charged with DUI or DWI, or with a similar alcohol-related conviction, is not eligible to have his or her application for Peace Corps service considered until 12 months has passed from the date of the incident.


(2) An Applicant who, at any time on or prior to the day of departure for Peace Corps service, is arrested for any drug offense or for public intoxication, DUI, DWI or any similar alcohol-related offense will have any pending application or invitation for Peace Corps service withdrawn. If the charges are dismissed, an Applicant whose application or invitation for Peace Corps service was terminated may immediately reapply. If the applicant is convicted of the offense, he or she may reapply after 12 months from the date of the incident.


(c) Review process. An Applicant who is rejected for a Volunteer position because of an arrest or conviction may request a review of that decision by submitting any relevant information to the Associate Director of the Office of Volunteer Recruitment and Selection (VRS). The Associate Director will review the information submitted and consult with the General Counsel. The decision of the Associate Director will be the final agency decision. The Associate Director may delegate authority to conduct such a review to another senior member of VRS, but not to the supervisor of the office making the original eligibility determination.


(d) Subsequent application. An Applicant rejected for service due to failure to meet the legal status eligibility standard may reapply at a later date, but not sooner than 12 months after the final agency decision.


§ 305.6 Applicants with an intelligence background.

(a) General. It has been the longstanding policy of the Peace Corps to exclude from Volunteer service any individuals who have engaged in intelligence activity or related work or who have been employed by or connected with an intelligence agency, either for a specific period of time or permanently (depending on the agency). This policy is founded on the premise that it is crucial to the Peace Corps in carrying out its mission that there be a complete and total separation of Peace Corps from the intelligence activities of the United States Government or any foreign government, both in reality and appearance. Any semblance of a connection between the Peace Corps and the intelligence community would seriously compromise the ability of the Peace Corps to develop and maintain the trust and confidence of the people of the host countries. To ensure that there is not the slightest basis for the appearance of any connection between the Peace Corps and the intelligence community, this policy contains certain temporary and permanent bars to Peace Corps service. Serious doubts about an Applicant’s connection with intelligence activities are to be resolved in favor of exclusion.


(b) Definitions. For purposes of this section:


(1) Intelligence activity includes any activities or specialized training involving or related to the clandestine collection of information, or the analysis or dissemination of such information, intended for use by the United States Government or any foreign government in formulating or implementing political or military policy in regard to other countries. The term “intelligence activity” includes any involvement in covert actions designed to influence events in foreign countries. The fact that the name of an employer or the description of a person’s work uses or does not use the term “intelligence” does not, in and of itself, mean that the person has or has not engaged in intelligence activity or related work.


(2) Intelligence agency includes:


(i) Any agency, division of an agency, or instrumentality of the United States Government that is a member of the United States Intelligence Community; and


(ii) Any other agency, division of an agency, or instrumentality of the United States Government or any foreign government, a substantial part of whose mission has been determined by the General Counsel to include intelligence activities.


(3) Employment, employee or employed refer to the existence of a relationship of employer and employee, whether full-time or part-time, permanent or temporary, whether or not the individual is engaged in intelligence activity for an employer, without regard to the length of time the relationship existed or is proposed to exist, and includes individuals performing duties as volunteers, fellows, interns, consultants, personal services contractors, contractors (non-personal services contractors), and employees of contractors who were assigned to work for an intelligence agency or to engage in intelligence activities. Employees of contractors who were or are not themselves assigned to work for an Intelligence Agency or to engage in intelligence activities are not considered to have been or to be employed by an intelligence agency.


(c) Employment by an intelligence agency or engagement in intelligence activities. (1) An Applicant currently or formerly employed by the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) is permanently ineligible for Peace Corps Volunteer service.


(2) An Applicant who has been employed by an intelligence agency other than the CIA is ineligible for a minimum of 10 years from the last day of employment by such intelligence agency. This bar on an Applicant who is or was employed by an intelligence agency applies whether or not the Applicant was engaged in intelligence activity for the intelligence agency.


(3) An Applicant who has been engaged in intelligence activities is ineligible for service as a Volunteer for a period of 10 years from the last date on which the Applicant engaged in intelligence activities.


(4) An Applicant may be ineligible for service for a period in excess of 10 years if the General Counsel determines that the Applicant’s background or work history with regard to intelligence activities warrants such action.


(d) Relationship to intelligence agency or activity. (1) An Applicant whose background discloses a relationship to an intelligence agency or intelligence activity may be ineligible to serve as a Peace Corps Volunteer. The term “relationship” means any association with an intelligence agency or with an intelligence activity, if such association could be the basis for an inference or the appearance that an Applicant was engaged in an intelligence activity. The association could include, but not be limited to, one based upon a familial, personal or financial connection to an intelligence agency or with an intelligence activity.


(2) Determinations of the eligibility or periods of ineligibility of such Applicants will be made by the General Counsel on a case by case basis using the criteria set forth below. Examples of the type of relationships among others that could lead to ineligibility are Applicants whose spouses, domestic partners, or parents are or were involved in actual intelligence activities, or members of the immediate family of prominent highly placed officials in an intelligence agency who might be the target of harassment or violence overseas as the result of family connections. Employment by an organization that has been funded by an intelligence agency may also lead to ineligibility.


(3) In determining whether an Applicant’s relationship to an intelligence agency or intelligence activity makes the Applicant ineligible for service, or in determining the duration of any ineligibility, the General Counsel will consider the following factors as appropriate:


(i) Nature of the relationship.


(ii) The intelligence agency with which the Applicant has the relationship.


(iii) Duration of the relationship.


(iv) Length of time that has elapsed since the last connection to the intelligence agency.


(v) Where the intelligence activity or work was performed.


(vi) Nature of the connection with intelligence activity or work.


(vii) Whether or not the intelligence activity or work involved contact with foreign nationals.


(viii) Whether the connection was known or unknown to the Applicant at the time it occurred.


(ix) Training received, if any.


(x) Regularity of the contact with foreign nationals, and nature of duties, if any.


(xi) Public knowledge of the activity or connection.


(xii) Any other information which bears on the relationship of the Applicant to an intelligence agency or intelligence activity.


(e) Determination. VRS is responsible for the initial screening of Peace Corps Volunteer applications for compliance with the provisions of this policy. In cases where that office is unable to make a decision regarding the eligibility of an Applicant under this policy, the individual’s application will be referred to the General Counsel, who will make the determination on eligibility.


(f) Appeal. VRS will inform all Applicants promptly and in writing of any decision to disqualify them based on an intelligence background and the reasons for that decision. Applicants have 15 days from the date of receipt of the letter from VRS to appeal the decision to the Director of the Peace Corps. The decision of the Director of the Peace Corps will be the final agency decision.


(g) Post Peace Corps employment by United States intelligence agencies. Pursuant to agreements between the Peace Corps and certain intelligence agencies, those intelligence agencies will not employ former Volunteers for a specified period after the end of their Peace Corps service and will not use former Volunteers for certain purposes or in certain positions. Information regarding such agreements may be obtained from the Office of the General Counsel.


§ 305.7 Special circumstances.

(a) Couples. Two Applicants who are married to one another or two unmarried Applicants who are in a same-sex or opposite-sex domestic partnership or other committed relationship are eligible to apply for service as a couple. In the case of an unmarried couple, each member of the couple must provide a sworn statement, in a form acceptable to the Peace Corps, attesting to their domestic partnership status or committed relationship (as the case may be) and their request to be considered for assignment as a couple. In all cases, both members of the couple must apply and qualify for assignment at the same location.


(b) Serving with dependents and other family members. In general, dependents and other family members may not accompany a Volunteer during service. However, the Peace Corps may from time to time make exceptions either on a case-by-case basis or for particular categories of Volunteers to the extent permitted by Federal law.


(c) Military service. The Peace Corps welcomes applications from veterans, reservists, and active duty military personnel who are interested in Peace Corps service after completion of their military service. After receiving an invitation for Peace Corps service, applicants with reserve obligations are reminded to comply with all requirements to notify their reserve component that they will be unavailable for drills and annual training because of their Peace Corps service. Such applicants are urged to obtain written confirmation from their reserve component that they have complied with these requirements.


§ 305.8 Background investigation.

Section 22 of the Peace Corps Act requires that each Applicant be investigated to ensure that enrollment of the Applicant as a Volunteer is consistent with the national interest. The Peace Corps therefore obtains an appropriate background investigation for all Applicants who are invited to serve in the Peace Corps. Information revealed by the background investigation may be grounds for disqualification from Peace Corps service. Under the Peace Corps Act, if a background investigation regarding an Applicant develops any data reflecting that the Applicant is of questionable loyalty or is a questionable security risk, the Peace Corps must refer the matter to the Federal Bureau of Investigation for a full field investigation. The results of that full field investigation will be furnished to the Peace Corps for information and appropriate action.


PART 306 – VOLUNTEER DISCRIMINATION COMPLAINT PROCEDURE


Authority:22 U.S.C. 2501 et seq.


Source:86 FR 30171, June 7, 2021, unless otherwise noted.

Subpart A – General Provisions

§ 306.1 Purpose.

The purpose of this part is to establish a procedure for the filing, investigation, and administrative determination of allegations of discrimination (including harassment) based on race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age (40 or over), disability or other bases provided for in applicable statutes, regulations or the Peace Corps Manual or history of participation in the Peace Corps discrimination complaint process which arise in connection with the recruitment, selection, placement, service, or termination of applicants, trainees, or volunteers. In addition, any Peace Corps applicant, trainee, or volunteer may submit an allegation of discrimination to the Peace Corps Office of Inspector General at any time, and the allegation will be processed in accordance with policy and procedures of the Office of Inspector General.


§ 306.2 Policy.

(a) In the recruitment, selection, placement, service, and termination of Peace Corps Trainees and Volunteers, it is the policy of the Peace Corps to provide equal opportunity for all persons and to prohibit discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age (40 or over), disability, and other bases provided for in applicable statutes, regulations or the Peace Corps Manual, or history of participation in the Peace Corps discrimination complaint process.


(b) It is the policy of the Peace Corps, upon a determination that such prohibited discrimination has occurred, to take appropriate corrective action to remedy the discrimination and to prevent its recurrence.


(c) It is the policy of the Peace Corps that all agency staff must cooperate in the investigation of a complaint. Volunteers and trainees are strongly encouraged to cooperate.


§ 306.3 Definitions.

Unless the context requires otherwise, in this part:


Applicant means a person who has submitted a completed application required for consideration of eligibility for Peace Corps Volunteer service. “Applicant” may also mean a person who alleges that the actions of agency personnel precluded them from submitting such an application or any other information reasonably required by the appropriate personnel as necessary for a determination of the individual’s eligibility for Volunteer service.


Complainant means an aggrieved applicant, trainee, or volunteer who believes they have been subject to prohibited discrimination and files a formal complaint.


Complaint means a written statement signed by a Complainant alleging prohibited discrimination and submitted to the OCRD Director, as described in § 306.9(a).


Counselor means an official designated by the OCRD Director to perform an informal inquiry focused on possible resolution as detailed in this Part.


Director means the Director of the Peace Corps.


File(d) Date means the date a Complaint is received by the appropriate agency official.


Final Agency Decision (FAD) means the Peace Corps’ final written determination on a complaint.


OCRD Director means the Director of the Peace Corps’ Office of Civil Rights and Diversity.


Prohibited discrimination means discrimination (including harassment) on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age (40 or over), disability, or other bases provided for in applicable statutes, regulations or the Peace Corps Manual, or history of participation in the Peace Corps discrimination complaint process.


Trainee means a person who has accepted an invitation issued by the Peace Corps and has registered for Peace Corps staging.


Volunteer means a person who has taken the oath of service and been sworn in for Peace Corps service, whether or not this person is still in Peace Corps service.


§ 306.4 Coverage.

(a) Except as set out below, these procedures apply to all Peace Corps applicants, trainees, and volunteers.


(1) To the extent that a trainee or volunteer makes a complaint containing an allegation of prohibited discrimination in connection with conduct that constitutes sexual misconduct as defined in the Peace Corps’ policy on volunteer sexual misconduct.


(2) When an applicant, trainee, or volunteer makes a complaint which contains an allegation of prohibited discrimination in connection with an early termination or other administrative procedure of the agency, only the allegation of prohibited discrimination will be processed under this part. At the discretion of the OCRD Director, additional allegations or claims material to the complaint may be consolidated with the discrimination complaint for processing under these regulations. Any issues which are not so consolidated will continue to be processed under those procedures pursuant to which they were originally raised.


(3) Complaints of retaliation in connection with allegations made under the Peace Corps Volunteer Confidentiality Protection policy shall be handled in accordance with that policy.


(b) The OCRD Director has the discretion to consolidate complaints from different applicants, Trainees, or Volunteers that allege common underlying facts and similar claims.


(c) These regulations do not create any right or benefit, substantive or procedural, enforceable at law or in equity by any party against the United States, its departments, agencies, or entities, its officers, employees, or agents, or any other person. Coverage under these rules does not constitute acceptance by the agency or the United States Government of jurisdiction for judicial review.


§ 306.5 Representation.

Any aggrieved party may be assisted in all stages of these procedures under this Part by an attorney or non-staff representative of his or her own choosing at his or her own expense. An aggrieved party must immediately inform the agency if representation is retained.


§ 306.6 Freedom from retaliation.

Aggrieved parties, their representatives, and witnesses will be free from retaliation at any stage in the presentation and processing of a complaint under this section, including the counseling stage described in 306.8 of this Part, or any time thereafter.


§ 306.7 Review of allegations of retaliation.

(a) An aggrieved party, his or her representative, or a witness who alleges retaliation in connection with the presentation of a complaint under this part, may, if covered by this Part, request in writing that the allegation be reviewed as an act of discrimination subject to the procedures described in subpart B or that the allegation be considered as an issue in the complaint at hand. The determination whether to consider the complaint in the same or a separate proceeding is within the discretion of the OCRD Director.


Subpart B – Processing Individual Complaints of Discrimination

§ 306.8 Pre-complaint procedure.

(a) Any applicant, trainee or volunteer who believes that he or she has been subject to prohibited discrimination must bring such allegations to the attention of OCRD within 60 days of the alleged discrimination, at which point a Counselor will be assigned to attempt to resolve them.


(b) The pre-complaint procedure is intended to determine whether the concerns of the aggrieved party can be resolved to the mutual satisfaction of the aggrieved party and the agency without the filing of a formal complaint.


(c) The counselor serves as a neutral party, to gather a limited amount of information from the aggrieved party about his or her allegations, explain to the aggrieved party his or her rights, obtain information to determine the applicability of this regulation, and where appropriate, attempt an informal resolution among relevant parties.


(d) The amount of information that the counselor gathers from the agency is limited to information needed to reach an informal resolution to the mutual satisfaction of the aggrieved party and the agency.


(e) The counselor will keep a written record of his or her activities, which will be submitted to the OCRD Director as a counselor’s report.


(f) To the extent necessary to reach an informal resolution, the counselor may reveal to relevant agency officials the identity of the aggrieved party. In the event that the aggrieved party requests that the Counselor not share his or her identity with agency officials, the Counselor will not reveal the identity of the aggrieved party (or information that could be used to easily identify the aggrieved party) outside of OCRD. If appropriate, the Counselor should explain to the aggrieved party that an informal resolution and/or the scope of relief available may be limited as a result of the request for anonymity.


(g) The pre-complaint process should be completed within 30 days, but the OCRD Director may extend the period upon request of the aggrieved party or the agency for good cause shown.


(h) If, after inquiry and counseling, an informal resolution to the allegation is not reached, the Counselor will notify the aggrieved party in writing of the right to file a formal complaint of discrimination with the OCRD Director within 30 calendar days of the aggrieved party’s receipt of the notice.


(i) As an alternative to assignment of a Counselor as described above, the aggrieved party may ask for Alternative Dispute Resolution as set out in the Peace Corps’ policy. In such a case, the parties have 90 days to attempt in good faith to reach an informal resolution of the allegation. At any time during the course of Alternative Dispute Resolution, the aggrieved party or the Responsible Management Official (or their Supervisor), in consultation with the Office of the General Counsel, may terminate those proceedings.


§ 306.9 Complaint procedure.

(a) An applicant, trainee or volunteer who wishes to file a formal complaint must do so within 30 days of receiving the notice set out in 306.8(g) above, by filing a signed complaint in writing with OCRD. A complaint must set forth specifically:


(1) A detailed description, including names and dates, if possible, of the actions of the Peace Corps officials or other persons which resulted in the alleged prohibited discrimination;


(2) The manner in which the Peace Corps’ action directly affected the complainant; and


(3) The relief sought.


(b) A complaint that does not conform to the above requirements will nevertheless be deemed to have been received by the OCRD, and the complainant will be notified of the steps necessary to correct the deficiencies of the complaint. The complainant will have 30 days from receipt of notification that the complaint is defective to submit an amended complaint.


(c) The OCRD Director must accept a complaint if the process set forth above has been followed, and the complaint states a covered claim of prohibited discrimination. The OCRD Director may extend the time limits set out above:


(1) When the complainant shows that they were not notified of the time limits and were not otherwise aware of them;


(2) The complainant shows that they were prevented by circumstances beyond their control from submitting the matter in a timely fashion; or


(3) For other reasons considered sufficient by the OCRD Director.


(d) At any time during the complaint procedure, the OCRD Director may dismiss a complaint based on the aggrieved party’s failure to prosecute the complaint. However, this action may be taken only after:


(1) The OCRD Director has made a written request, including notice of the proposed dismissal, that the Complainant provide certain information or otherwise proceed with the complaint; and


(2) 30 days have elapsed since the sending of the request.


If the complaint is rejected for failure to meet one or more of the requirements set out in the procedure outlined in 306.8 or is dismissed, the OCRD Director will inform the aggrieved party in writing of this FAD, advising that the Peace Corps will take no further action.


(e) Upon acceptance of the complaint and receipt of the Counselor’s report, the OCRD Director will provide for a prompt impartial investigation of the complaint. The OCRD may employ a Peace Corps employee or external party to conduct the investigation. If a Peace Corps employee is selected to investigate the complaint, the person assigned to investigate the complaint may not occupy a position in the agency which is, directly or indirectly, under the jurisdiction of the head of that part of the agency in which the complaint arose. The investigation will include a review of the circumstances under which the alleged discrimination occurred, and any other circumstances which may constitute, or appear to constitute, discrimination against the complainant.


(f) Agency officials responsible for providing information relating to the complaint to the investigator will be provided such information about the complaint as they may need in order to respond appropriately. For example, responding agency officials who have a need to know may be provided with information including the identity of the complainant and statements of the alleged discriminatory basis and adverse action.


(g) In cases where sensitive and/or protected information about applicants, trainees, or volunteers (other than the complainant) is requested or involved, agency officials may only disclose such information that is directly relevant to claim(s) being investigated, and must ensure that such information is handled in such a manner that the privacy of the applicants, trainees, or volunteers in question is fully protected, in accordance with the Peace Corps’ policy on confidentiality of volunteer information.


(h) Every agency official responsible for providing information relating to the complaint to the investigator may at any point consult the Office of the General Counsel and/or his or her supervisor, unless the supervisor is alleged to have been involved in the conduct that is the subject of the complaint. Agency officials responsible for providing information to the investigator shall only provide information based on personal knowledge, and should not seek to align or conform his or her statement with that of another responding agency official.


(i) The investigator will compile a report of investigation (ROI) and forward the ROI to the OCRD Director. The OCRD Director will arrange for preparation of a draft FAD, which will be in writing, state the reasons underlying the decision, recommend corrective action if and as appropriate, and advise the complainant of the right to appeal the recommended FAD to the Peace Corps Director, or designee. To the extent feasible, this will be completed within 120 days of the filing of the complaint. However, the OCRD Director has discretion to extend the period.


(j) The OCRD Director will issue the proposed FAD to the complainant with a copy of the ROI.


(k) Within ten calendar days of receipt of such proposed FAD, the complainant may submit his or her appeal of the proposed disposition to the Peace Corps Director, or designee.


(l) The Peace Corps Director, or designee, will, to the extent feasible, decide the issue within 45 days of the date of receipt of the appeal. The claimant will be informed in writing of the decision and its basis and advised that it is the FAD regarding the complaint.


(m) Where a complainant does not submit a timely appeal pursuant to (k) above, the OCRD Director will issue the proposed FAD as the FAD.


(n) The OCRD Director will inform relevant management officials as to whether or not prohibited discrimination was found in the FAD.


§ 306.10 Corrective action.

When the agency’s FAD states that the aggrieved party has been subjected to prohibited discrimination, the following corrective actions may be taken:


(a) Selection as a trainee for an otherwise qualified complainant found to have been denied selection based on prohibited discrimination.


(b) Reinstatement to volunteer service for a complainant found to have been early-terminated as a result of prohibited discrimination. To the extent possible, a terminated volunteer will be placed in the same position previously held. However, reinstatement to the specific country of prior service, or to the specific position previously held is contingent on programmatic considerations, including but not limited to the continued availability of the position or program in that country, and acceptance by the host country of such placement. If the same position is deemed to be no longer available, the aggrieved party will be offered reenrollment in a position in as similar as possible circumstances to the position previously held, or will be given interrupted service status. A reenrollment may require a medical clearance and/or other clearances, and both additional training and an additional two year commitment to Volunteer service.


(c) Such other relief as may be deemed appropriate by the Peace Corps.


PART 308 – IMPLEMENTATION OF THE PRIVACY ACT OF 1974


Authority:5 U.S.C. 552a.


Source:50 FR 1844, Jan. 14, 1985, unless otherwise noted.

§ 308.1 Purpose.

The purpose of this part is to set forth the basic policies of the Peace Corps governing the maintenance of systems of records containing personal information as defined in the Privacy Act of 1974 (5 U.S.C. 552a). Records included in this part are those described in the aforesaid Act and maintained by the Peace Corps and/or any component thereof.


§ 308.2 Policy.

It is the policy of the Peace Corps to protect, preserve and defend the right of privacy of any individual as to whom the agency maintains personal information in any records system and to provide appropriate and complete access to such records including adequate opportunity to correct any errors in said records. It is further the policy of the agency to maintain its records in such a fashion that the information contained therein is and remains material and relevant to the purposes for which it is collected in order to maintain its records with fairness to the individuals who are the subject of such records.


§ 308.3 Definitions.

(a) Record means any document, collection, or grouping of information about an individual maintained by the agency, including but not limited to information regarding education, financial transactions, medical history, criminal or employment history, or any other personal information which contains the name or personal identification number, symbol, photograph, or other identifying particular assigned to such individual, such as a finger or voiceprint.


(b) System of Records means a group of any records under the control of the agency from which information is retrieved by use of the name of an individual or by some identifying number, symbol, or other identifying particular assigned to the individual.


(c) Routine Use means, with respect to the disclosure of a record, the use of such record for a purpose which is compatible with the purpose for which it was collected.


(d) The term agency means the Peace Corps or any component thereof.


(e) The term individual means any citizen of the United States or an alien lawfully admitted to permanent residence.


(f) The term maintain includes the maintenance, collection, use or dissemination of any record.


(g) The term Act means the Privacy Act of 1974 (5 U.S.C. 552a) as amended from time to time.


§ 308.4 Disclosure of records.

The agency will not disclose any personal information from systems of records it maintains to any individual other than the individual to whom the record pertains, or to another agency, without the express written consent of the individual to whom the record pertains, or his or her agent or attorney, except in the following instances:


(a) To officers or employees of the Peace Corps having a need for such record in the official performance of their duties.


(b) When required under the provisions of the Freedom of Information Act (5 U.S.C. 552).


(c) For routine uses as published in the Federal Register.


(d) To the Bureau of the Census for uses pursuant to title 13.


(e) To an individual or agency having a proper need for such record for statistical research provided that such record is transmitted in a form which is not individually identifiable and that an appropriate written statement is obtained from the person to whom the record is transmitted stating the purpose for the request and a certification under oath that the records will be used only for statistical purposes.


(f) To the National Archives of the United States as a record of historical value under rules and regulations of the Archives or to the Administrator of General Services or his designee to determine if it has such value.


(g) To an agency or instrumentality of any governmental jurisdiction within the control of the United States for civil or criminal law enforcement activities, if the activity is authorized by law, and the head of any such agency or instrumentality has made a written request for such records specifying the particular portion desired and the law enforcement activity for which the record is sought. Such a record may also be disclosed by the agency to the law enforcement agency on its own initiative in situations in which criminal conduct is suspected: Provided, That such disclosure has been established as a routine use or in situations in which the misconduct is directly related to the purpose for which the record is maintained.


(h) In emergency situations upon a showing of compelling circumstances affecting the health or safety of any individual provided that after such disclosure, notification of such disclosure must be promptly sent to the last known address of the individual to whom the record pertains.


(i) To either House of Congress or to a subcommittee or committee (joint or of either house) to the extent the subject matter falls within their jurisdiction.


(j) To the Comptroller General, or any of his authorized representatives, in the course of the performance of the duties of the General Accounting Office.


(k) Pursuant to an order by the presiding judge of a court of competent jurisdiction. If any record is disclosed under such compulsory legal process and subsequently made public by the court which issued it, the agency must make a reasonable effort to notify the individual to whom the record pertains of such disclosure.


(l) To consumer reporting agencies as defined in 31 U.S.C. 3701(a)(3) in accordance with 31 U.S.C. 3711, and under contracts for collection services as authorized in 31 U.S.C. 3718.


§ 308.5 New uses of information.

The agency shall publish in the Federal Register a notice of its intention to establish a new or revised routine use of any system of records maintained by it with an opportunity for public comments on such use. Such notice shall contain the following:


(a) The name of the system of records for which the new or revised routine use is to be established.


(b) The authority for maintaining the system of records.


(c) The categories of records maintained in the system.


(d) The purpose for which the record is to be maintained.


(e) The proposed routine use(s).


(f) The purpose of the routine use(s).


(g) The categories of recipients of such use.


In the event of any request for an addition to the routine uses of the systems which the agency maintains, such request may be sent to the following officer: Director, Office of Administrative Services, Peace Corps, 806 Connecticut Avenue, NW., Washington, DC 20526.


§ 308.6 Reports regarding changes in systems.

The agency shall provide to Congress and the Office of Management and Budget advance notice of any proposal to establish or alter any system of records as defined herein. This report will be submitted in accord with guidelines provided by the Office of Management and Budget.


§ 308.7 Use of social security account number in records systems. [Reserved]

§ 308.8 Rules of conduct.

(a) The head of the agency shall assure that all persons involved in the design, development, operation or maintenance of any systems of records as defined herein are informed of all requirements necessary to protect the privacy of individuals who are the subject of such records. All employees shall be informed of all implications of the Act in this area including the criminal penalties provided under the Act, and the fact the agency may be subject to civil suit for failure to comply with the provisions of the Privacy Act and these regulations.


(b) The head of the agency shall also ensure that all personnel having access to records receive adequate training in the protection of the security of personal records and that adequate and proper storage is provided for all such records with sufficient security to assure the privacy of such records.


§ 308.9 Records systems – management and control.

(a) The Director, Office of Administrative Services, shall have overall control and supervision of the security of all records keeping systems and shall be responsible for monitoring the security standards set forth in these regulations.


(b) A designated official (System Manager) shall be named who shall have management responsibility for each record system maintained by the agency and who shall be responsible for providing protection and accountability for such records at all times and for insuring that such records are secured in appropriate containers wherever not in use or in the direct control of authorized personnel.


§ 308.10 Security of records systems – manual and automated.

The head of the agency has the responsibility of maintaining adequate technical, physical, and security safeguards to prevent unauthorized disclosure or destruction of manual and automatic record systems. These security safeguards shall apply to all systems in which identifiable personal data are processed or maintained including all reports and outputs from such systems which contain identifiable personal information. Such safeguards must be sufficient to prevent negligent, accidental, or unintentional disclosure, modification or destruction of any personal records or data and must furthermore minimize the extent technicians or knowledgeable persons could improperly obtain access to modify or destroy such records or data and shall further insure against such casual entry by unskilled persons without official reasons for access to such records or data.


(a) Manual systems. (1) Records contained in records systems as defined herein may be used, held or stored only where facilities are adequate to prevent unauthorized access by persons within or without the agency.


(2) All records systems when not under the personal control of the employees authorized to use same must be stored in an appropriate metal filing cabinet. Where appropriate, such cabinet shall have a three position dial-type combination lock, and/or be equipped with a steel lock bar secured by a GSA approved changeable combination padlock or in some such other securely locked cabinet as may be approved by GSA for the storage of such records. Certain systems are not of such confidential nature that their disclosure would harm an individual who is the subject of such record. Records in this category shall be maintained in steel cabinets without the necessity of combination locks.


(3) Access to and use of systems of records shall be permitted only to persons whose official duties require such access within the agency, for routine use as defined in § 308.4 and in the Peace Corps’ published systems of records notices, or for such other uses as may be provided herein.


(4) Other than for access within the agency to persons needing such records in the performance of their official duties or routine uses as defined herein and in the Peace Corps’ systems of records notices or such other uses as provided herein, access to records within systems of records shall be permitted only to the individual to whom the record pertains or upon his or her written request to a designated personal representative.


(5) Access to areas where records systems are stored will be limited to those persons whose official duties require work in such areas and proper accounting of removal of any records from storage areas shall be maintained at all times in the form directed by the Director, Administrative Services.


(6) The agency shall assure that all persons whose official duties require access to and use of records contained in records systems are adequately trained to protect the security and privacy of such records.


(7) The disposal and destruction of records within records systems shall be in accord with rules promulgated by the General Services Administration.


(b) Automated systems. (1) Identifiable personal information may be processed, stored or maintained by automatic data systems only where facilities or conditions are adequate to prevent unauthorized access to such systems in any form. Whenever such data contained in punch cards, magnetic tapes or discs are not under the personal control of an authorized person such information must be stored in a metal filing cabinet having a built-in three position combination lock, a metal filing cabinet equipped with a steel lock, a metal filing cabinet equipped with a steel lock bar secured with a General Services Administration (GSA) approved combination padlock, or in adequate containers or in a secured room or in such other facility having greater safeguards than those provided for herein.


(2) Access to and use of identifiable personal data associated with automated data systems shall be limited to those persons whose official duties require such access. Proper control of personal data in any form associated with automated data systems shall be maintained at all times including maintenance of accountability records showing disposition of input and output documents.


(3) All persons whose official duties require access to processing and maintenance of identifiable personal data and automated systems shall be adequately trained in the security and privacy of personal data.


(4) The disposal and disposition of identifiable personal data and automated systems shall be carried on by shredding, burning or in the case of tapes of discs, degaussing, in accord with any regulations now or hereafter proposed by the GSA or other appropriate authority.


§ 308.11 Accounting for disclosure of records.

Each office maintaining a system of records shall keep a written account of routine disclosures (see paragraphs (a) through (e) of this section) for all records within such system in the form prescribed by the Director, Office of Administrative Services. Disclosure made to employees of the agency in the normal course of their official duties or pursuant to the provisions of the Freedom of Information Act need not be accounted for. Such written account shall contain the following:


(a) The date, nature, and purpose of each disclosure of a record to any person or to another agency.


(b) The name and address of the person or agency to whom the disclosure was made.


(c) Sufficient information to permit the construction of a listing of all disclosures at appropriate periodic intervals.


(d) The justification or basis upon which any release was made including any written documentation required when records are released for statistical or law enforcement purposes under the provisions of subsection (b) of the Act.


(e) For the purpose of this part, the system of accounting for disclosure is not a system of records under the definitions hereof and no accounting need be maintained for the disclosure of accounting of disclosures.


§ 308.12 Contents of records systems.

(a) The agency shall maintain in any records contained in any records system hereunder only such information about an individual as is accurate, relevant, and necessary to accomplish the purpose for which the agency acquired the information as authorized by statute or executive order.


(b) In situations in which the information may result in adverse determinations about such individual’s rights, benefits and privileges under any Federal program, all information placed in records systems shall, to the greatest extent practicable, be collected from the individual to whom the record pertains.


(c) Each form or other document which an individual is expected to complete in order to provide information for any records system shall have appended thereto, or in the body of the document:


(1) An indication of the authority authorizing the solicitation of the information and whether the provision of the information is mandatory or voluntary.


(2) The purpose or purposes for which the information is intended to be used.


(3) Routine uses which may be made of the information and published pursuant to § 308.7 of this regulation.


(4) The effect on the individual, if any, of not providing all or part of the required or requested information.


(d) Records maintained in any system of records used by the agency to make any determination about any individual shall be maintained with such accuracy, relevancy, timeliness, and completeness as is reasonably necessary to assure fairness to the individual in the making of any determination about such individual: Provided, however, That the agency shall not be required to update or keep current retired records.


(e) Before disseminating any record about an individual to any person other than an agency as defined in 5 U.S.C. 552(e) or pursuant to the provsions of the Freedom of Information Act (5 U.S.C. 552), the agency shall make reasonable efforts to assure that such records are accurate, complete, timely and relevant for agency purposes.


(f) Under no circumstances shall the agency maintain any record about an individual with respect to or describing how such individual exercises rights guaranteed by the first amendment of the Constitution of the United States unless expressly authorized by statute or by the individual about whom the record is maintained or unless pertinent to and within the scope of an authorized law enforcement activity.


(g) In the event any record is disclosed as a result of the order of a presiding judge of a court of competent jurisdiction, the agency shall make reasonable efforts to notify the individual whose record was so disclosed after the process becomes a matter of public record.


§ 308.13 Access to records.

(a) The Director, Administrative Services, shall keep a current list of systems of records maintained by the agency and published in accordance with the provisions of these regulations.


(b) Individuals requesting access to any record the agency maintains about him or her in a system of records shall be provided access to such records. Such requests shall be submitted in writing by mail, or in person during regular business hours, to the System Managers identified in the specific system notices. Systems maintained at overseas and dometic field offices may be addressed to the Country Director or Regional Service Center Manager. If assistance is needed, the Director, Office of Administrative Services, will provide agency addresses.


(c) Requests for records from more than one system of records shall be directed to the Director, Office of Administrative Services, Peace Crops, 806 Connecticut Avenue, NW., Washington, DC 20526.


(d) Requests for access to or copies of records should contain, at a minimum, identifying information needed to locate any given record and a brief description of the item or items of information required. If the individual wishes access to specific documents the request should identify or describe as nearly as possible such documents.


(e) A record may be disclosed to a representative of the person to whom a record relates who is authorized in writing to have access to the record by the person to whom it relates.


(f) A request made in person will be promptly complied with if the records sought are in the immediate custody of the Peace Corps. Mailed or personal request for documents in storage which must be complied from more than one location, or which are otherwise not immediately available, will be acknowledge within ten working days, and the records requested will be provided as promptly thereafter as possible.


(g) Medical or psychological records shall be disclosed to an individual unless in the judgment of the agency, access to such records might have an adverse effect upon such individual. When such determination has been made, the agency may require that the information be disclosed only to a physician chosen by the requesting individual. Such physician shall have full authority to disclose all or any portion of such record to the requesting individual in the exercise of his or her professional judgment.


§ 308.14 Specific exemptions.

Records or portions of records in certain record systems specified in paragraphs (a) through (c) of this section shall be exempt from disclosure: Provided, however, That no such exemption shall apply to the provisions of § 308.12(a) (maintaining records with accuracy, completeness, etc. as reasonably necessary for agency purposes); § 308.12(b) (collecting information directly from the individual to whom it pertains); § 308.12(c) (informing individuals asked to supply information of the purposes for which it is collected and whether it is mandatory); § 308.12(g) (notifying the subjects of records disclosed under compulsory court process); § 308.16(d)(3) (informing prior recipient of corrected or disputed records); § 308.16(g) (civil remedies). With the above exceptions the following material shall be exempt from disclosure to the extent indicated:


(a) Material in any system of records considered classified and exempt from disclosure under provisions of section 552(b)(1) of the Freedom of Information Act. Agency systems of records now containing such material are: Legal Files – Staff, Volunteers and Applicants; Security Records Peace Corps Staff/Volunteers and ACTION staff.


(1) Authority: 5 U.S.C. 552a (k)(1)


(2) Reasons: To protect information classified in the interest of national defense or foreign policy.


(b) Investigatory material compiled for the purposes of law enforcement: Provided, however, That if any individual is denied any right, privilege, or benefit that he or she would otherwise be entitled to by Federal law, or for which he or she would otherwise be eligible, as a result of the maintenance of such material, such material shall be provided to such individual except to the extent necessary to protect the identity of a source who furnished information to the government under an express promise that his or her identity would be held in confidence, or prior to the effective date of the Privacy Act of 1974, under an implied promise of such confidentiality of the identity of such source. Agency systems of records containing such investigatory material are: Discrimination Complaint Files; Employee Occupational Injury and Illness Reports; Legal Files – Staff, Volunteers and Applicants; Security Records – Peace Corps Staff/Volunteers and ACTION Staff.


(1) Authority: 5 U.S.C. 552a(k)(2)


(2) Reasons: To protect the identity of sources to whom proper promises of confidentiality have been made during investigations. Without these promises, sources will often be unwilling to provide information essential in adjudicating access in a fair and impartial manner.


(c) Investigatory material compiled solely for the purpose of determining suitability, eligibility or qualification for service as an employee or volunteer or for the obtaining of a Federal contract or for access to classified information: Provided, however, That such material shall be disclosed to the extent possible without revealing the identity of a source who furnished information to the government under an express promise of the confidentiality of his or her identity or, prior to the effective date of the Privacy Act of 1974, under an implied promise of such confidentiality of identity. Agency systems of records containing such material are: Contractors and Consultant Files; Discrimination Complaint Files; Legal Files – Staff, Volunteers and Applicants; Personal Service Contract Records – Peace Corps Staff/Volunteers and ACTION Staff; Staff Applicant and Personnel Records; Talent Bank; Volunteer Applicant and Service Record Systems.


(1) Authority: 5 U.S.C. 552a(k)(5)


(2) Reasons: To ensure the frankness of information used to determine whether Peace Corps Volunteers applicants and Peace Corps Staff applicants are qualified for service with the agency.


(d) Records in the Office of Inspector General Investigative Files and Records system of records are exempt from certain provisions to the extent provided hereinafter.


(1) To the extent that the system of records pertains to the enforcement of criminal laws, the Office of Inspector General Investigative Files and Records system of records is exempt from all sections of the Privacy Act (5 U.S.C. 552a) except the following sections: (b) relating to conditions of disclosure; (c)(1) and (2) relating to keeping and maintaining a disclosure accounting; (e)(4)(A) through (F) relating to publishing a system notice setting the name, location, categories of individuals and records, routine uses, and policies regarding storage, retrievability, access controls, retention and disposal of the records; (e)(6), (7), (9), (10), and (11) relating to dissemination and maintenance of records and (i) relating to criminal penalties. This system of records is also exempt from the provisions of § 308.11 through § 308.17 to the extent that the provisions of these sections conflict with this paragraph.


(i) Authority: 5 U.S.C. 552a(j)(2).


(ii) Reasons:


(A) To prevent interference with law enforcement proceedings.


(B) To avoid unwarranted invasion of personal privacy, by disclosure of information about third parties, including other subjects of investigations, investigators, and witnesses.


(C) To protect the identity of Federal employees who furnish a complaint or information to OIG, consistent with section 7(b) of the Inspector General Act of 1978, as amended, 5 U.S.C. App. 3.


(D) To protect the confidentiality of non-Federal employee sources of information.


(E) To assure access to sources of confidential information, including those contained in Federal, State, and local criminal law enforcement information systems.


(F) To prevent disclosure of law enforcement techniques and procedures.


(G) To avoid endangering the life or physical safety of confidential sources.


(2) To the extent that there may exist within this system of records investigative files compiled for law enforcement purposes, other than material within the scope of subsection (j)(2) of the Privacy Act, the OIG Investigative Files and Records system of records is exempt from the following sections of the Privacy Act: (c)(3) relating to access to the disclosure accounting; (d) relating to access to records; (e)(1) relating to the type of information maintained in the records; (e)(4) (G), (H), and (I) relating to publishing the system notice information as to agency procedures for access and amendment, and information as to the categories of sources or records; and (f) relating to developing agency rules for gaining access and making corrections. Provided, however, That if any individual is denied any right, privilege, or benefit that they would otherwise be entitled by Federal law, or for which they would otherwise be eligible, as a result of the maintenance of such material, such material shall be provided to such individual except to the extent that the disclosure of such material would reveal the identity of a source who furnished information to the Government under an express promise that the identity of the source would be held in confidence, or, prior to January 1, 1975, under an implied promise that the identity of the source would be held in confidence. This system of records is also exempt from the provisions of § 308.11 through § 308.17 to the extent that the provisions of these sections conflict with this paragraph.


(i) Authority: 5 U.S.C. 552a(k)(2)


(ii) Reasons:


(A) To prevent interference with law enforcement proceedings.


(B) To protect investigatory material compiled for law enforcement purposes.


(C) To avoid unwarranted invasion of personal privacy, by disclosure of information about third parties, including other subjects of investigation, law enforcement personnel, and sources of information.


(D) To fulfill commitments made to protect the confidentiality of sources.


(E) To protect the identity of Federal employees who furnish a complaint or information to the OIG, consistent with Section 7(b) of the Inspector General Act of 1978, as amended, 5 U.S.C. App. 3.


(F) To assure access to sources of confidential information, including those contained in Federal, State, and local criminal law enforcement systems.


(G) [Reserved]


(H) To prevent disclosure of law enforcement techniques and procedures.


(I) To avoid endangering the life or physical safety of confidential sources and law enforcement personnel.


[50 FR 1844, Jan. 14, 1985, as amended at 58 FR 39657, July 26, 1993]


§ 308.15 Identification of requesters.

The agency shall require reasonable identification of all individuals who request access to records to assure that records are not disclosed to persons not entitled to such access.


(a) In the event an individual requests disclosure in person, such individual shall be required to show an identification card such as a driver’s license, etc., containing a photo and a sample signature of such individual. Such individual may also be required to sign a statement under oath as to his or her identity acknowledging that he or she is aware of the penalties for improper disclosure under the provisions of the Privacy Act of 1974.


(b) In the event that disclosure is requested by mail, the agency may request such information as may be necessary to reasonably assure that the individual making such request is properly identified. In certain cases, the agency may require that a mail request be notarized with an indication that the notary received an acknowledgment of identity from the individual making such request.


(c) In the event an individual is unable to provide suitable documentation or identification, the agency may require a signed notarized statement asserting the identity of the individual and stipulating that the individual understands that knowingly or willfully seeking or obtaining access to records about another person under false pretenses is punishable by a fine of up to $5,000.


(d) In the event a requester wishes to be accompanied by another person while reviewing his or her records, the agency may require a written statement authorizing discussion of his or her records in the presence of the accompanying representative or other persons.


§ 308.16 Amendment of records and appeals with respect thereto.

(a) In the event an individual desires to request an amendment of his or her record, he or she may do so by submitting such written request to the Director, Administrative Services, Peace Corps, 806 Connecticut Avenue, NW., Washington, DC 20526. The Director, Administrative Services, shall provide assistance in preparing any amendment upon request and a written acknowledgment of receipt of such request within 10 working days after the receipt thereof from the individual who requested the amendment. Such acknowledgment may, if necessary, request any additional information needed to make a determination with respect to such request. If the agency decides to comply with the request within the 10 day period, no written acknowledgment is necessary: Provided, however, That a certification of the change shall be provided to such individual within such period.


(b) Promptly after acknowledgment of the receipt of a request for an amendment the agency shall take one of the following actions:


(1) Make any corrections of any portion of the record which the individual believes is not accurate, relevant, timely or complete.


(2) Inform the individual of its refusal to amend the record in accord with the request together with the reason for such refusal and the procedures established for requesting review of such refusal by the head of the agency or his or her designee. Such notice shall include the name and business address of the reviewing official.


(3) Refer the request to the agency that has control of and maintains the record in those instances where the record requested remains the property of the controlling agency and not of the Peace Corps.


(c) In reviewing a request to amend the record the agency shall assess the accuracy, relevance, timeliness and completeness of the record with due and appropriate regard for fairness to the individual about whom the record is maintained. In making such determination, the agency shall consult criteria for determining record quality published in pertinent chapters of the Federal Personnel Manual and to the extent possible shall accord therewith.


(d) In the event the agency agrees with the individual’s request to amend such record it shall:


(1) Advise the individual in writing,


(2) Correct the record accordingly, and


(3) Advise all previous recipients of a record which was corrected of the correction and its substance.


(e) In the event the agency, after an initial review of the request to amend a record, disagrees with all or a portion of it, the agency shall:


(1) Advise the individual of its refusal and the reasons therefore,


(2) Inform the individual that he or she may request further review in accord with the provisions of these regulations, and


(3) Specify The name and address of the person to whom the request should be directed.


(f) In the event an individual requester disagrees with the initial agency determination, he or she may appeal such determination to the Director of the Peace Corps or his or her designee. Such request for review must be made within 30 days after receipt by the requester of the initial refusal to amend.


(g) If after review the Director or designee refuses to amend the record as requested he or she shall advise the individual requester of such refusal and the reasons for same; of his or her right to file a concise statement in the record of the reasons for disagreeing with the decision of the agency; of the procedures for filing a statement of disagreement and of the fact that such statement so filed will be made available to anyone to whom the record is subsequently disclosed together with a brief statement of the agency summarizing its reasons for refusal, if the agency decides to place such brief statement in the record. The agency shall have the authority to limit the length of any statement to be filed, such limit to depend upon the record involved. The agency shall also inform such individual that prior recipients of the disputed record will be provided a copy of both statements of the dispute to the extent that the accounting of disclosures has been maintained and of the individual’s right to seek judicial review of the agency’s refusal to amend the record.


(h) If after review the official determines that the record should be amended in accordance with the individual’s request, the agency shall proceed as provided above in the event a request is granted upon initial demand.


(i) Final agency determination of an individual’s request for a review shall be concluded with 30 working days from the date of receipt of the review request: Provided, however, That the Director or designee may determine that fair and equitable review cannot be made within that time. If such circumstances occur, the individual shall be notified in writing of the additional time required and of the approximate date on which determination of the review is expected to be completed.


§ 308.17 Denial of access and appeals with respect thereto.

In the event that the agency finds it necessary to deny any individual access to a record about such individual pursuant to provisions of the Privacy Act or of these regulations, a response to the original request shall be made in writing within ten working days after the date of such initial request. The denial shall specify the reasons for such refusal or denial and advise the individual of the reasons therefore, and of his or her right to an appeal within the agency and/or judicial review under the provisions of the Act.


(a) In the event an individual desires to appeal any denial of access, he or she may do so in writing by addressing such appeal to the attention of the Director, Peace Corps, or designee identified in such denial. Such appeal should be addressed to Director, Peace Corps, c/o Office of Administrative Services, Room P-314, 806 Connecticut Avenue, NW., Washington, DC 20526.


(b) The Director, or designee, shall review a request from a denial of access and shall make a determination with respect to such appeal within 30 days after receipt thereof. Notice of such determination shall be provided to the individual making the request in writing. If such appeal is denied in whole or in part, such notice shall include notification of the right of the person making such request to have judicial review of the denial as provided in the Act.


§ 308.18 Fees.

No fees shall be charged for search time or for any other time expended by the agency to produce a record. Copies of records may be charged for at the rate of 10 cents per page provided that one copy of any record shall be provided free of charge.


PART 309 – DEBT COLLECTION


Authority:31 U.S.C. 3701-3719; 5 U.S.C. 5514; 22 U.S.C. 2503(b); 31 U.S.C. 3720A; 31 CFR part 285; 5 CFR 550, subpart K.


Source:73 FR 18155, Apr. 3, 2008, unless otherwise noted.

Subpart A – General Provisions

§ 309.1 General purpose.

This part prescribes the procedures to be used by the United States Peace Corps (Peace Corps) in the collection and/or disposal of non-tax debts owed to Peace Corps and to the United States.


§ 309.2 Scope.

(a) Applicability of Federal Claims Collection Standards (FCCS). Peace Corps hereby adopts the provisions of the Federal Claims Collections Standards (31 CFR parts 900-904) and, except as set forth in this part or otherwise provided by law, Peace Corps will conduct administrative actions to collect claims (including offset, compromise, suspension, termination, disclosure and referral) in accordance with the FCCS.


(b) This part is not applicable to:


(1) Peace Corps claims against another Federal agency, any foreign country or any political subdivision thereof, or any public international organization.


(2) Debts arising out of acquisitions contracts subject to the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) shall be determined, collected, compromised, terminated, or settled in accordance with those regulations (see 49 CFR part 32).


(3) Claims where the Peace Corps Director (or designee) determines that the achievement of the purposes of the Peace Corps Act, as amended, 22 U.S.C. 2501 et seq., or any other provision of law administered by the Peace Corps require a different course of action.


§ 309.3 Definitions.

As used in this part (except where the context clearly indicates, or where the term is otherwise defined elsewhere in this part) the following definitions shall apply:


(a) Administrative offset means withholding funds payable by the United States to, or held by the United States for, a person to satisfy a debt owed by the person to the United States.


(b) Administrative wage garnishment means the process by which a Federal agency orders a non-Federal employer to withhold amounts from an employee’s wages to satisfy a debt the employee owes to the United States.


(c) Compromise means that the creditor agency accepts less than the full amount of an outstanding debt in full satisfaction of the entire amount of the debt.


(d) Debt or claim means an amount of money which has been determined by an appropriate agency official to be owed to the United States from any person. As used in this part, the terms debt and claim are synonymous.


(e) Debtor means a person who owes the Federal Government money.


(f) Delinquent debt means any debt, which has not been paid by the date specified in an agency’s initial written notification or in an applicable agreement, unless other satisfactory payment arrangements have been made.


(g) Discharge means the release of a debtor from personal liability for a debt. Further collection action is prohibited.


(h) Disposable pay has the same meaning as that term is defined in 5 CFR § 550.1103.


(i) Employee means a current employee of the Peace Corps or other Federal agency, including a member of the Armed Forces or Reserve of the Armed Forces of the United States.


(j) FCCS means the Federal Claims Collection Standards jointly published by the Department of the Treasury and the Department of Justice at 31 CFR parts 900-904.


(k) Person means an individual, corporation, partnership, association, organization, State or local government, or any other type of entity other than a Federal agency, foreign government, or public international organization.


(l) Salary offset means the withholding of amounts from the current pay account of a Federal employee to satisfy a debt owed by that employee to the United States.


(m) Suspension means the temporary cessation of an active debt collection pending the occurrence of an anticipated event.


(n) Termination means the cessation of all active debt collection action for the foreseeable future.


(o) Waiver means the decision to forgo collection of a debt owed to the United States as permitted or required by law.


§ 309.4 Other procedures or actions.

(a) Nothing contained in this regulation is intended to require Peace Corps to duplicate administrative proceedings required by contract or other laws or regulations.


(b) Nothing in this regulation is intended to preclude utilization of informal administrative actions or remedies which may be available.


(c) Nothing contained in this regulation is intended to deter Peace Corps from demanding the return of specific property or from demanding the return of the property or the payment of its value.


(d) The failure of Peace Corps to comply with any provision in this regulation shall not serve as a defense to the debt.


§ 309.5 Interest, penalties, and administrative costs.

(a) Except as otherwise provided by statute, contract or excluded in accordance with FCCS, Peace Corps will assess:


(1) Interest on unpaid debts in accordance with 31 CFR 901.9.


(2) Penalty charges at a rate of 6 percent a year or such other rate as authorized by law on any portion of a claim that is delinquent for more than 90 days.


(3) Administrative charges to cover the costs of processing and handling delinquent debts.


(4) Late payment charges that shall be computed from the date of mailing or hand delivery of the notice of the claim and interest requirements.


(b) When a debt is paid in partial or installment payments, amounts received shall be applied first to outstanding penalty and administrative cost charges, second to accrued interest, and then to outstanding principal.


(c) Waiver. Peace Corps will consider waiver of interest, penalties and/or administrative costs in accordance with the FCCS, 31 CFR 901.9(g).


§ 309.6 Collection in installments.

Whenever feasible, and except as required otherwise by law, debts owed to the United States, together with interest, penalties, and administrative costs as required by this regulation, should be collected in one lump sum. This is true whether the debt is being collected under administrative offset, including salary offset, or by another method, including voluntary payment. However, if the debtor is financially unable to pay the indebtedness in one lump sum, payment may be accepted in regular installments. If Peace Corps agrees to accept payment in installments, it may require a legally enforceable written agreement from the debtor that specifies all of the terms of the arrangement and which contains a provision accelerating the debt in the event the debtor defaults. The size and frequency of the payments should bear a reasonable relation to the size of the debt and ability of the debtor to pay. If possible, the installment payments should be sufficient in size and frequency to liquidate the Government’s claim within three years.


§ 309.7 Designation.

The Chief Financial Officer is delegated authority and designated to perform all the duties for which the Director is responsible under the forgoing statutes and joint regulations.


Subpart B – Collection Actions

§ 309.8 Application.

(a) Peace Corps shall aggressively collect claims and debts in accordance with these regulations and applicable law.


(b) Peace Corps will transfer to the Department of the Treasury, Financial Management Service (FMS) any past due, legally enforceable non-tax debt that has been delinquent for 180 days or more so that FMS may take appropriate action to collect the debt or take other appropriate action in accordance with applicable law and regulation.


(c) Peace Corps may transfer any past due, legally enforceable debt that has been delinquent for fewer than 180 days to FMS for collection in accordance with applicable law and regulation. (See 31 CFR part 285.)


§ 309.9 Notice – written demand for payment.

(a) Upon determination that a debt is owed to Peace Corps or the United States, Peace Corps shall promptly hand deliver or send by first-class mail (to the debtor’s most current address in the records of Peace Corps) at least one written notice (e.g. Bill of Collection or demand letter) informing the debtor of the consequences of failing to pay or otherwise resolve a Peace Corps debt, subject to paragraph (c) of this section. Written demand under this subpart may be preceded by other appropriate actions under this part and or the FCCS, including but not limited to actions taken under the procedures applicable to administrative offset, including salary offset.


(b) The written notice shall inform the debtor of:


(1) The nature and amount of the debt, and the facts giving rise to the debt;


(2) The date by which payment should be made to avoid the imposition of interest, penalties, and administrative costs, and the enforced collection actions described in § 309.5 of this part;


(3) The applicable standards for imposing interest, penalties and administrative costs to delinquent debts;


(4) Peace Corps’ willingness to discuss alternative payment arrangements and how the debtor may enter into a written agreement to repay the debt under terms acceptable to Peace Corps;


(5) The name, address, and telephone number of a contact person or office within Peace Corps;


(6) Peace Corps’ intention to enforce collection if the debtor fails to pay or otherwise resolve the debt, by taking one or more of the following actions:


(i) Offset from Federal payments otherwise due to the debtor, including income tax refunds, salary, certain benefit payments, retirement, vendor payments, travel reimbursement and advances, and other Federal payments;


(ii) Referral to private collection agency;


(iii) Report to credit bureaus;


(iv) Administrative wage garnishment;


(v) Referral to Department of Justice for litigation action;


(vi) Referral to Financial Management Service of the Department of the Treasury for collection;


(vii) Other actions as permitted by the FCCS and applicable law.


(7) How the debtor may inspect and copy records related to the debt;


(8) The debtor’s opportunity for an internal review of Peace Corps’ determination that the debtor owes a debt or the amount of the debt;


(9) The debtor’s right, if any, to request waiver of collection of certain debts, as applicable;


(10) Requirement that the debtor advise Peace Corps of any bankruptcy proceeding of the debtor.


(c) Peace Corps may omit from a notice to a debtor one or more of the provisions contained in paragraphs (b) (6) through (10) of this section if Peace Corps determines that any provision is not legally required given the collection remedies to be applied to a particular debt, or which have already been provided by prior notice, applicable agreement, or contract.


§ 309.10 Review requirements.

(a) For purposes of this section, whenever Peace Corps is required to afford a debtor a review within the agency, Peace Corps shall provide the debtor with an opportunity for an internal review of the existence or the amount of the debt. For offset of current Federal salary under 5 U.S.C. 5514 for certain debts, debtors may also request an outside hearing. (See subpart C of this part)


(b) Any request for a review must be in writing to the contact office by the payment due date stated in the initial notice sent under § 309.9(b) or other applicable provision. The debtor’s request shall state the basis for the dispute and include any relevant documentation in support.


(1) Peace Corps will provide for an internal review of the debt by an appropriate agency official. The review may include examination of documents, internal discussions with relevant officials and discussion by letter or orally with the debtor, at Peace Corps’ discretion.


(2) An oral hearing is not required when, in Peace Corps’ determination, the matter can be decided on the documentary record. Peace Corps will provide a “paper hearing”, that is, a determination based upon a review of the written record unless Peace Corps makes a determination that a debt involves issues of credibility or veracity, at which point an oral hearing may be required. Unless otherwise required by law, such oral hearing shall not be a formal evidentiary hearing.


§ 309.11 Collection.

Upon final determination of the existence and amount of a debt, unless other acceptable payment arrangement have been made or procedures under a specific statute apply, Peace Corps shall collect the debt by one or more of the methods described in § 309.9(b) (6) (i-vii) or as otherwise authorized by law and regulation.


(a) Administrative offset – (1) Payments otherwise due the debtor from the United States shall be offset from the debt in accordance with 31 CFR 901.3. These may be funds under the control of Peace Corps or other Federal agencies. Collection may be through centralized offset by the Financial Management Service (FMS) of the Department of the Treasury.


(2) Such payments include but are not limited to vendor payments, salary, retirement, lump sum payments due upon Federal employment separation, travel reimbursements, tax refunds, loans or other assistance. Offset of Federal salary payments will be in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 5514.


(3) Before administrative offset is instituted by another Federal agency or the FMS, Peace Corps shall certify in writing to that entity that the debt is past due and legally enforceable and that Peace Corps has complied with all applicable due process and other requirements as described in this part and other Federal law and regulations.


(b) Any other method authorized by law or regulation.


Subpart C – Salary Offset

§ 309.12 Purpose.

This subpart provides Peace Corps’ policies and procedures for the collection by salary offset of a Federal employee’s pay to satisfy certain past due debts owed the United States Government.


§ 309.13 Scope.

(a) The provisions of this section apply to collection by salary offset under 5 U.S.C. 5514 of debts owed to Peace Corps and debts owed to other Federal agencies by Peace Corps’ employees. Peace Corps will make reasonable and lawful efforts to administratively collect amounts owed by employees prior to initiating salary offset action. This section does not apply to debts where collection by salary offset is explicitly provided for or prohibited by another statute (e.g. travel advances).


(b) References. The following statutes and regulations apply to Peace Corps’ recovery of debts due the United States by salary offset:


(1) 5 U.S.C. 5514, as amended, governing the installment collection of debts;


(2) 31 U.S.C. 3716, governing the liquidation of debts by administrative offset;


(3) 5 CFR part 550, subpart K, setting forth the minimum requirements for executive agency regulations on salary offset; and


(4) 31 CFR parts 900 through 904, the Federal Claims Collections Standards.


(c) Nothing in this subpart precludes the compromise, suspension, or termination of collection actions where appropriate under the standards implementing the Federal Claims Collection Standards.


§ 309.14 Coordinating offset with another Federal agency.

(a) When Peace Corps is owed a debt by an employee of another agency, the other agency shall not initiate the requested offset until Peace Corps provides the agency with a written certification that the debtor owes Peace Corps a debt (including the amount and basis of the debt and the due date of payment) and that Peace Corps has complied with these regulations.


(b) When another agency is owed the debt, Peace Corps may use salary offset against one of its employees who is indebted to another agency, if requested to do so by that agency. Such request must be accompanied by a certification that the person owes the debt (including the amount and basis of the debt and the due date of payment) and that the agency has complied with its regulations as required by 5 U.S.C. 5514 and 5 CFR part 550, subpart K.


§ 309.15 Notice requirements before offset.

(a) Deductions under the authority of 5 U.S.C. 5514 shall not be made unless the creditor agency first provides the employee with written notice that he/she owes a debt to the Federal Government at least 30 calendar days before salary offset is to be initiated. When Peace Corps is the creditor agency this notice of intent to offset an employee’s salary shall be hand-delivered or sent by certified mail to the most current address that is available. The written notice will state:


(1) That Peace Corps has reviewed the records relating to the claim and has determined that a debt is owed, its origin and nature, and the amount of the debt;


(2) The intention of Peace Corps to collect the debt by means of deduction from the employee’s current disposable pay account until the debt and all accumulated interest is paid in full;


(3) The amount, frequency, approximate beginning date, and duration of the intended deductions;


(4) An explanation of the Peace Corps’ policy concerning interest, penalties and administrative costs, including a statement that such assessments must be made unless excused in accordance with the FCCS (See § 309.5);


(5) The employee’s right to inspect and copy all records of the Peace Corps pertaining to the debt claimed or to receive copies of such records if personal inspection is impractical;


(6) The right to a hearing conducted by a hearing official (an administrative law judge, or alternatively, an individual not under the supervision or control of the Peace Corps) with respect to the existence and amount of the debt claimed, or the repayment schedule, so long as a petition is filed by the employee as prescribed;


(7) If not previously provided, the opportunity (under terms agreeable to the Peace Corps) to establish a schedule for the voluntary repayment of the debt or to enter into a written agreement to establish a schedule for repayment of the debt in lieu of offset. The agreement must be in writing, signed by both the employee and the creditor agency, and documented in the creditor agency’s files;


(8) The name, address and telephone number of an officer or employee of the Peace Corps who may be contacted concerning procedures for requesting a hearing;


(9) The method and time period for requesting a hearing;


(10) That the timely filing of a petition for a hearing as prescribed will stay the commencement of collection proceedings;


(11) The name and address of the office to which the petition should be sent;


(12) That the Peace Corps will initiate certification procedures to implement a salary offset, as appropriate, (which may not exceed 15 percent of the employee’s disposable pay) not less than 30 calendar days from the date of delivery of the notice of debt, unless the employee files a timely petition for a hearing;


(13) That a final decision on the hearing (if one is requested) will be issued at the earliest practical date, but not later than 60 calendar days after the filing of the petition requesting the hearing, unless the employee requests and the hearing official grants a delay in the proceedings;


(14) That any knowingly false or frivolous statements, representations or evidence may subject the employee to:


(i) Disciplinary procedures appropriate under the Peace Corps Act or the Foreign Service Act, Peace Corps regulations, or any other applicable statutes or regulations;


(ii) Penalties under the False Claims Act, §§ 3729-3731 of title 31, United States Code, or any other applicable statutory authority; and


(iii) Criminal penalties under 18 U.S.C. sections 286, 287, 1001, and 1002 or any other applicable authority;


(15) Any other rights and remedies available to the employee under statutes or regulations governing the program for which the collection is being made;


(16) That unless there are applicable contractual or statutory provisions to the contrary, amounts paid on or deducted for the debt which are later waived or found not owed to the United States will be promptly refunded to the employee; and


(17) That proceedings with respect to such debt are governed by 5 U.S.C. 5514.


(b) Peace Corps is not required to provide prior notice to an employee when the following adjustments are made by Peace Corps to a Peace Corps employee’s pay:


(1) Any adjustment to pay arising out of an employee’s election of coverage or a change in coverage under a Federal benefits program requiring periodic deductions from pay if the amount to be recovered was accumulated over four pay periods or less;


(2) A routine adjustment of pay that is made to correct an overpayment of pay attributable to clerical or administrative errors or delays in processing pay documents, if the overpayment occurred within the four pay periods preceding the adjustment, and, at the time of such adjustment, or as soon thereafter as practical, the individual is provided written notice of the nature and the amount of the adjustment and point of contact for contesting the adjustment; or


(3) Any adjustment to collect a debt of $50 or less, if, at the time of such adjustment, or as soon thereafter as practical, the individual is provided written notice of the nature of the amount of the adjustment and a point of contact for contesting the adjustment.


§ 309.16 Review.

(a) Request for outside hearing. Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, an employee who desires an outside hearing concerning the existence or amount of the debt or the proposed offset schedule must send a request to the office designated in the notice of intent. See § 309.15(a)(8). The request must be received by the designated office not later than 20 calendar days after the date of delivery of the notice as provided in § 309.15(a). The request must be signed by the employee and should identify and explain with reasonable specificity and brevity the facts, evidence and witnesses which the employee believes support his or her position. If the employee objects to the percentage of disposable pay to be deducted from each check, the request should state the objection and the reasons for it. The employee must also specify whether an oral hearing or a review of the documentary evidence is requested. If an oral hearing is desired, the request should explain why the matter cannot be resolved by review of the documentary evidence alone.


(b) Failure to submit timely. (1) If the employee files a petition for a review after the expiration of the 20 calendar day period provided for in paragraph (a) of this section, the designated office may accept the request if the employee can show that the delay was the result of circumstances beyond his or her control, or because of a failure to receive the notice of the filing deadline (unless the employee has actual knowledge of the filing deadline).


(2) An employee waives the right to a review, and will have his or her disposable pay offset in accordance with Peace Corps’ offset schedule, if the employee fails to file a request for a hearing unless such failure is excused as provided in paragraph (b)(1) of this section.


(3) If the employee fails to appear at an oral hearing of which he or she was notified, unless the hearing official determines failure to appear was due to circumstances beyond the employee’s control, his or her appeal will be decided on the basis of the documents then available to the hearing official.


(c) Representation at the hearing. The creditor agency may be represented by a representative of its choice. The employee may represent himself or herself or may be represented by an individual of his or her choice and at his or her expense.


(d) Review of Peace Corps records related to the debt. (1) An employee who intends to inspect or copy creditor agency records related to the debt in accordance with § 309.15(a)(5), must send a letter to the official designated in the notice of intent to offset stating his or her intention. The letter must be sent within 20 calendar days after receipt of the notice.


(2) In response to a timely request submitted by the debtor, the designated official will notify the employee of the location and time when the employee may inspect and copy records related to the debt.


(3) If personal inspection is impractical, copies of such records shall be sent to the employee.


(e) Oral Hearing. (1) If an employee timely files a request for an oral hearing under § 309.16(a), the matter will be conducted by a hearing official not under the supervision or control of Peace Corps.


(2) Procedure. (i) After the employee requests a hearing, the hearing official shall notify the employee of the form of the hearing to be provided. If the hearing will be oral, notice shall set forth the date, time and location of the hearing. If the hearing will be paper, the employee shall be notified that he or she should submit arguments in writing to the hearing official by a specified date after which the record shall be closed. This date shall give the employee reasonable time to submit documentation.


(ii) An employee who requests an oral hearing shall be provided an oral hearing if the hearing official determines that the matter cannot be resolved by review of documentary evidence alone (e.g. when an issue of credibility or veracity is involved). The hearing is not an adversarial adjudication, and need not take the form of an evidentiary hearing.


(iii) If the hearing official determines that an oral hearing is not necessary, he or she will make a decision based upon a review of the available written record.


(iv) The hearing official must maintain a summary record of any hearing provided by this subpart. Witnesses who provide testimony will do so under oath or affirmation.


(3) Decision. The written decision shall include:


(i) A statement of the facts presented to support the origin, nature, and amount of the debt;


(ii) The hearing official’s findings, analysis, and conclusions; and


(iii) The terms of any repayment schedules, or the date salary offset will commence, if applicable.


(4) Failure to appear. In the absence of good cause shown (e.g. excused illness), an employee who fails to appear at a hearing shall be deemed, for the purpose of this subpart, to admit the existence and amount of the debt as described in the notice of intent. The hearing official shall schedule a new hearing upon the request of the creditor agency representative when good cause is shown.


(5) A hearing official’s decision is considered to be an official certification regarding the existence and amount of the debt for purposes of executing salary offset under 5 U.S.C. 5514 only. It does not supersede the finding by Peace Corps that a debt is owed and does not affect the Government’s ability to recoup the debt through alternative collection methods under other appropriate methods.


§ 309.17 Procedures for salary offset.

Unless otherwise provided by statute or contract, the following procedures apply to salary offset:


(a) Method. Salary offset will be made by deduction at one or more officially established pay intervals from the current pay account of the employee without his or her consent.


(b) Source. The source of salary offset is current disposable pay.


(c) Types of collection – (1) Lump sum payment. Ordinarily debts will be collected by salary offset in one lump sum if possible. However, if the amount of the debt exceeds 15 percent of disposable pay for an officially established pay interval, the collection by salary offset must be made in installment deductions.


(2) Installment deductions. (i) The size of installment deductions must bear a reasonable relation to the size of the debt and the employee’s ability to pay. If possible, the size of the deduction will be that necessary to liquidate the debt in no more than 1 year. However, the amount deducted for any period must not exceed 15 percent of the disposable pay from which the deduction is made, except as provided by other regulations or unless the employee has agreed in writing to greater amount.


(ii) Installment payments of less than $25 per pay period will be accepted only in the most unusual circumstances.


(iii) Installment deductions will be made over a period of not greater than the anticipated period of employment.


§ 309.18 Voluntary repayment agreements as an alternative to salary offset.

(a) In response to a notice of intent, an employee may propose a written agreement to repay the debt as an alternative to salary offset. Any employee who wishes to repay a debt without salary offset shall submit in writing a proposed agreement to repay the debt. The proposal shall admit the existence of the debt and set forth a proposed repayment schedule. Any proposal under this paragraph must be received by the official designated in that notice within 20 calendar days after receipt of the notice of intent.


(b) When the Peace Corps is the creditor agency, in response to a timely proposal by the debtor the agency will notify the employee whether the employee’s proposed written agreement for repayment is acceptable. It is within the agency’s discretion to accept a repayment agreement instead of proceeding by offset.


(c) If the Peace Corps decides that the proposed repayment agreement is unacceptable, the employee will have 15 calendar days from the date he or she received notice of the decision to file a petition for a review.


(d) If the Peace Corps decides that the proposed repayment agreement is acceptable, the alternative arrangement must be in writing and signed by both the employee and a designated agency official.


§ 309.19 Waiver.

(a) Under certain circumstances, employees may have a statutory right to request a waiver of indebtedness. When an employee makes a request under a statutory right, further collection will be stayed pending an administrative determination on the request.


(b) Waiver of indebtedness is an equitable remedy and as such must be based on an assessment of the facts involved in the individual case under consideration. The burden is on the employee to demonstrate that the applicable waiver standard has been met.


§ 309.20 Compromise.

Peace Corps may attempt to effect compromise in accordance with the standards set forth in the FCCS (31 CFR part 902).


§ 309.21 Suspension of collection.

Suspension of collection action shall be made in accordance with the standards set forth in the FCCS (31 CFR 903.1-903.2).


§ 309.22 Termination of collection.

Termination of collection action shall be made in accordance with the standards set forth in the FCCS (31 CFR 903.1 and 903.3-903.4).


§ 309.23 Discharge.

Once a debt has been closed out for accounting purposes and collection has been terminated, the debt is discharged. Peace Corps will report discharged debt as income to the debtor to the Internal Revenue Service per 26 U.S.C. 6050P and 26 CFR 1.6050P-1.


§ 309.24 Bankruptcy.

Peace Corps generally terminates collection activity on debts that have been discharged in bankruptcy unless otherwise provided for by bankruptcy law. The CFO will seek legal advice by the General Counsel’s office if there is the belief that any claims or offset may have survived the discharge of a debtor.


PART 311 – NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING


Authority:Section 319, Public Law 101-121 (31 U.S.C. 1352); 22 U.S.C. 2503.


Cross Reference:

See also Office of Management and Budget notice published at 54 FR 52306, December 20, 1989.



Source:55 FR 6737, 6749, Feb. 26, 1990, unless otherwise noted.

Subpart A – General

§ 311.100 Conditions on use of funds.

(a) No appropriated funds may be expended by the recipient of a Federal contract, grant, loan, or cooperative ageement to pay any person for influencing or attempting to influence an officer or employee of any agency, a Member of Congress, an officer or employee of Congress, or an employee of a Member of Congress in connection with any of the following covered Federal actions: the awarding of any Federal contract, the making of any Federal grant, the making of any Federal loan, the entering into of any cooperative agreement, and the extension, continuation, renewal, amendment, or modification of any Federal contract, grant, loan, or cooperative agreement.


(b) Each person who requests or receives from an agency a Federal contract, grant, loan, or cooperative agreement shall file with that agency a certification, set forth in appendix A, that the person has not made, and will not make, any payment prohibited by paragraph (a) of this section.


(c) Each person who requests or receives from an agency a Federal contract, grant, loan, or a cooperative agreement shall file with that agency a disclosure form, set forth in appendix B, if such person has made or has agreed to make any payment using nonappropriated funds (to include profits from any covered Federal action), which would be prohibited under paragraph (a) of this section if paid for with appropriated funds.


(d) Each person who requests or receives from an agency a commitment providing for the United States to insure or guarantee a loan shall file with that agency a statement, set forth in Appendix A, whether that person has made or has agreed to make any payment to influence or attempt to influence an officer or employee of any agency, a Member of Congress, an officer or employee of Congress, or an employee of a Member of Congress in connection with that loan insurance or guarantee.


(e) Each person who requests or receives from an agency a commitment providing for the United States to insure or guarantee a loan shall file with that agency a disclosure form, set forth in appendix B, if that person has made or has agreed to make any payment to influence or attempt to influence an officer or employee of any agency, a Member of Congress, an officer or employee of Congress, or an employee of a Member of Congress in connection with that loan insurance or guarantee.


§ 311.105 Definitions.

For purposes of this part:


(a) Agency, as defined in 5 U.S.C. 552(f), includes Federal executive departments and agencies as well as independent regulatory commissions and Government corporations, as defined in 31 U.S.C. 9101(1).


(b) Covered Federal action means any of the following Federal actions:


(1) The awarding of any Federal contract;


(2) The making of any Federal grant;


(3) The making of any Federal loan;


(4) The entering into of any cooperative agreement; and,


(5) The extension, continuation, renewal, amendment, or modification of any Federal contract, grant, loan, or cooperative agreement.


Covered Federal action does not include receiving from an agency a commitment providing for the United States to insure or guarantee a loan. Loan guarantees and loan insurance are addressed independently within this part.

(c) Federal contract means an acquisition contract awarded by an agency, including those subject to the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR), and any other acquisition contract for real or personal property or services not subject to the FAR.


(d) Federal cooperative agreement means a cooperative agreement entered into by an agency.


(e) Federal grant means an award of financial assistance in the form of money, or property in lieu of money, by the Federal Government or a direct appropriation made by law to any person. The term does not include technical assistance which provides services instead of money, or other assistance in the form of revenue sharing, loans, loan guarantees, loan insurance, interest subsidies, insurance, or direct United States cash assistance to an individual.


(f) Federal loan means a loan made by an agency. The term does not include loan guarantee or loan insurance.


(g) Indian tribe and tribal organization have the meaning provided in section 4 of the Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act (25 U.S.C. 450B). Alaskan Natives are included under the definitions of Indian tribes in that Act.


(h) Influencing or attempting to influence means making, with the intent to influence, any communication to or appearance before an officer or employee or any agency, a Member of Congress, an officer or employee of Congress, or an employee of a Member of Congress in connection with any covered Federal action.


(i) Loan guarantee and loan insurance means an agency’s guarantee or insurance of a loan made by a person.


(j) Local government means a unit of government in a State and, if chartered, established, or otherwise recognized by a State for the performance of a governmental duty, including a local public authority, a special district, an intrastate district, a council of governments, a sponsor group representative organization, and any other instrumentality of a local government.


(k) Officer or employee of an agency includes the following individuals who are employed by an agency:


(1) An individual who is appointed to a position in the Government under title 5, U.S. Code, including a position under a temporary appointment;


(2) A member of the uniformed services as defined in section 101(3), title 37, U.S. Code;


(3) A special Government employee as defined in section 202, title 18, U.S. Code; and,


(4) An individual who is a member of a Federal advisory committee, as defined by the Federal Advisory Committee Act, title 5, U.S. Code appendix 2.


(l) Person means an individual, corporation, company, association, authority, firm, partnership, society, State, and local government, regardless of whether such entity is operated for profit or not for profit. This term excludes an Indian tribe, tribal organization, or any other Indian organization with respect to expenditures specifically permitted by other Federal law.


(m) Reasonable compensation means, with respect to a regularly employed officer or employee of any person, compensation that is consistent with the normal compensation for such officer or employee for work that is not furnished to, not funded by, or not furnished in cooperation with the Federal Government.


(n) Reasonable payment means, with respect to perfessional and other technical services, a payment in an amount that is consistent with the amount normally paid for such services in the private sector.


(o) Recipient includes all contractors, subcontractors at any tier, and subgrantees at any tier of the recipient of funds received in connection with a Federal contract, grant, loan, or cooperative agreement. The term excludes an Indian tribe, tribal organization, or any other Indian organization with respect to expenditures specifically permitted by other Federal law.


(p) Regularly employed means, with respect to an officer or employee of a person requesting or receiving a Federal contract, grant, loan, or cooperative agreement or a commitment providing for the United States to insure or guarantee a loan, an officer or employee who is employed by such person for at least 130 working days within one year immediately preceding the date of the submission that initiates agency consideration of such person for receipt of such contract, grant, loan, cooperative agreement, loan insurance commitment, or loan guarantee commitment. An officer or employee who is employed by such person for less than 130 working days within one year immediately preceding the date of the submission that initiates agency consideration of such person shall be considered to be regularly employed as soon as he or she is employed by such person for 130 working days.


(q) State means a State of the United States, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, a territory or possession of the United States, an agency or instrumentality of a State, and a multi-State, regional, or interstate entity having governmental duties and powers.


§ 311.110 Certification and disclosure.

(a) Each person shall file a certification, and a disclosure form, if required, with each submission that initiates agency consideration of such person for:


(1) Award of a Federal contract, grant, or cooperative agreement exceeding $100,000; or


(2) An award of a Federal loan or a commitment providing for the United States to insure or guarantee a loan exceeding $150,000.


(b) Each person shall file a certification, and a disclosure form, if required, upon receipt by such person of:


(1) A Federal contract, grant, or cooperative agreement exceeding $100,000; or


(2) A Federal loan or a commitment providing for the United States to insure or guarantee a loan exceeding $150,000, unless such person previously filed a certification, and a disclosure form, if required, under paragraph (a) of this section.


(c) Each person shall file a disclosure form at the end of each calendar quarter in which there occurs any event that requires disclosure or that materially affects the accuracy of the information contained in any disclosure form previously filed by such person under paragraphs (a) or (b) of this section. An event that materially affects the accuracy of the information reported includes:


(1) A cumulative increase of $25,000 or more in the amount paid or expected to be paid for influencing or attempting to influence a covered Federal action; or


(2) A change in the person(s) or individual(s) influencing or attempting to influence a covered Federal action; or,


(3) A change in the officer(s), employee(s), or Member(s) contacted to influence or attempt to influence a covered Federal action.


(d) Any person who requests or receives from a person referred to in paragraphs (a) or (b) of this section:


(1) A subcontract exceeding $100,000 at any tier under a Federal contract;


(2) A subgrant, contract, or subcontract exceeding $100,000 at any tier under a Federal grant;


(3) A contract or subcontract exceeding $100,000 at any tier under a Federal loan exceeding $150,000; or,


(4) A contract or subcontract exceeding $100,000 at any tier under a Federal cooperative agreement, shall file a certification, and a disclosure form, if required, to the next tier above.


(e) All disclosure forms, but not certifications, shall be forwarded from tier to tier until received by the person referred to in paragraphs (a) or (b) of this section. That person shall forward all disclosure forms to the agency.


(f) Any certification or disclosure form filed under paragraph (e) of this section shall be treated as a material representation of fact upon which all receiving tiers shall rely. All liability arising from an erroneous representation shall be borne solely by the tier filing that representation and shall not be shared by any tier to which the erroneous representation is forwarded. Submitting an erroneous certification or disclosure constitutes a failure to file the required certification or disclosure, respectively. If a person fails to file a required certification or disclosure, the United States may pursue all available remedies, including those authorized by section 1352, title 31, U.S. Code.


(g) For awards and commitments in process prior to December 23, 1989, but not made before that date, certifications shall be required at award or commitment, covering activities occurring between December 23, 1989, and the date of award or commitment. However, for awards and commitments in process prior to the December 23, 1989 effective date of these provisions, but not made before December 23, 1989, disclosure forms shall not be required at time of award or commitment but shall be filed within 30 days.


(h) No reporting is required for an activity paid for with appropriated funds if that activity is allowable under either subpart B or C.


Subpart B – Activities by Own Employees

§ 311.200 Agency and legislative liaison.

(a) The prohibition on the use of appropriated funds, in § 311.100 (a), does not apply in the case of a payment of reasonable compensation made to an officer or employee of a person requesting or receiving a Federal contract, grant, loan, or cooperative agreement if the payment is for agency and legislative liaison activities not directly related to a covered Federal action.


(b) For purposes of paragraph (a) of this section, providing any information specifically requested by an agency or Congress is allowable at any time.


(c) For purposes of paragraph (a) of this section, the following agency and legislative liaison activities are allowable at any time only where they are not related to a specific solicitation for any covered Federal action:


(1) Discussing with an agency (including individual demonstrations) the qualities and characteristics of the person’s products or services, conditions or terms of sale, and service capabilities; and,


(2) Technical discussions and other activities regarding the application or adaptation of the person’s products or services for an agency’s use.


(d) For purposes of paragraph (a) of this section, the following agencies and legislative liaison activities are allowable only where they are prior to formal solicitation of any covered Federal action:


(1) Providing any information not specifically requested but necessary for an agency to make an informed decision about initiation of a covered Federal action;


(2) Technical discussions regarding the preparation of an unsolicited proposal prior to its official submission; and,


(3) Capability presentations by persons seeking awards from an agency pursuant to the provisions of the Small Business Act, as amended by Public Law 95-507 and other subsequent amendments.


(e) Only those activities expressly authorized by this section are allowable under this section.


§ 311.205 Professional and technical services.

(a) The prohibition on the use of appropriated funds, in § 311.100 (a), does not apply in the case of a payment of reasonable compensation made to an officer or employee of a person requesting or receiving a Federal contract, grant, loan, or cooperative agreement or an extension, continuation, renewal, amendment, or modification of a Federal contract, grant, loan, or cooperative agreement if payment is for professional or technical services rendered directly in the preparation, submission, or negotiation of any bid, proposal, or application for that Federal contract, grant, loan, or cooperative agreement or for meeting requirements imposed by or pursuant to law as a condition for receiving that Federal contract, grant, loan, or cooperative agreement.


(b) For purposes of paragraph (a) of this section, “professional and technical services” shall be limited to advice and analysis directly applying any professional or technical discipline. For example, drafting of a legal document accompanying a bid or proposal by a lawyer is allowable. Similarly, technical advice provided by an engineer on the performance or operational capability of a piece of equipment rendered directly in the negotiation of a contract is allowable. However, communications with the intent to influence made by a professional (such as a licensed lawyer) or a technical person (such as a licensed accountant) are not allowable under this section unless they provide advice and analysis directly applying their professional or technical expertise and unless the advice or analysis is rendered directly and solely in the preparation, submission or negotiation of a covered Federal action. Thus, for example, communications with the intent to influence made by a lawyer that do not provide legal advice or analysis directly and solely related to the legal aspects of his or her client’s proposal, but generally advocate one proposal over another are not allowable under this section because the lawyer is not providing professional legal services. Similarly, communications with the intent to influence made by an engineer providing an engineering analysis prior to the preparation or submission of a bid or proposal are not allowable under this section since the engineer is providing technical services but not directly in the preparation, submission or negotiation of a covered Federal action.


(c) Requirements imposed by or pursuant to law as a condition for receiving a covered Federal award include those required by law or regulation, or reasonably expected to be required by law or regulation, and any other requirements in the actual award documents.


(d) Only those services expressly authorized by this section are allowable under this section.


§ 311.210 Reporting.

No reporting is required with respect to payments of reasonable compensation made to regularly employed officers or employees of a person.


Subpart C – Activities by Other Than Own Employees

§ 311.300 Professional and technical services.

(a) The prohibition on the use of appropriated funds, in § 311.100 (a), does not apply in the case of any reasonable payment to a person, other than an officer or employee of a person requesting or receiving a covered Federal action, if the payment is for professional or technical services rendered directly in the preparation, submission, or negotiation of any bid, proposal, or application for that Federal contract, grant, loan, or cooperative agreement or for meeting requirements imposed by or pursuant to law as a condition for receiving that Federal contract, grant, loan, or cooperative agreement.


(b) The reporting requirements in § 311.110 (a) and (b) regarding filing a disclosure form by each person, if required, shall not apply with respect to professional or technical services rendered directly in the preparation, submission, or negotiation of any commitment providing for the United States to insure or guarantee a loan.


(c) For purposes of paragraph (a) of this section, professional and technical services shall be limited to advice and analysis directly applying any professional or technical discipline. For example, drafting or a legal document accompanying a bid or proposal by a lawyer is allowable. Similarly, technical advice provided by an engineer on the performance or operational capability of a piece of equipment rendered directly in the negotiation of a contract is allowable. However, communications with the intent to influence made by a professional (such as a licensed lawyer) or a technical person (such as a licensed accountant) are not allowable under this section unless they provide advice and analysis directly applying their professional or technical expertise and unless the advice or analysis is rendered directly and solely in the preparation, submission or negotiation of a covered Federal action. Thus, for example, communications with the intent to influence made by a lawyer that do not provide legal advice or analysis directly and solely related to the legal aspects of his or her client’s proposal, but generally advocate one proposal over another are not allowable under this section because the lawyer is not providing professional legal services. Similarly, communications with the intent to influence made by an engineer providing an engineering analysis prior to the preparation or submission of a bid or proposal are not allowable under this section since the engineer is providing technical services but not directly in the preparation, submission or negotiation of a covered Federal action.


(d) Requirements imposed by or pursuant to law as a condition for receiving a covered Federal award include those required by law or regulation, or reasonably expected to be required by law or regulation, and any other requirements in the actual award documents.


(e) Persons other than officers or employees of a person requesting or receiving a covered Federal action include consultants and trade associations.


(f) Only those services expressly authorized by this section are allowable under this section.


Subpart D – Penalties and Enforcement

§ 311.400 Penalties.

(a) Any person who makes an expenditure prohibited herein shall be subject to a civil penalty of not less than $10,000 and not more than $100,000 for each such expenditure.


(b) Any person who fails to file or amend the disclosure form (see appendix B) to be filed or amended if required herein, shall be subject to a civil penalty of not less than $10,000 and not more than $100,000 for each such failure.


(c) A filing or amended filing on or after the date on which an administrative action for the imposition of a civil penalty is commenced does not prevent the imposition of such civil penalty for a failure occurring before that date. An administrative action is commenced with respect to a failure when an investigating official determines in writing to commence an investigation of an allegation of such failure.


(d) In determining whether to impose a civil penalty, and the amount of any such penalty, by reason of a violation by any person, the agency shall consider the nature, circumstances, extent, and gravity of the violation, the effect on the ability of such person to continue in business, any prior violations by such person, the degree of culpability of such person, the ability of the person to pay the penalty, and such other matters as may be appropriate.


(e) First offenders under paragraphs (a) or (b) of this section shall be subject to a civil penalty of $10,000, absent aggravating circumstances. Second and subsequent offenses by persons shall be subject to an appropriate civil penalty between $10,000 and $100,000, as determined by the agency head or his or her designee.


(f) An imposition of a civil penalty under this section does not prevent the United States from seeking any other remedy that may apply to the same conduct that is the basis for the imposition of such civil penalty.


§ 311.405 Penalty procedures.

Agencies shall impose and collect civil penalties pursuant to the provisions of the Program Fraud and Civil Remedies Act, 31 U.S.C. sections 3803 (except subsection (c)), 3804, 3805, 3806, 3807, 3808, and 3812, insofar as these provisions are not inconsistent with the requirements herein.


§ 311.410 Enforcement.

The head of each agency shall take such actions as are necessary to ensure that the provisions herein are vigorously implemented and enforced in that agency.


Subpart E – Exemptions

§ 311.500 Secretary of Defense.

(a) The Secretary of Defense may exempt, on a case-by-case basis, a covered Federal action from the prohibition whenever the Secretary determines, in writing, that such an exemption is in the national interest. The Secretary shall transmit a copy of each such written exemption to Congress immediately after making such a determination.


(b) The Department of Defense may issue supplemental regulations to implement paragraph (a) of this section.


Subpart F – Agency Reports

§ 311.600 Semi-annual compilation.

(a) The head of each agency shall collect and compile the disclosure reports (see appendix B) and, on May 31 and November 30 of each year, submit to the Secretary of the Senate and the Clerk of the House of Representatives a report containing a compilation of the information contained in the disclosure reports received during the six-month period ending on March 31 or September 30, respectively, of that year.


(b) The report, including the compilation, shall be available for public inspection 30 days after receipt of the report by the Secretary and the Clerk.


(c) Information that involves intelligence matters shall be reported only to the Select Committee on Intelligence of the Senate, the Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence of the House of Representatives, and the Committees on Appropriations of the Senate and the House of Representatives in accordance with procedures agreed to by such committees. Such information shall not be available for public inspection.


(d) Information that is classified under Executive Order 12356 or any successor order shall be reported only to the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate and the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the House of Representatives or the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives (whichever such committees have jurisdiction of matters involving such information) and to the Committees on Appropriations of the Senate and the House of Representatives in accordance with procedures agreed to by such committees. Such information shall not be available for public inspection.


(e) The first semi-annual compilation shall be submitted on May 31, 1990, and shall contain a compilation of the disclosure reports received from December 23, 1989 to March 31, 1990.


(f) Major agencies, designated by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), are required to provide machine-readable compilations to the Secretary of the Senate and the Clerk of the House of Representatives no later than with the compilations due on May 31, 1991. OMB shall provide detailed specifications in a memorandum to these agencies.


(g) Non-major agencies are requested to provide machine-readable compilations to the Secretary of the Senate and the Clerk of the House of Representatives.


(h) Agencies shall keep the originals of all disclosure reports in the official files of the agency.


§ 311.605 Inspector General report.

(a) The Inspector General, or other official as specified in paragraph (b) of this section, of each agency shall prepare and submit to Congress each year, commencing with submission of the President’s Budget in 1991, an evaluation of the compliance of that agency with, and the effectiveness of, the requirements herein. The evaluation may include any recommended changes that may be necessary to strengthen or improve the requirements.


(b) In the case of an agency that does not have an Inspector General, the agency official comparable to an Inspector General shall prepare and submit the annual report, or, if there is no such comparable official, the head of the agency shall prepare and submit the annual report.


(c) The annual report shall be submitted at the same time the agency submits its annual budget justifications to Congress.


(d) The annual report shall include the following: All alleged violations relating to the agency’s covered Federal actions during the year covered by the report, the actions taken by the head of the agency in the year covered by the report with respect to those alleged violations and alleged violations in previous years, and the amounts of civil penalties imposed by the agency in the year covered by the report.


Appendix A to Part 311 – Certification Regarding Lobbying

Certification for Contracts, Grants, Loans, and Cooperative Agreements

The undersigned certifies, to the best of his or her knowledge and belief, that:


(1) No Federal appropriated funds have been paid or will be paid, by or on behalf of the undersigned, to any person for influencing or attempting to influence an officer or employee of an agency, a Member of Congress, an officer or employee of Congress, or an employee of a Member of Congress in connection with the awarding of any Federal contract, the making of any Federal grant, the making of any Federal loan, the entering into of any cooperative agreement, and the extension, continuation, renewal, amendment, or modification of any Federal contract, grant, loan, or cooperative agreement.


(2) If any funds other than Federal appropriated funds have been paid or will be paid to any person for influencing or attempting to influence an officer or employee of any agency, a Member of Congress, an officer or employee of Congress, or an employee of a Member of Congress in connection with this Federal contract, grant, loan, or cooperative agreement, the undersigned shall complete and submit Standard Form-LLL, “Disclosure Form to Report Lobbying,” in accordance with its instructions.


(3) The undersigned shall require that the language of this certification be included in the award documents for all subawards at all tiers (including subcontracts, subgrants, and contracts under grants, loans, and cooperative agreements) and that all subrecipients shall certify and disclose accordingly.


This certification is a material representation of fact upon which reliance was placed when this transaction was made or entered into. Submission of this certification is a prerequisite for making or entering into this transaction imposed by section 1352, title 31, U.S. Code. Any person who fails to file the required certification shall be subject to a civil penalty of not less than $10,000 and not more than $100,000 for each such failure.


Statement for Loan Guarantees and Loan Insurance

The undersigned states, to the best of his or her knowledge and belief, that:


If any funds have been paid or will be paid to any person for influencing or attempting to influence an officer or employee of any agency, a Member of Congress, an officer or employee of Congress, or an employee of a Member of Congress in connection with this commitment providing for the United States to insure or guarantee a loan, the undersigned shall complete and submit Standard Form-LLL, “Disclosure Form to Report Lobbying,” in accordance with its instructions.


Submission of this statement is a prerequisite for making or entering into this transaction imposed by section 1352, title 31, U.S. Code. Any person who fails to file the required statement shall be subject to a civil penalty of not less than $10,000 and not more than $100,000 for each such failure.


Appendix B to Part 311 – Disclosure Form To Report Lobbying




PART 312 – GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE)


Authority:22 U.S.C. 2503 (b); 41 U.S.C. 701 et seq.


Source:68 FR 66588, Nov. 26, 2003, unless otherwise noted.

Subpart A – Purpose and Coverage

§ 312.100 What does this part do?

This part carries out the portion of the Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988 (41 U.S.C. 701 et seq., as amended) that applies to grants. It also applies the provisions of the Act to cooperative agreements and other financial assistance awards, as a matter of Federal Government policy.


§ 312.105 Does this part apply to me?

(a) Portions of this part apply to you if you are either –


(1) A recipient of an assistance award from the Peace Corps; or


(2) A(n) Peace Corps awarding official. (See definitions of award and recipient in §§ 312.605 and 312.660, respectively.)


(b) The following table shows the subparts that apply to you:


If you are . . .
see subparts . . .
(1) A recipient who is not an individualA, B and E.
(2) A recipient who is an individualA, C and E.
(3) A(n) Peace Corps awarding officialA, D and E.

§ 312.110 Are any of my Federal assistance awards exempt from this part?

This part does not apply to any award that the Peace Corps Director or designee determines that the application of this part would be inconsistent with the international obligations of the United States or the laws or regulations of a foreign government.


§ 312.115 Does this part affect the Federal contracts that I receive?

It will affect future contract awards indirectly if you are debarred or suspended for a violation of the requirements of this part, as described in § 312.510(c). However, this part does not apply directly to procurement contracts. The portion of the Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988 that applies to Federal procurement contracts is carried out through the Federal Acquisition Regulation in chapter 1 of Title 48 of the Code of Federal Regulations (the drug-free workplace coverage currently is in 48 CFR part 23, subpart 23.5).


Subpart B – Requirements for Recipients Other Than Individuals

§ 312.200 What must I do to comply with this part?

There are two general requirements if you are a recipient other than an individual.


(a) First, you must make a good faith effort, on a continuing basis, to maintain a drug-free workplace. You must agree to do so as a condition for receiving any award covered by this part. The specific measures that you must take in this regard are described in more detail in subsequent sections of this subpart. Briefly, those measures are to –


(1) Publish a drug-free workplace statement and establish a drug-free awareness program for your employees (see §§ 312.205 through 312.220); and


(2) Take actions concerning employees who are convicted of violating drug statutes in the workplace (see § 312.225).


(b) Second, you must identify all known workplaces under your Federal awards (see § 312.230).


§ 312.205 What must I include in my drug-free workplace statement?

You must publish a statement that –


(a) Tells your employees that the unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensing, possession, or use of a controlled substance is prohibited in your workplace;


(b) Specifies the actions that you will take against employees for violating that prohibition; and


(c) Lets each employee know that, as a condition of employment under any award, he or she:


(1) Will abide by the terms of the statement; and


(2) Must notify you in writing if he or she is convicted for a violation of a criminal drug statute occurring in the workplace and must do so no more than five calendar days after the conviction.


§ 312.210 To whom must I distribute my drug-free workplace statement?

You must require that a copy of the statement described in § 312.205 be given to each employee who will be engaged in the performance of any Federal award.


§ 312.215 What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

You must establish an ongoing drug-free awareness program to inform employees about –


(a) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace;


(b) Your policy of maintaining a drug-free workplace;


(c) Any available drug counseling, rehabilitation, and employee assistance programs; and


(d) The penalties that you may impose upon them for drug abuse violations occurring in the workplace.


§ 312.220 By when must I publish my drug-free workplace statement and establish my drug-free awareness program?

If you are a new recipient that does not already have a policy statement as described in § 312.205 and an ongoing awareness program as described in § 312.215, you must publish the statement and establish the program by the time given in the following table:


If . . .
then you . . .
(a) The performance period of the award is less than 30 daysmust have the policy statement and program in place as soon as possible, but before the date on which performance is expected to be completed.
(b) The performance period of the award is 30 days or moremust have the policy statement and program in place within 30 days after award.
(c) You believe there are extraordinary circumstances that will require more than 30 days for you to publish the policy statement and establish the awareness programmay ask the Peace Corps awarding official to give you more time to do so. The amount of additional time, if any, to be given is at the discretion of the awarding official.

§ 312.225 What actions must I take concerning employees who are convicted of drug violations in the workplace?

There are two actions you must take if an employee is convicted of a drug violation in the workplace:


(a) First, you must notify Federal agencies if an employee who is engaged in the performance of an award informs you about a conviction, as required by § 312.205(c)(2), or you otherwise learn of the conviction. Your notification to the Federal agencies must –


(1) Be in writing;


(2) Include the employee’s position title;


(3) Include the identification number(s) of each affected award;


(4) Be sent within ten calendar days after you learn of the conviction; and


(5) Be sent to every Federal agency on whose award the convicted employee was working. It must be sent to every awarding official or his or her official designee, unless the Federal agency has specified a central point for the receipt of the notices.


(b) Second, within 30 calendar days of learning about an employee’s conviction, you must either –


(1) Take appropriate personnel action against the employee, up to and including termination, consistent with the requirements of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (29 U.S.C. 794), as amended; or


(2) Require the employee to participate satisfactorily in a drug abuse assistance or rehabilitation program approved for these purposes by a Federal, State or local health, law enforcement, or other appropriate agency.


§ 312.230 How and when must I identify workplaces?

(a) You must identify all known workplaces under each Peace Corps award. A failure to do so is a violation of your drug-free workplace requirements. You may identify the workplaces –


(1) To the Peace Corps official that is making the award, either at the time of application or upon award; or


(2) In documents that you keep on file in your offices during the performance of the award, in which case you must make the information available for inspection upon request by Peace Corps officials or their designated representatives.


(b) Your workplace identification for an award must include the actual address of buildings (or parts of buildings) or other sites where work under the award takes place. Categorical descriptions may be used (e.g., all vehicles of a mass transit authority or State highway department while in operation, State employees in each local unemployment office, performers in concert halls or radio studios).


(c) If you identified workplaces to the Peace Corps awarding official at the time of application or award, as described in paragraph (a)(1) of this section, and any workplace that you identified changes during the performance of the award, you must inform the Peace Corps awarding official.


Subpart C – Requirements for Recipients Who Are Individuals

§ 312.300 What must I do to comply with this part if I am an individual recipient?

As a condition of receiving a(n) Peace Corps award, if you are an individual recipient, you must agree that –


(a) You will not engage in the unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensing, possession, or use of a controlled substance in conducting any activity related to the award; and


(b) If you are convicted of a criminal drug offense resulting from a violation occurring during the conduct of any award activity, you will report the conviction:


(1) In writing.


(2) Within 10 calendar days of the conviction.


(3) To the Peace Corps awarding official or other designee for each award that you currently have, unless § 312.301 or the award document designates a central point for the receipt of the notices. When notice is made to a central point, it must include the identification number(s) of each affected award.


§ 312.301 [Reserved]

Subpart D – Responsibilities of Peace Corps Awarding Officials

§ 312.400 What are my responsibilities as a(n) Peace Corps awarding official?

As a(n) Peace Corps awarding official, you must obtain each recipient’s agreement, as a condition of the award, to comply with the requirements in –


(a) Subpart B of this part, if the recipient is not an individual; or


(b) Subpart C of this part, if the recipient is an individual.


Subpart E – Violations of this Part and Consequences

§ 312.500 How are violations of this part determined for recipients other than individuals?

A recipient other than an individual is in violation of the requirements of this part if the Peace Corps Director or designee determines, in writing, that –


(a) The recipient has violated the requirements of subpart B of this part; or


(b) The number of convictions of the recipient’s employees for violating criminal drug statutes in the workplace is large enough to indicate that the recipient has failed to make a good faith effort to provide a drug-free workplace.


§ 312.505 How are violations of this part determined for recipients who are individuals?

An individual recipient is in violation of the requirements of this part if the Peace Corps Director or designee determines, in writing, that –


(a) The recipient has violated the requirements of subpart C of this part; or


(b) The recipient is convicted of a criminal drug offense resulting from a violation occurring during the conduct of any award activity.


§ 312.510 What actions will the Federal Government take against a recipient determined to have violated this part?

If a recipient is determined to have violated this part, as described in § 312.500 or § 312.505, the Peace Corps may take one or more of the following actions –


(a) Suspension of payments under the award;


(b) Suspension or termination of the award; and


(c) Suspension or debarment of the recipient under 22 CFR part 310, for a period not to exceed five years.


§ 312.515 Are there any exceptions to those actions?

The Peace Corps Director may waive with respect to a particular award, in writing, a suspension of payments under an award, suspension or termination of an award, or suspension or debarment of a recipient if the Peace Corps Director determines that such a waiver would be in the public interest. This exception authority cannot be delegated to any other official.


Subpart F – Definitions

§ 312.605 Award.

Award means an award of financial assistance by the Peace Corps or other Federal agency directly to a recipient.


(a) The term award includes:


(1) A Federal grant or cooperative agreement, in the form of money or property in lieu of money.


(2) A block grant or a grant in an entitlement program, whether or not the grant is exempted from coverage under the Governmentwide rule [Agency-specific CFR citation] that implements OMB Circular A-102 (for availability, see 5 CFR 1310.3) and specifies uniform administrative requirements.


(b) The term award does not include:


(1) Technical assistance that provides services instead of money.


(2) Loans.


(3) Loan guarantees.


(4) Interest subsidies.


(5) Insurance.


(6) Direct appropriations.


(7) Veterans’ benefits to individuals (i.e., any benefit to veterans, their families, or survivors by virtue of the service of a veteran in the Armed Forces of the United States).


(c) Notwithstanding paragraph (a)(2) of this section, this paragraph is not applicable for the Peace Corps.


§ 312.610 Controlled substance.

Controlled substance means a controlled substance in schedules I through V of the Controlled Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 812), and as further defined by regulation at 21 CFR 1308.11 through 1308.15.


§ 312.615 Conviction.

Conviction means a finding of guilt (including a plea of nolo contendere) or imposition of sentence, or both, by any judicial body charged with the responsibility to determine violations of the Federal or State criminal drug statutes.


§ 312.620 Cooperative agreement.

Cooperative agreement means an award of financial assistance that, consistent with 31 U.S.C. 6305, is used to enter into the same kind of relationship as a grant (see definition of grant in § 312.650), except that substantial involvement is expected between the Federal agency and the recipient when carrying out the activity contemplated by the award. The term does not include cooperative research and development agreements as defined in 15 U.S.C. 3710a.


§ 312.625 Criminal drug statute.

Criminal drug statute means a Federal or non-Federal criminal statute involving the manufacture, distribution, dispensing, use, or possession of any controlled substance.


§ 312.630 Debarment.

Debarment means an action taken by a Federal agency to prohibit a recipient from participating in Federal Government procurement contracts and covered nonprocurement transactions. A recipient so prohibited is debarred, in accordance with the Federal Acquisition Regulation for procurement contracts (48 CFR part 9, subpart 9.4) and the common rule, Government-wide Debarment and Suspension (Nonprocurement), that implements Executive Order 12549 and Executive Order 12689.


§ 312.635 Drug-free workplace.

Drug-free workplace means a site for the performance of work done in connection with a specific award at which employees of the recipient are prohibited from engaging in the unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensing, possession, or use of a controlled substance.


§ 312.640 Employee.

(a) Employee means the employee of a recipient directly engaged in the performance of work under the award, including –


(1) All direct charge employees;


(2) All indirect charge employees, unless their impact or involvement in the performance of work under the award is insignificant to the performance of the award; and


(3) Temporary personnel and consultants who are directly engaged in the performance of work under the award and who are on the recipient’s payroll.


(b) This definition does not include workers not on the payroll of the recipient (e.g., volunteers, even if used to meet a matching requirement; consultants or independent contractors not on the payroll; or employees of subrecipients or subcontractors in covered workplaces).


§ 312.645 Federal agency or agency.

Federal agency or agency means any United States executive department, military department, government corporation, government controlled corporation, any other establishment in the executive branch (including the Executive Office of the President), or any independent regulatory agency.


§ 312.650 Grant.

Grant means an award of financial assistance that, consistent with 31 U.S.C. 6304, is used to enter into a relationship –


(a) The principal purpose of which is to transfer a thing of value to the recipient to carry out a public purpose of support or stimulation authorized by a law of the United States, rather than to acquire property or services for the Federal Government’s direct benefit or use; and


(b) In which substantial involvement is not expected between the Federal agency and the recipient when carrying out the activity contemplated by the award.


§ 312.655 Individual.

Individual means a natural person.


§ 312.660 Recipient.

Recipient means any individual, corporation, partnership, association, unit of government (except a Federal agency) or legal entity, however organized, that receives an award directly from a Federal agency.


§ 312.665 State.

State means any of the States of the United States, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, or any territory or possession of the United States.


§ 312.670 Suspension.

Suspension means an action taken by a Federal agency that immediately prohibits a recipient from participating in Federal Government procurement contracts and covered nonprocurement transactions for a temporary period, pending completion of an investigation and any judicial or administrative proceedings that may ensue. A recipient so prohibited is suspended, in accordance with the Federal Acquisition Regulation for procurement contracts (48 CFR part 9, subpart 9.4) and the common rule, Government-wide Debarment and Suspension (Nonprocurement), that implements Executive Order 12549 and Executive Order 12689. Suspension of a recipient is a distinct and separate action from suspension of an award or suspension of payments under an award.


PART 313 – GUIDANCE PROCEDURES


Authority:22 U.S.C. 2501 et seq.



Source:85 FR 73419, Nov. 18, 2020, unless otherwise noted.

§ 313.1 General; definition of “guidance documents” covered by this part.

(a) This part governs Peace Corps (Agency) employees and contractors involved with all phases of issuing Agency guidance documents.


(b) For purposes of this part, the term “guidance document” means a statement of Agency policy or interpretation concerning a statute, regulation, or technical matter within the jurisdiction of the Agency intended to have general applicability and future effect on the behavior of the public, but which is not intended to have the force or effect of law and is not otherwise required by statute to satisfy the rulemaking procedures specified in 5 U.S.C. 553 or 5 U.S.C. 556. The term is not limited to formal written documents and may include, without limitation, letters, memoranda, circulars, bulletins, advisories, as well as video, audio, and web-based formats. See OMB Bulletin 07-02, “Agency Good Guidance Practices,” (January 25, 2007) (“OMB Good Guidance Bulletin”).


(c) The following shall not be considered “guidance documents” for purposes of this part:


(1) Rules exempt from rulemaking requirements under 5 U.S.C. 553(a);


(2) Rules of agency organization, procedure, or practice;


(3) Decisions of agency adjudications under 5 U.S.C. 554 or similar statutory provisions;


(4) Internal executive branch legal advice or legal advisory opinions addressed to executive branch officials;


(5) Agency statements of specific applicability, including advisory or legal opinions directed to particular parties about circumstance-specific questions (e.g., case or investigatory letters responding to complaints, warning letters), notices regarding particular locations or facilities (e.g., guidance pertaining to the use, operation, or control of a government facility or property), and correspondence with individual persons or entities (e.g., congressional correspondence), except documents ostensibly directed to a particular party but designed to guide the conduct of the broader regulated public;


(6) Legal briefs, other court filings, or positions taken in litigation or enforcement actions;


(7) Agency statements that do not set forth a policy on a statutory, regulatory, or technical issue or an interpretation of a statute or regulation, including speeches and individual presentations, editorials, media interviews, press materials, or congressional testimony that do not set forth for the first time a new regulatory policy;


(8) Guidance pertaining to military or foreign affairs functions;


(9) Grant solicitations and awards;


(10) Contract solicitations and awards; or


(11) Purely internal Agency policies or guidance directed solely to Agency employees, contractors, volunteers, trainees, or invitees or to other Federal agencies that are not intended to have substantial future effect on the behavior of regulated parties.


(d) The Peace Corps will not cite, use, or rely upon a guidance document that is rescinded, except for the purpose of establishing historical fact. Guidance documents not on an Agency website, as set forth in this part, are considered to be rescinded.


§ 313.2 Guidance documents; required elements.

Each guidance document proposed to be issued by the Agency shall:


(a) Comply with all relevant statutes and regulation;


(b) Identify or include for each guidance document:


(1) The term “guidance” or its functional equivalent;


(2) A unique identifier;


(3) The issuance date, posting date, and the issuing office within the Agency;


(4) The activity or entities to which the guidance applies;


(5) Citations to applicable statutes and regulations;


(6) A statement noting whether the guidance is intended to revise or replace any previously issued guidance and, if so, sufficient information to identify the previously issued guidance; and


(7) A summary of the subject matter covered in the guidance document at the top of the document.


(c) Avoid use of mandatory language, such as “shall,” “must,” “required,” or “requirement,” unless the language is describing an established statutory or regulatory requirement or is addressed to Agency’s staff and will not foreclose the Agency’s consideration of positions advanced by affected private parties;


(d) Be written in plain, understandable English; and


(e) Clearly and prominently state that the contents of the document do not have the force and effect of law and are not meant to bind the public, and the document is intended only to provide clarity to the public regarding existing requirements under the law or Agency policies.


§ 313.3 Public access to guidance documents.

The Agency, whenever it issues a guidance document as defined in this part, shall:


(a) Ensure it is identified by the document’s title and date of issuance or revision and is placed on its website within a single, searchable, indexed database, and available to the public;


(b) Note on an Agency website that guidance documents lack the force and effect of law, except as authorized by law or as incorporated into a contract;


(c) Maintain and advertise on an Agency website a means for the public to comment electronically on guidance documents that are subject to the notice-and-comment procedures and to submit requests electronically for issuance, reconsideration, modification, or rescission of guidance documents in accordance with § 313.6; and


(d) Designate the Office of the General Counsel to receive and address any complaints from the public that the Agency is not following the requirements of E.O 13891, entitled “Promoting the Rule of Law through Improved Agency Guidance Documents” (October 9, 2019), or is improperly treating a guidance document as a binding requirement.


§ 313.4 Definition of “significant guidance document.”

(a) A “significant guidance document” is a guidance document that will be disseminated to the general public and that may reasonably be anticipated:


(1) To lead to an annual effect on the economy of $100 million or more or adversely affect in a material way the U.S. economy, a sector of the U.S. economy, productivity, competition, jobs, the environment, public health or safety, or State, local, or tribal governments or communities;


(2) To create serious inconsistency or otherwise interfere with an action taken or planned by another Federal agency;


(3) To alter materially the budgetary impact of entitlements, grants, user fees, or loan programs or the rights and obligations of recipients thereof; or


(4) To raise novel legal or policy issues arising out of legal mandates, the President’s priorities, or the principles set forth in E.O. 12866, as further amended.


(b) The term “significant guidance document” does not include the categories of documents excluded by § 313.1(c) or any other category of guidance documents exempted by the Agency in consultation with the Office of Management and Budget, Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs (OMB/OIRA).


(c) Significant guidance documents must be reviewed by OMB/OIRA under E.O. 12866 before issuance; and must demonstrate compliance with the applicable requirements for regulations or rules, including significant regulatory actions, set forth in E.O. 12866, E.O. 13563, E.O. 13609, E.O. 13771 and E.O. 13777.


§ 313.5 Procedures for guidance documents identified as “significant.”

(a) Whenever a guidance document is proposed to be issued by the Agency, a copy of the proposed guidance document will be reviewed by the Office of the General Counsel and provided to OMB/OIRA for a “significance” determination pursuant to Executive Order 12866.


(b) Following review and an affirmative “significance” determination by OMB/OIRA pursuant to Executive Order 12866, the guidance document will be reviewed by the Senior Policy Committee which may recommend that it be approved by the Director for issuance as a “significant” guidance document and the Agency may issue the guidance following approval by the Director.


(c) If the guidance document is determined by OMB/OIRA not to be “significant” within the meaning of § 313.4, the Agency or office within the Agency may proceed to issue the guidance.


§ 313.6 Notice-and-comment procedures.

(a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, any proposed Peace Corps guidance document determined to be “significant” within the meaning of § 313.4 shall be subject to the following notice-and-comment procedures. The Agency shall publish a notification in the Federal Register announcing that a draft of the proposed guidance document is publicly available, shall post the draft guidance document on its website, shall invite public comment on the draft document for a minimum of 30 days, and shall prepare and post a public response to major concerns raised in the comments, as appropriate, on its website, either before or when the guidance document is finalized and issued.


(b) The requirements of paragraph (a) of this section will not apply to any significant guidance document or categories of significant guidance documents for which the Agency finds, in consultation with OMB/OIRA, that notice and public comment thereon are impracticable, unnecessary, or contrary to the public interest.


§ 313.7 Petition procedures for withdrawal or modification of a guidance document.

Any member of the public may submit a petition to the Peace Corps requesting the Agency to consider withdrawing or modifying any guidance document. Such requests shall be sent by email to [email protected] or mailed to the Peace Corps, Office of the General Counsel, 1275 First St. NW, Washington, DC 20526. The Peace Corps will respond to a petition within 90 days of receipt by the Agency.


§ 313.8 No judicial review or enforceable rights.

This part is intended to improve the internal management of the Peace Corps. As such, it is for the use of Agency personnel only and is not intended to, and does not, create any right or benefit, substantive or procedural, enforceable at law or in equity by any party against the United States, its agencies or other entities, its officers or employees, or any other person.


PARTS 314-399 [RESERVED]

CHAPTER IV – INTERNATIONAL JOINT COMMISSION, UNITED STATES AND CANADA

PART 400 [RESERVED]

PART 401 – RULES OF PROCEDURE


Authority:Art. XII, 36 Stat. 2453.


Source:30 FR 3379, Mar. 13, 1965, unless otherwise noted.

Subpart A – General

§ 401.1 Definitions.

(a) In the construction of the regulations in this part, unless the context otherwise requires, words importing the singular number shall include the plural and words importing the plural number shall include the singular; and,


(b) Applicant means the Government or person on whose behalf on application is presented to the Commission in accordance with § 401.12;


(c) Government means the Government of Canada or the Government of the United States of America;


(d) Person includes Province, State, department or agency of a Province or State, municipality, individual, partnership, corporation and association, but does not include the Government of Canada or the Government of the United States of America;


(e) Oath includes affirmation;


(f) Reference means the document by which a question or matter of difference is referred to the Commission pursuant to Article IX of the Treaty;


(g) The Treaty means the Treaty between the United States of America and His Majesty the King, dated the 11th day of January 1909;


(h) Canadian section consists of the commissioners appointed by Her Majesty on the recommendation of the Governor in Council of Canada;


(i) United States section consists of the Commissioners appointed by the President of the United States.


§ 401.2 Chairmen.

(a) The commissioners of the United States section of the Commission shall appoint one of their number as chairman, to be known as the Chairman of the United States Section of the International Joint Commission, and he shall act as chairman at all meetings of the Commission held in the United States and in respect to all matters required to be done in the United States by the chairman of the Commission.


(b) The commissioners of the Canadian section of the Commission shall appoint one of their number as chairman, to be known as the Chairman of the Canadian Section of the International Joint Commission, and he shall act as chairman at all meetings of the Commission held in Canada and in respect to all matters required to be done in Canada by the chairman of the Commission.


(c) In case it shall be impracticable for the chairman of either section to act in any matter, the commissioner of such section who is senior in order of appointment shall act in his stead.


§ 401.3 Permanent offices.

The permanent offices of the Commission shall be at Washington, in the District of Columbia, and at Ottawa, in the Province of Ontario, and, subject to the directions of the respective chairmen acting for their respective sections, the secretaries of the United States and Canadian sections of the Commission shall have full charge and control of said offices, respectively.


§ 401.4 Duties of secretaries.

(a) The secretaries shall act as joint secretaries at all meetings and hearings of the Commission. The secretary of the section of the Commission of the country in which a meeting or hearing is held shall prepare a record thereof and each secretary shall preserve an authentic copy of the same in the permanent offices of the Commission.


(b) Each secretary shall receive and file all applications, references and other papers properly presented to the Commission in any proceeding instituted before it and shall number in numerical order all such applications and references; the number given to an application or reference shall be the primary file number for all papers relating to such application or reference.


(c) Each secretary shall forward to the other for filing in the office of the other copies of all official letters, documents, records or other papers received by him or filed in his office, pertaining to any proceeding before the Commission, to the end that there shall be on file in each office either the original or a copy of all official letters and other papers, relating to the said proceeding.


(d) Each secretary shall also forward to the other for filing in the office of the other copies of any letters, documents or other papers received by him or filed in his office which are deemed by him to be of interest to the Commission.


§ 401.5 Meetings.

(a) Subject at all times to special call or direction by the two Governments, meetings of the Commission shall be held at such times and places in the United States and Canada as the Commission or the Chairman may determine and in any event shall be held each year at Washington in April and at Ottawa in October, beginning ordinarily on the first Tuesday of the said months.


(b) If the Commission determines that a meeting shall be open to the public, it shall give such advance notice to this effect as it considers appropriate in the circumstances.


§ 401.6 Service of documents.

(a) Where the secretary is required by the regulations in this part to give notice to any person, this shall be done by delivering or mailing such notice to the person at the address for service that the said person has furnished to the Commission, or if no such address has been furnished, at the dwelling house or usual place of abode or usual place of business of such person.


(b) Where the secretary is required by the regulations in this part to give notice to a Government, this shall be done by delivering or mailing such notice to the Secretary of State for External Affairs of Canada or to the Secretary of State of the United States of America, as the case may be.


(c) Service of any document pursuant to § 401.22 shall be by delivering a copy thereof to the person named therein, or by leaving the same at the dwelling house or usual place of abode or usual place of business of such person. The person serving the notice or request shall furnish an affidavit to the secretary stating the time and place of such service.


§ 401.7 Conduct of hearings.

Hearings may be conducted, testimony received and arguments thereon heard by the whole Commission or by one or more Commissioners from each section of the Commission, designated for that purpose by the respective sections or the Chairman thereof.


§ 401.8 Decision by the whole Commission.

The whole Commission shall consider and determine any matter or question which the Treaty or any other treaty or international agreement, either in terms or by implication, requires or makes it the duty of the Commission to determine. For the purposes of this section and § 401.7, “the whole Commission” means all of the commissioners appointed pursuant to Article VII of the Treaty whose terms of office have not expired and who are not prevented by serious illness or other circumstances beyond their control from carrying out their functions as commissioners. In no event shall a decision be made without the concurrence of at least four commissioners.


§ 401.9 Suspension or amendment of rules.

The commission may suspend, repeal, or amend all or any of the rules of procedure at any time, with the concurrence of at least four commissioners. Both Governments shall be informed forthwith of any such action.


§ 401.10 General rule.

The Commission may, at any time, adopt any procedure which it deems expedient and necessary to carry out the true intent and meaning of the Treaty.


§ 401.11 Availability of records.

(a) The following items in the official records of the Commission shall be available for public information at the permanent offices of the Commission.



Applications.

References.

Public Notices.

Press Releases.

Statements in Response.

Statements in Reply.

Records of hearings, including exhibits filed.

Brief and formal Statements submitted at hearings or at other times.

(b) Decisions rendered and orders issued by the Commission and formal opinions of any of the Commissioners with relation thereto, shall be available similarly for public information after duplicate originals of the decisions or orders have been transmitted to and filed with the Governments pursuant to Article XI of the Treaty.


(c) Copies of reports submitted to one or both of the Governments pursuant to the Treaty shall be available similarly for public information only with the consent of the Government or Governments to whom the reports are addressed.


(d) Reports, letters, memoranda and other communications addressed to the Commissions, by boards or committees created by or at the request of the Commission, are privileged and shall become available for public information only in accordance with a decision of the Commission to that effect.


(e) Except as provided in the preceding paragraphs of this section, records of deliberations, and documents, letters, memoranda and communications of every nature and kind in the official records of the Commission, whether addressed to or by the Commission, commissioners, secretaries, advisers or any of them, are privileged and shall become available for public information only in accordance with a decision of the Commission to that effect.


(f) A copy of any document, report, record or other paper which under this section is available for public information may be furnished to any person upon payment of any cost involved in its reproduction.


Subpart B – Applications

§ 401.12 Presentation to Commission.

(a) Where one or the other of the Governments on its own initiative seeks the approval of the commission for the use, obstruction or diversion of waters with respect to which under Articles III or IV of the Treaty the approval of the Commission is required, it shall present to the Commission an application setting forth as fully as may be necessary for the information of the Commission the facts upon which the application is based and the nature of the order of approval desired.


(b) Where a person seeks the approval of the Commission for the use, obstruction or diversion of waters with respect to which under Articles III or IV of the Treaty the approval of the Commission is required, he shall prepare an application to the Commission and forward it to the Government within whose jurisdiction such use, obstruction or diversion is to be made, with the request that the said application be transmitted to the Commission. If such Government transmits the application to the Commission with a request that it take appropriate action thereon, the same shall be filed by the Commission in the same manner as an application presented in accordance with paragraph (a) of this section. Transmittal of the application to the Commission shall not be construed as authorization by the Government of the use, obstruction or diversion proposed by the applicant. All applications by persons shall conform, as to their contents, to the requirements of paragraph (a) of this section.


(c) Where the Commission has issued an Order approving a particular use, obstruction or diversion, in which it has specifically retained jurisdiction over the subject matter of an application and has reserved the right to make further orders relating thereto, any Government or person entitled to request the issuance of such further order may present to the Commission a request, setting forth the facts upon which it is based and the nature of the further order desired. On receipt of the request, the Commission shall proceed in accordance with the terms of the Order in which the Commission specifically retained jurisdiction. In each case the secretaries shall notify both Governments and invite their comments before the request is complied with.


§ 401.13 Copies required.

(a) Subject to paragraph (c) of this section, two duplicate originals and fifty copies of the application and of any supplemental application, statement in response, supplemental statement in response, statement in reply and supplemental statement in reply shall be delivered to either secretary. On receipt of such documents, the secretary shall forthwith send one duplicate original and twenty-five copies to the other secretary.


(b) Subject to paragraph (c) of this section, two copies of such drawings, profiles, plans or survey, maps and specifications as may be necessary to illustrate clearly the matter of the application shall be delivered to either secretary and he shall send one copy forthwith to the other secretary.


(c) Notwithstanding paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section, such additional copies of the documents mentioned therein as may be requested by the Commission shall be provided forthwith.


§ 401.14 Authorization by Government.

(a) Where the use, obstruction or diversion of waters for which the Commission’s approval is sought has been authorized by or on behalf of a Government or by or on behalf of a State or Province or other competent authority, two copies of such authorization and of any plans approved incidental thereto shall accompany the application when it is presented to the Commission in accordance with § 401.12.


(b) Where such a use, obstruction or diversion of waters is authorized by or on behalf of a Government or by or on behalf of a State or Province or other competent authority after an application has been presented to the Commission in accordance with § 401.12, the applicant shall deliver forthwith to the Commission two copies of such authorization and of any plans approved incidental thereto.


§ 401.15 Notice of publication.

(a) As soon as practicable after an application is presented or transmitted in accordance with § 401.12, the secretary of the section of the Commission appointed by the other Government shall send a copy of the application to such Government.


(b) Except as otherwise provided pursuant to § 401.19, the secretaries, as soon as practicable after the application is received, shall cause a notice to be published in the Canada Gazette and the Federal Register and once each week for three successive weeks in two newspapers, published one in each country and circulated in or near the localities which, in the opinion of the Commission, are most likely to be affected by the proposed use, obstruction or diversion. Subject to paragraph (c) of this section, the notice shall state that the application has been received, the nature and locality of the proposed use, obstruction or diversion, the time within which any person interested may present a statement in response to the Commission and that the Commission will hold a hearing or hearings at which all persons interested are entitled to be heard with respect thereto.


(c) If the Commission so directs, the notice referred to in paragraph (b) of this section, appropriately modified, may be combined with the notice of hearing referred to in § 401.24 and published accordingly.


§ 401.16 Statement in response.

(a) Except as otherwise provided pursuant to § 410.19, a Government and any interested person, other than the applicant, may present a statement in response to the Commission within thirty days after the filing of an application. A statement in response shall set forth facts and arguments bearing on the subject matter of the application and tending to oppose or support the application, in whole or in part. If it is desired that conditional approval be granted, the statement in response should set forth the particular condition or conditions desired. An address for service of documents should be included in the statement in response.


(b) When a statement in response has been filed, the secretaries shall send a copy forthwith to the applicant and to each Government except the Government which presented the said statement in response. If so directed by the Commission, the secretaries shall inform those who have presented statements in response, of the nature of the total response.


§ 401.17 Statement in reply.

(a) Except as otherwise provided pursuant to § 410.19, the applicant and, if he is a person, the Government which transmitted the application on his behalf, one or both may present a statement or statements in reply to the Commission within thirty days after the time provided for presenting statements in response. A statement in reply shall set forth facts and arguments bearing upon the allegations and arguments contained in the statements in response.


(b) When a statement in reply has been filed, the secretary shall send a copy forthwith to each Government except the Government which presented the said statement in reply, and to all persons who presented statements in response.


§ 401.18 Supplemental or amended applications and statements.

(a) If it appears to the Commission that either an application, a statement in response or a statement in reply is not sufficiently definite and complete, the Commission may require a more definite and complete application, statement in response or statement in reply, as the case may be, to be presented.


(b) Where substantial justice requires it, the Commission with the concurrence of at least four Commissioners may allow the amendment of any application, statement in response, statement in reply and any document or exhibit which has been presented to the Commission.


§ 401.19 Reducing or extending time and dispensing with statements.

In any case where the Commission considers that such action would be in the public interest and not prejudicial to the right of interested persons to be heard in accordance with Article XII of the Treaty, the Commission may reduce or extend the time for the presentation of any paper or the doing of any act required by these rules or may dispense with the presentation of statements in response and statements in reply.


§ 401.20 Interested persons and counsel.

Governments and persons interested in the subject matter of an application, whether in favor of or opposed to is, are entitled to be heard in person or by counsel at any hearing thereof held by the Commission.


§ 401.21 Consultation.

The Commission may meet or consult with the applicant, the Governments and other persons or their counsel at any time regarding the plan of hearing, the mode of conducting the inquiry, the admitting or proof of certain facts or for any other purpose.


§ 401.22 Attendance of witnesses and production of documents.

(a) Requests for the attendance and examination of witnesses and for the production and inspection of books, papers and documents may be issued over the signature of the secretary of the section of the Commission of the country in which the witnesses reside or the books, papers or documents may be, when so authorized by the Chairman of that section.


(b) All applications for subpoena or other process to compel the attendance of witnesses or the production of books, papers and documents before the Commission shall be made to the proper courts of either country, as the case may be, upon the order of the Commission.


§ 401.23 Hearings.

(a) The time and place of the hearing or hearings of an application shall be fixed by the Chairmen of the two sections.


(b) The secretaries shall forthwith give written notice of the time and place of the hearing or hearings to the applicant, the Governments and all persons who have presented statements in response to the Commission. Except as otherwise provided by the Commission, the secretaries shall also cause such notice to be published in the Canada Gazette and the Federal Register and once each week for three successive weeks in two newspapers, published one in each country and circulated in or near the localities which, in the opinion of the Commission, are most likely to be affected by the proposed use, obstruction or diversion of water.


(c) All hearings shall be open to the public.


(d) The applicant, the Governments and persons interested are entitled to present oral and documentary evidence and argument that is relevant and material to any issue that is before the Commission in connection with the application.


(e) The presiding chairman may require that evidence to be under oath.


(f) Witnesses may be examined and cross-examined by the Commissioners and by counsel for the applicant, the Governments and the Commission. With the consent of the presiding chairman, cousel for a person other than the applicant may also examine or cross-examine witnesses.


(g) The Commission may require further evidence to be given and may require printed briefs to be submitted at or subsequent to the hearing.


(h) The Commissioners shall be free to determine the probative value of the evidence submitted to it.


(i) A verbatim transcript of the proceedings at the hearing shall be prepared.


(j) The hearing of the application, when once begun, shall proceed at the times and places determined by the Chairmen of the two sections to ensure the greatest practicable continuity and dispatch of proceedings.


§ 401.24 Expenses of proceedings.

(a) The expenses of those participating in any proceeding under this subpart B shall be borne by the participants.


(b) The Commission, after due notice to the participant or participants concerned, may require that any unusual cost or expense to the Commission shall be paid by the person on whose behalf or at whose request such unusual cost or expense has been or will be incurred.


§ 401.25 Government brief regarding navigable waters.

When in the opinion of the Commission it is desirable that a decision should be rendered which affects navigable waters in a manner or to an extent different from that contemplated by the application and plans presented to the Commission, the Commission will, before making a final decision, submit to the Government presenting or transmitting the application a draft of the decision, and such Government may transmit to the Commission a brief or memorandum thereon which will receive due consideration by the Commission before its decision is made final.


Subpart C – References

§ 401.26 Presentation to Commission.

(a) Where a question or matter of difference arising between the two Governments involving the rights, obligations, or interests of either in relation to the other or to the inhabitants of the other along the common frontier between the United States of America and Canada is to be referred to the Commission under Article IX of the Treaty, the method of brining such question or matter to the attention of the Commission and invoking its action ordinarily will be as set forth in this section.


(b) Where both Governments have agreed to refer such a question or matter to the Commission, each Government will present to the Commission, at the permanent office in its country, a reference in similar or identical terms setting forth as fully as may be necessary for the information of the Commission the question or matter which it is to examine into the report upon and any restrictions or exceptions which may be imposed upon the Commission with respect thereto.


(c) Where one of the Governments, on its own initiative, has decided to refer such a question or matter to the Commission, it will present a reference to the Commission at the permanent office in its country. All such references should conform, as to their contents, to the requirements of paragraph (b) of this section.


(d) Such drawings, plans of survey and maps as may be necessary to illustrate clearly the question or matter referred should accompany the reference when it is presented to the Commission.


§ 401.27 Notice and publication.

(a) The secretary to whom a reference is presented shall receive and file the same and shall send a copy forthwith to the other secretary for filing in the office of the latter. If the reference is presented by one Government only, the other secretary shall send a copy forthwith to his Government.


(b) Subject to any restrictions or exceptions which may be imposed upon the Commission by the terms of the reference, and unless otherwise provided by the Commission, the secretaries, as soon as practicable after the reference is received, shall cause a notice to be published in the Canada Gazette, the Federal Register and in two newspapers, published one in each country and circulated in or near the localities which, in the opinion of the Commission, are most likely to be interested in the subject matter of the reference. The notice shall describe the subject matter of reference in general terms invite interested persons to inform the Commission of the nature of their interest and state that the Commission will provide convenient opportunity for interested persons to be heard with respect thereto.


§ 401.28 Advisory boards.

(a) The Commission may appoint a board or boards, composed of qualified persons, to conduct on its behalf investigations and studies that may be necessary or desirable and to report to the Commission regarding any questions or matters involved in the subject matter of the reference.


(b) Such board ordinarily will have an equal number of members from each country.


(c) The Commission ordinarily will make copies of the main or final report of such board or a digest thereof available for examination by the Governments and interested persons prior to holding the final hearing or hearings referred to in § 401.29.


§ 401.29 Hearings.

(a) A hearing or hearings may be held whenever in the opinion of the Commission such action would be helpful to the Commission in complying with the terms of a reference. Subject to any restrictions or exceptions which may be imposed by the terms of the reference, a final hearing or hearings shall be held before the Commission reports to Government in accordance with the terms of the reference.


(b) The time, place and purpose of the hearing or hearings on a reference shall be fixed by the chairmen of the two sections.


(c) The secretaries shall forthwith give written notice of the time, place and purpose of the hearing or hearings to each Government and to persons who have advised the Commission of their interest. Unless otherwise directed by the Commission, the secretaries shall also cause such notice to be published in the Canada Gazette, the Federal Register and once each week for three successive weeks in two newspapers, published one in each country and circulated in or near the localities which, in the opinion of the Commission, are most likely to be interested in the subject matter of the reference.


(d) All hearings shall be open to the public, unless otherwise determined by the Commission.


(e) At a hearing, the Governments and persons interested are entitled to present, in person or by counsel, oral and documentary evidence and argument that is relevant and material to any matter that is within the published purpose of the hearing.


(f) The presiding chairman may require that evidence be under oath.


(g) Witnesses may be examined and cross-examined by the Commissioners and by counsel for the Governments and the Commission. With the consent of presiding chairman, counsel for any interested person may also examine or cross-examine witnesses.


(h) The Commission may require further evidence to be given and may require printed briefs to be submitted at or subsequent to the hearing.


(i) A verbatim transcript of the proceedings at the hearing shall be prepared.


§ 401.30 Proceedings under Article X.

When a question or matter of difference arising between the two Governments involving the rights, obligations or interests of either in relation to the other or to their respective inhabitants has been or is to be referred to the Commission for decision under Article X of the Treaty, the Commission, after consultation with the said Governments, will adopt such rules of procedure as may be appropriate to the question or matter referred or to be referred.


PARTS 402-499 [RESERVED]

CHAPTER V – UNITED STATES AGENCY FOR GLOBAL MEDIA

PART 500 [RESERVED]

PART 501 – APPOINTMENT OF FOREIGN SERVICE OFFICERS


Authority:Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 U.S.C. 3901 et seq.).


Source:50 FR 27423, July 3, 1985, unless otherwise noted.

§ 501.1 Policy.

It is the policy of the Broadcasting Board of Governors that Foreign Service Officers occupy positions in which there is a need and reasonable opportunity for interchangeability of personnel between the Board and posts abroad, and which are concerned with (a) the conduct, observation, or analysis of information and cultural activities, or (b) the executive management of, or administrative responsibility for, the overseas operations of the Board’s program.


§ 501.2 Eligibility for appointment as Foreign Service Officer.

Cross-reference: The regulations governing eligibility for appointment as a Foreign Service Officer are codified in part 11 of this title.


§ 501.3 Noncompetitive interchange between Civil Service and Foreign Service.

(a) An agreement between the Office of Personnel Management and the Board under the provisions of Executive Order 11219 (3 CFR 1964-65 Comp. p. 303) provides for the noncompetitive appointment of present or former Foreign Service employees as career or career conditional Civil Service employees.


(b) Under this agreement former career personnel of the Board’s Foreign Service (FSCR, FSRU, FSIO, FSS, FSO, or FP) and such present personnel desiring to transfer, are eligible, under certain conditions, for noncompetitive career or career-conditional appointment in any Federal agency that desires to appoint them. The President has authorized the Office of Personnel Management by executive order to waive the requirements for competitive examination and appointment for such Board career Foreign Service personnel.


(c) A present or former Civil Service employee may be appointed on a competitive basis in any Foreign Service class for which the employee has qualified under the provisions of section 3947 of title 22, United States Code.


§ 501.4 Junior Level Career Candidate Program (Class 6, 5, or 4).

Cross-reference: The regulations governing the junior level Career Candidate program are codified in part 11 of this title.


§ 501.5 Mid-level FSO Candidate Program (Class 3, 2, or 1).

(a) General. The mid-level FSO Candidate program, under the provisions of section 306 of the Foreign Service Act of 1980, supplements the junior-level Career Candidate program to meet total requirements for Foreign Service Officers at the mid-level in the Foreign Service. Foreign Service limited appointments of FSO Candidates are made to Class 3, 2, or 1 for a period not to exceed five years. Occasionally, appointments may be offered at the Class 4 level. The FSO Commissioning Board will determine whether FSO Candidates have performed at a satisfactory level and demonstrated the required level of growth potential and competence, and will make a recommendation on commissioning as Foreign Service Officers. FSO Candidates who are not recommended for commissioning prior to the expiration of their limited appointment will be separated from the mid-level program.


(b) Sources of applicants. (1) The Broadcasting Board of Governors draws a significant number of FSO Candidates from Board employees who apply, and are found qualified by the Board of Examiners for the Foreign Service (BEX).


(2) The Board also draws Candidates from outside applicants who possess skills and abilities in short supply in the Foreign Service and who have capabilities, insights, techniques, experiences, and differences of outlook which would serve to enrich the Foreign Service and enable them to perform effectively in assignments both abroad and in the United States. Minority applicants are recruited for mid-level entry under the COMRAT program. Appointment from sources outside the Board is limited and based on intake levels established in accordance with total Broadcasting Board of Governors FSO workforce and functional requirements. Such appointments are based on successful completion of the examination process, and existing assignment vacancies.


(c) Eligibility requirement – (1) Broadcasting Board of Governors Employees. On the date of application, employees must have at least three years of Federal Government service in a position of responsibility in the Board. A position of responsibility is defined as service as an Overseas Specialist at Class 4 or above or as a Domestic Specialist at GS-11 or above within the Board. The duties and responsibilities of the position occupied by the applicant must have been similar or closely related to those of a Foreign Service Officer in terms of knowledge, skills, abilities, and overseas experience. Board Domestic and Overseas Specialists must be no more than 58 years of age on the date of redesignation or appointment as an FSO Candidate.


(2) Applicants Under Special Recruitment Programs. Minority and women applicants must be no more than 58 years of age, must have approximately nine years of education or experience relevant to work performed in Broadcasting Board of Governors, must be knowledgeable in the social, political and cultural history of the U.S. and be able to analyze and interpret this in relation to U.S. Government policy and American life.


(3) Outside Applicants. On the date of appointment, applicants must be no more than 58 years of age, with nine years of relevant work experience and/or education, or proficiency in a language for which the Board has a need, or substantial management expertise. Relevant work experience is defined as public relations work, supervisory or managerial positions in communications media, program director for a museum or university-level teacher of political science, history, English or other relevant disciplines. Appointments from these sources for the limited vacancies available are made on a competitive basis to fill specific Service needs after ensuring that the vacancies cannot be filled by Foreign Service Officers already in the Foreign Service Officer Corps.


(d) Application Procedures. (1) Applicants must complete Standard Form 171, Application for Federal Employment; Form DSP-34, Supplement to Application for Federal Employment; a 1,000 word autobiography; a statement affirming willingness and capacity to serve at any post worldwide; and transcripts of all graduate and undergraduate course work and forward them to the Special Recruitment Branch, Office of Personnel (M/PDSE).


(2) The filing of an application for the Foreign Service does not in itself entitle an applicant to examination. The decision to proceed with an oral examination is made by a Qualifications Evaluation Panel after determining the applicant’s eligibility for appointment and reviewing the applicant’s qualifications including his/her performance, and administrative files (or equivalents), claimed language proficiency and other background or factors which may be related to the work performed by FSOs. An oral examination is given only in those cases where the applicant is found to possess superior qualifications, proven ability, and high potential for success in the Foreign Service.


(e) Examination process – (1) Written Examination. A written examination will not normally be required of applicants for FSO Candidate appointments. However, if the volume of applications for a given class or classes is such as to make it infeasible to examine applicants orally within a reasonable time, such applicants may be required to take an appropriate written examination prescribed by the Board of Examiners. Those who meet or exceed the passing level set by the Board of Examiners on the written examination will be eligible for selection for the oral examination.


(2) Oral examination. (i) Applicants approved by the Qualifications Evaluation Panel for examination will be given an oral examination by a panel of Deputy Examiners approved by the Board of Examiners. The oral examination is designed to enable the Board of Examiners to determine whether applicants are functionally qualified for work in the Foreign Service at the mid-level, whether they would be suitable representatives abroad of the United States, whether they have the potential to advance in the Foreign Service, and whether they have the background and experience to make a contribution to the Foreign Service. The oral examination is individually scheduled throughout the year and is normally given in Washington, D.C. At the discretion of the Board of Examiners, it may be given in other American cities, or at Foreign Service posts, selected by the Board.


(ii) The panel will orally examine each applicant through questioning and discussion. There will also be a writing exercise and an in-basket test. Applicants taking the oral examination will be graded according to the standards established by the Board of Examiners. The application of anyone whose score is at or above the passing level set by the Board will be continued. The application of anyone whose score is below the passing level will be terminated. The applicant may, however, reapply in 12 months by submitting a new application.


(3) Foreign language requirement. All applicants who pass the oral examination will be required to take a subsequent test to measure their fluency in foreign languages, or their aptitude for learning them (MLAT) for which a score of 50 points (on a scale of zero to eighty) is necessary to qualify for further processing. No applicant will be recommended for career appointment who has not demonstrated such a proficiency or aptitude. An applicant may be selected, appointed and assigned without first having demonstrated required proficiency in a foreign language, but the appointment will be subject to the condition that the employee may not receive more than one promotion and may not be commissioned as an FSO until proficiency in one foreign language is achieved.


(4) Medical examination. Those applicants recommended by the Board of Examiners for an FSO candidacy, and their dependents who will reside with them overseas, are required to pass a physical examination at the Department of State Medical Division.


(5) Security and suitability considerations. A background investigation or appropriate security clearance update will be conducted on each applicant, and no application may be continued until a security clearance has been granted.


(6) Class of appointment. The Board of Examiners fixes the entry level for appointment as an FSO candidate.


(7) Certification for appointment. After completion of all aspects of the examination, the Board of Examiners certifies to the Board successful candidates for appointment as FSO Candidates. Determinations of duly constituted panels of examiners and deputy examiners are final, unless modified by specific action of the Board of Examiners for the Foreign Service.


(8) FSO Candidate registers. (i) After approval by the Board of Examiners, and certification as to suitability and security clearance by the Board’s Director of Security, successful applicants will have their names placed on a register for the class for which they have been found qualified. Appointments to available openings will be made from the applicants entered on the register for the class of the position to be filled. Inclusion on the register does not guarantee eventual assignment and appointment as an FSO Candidate. Applicants who have qualified but have not been appointed because of lack of openings will be dropped from the register 18 months after the date of placement on it (or the completion of an inside applicant’s current overseas tour, whichever is longer). Such applicants may reapply for the program, but will be required to repeat the entire application process, including BEX testing.


(ii) Any applicant on the register who refuses an assignment offer will be removed from the Register and will not be eligible to reapply for the program for seven years.


(iii) The Board of Examiners may extend the eligibility period when such extension is in its judgment justified in the interest of the Foreign Service.


(f) Appointment as an FSO Candidate. (1) An FSO Candidate will be given a four-year Foreign Service limited appointment. Board Career Overseas Specialists will be redesignated as FSO Candidates for a period of four years. The appointment or redesignation may be extended for one year, but must be terminated at the end of the fifth year. The purpose of the FSO Candidacy is to permit on-the-job evaluation of an individual’s suitability and capacity for effective service as a Foreign Service Officer.


(2) FSO Candidates will be assigned to Generalist positions overseas, and will compete for promotion with other Generalist officers under the Annual Generalist Selection Boards. FSO Candidates at the Class 1 level may not compete for promotion into the Senior Foreign Service prior to commissioning as an FSO.


(3) The FSO Candidacy may be terminated during the four-year period for unsatisfactory performance (22 U.S.C. 4011) or for such other cause as will promote the efficiency of the Service (22 U.S.C. 4010).


(g) Commissioning as a Foreign Service Officer. (1) Upon completion of three years’ service (most of which will have been overseas), the FSO Candidate will be eligible for commissioning as a Foreign Service Officer. The FSO Commissioning Board will review all FSO Candidates appointed on or after March 1, 1980 and will recommend on tenure.


(2) The criterion used for deciding whether to recommend commissioning of FSO Candidates is the Candidate’s demonstrated potential to perform effectively as a Foreign Service Officer in a normal range of generalist assignments up through the Class 1 level. No quota or numerical limit is placed on the number of affirmative decisions.


(3) If recommended for commissioning, and having satisfied the language proficiency requirements, the name of the FSO Candidate will be forwarded to the President and the Senate and, upon approval, the FSO Candidate will be commissioned as an FSO.


(4) If the FSO Commissioning Board does not recommend commissioning of the FSO Candidate during its review, it may recommend extension of the FSO Candidacy to allow for a future review. Under no circumstances will an FSO Candidacy be extended to a total of more than five years.


(5) Candidates not recommended for commissioning or who have not satisfied the language proficiency requirement will be separated from the Service at the expiration of their appointment. However, FSO Candidates who were appointed from within the Board with career status as a Domestic or Overseas Specialist may exercise reappointment rights to their previous category in lieu of separation.


§ 501.6 Appointment of Overseas Specialists.

(a) General. Members of the Board’s Foreign Service appointed as Overseas Specialists serve on rotational U.S.-overseas assignments in the following types of positions: General Administration; Publication Writers and Editors; Exhibit Managers; Printing Specialists; English Teaching Specialists; Correspondents; Engineers for the Voice of America; Regional Librarian Consultants; and Secretaries. Appointees serve a trial period of service as Specialist Candidates under Foreign Service limited appointments (or redesignation) for a period not to exceed five years. Appointments are made to F.S. classes 8 through 1. Specialist Candidates are given career appointments as Overseas Specialists based on the recommendations of Specialist Selection Boards. Specialist candidates not recommended for tenuring will be separated from the Foreign Service, or reinstated in the Civil Service.


(b) Sources of applicants. Qualified Broadcasting Board of Governors domestic employees comprise a significant recruitment source for Overseas Specialist appointments. Such employees will be given priority consideration over outside applicants when applying for Overseas Specialist positions, when qualifications are otherwise equal.


(c) Eligibility requirements. All applicant must be citizens of the United States, and must be at least 21 years of age and no more than 58 years of age at the time of appointment. The 21-year age requirement may be waived by the Director, Office of Personnel (M/P or VOA/P) when she or he determines that the applicant’s services are urgently needed. Broadcasting Board of Governors employee applicants must also have at least three years of Federal government experience and occupy a position at the GS-11 level (or equivalent) or above (GS-10 for Electronic Technicians in the Voice of America). All applicants must be available for worldwide assignment to positions in their occupational category.


(d) Application procedures. (1) Applications for all specialties except secretarial should include a current SF-171, Application for Federal Employment; a DSP-34, Supplement to Application for Federal Employment; university transcripts; a 1,000 word autobiographical statement which should include mention of the qualifications the applicant would bring to the job and reason for desiring to work for the Board; and a statement affirming willingness and capacity to serve at any post worldwide.


(2) Special requirements for Foreign Service Secretaries. Secretarial applicants must submit a current SF-171, Application for Federal Employment, and a 250 word essay on a commonly understood subject to demonstrate grammatical competence. The following specific requirements must be met by applicants: Ability to type accurately at 60 words per minute; four years of secretarial or administrative experience (business school or college training may be substituted for up to two years of required work experience); and attainment of an acceptable score in verbal ability and spelling tests. Applicants will subsequently be given a written examination to measure administrative aptitude.


(e) Examination process – (1) Application review. All applications are to be sent to the Special Recruitment Staff, Office of Personnel (M/PDSE), or to the Foreign Personnel Advisor (VOA/PF) for Voice of America positions.


(2) Qualifications Evaluation Panel. A Qualifications Evaluation Panel will evaluate the applicant’s qualifications including his/her performance and administrative files (or equivalent), claimed language proficiency and other background or factors which may be related to the work performed by an Overseas Specialist Officer in the relevant specialty.


(3) Oral examination. (i) Applicants who are passed on by the Qualifications Evaluation Panel to the Board of Examiners will be given an oral examination to evaluate the applicant’s total qualifications for service as an Overseas Specialist in the desired functional specialty.


(ii) The Board panel examining all candidates except those of the Voice of America will consist of one Broadcasting Board of Governors Overseas Specialist and two BEX Deputy Examiners. For VOA candidates, the panel will consist of the Foreign Personnel Advisor, a BEX Deputy Examiner assigned to the Voice of America, and a Deputy Examiner assigned to the Board of Examiners.


(iii) The panel will examine each applicant through questioning and discussion. Hypothetical problem-solving exercises, a writing exercise and an in-basket test may also be required. The panel will also recommend the F.S. entry level for appointment. If the panel’s recommendation is unfavorable, the application process will be discontinued. An unsuccessful applicant may apply again in 12 months.


(4) The same medical and security requirements applicable to FSO Candidates pertain to Specialist Candidates.


(5) Overseas Specialist Candidate register. If an applicant is successful in the examination, and medical and security clearances have been successfuly completed, his/her name will be added to the appropriate Overseas Specialist register for a period of 18 months, or completion of an inside candidate’s current tour of duty overseas, whichever is longer, at the Foreign Service class determined in the examination process and based on previous experience. Inclusion on the register does not guarantee eventual assignment and appointment as an Overseas Specialist Candidate.


(f) Appointment as a Specialist Candidate. (1) When the Office of Personnel identifies an overseas vacancy which cannot be filled from the existing ranks of Overseas Specialists, applicants on the Overseas Specialist register will be considered for the assignment. An applicant will not be appointed unless an overseas position has been identified and a need for the individual in the Foreign Service has been certified by the Director, Office of Personnel (M/P or VOA/P). Any applicant selected from the register who refuses an assignment offer will be dropped from the register and precluded from reapplying for a period of seven years.


(2) Applicants will be given a Foreign Service limited appointment (or redesignation) for a period of four years at the Foreign Service Class determined in the examination process. The purpose of this untenured appointment is to allow the Board to evaluate and assess the Specialist Candidate’s abilities and future potential prior to offering career appointment as an Overseas Specialist. The limited appointment may be extended for one additional year, but must be terminated at the end of the fifth year if the Candidate does not obtain career tenure.


(3) The Candidate will receive the orientation and training necessary to serve overseas and will be assigned overseas in a position in his or her specialty. Broadcasting Board of Governors Civil Service employees selected as Overseas Specialist Candidates will be appointed only if the Board element to which they are currently assigned is willing to affirm in writing that a position at the appropriate level will be made available for the employee should the candidacy end unsuccessfully. Broadcasting Board of Governors Civil Service applicants will be appointed as Overseas Specialist Candidates on or about the date of their departure for post of assignment or upon assumption of an assignment (which has been identified and will follow a period of orientation in Washington). The Board may also assign a Candidate to a U.S.-based position for an initial assignment of up to 24 months when the Candidate will spend the majority of his/her time traveling overseas and will, except for the U.S. basing, be fully functioning as an Overseas Specialist. Specialist Candidates will compete for promotion by the Annual Overseas Specialist Selection Board with other officers in the same specialty and at the same class level. Specialist Candidates at the Class 1 level are ineligible for promotion into the Senior Foreign Service.


(4) The Specialist candidacy may be terminated at any time for unsatisfactory performance (22 U.S.C. 4011) or for such cause as will promote the efficiency of the Service (22 U.S.C. 4010).


(g) Career appointment as an Overseas Specialist. In accordance with section 3946 of title 22 United States Code, the decision to offer a Specialist Candidate a career appointment will be based on the recommendation made by the Annual Overseas Specialist Selection Board which reviews all employees in the Candidate’s occupational category and class level.


(1) Eligibility. Specialist Candidates who have performed at least two years of overseas service will be eligible for review for career status at the time of the Candidate’s third Board review. Candidates serving an initial tour in the U.S. but spending the majority of time working overseas will be credited with up to one year’s overseas service, but no more than half of the time based in the U.S. If a Specialist Candidate is not recommended for career status during the initial review, the Candidate may be reviewed again when the next Annual Overseas Specialist Selection Board convenes if the initial Board so recommends.


(2) Selection Board Review. The Selection Board(s) will review the official performance file of the eligible Specialist Candidates and in accordance with established precepts, will determine whether the Candidates should be recommended for career appointment as Overseas Specialists. Recommendations by the Board will be based on the Candidate’s demonstrated aptitude and fitness for a career in the Foreign Service in their occupational specialties. No quota or numerical limit is placed on the number of positive career status decisions that can be made by Selection Boards. The Specialist candidacy will be terminated if the Candidate fails to be recommended for career status after a second Board review for tenuring. Candidates may be terminated earlier than the expiration of their limited appointment if so recommended by the Board and approved by the Director, Office of Personnel (M/P or VOA/P). Specialist Candidates recommended for career status by the Selection Board will be given Foreign Service career appointments (or redesignation) as Overseas Specialist, to take effect within one month of the Board’s recommendation.


§ 501.7 Appointment as Chief of Mission.

(a) Appointment by President. Chiefs of mission are appointed by the President, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate. They may be career members of the Foreign Service or they may be appointed from outside the Service.


(b) Recommendation of Foreign Service career members. On the basis of recommendations made by the Director of Broadcasting Board of Governors, the Secretary of State from time to time furnishes the President with the names of Foreign Service career members qualified for appointment as chiefs of mission. The names of these officers, together with pertinent information concerning them, are given to the President to assist him in selecting qualified candidates for appointment as chiefs of mission.


(c) Status of Foreign Service career members appointed as Chiefs of Mission. Foreign Service career members who are appointed as chiefs of mission retain their career status as Foreign Service career members.


§ 501.8 Reappointment of Foreign Service Officers and Career Overseas Specialists.

The President may, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, reappoint to the Service a former Foreign Service Officer who is separated from the Service. The Director (Broadcasting Board of Governors) may reappoint to the Service a former career Overseas Specialist.


(a) Requirements for reappointment. (1) On the date of application, each applicant must be a citizen of the United States.


(2) No applicant will be considered who has previously been separated from the Foreign Service pursuant to section 608 or 610 of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (or predecessor section 633, 635, or 637 of the Foreign Service Act of 1946, as amended); or who resigned or retired in lieu of selection out or separation for cause.



Note:

This requirement will not apply where it has been determined by the Foreign Service Grievance Board under 3 FAM 660 or by the Director, Office of Personnel, that the separation or the resignation or retirement in lieu of selection out or separation for cause was wrongful; where reappointment is determined by the Director, Office of Personnel, as an appropriate means to settle a grievance or complaint of a former Foreign Service career member on a mutually satisfactory basis; or where reappointment is the indicated redress in a proceeding under 3 FAM 130 “Equal Employment Opportunity.”


(b) Application. Apply by letter addressed to the Director, Office of Personnel. Include the standard application forms, SF-171, Application for Federal Employment; and DSP-34, Supplement to Application for Federal Employment; and a brief resume of work and other experience since resignation from the Foreign Service. Whenever the Director, Office of Personnel, finds that the reappointment of one or more former Foreign Service Career Members may be in the best interest of the Service, all application forms, along with the available personnel files, will be referred as appropriate to the Board of Examiners for the Foreign Service which will conduct an advisory evaluation of the qualifications of each applicant.


(c) Nature of evaluation. (1) The Board of Examiners’ advisory qualifications evaluation of FSO applicants (i) will be based on a review of all pertinent information relating to the applicant’s record of employment in the Foreign Service and to subsequent experience, as well, and (ii) will take into consideration among other factors, the rank of the applicant’s contemporaries in the Service in recommending the class in which the applicant will be reappointed under section 308 of the Foreign Service Act of 1980.


(2) In consultation with the Foreign Service Personnel Division (M/PF or VOA/PF) and officials from the pertinent Board elements, the Overseas Specialist applicant’s total qualifications and experience will be evaluated based on the application and an interview. On the basis of this review and the recommendations of the appropriate officials, the personnel office will determine whether the application should be continued and, if so, will recommend the appointment class.


(d) Medical examination and security investigation. Qualified applicants and their dependents who will accompany them overseas will be given a physical examination. A security investigation will also be conducted. The reappointment action is subject to completion of a satisfactory security investigation and satisfactory medical examination of the applicant and his/her dependents.


(e) Selection for reappointment. The Director, Office or Personnel (M/P or VOA/P), taking into consideration (1) the qualifications and experience of each applicant as outlined in the qualifications evaluation performed by the Board of Examiners for the Foreign Service or the personnel office, (2) future placement and growth potential, and (3) the needs of the Service for the applicant’s skills determines which applicant, or applicants, are qualified for reappointment and the appointment class that is considered to be appropriate. An Overseas Specialist may not be reappointed until and unless an overseas assignment has been identified. The Director, Office of Personnel (M/P or VOA/P) is responsible for initiating appointment action. Any voluntary applicant who refuses an offer of reappointment will not be considered for reappointment again.


§ 501.9 Interchange of FSOs between Broadcasting Board of Governors and other Foreign Affairs Agencies.

Foreign Service Officers (FSOs) desiring transfer from one agency to another may apply under the following provisions:


(a) Applications. Applications for interchange appointments should be sent to the Board of Examiners for the Foreign Service, Department of State, Washington, DC 20520.


(b) Certification and approval. (1) When a Foreign Service Officer of another Foreign Affairs Agency wishes to transfer to the Broadcasting Board of Governors, a certification of need is required from the Director, Office of Personnel, Broadcasting Board of Governors, and approval is required by the Director of Personnel for the other agency for the officer’s release to Broadcasting Board of Governors.


(2) When a Broadcasting Board of Governors FSO wishes to transfer to another Foreign Affairs Agency, a certification of need is required from the Director of Personnel of the other Agency, and approval is required by the Director, Office of Personnel, Broadcasting Board of Governors, for the officer’s release to that Agency.


(3) A review by the Board of Examiners for the Foreign Service will certify the eligibility of candidates for exchange. BEX will notify the Office of Personnel, Broadcasting Board of Governors when a Foreign Service Officer of another Agency has been approved for transfer and Broadcasting Board of Governors will process the necessary employment papers.


(4) A new FSO appointment for officers transferring between another Foreign Affairs Agency and Broadcasting Board of Governors is not required.


PART 502 – DOMESTIC REQUESTS FOR BROADCASTING BOARD OF GOVERNORS PROGRAM MATERIALS


Authority:22 U.S.C. 1461, 1461-1a.


Source:78 FR 39585, July 2, 2013, unless otherwise noted.

§ 502.1 Authority and scope.

(a) Authority for this part. This part is pursuant to Section 1078 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2013, Public Law 112-239, as codified in 22 U.S.C. 1461, 1461-1a and the U.S. International Broadcasting Act, 22 U.S.C. 6201 et seq.


(b) Scope. This part applies to the public and all divisions of the Federal Government supervised by the Broadcasting Board of Governors under the U.S. International Broadcasting Act of 1994 (collectively “the Agency”). These regulations only cover the procedures for responding to domestic requests for Agency program materials.


(c) Summary. (1) The Broadcasting Board of Governors supervises all U.S. non-military international broadcasting activities in accordance with the broadcasting principles and standards in the U.S. International Broadcasting Act of 1994, 22 U.S.C. 6201 et seq., including consistency with the broad foreign policy objectives of the United States.


(2) As stated in the U.S. International Broadcasting Act of 1994, it is the policy of the United States to promote freedom of opinion and expression and to open communication of information and ideas among the people of the world. The Agency has adopted as its mission statement “to inform, engage, and connect people around the world in support of freedom and democracy.”


(3) It is the Agency’s policy to make its program materials available, upon request, whenever doing so is consistent with all statutory authorities, prohibitions, principles, and standards. However, the Agency reserves the right to deny requests for program materials under circumstances described in Section 502.7 of this regulation.


(4) Pursuant to section 501 of the U.S. Information and Educational Exchange Act, as amended, as codified in 22 U.S.C. 1461, the Agency may, upon request, provide members of the public, organizations, and media with program materials which the Agency disseminated abroad, in accordance with these regulations.


(5) Pursuant to Section 208 of Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1986 and 1987, as amended, as codified at 22 U.S.C. 1461-1a, the Agency is prohibited from using appropriated funds to influence public opinion in the United States, however, the statute clarifies that the Agency may:


(i) Provide information about its operations, programs, or program materials to the media, the public, or Congress in accordance with applicable law;


(ii) Make program materials available in the Unites States, when appropriate, and in accordance with other applicable law.


§ 502.2 Definitions.

As used in this part:


(a) Media entity means any person or entity, that actively gathers information of potential interest to a segment of the public, turns gathered information into a distinct work, or distributes that work to an audience within the United States, and otherwise serves the purposes described in § 502.4.


(b) Organization means any corporation, trust, association, cooperative, or other group organized primarily for scientific, educational, service, charitable, or similar purpose, including but not limited to institutions of higher education, and otherwise serves the purposes described in § 502.4.


(c) Program materials means radio broadcasts, television broadcasts, and Internet content that the Agency disseminates to audiences outside of the United States, pursuant to: The U.S. Information and Educational Exchange Act of 1948 (22 U.S.C. 1461 et seq.); The U.S. International Broadcasting Act of 1994 (22 U.S.C. 6201 et seq.); The Radio Broadcasting to Cuba Act (22 U.S.C. 1465 et seq.); or The Television Broadcasting to Cuba Act (22 U.S.C. 1465aa et seq.).


(d) Requestor means any private person or entity within the United States that requests program materials from the Agency.


§ 502.3 Availability of program materials on public Web sites.

(a) The Agency makes program materials available to Requestors through the Agency’s news and information Web sites designed for foreign audiences. To access currently-available Agency program materials, please visit www.voanews.com and www.martinoticias.com. The homepages of these Web sites display a portion of the Agency’s most recent news reporting. Additional program materials are available through the Web sites’ search functions.


(b) Program materials are available on Agency Web sites, and may be removed from Agency Web sites solely at the Agency’s discretion. The Agency will remove program materials from Agency Web sites when a National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) records schedule goes into effect, or when required by licensing agreements with third-party copyright holders. Once these program materials have been removed from Agency Web sites, they are no longer available from the Agency.


(1) When full programs are removed from the Agency’s Web sites in accordance with a NARA records schedule, programs designated as permanent will be transferred to NARA. For information on how to request Agency program materials that have been transferred to NARA, see the Agency’s records schedules and NARA’s regulations at www.nara.gov.


(2) Programs designated as temporary under a NARA records schedule will not be retained by the Agency once they are removed from the Agency’s Web sites and are no longer needed for the Agency’s use.


(c) Segments incorporated into final programs, including music, interviews, reports, and other program elements, will not be transferred to NARA independently of full program recordings, and will not be available after they have been removed from Agency Web sites.


(d) Draft program materials, and any other program materials not selected for dissemination abroad, are not available.


(e) The Agency shall determine the method of making program materials available, as well as the file type, file format, resolution, and storage medium(s) that are available. Program materials are only available in the same form (i.e. radio or television file-type and file format) and language in which the Agency disseminated them abroad.


[78 FR 39585, July 2, 2013, as amended at 78 FR 67026, Nov. 8, 2013]


§ 502.4 Media or organization one-time requests for broadcast quality agency program materials.

Upon request, the Agency may provide a broadcast-quality copy of Agency program materials to media entities, educational organizations, not-for-profit corporations, or other requestors. Requestors will be informed if materials are subject to third party content holders’ restrictions. One-time requests for broadcast quality copies of Agency program materials should be directed to:


(a) The Voice of America Office of Public Relations for broadcast-quality copies of Voice of America program materials; and


(b) The TV Marti Division of the Office of Cuba Broadcasting for broadcast-quality copies of TV or Radio Marti program materials.


[78 FR 67026, Nov. 8, 2013]


§ 502.5 Media or organization requests for ongoing subscriptions to broadcast quality agency program materials

(a) Upon request, the Agency may make program materials available on an ongoing basis to Media entities, or other organizations, through a subscription agreement, provided that the Agency determines that entering into a subscription agreement to make program materials available on an ongoing basis would be consistent with the Agency’s mission and authorities. Requested, ongoing subscription agreements must be consistent with the Agency’s Policy for domestic distribution which incorporates the Broadcasting principles and standards and other requirements, found in 22 U.S.C. 1461, 1461-1a, 1462, 6201, 6202, 6203, 6204, 6205, 6206; Pub. L. 112-239, section 1078(b), 126 Stat. 1632, 1958; agreements with third-parties that hold a copyright in Agency program materials; and Terms of Use on Agency Web sites. Requestors shall secure all necessary licenses from all persons or organizations that hold a copyright in any portion of program materials before making any use of those program materials, except uses of program materials permitted by the Copyright Act of 1976, as amended.


(b) Media entities or other organizations may request ongoing subscriptions by filling out an application form found on the Web site for the Direct System, the Agency’s professional distribution system.


[78 FR 67026, Nov. 8, 2013]


§ 502.6 Terms of use for accessing program materials available on agency Web sites.

(a) By accessing Agency Web sites, Requestors agree to all the Terms of Use available on those Web sites.


(b) All Requestors are advised that Agency program materials may contain third-party copyrighted material, unless the Agency specifically informs the Requestor otherwise. Accordingly, and as further explained in the Terms of Use mentioned above, by using Agency Web sites to access program materials:


(1) The Requestor agrees that he or she is solely responsible for his or her use of program materials provided by the Agency and any copyrighted portion(s) of those materials;


(2) The Requestor agrees that he or she shall secure all necessary licenses from all persons or organizations that hold a copyright in any portion of requested program materials before making any use of those program materials, except uses of program materials permitted by the Copyright Act of 1976, as amended.


[78 FR 39585, July 2, 2013, as amended at 78 FR 67026, Nov. 8, 2013]


§ 502.7 Denial of requests.

(a) The Agency reserves the right to deny any request for program materials made pursuant to these regulations for cause, including but not limited to the following circumstances:


(1) For a Requestor’s failure to comply with the Terms of Use on Agency Web sites;


(2) For a Requestor’s failure to secure necessary rights and licenses to use third-party copyrighted materials when the Requestor uses Agency program materials in any way not explicitly permitted by the Copyright Act of 1976, as amended;


(3) When the Agency’s distribution of program materials is restricted by an agreement with a third-party that holds a copyright in a portion of Agency program materials;


(4) If providing the requested materials would be inconsistent with the Agency’s statutory authorities, the broadcasting element’s charter, or any applicable law or regulation.


(b) For more information on the criteria for accepting or denying requests, please see the Agency’s policy for domestic distribution, available at www.bbg.gov.


§ 502.8 Fees.

(a) The Agency makes program material available at no cost on www.voanews.com and www.martinoticias.com.


(b) The Agency may collect a fee for reimbursement of the reasonable costs incurred to fulfill a request for Agency program materials, including ongoing subscriptions for Media entities and one-time requests for broadcast-quality copies of Agency program materials. Fees charged for ongoing subscriptions, if any, will be outlined in an agreement between the Media entity and the Agency.


(c) The Agency reserves the right to establish and change fees in accordance with applicable law and regulation.


PART 503 – FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT REGULATION


Authority:5 U.S.C. 552 Reform Act of 1986 as amended by Pub. L. 99-570; sec. 1801-1804; U.S.C. 2658; 5 U.S.C. 301; 13 U.S.C. 8, E.O. 10477, as amended; 47 FR 9320, Apr. 2, 1982, E.O. 12356. 5 U.S.C. 552 (1988 & Supp. III 1991) as amended by Freedom of Information Reform Act of 1986, Pub. L. 99-570, Title I, sections 1801-1804, 100 Stat. 3207, 3207-48-50 (1986)(codified at 5 U.S.C. 552 (1988)); 22 U.S.C. 2658 (1988); 5 U.S.C. 301 (1988); 13 U.S.C. 8 (2988); E.O. 10477, 3 CFR 958 (1949-1953) as amended by E.O. 10822, 3 CFR 355 (1959-1963), E.O. 12292, 3 FR 134 (1982), E.O. 12356, 3 CFR 166 (1983), E.O. 12958 (1995).


Source:67 FR 8867, Feb. 27, 2002, unless otherwise noted.

§ 503.1 Introduction and definitions.

(a) Introduction. The Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) and this part apply to all records of The Broadcasting Board of Governors (BBG). As a general policy BBG follows a balanced approach in administering the FOIA. We recognize the right of public access to information in the Agency’s possession, but we also seek to protect the integrity of the Agency’s internal processes. This policy calls for the fullest possible disclosure of records consistent with those requirements of administrative necessity and confidentiality which are recognized by the FOIA.


(b) Definitions:


Access Appeal Committee or Committee means the Committee delegated by the Agency Head for making final agency determinations regarding appeals from the initial denial of records under the FOIA.


Agency or BBG means the Broadcasting Board of Governors. It includes all parts of the BBG in the U.S. and its worldwide operations.


Commercial use, when referring to a request, means that the request is from, or on behalf of, one who seeks information for a use or purpose that furthers the commercial, trade, or profit interests of the requester or of a person on whose behalf the request is made. Whether a request is for a commercial use depends on the purpose of the request and how the records will be used. The identity of the requester (individual, non-profit corporation, for-profit corporation), or the nature of the records, while in some cases indicative of that purpose or use, is not necessarily determinative. When a request is made by a representative of the news media, the request shall be deemed to be for a non-commercial use.


Department means any executive department, military department, government corporation, government controlled corporation, any independent regulatory agency, or other establishment in the executive branch of the Federal Government. A private organization is not a department even if it is performing work under contract with the Government or is receiving Federal financial assistance. Grantee and contractor records are not subject to the FOIA unless they are in the possession and control of the BBG.


Duplication means the process of making a copy of a record and sending it to the requester, to the extent necessary to respond to the request. Such copies include paper copy, microform, audiovisual materials, and magnetic tapes, cards and discs.


Educational institution means a preschool, elementary or secondary school, institution of undergraduate or graduate higher education, or institution of professional or vocational education.


FOIA means the Freedom of Information Act, section 552 of title 5, United States Code, as amended.


Freedom of Information Officer means the BBG official who has been delegated the authority to release or withhold records and assess, waive, or reduce fees in response to FOIA requests.


Non-commercial scientific institution means an institution that is not operated substantially for the purposes of furthering its own or someone else’s business, trade, or profit interests, and that is operated for purposes of conducting scientific research whose results are not intended to promote any particular product or industry.


Records (and any other term used in this section in reference to information) include any information that would be an agency record subject to the requirements of this section when maintained by the Agency in any format, including an electronic format. Records also include any handwritten, typed or printed documents (such as memoranda, books, brochures, studies, writings, drafts, letters, transcripts, and minutes) and documentary material in other forms (such as punchcards, magnetic tapes, cards, or discs; paper tapes; audio or video recordings, maps, photographs, slides, microfilm, and motion pictures). It does not include objects or articles such as exhibits, models, equipment, and duplication machines or audiovisual processing materials. Reports does not include books, magazines, pamphlets, or other reference material in formally organized and officially designated BBG libraries, where such materials are available under the rules of the particular library.


Representative of the news media means a person actively gathering news for an entity organized and operated to publish or broadcast news to the public. News means information that is about current events or that would be of current interest to the public. News media entities include television and radio broadcasters, publishers of periodicals (to the extent they publish “news”) who make their products available for purchase or subscription by the general public, and entities that may disseminate news through other media (e.g., electronic dissemination of text). Freelance journalists shall be considered representatives of a news media entity if they can show a solid basis for expecting publication through such an entity. A publication contract or a requester’s past publication record may show such a basis.


Request means asking in writing for records whether or not the request refers specifically to the FOIA.


Review means examining the records to determine which portions, if any, may be released, and any other processing that is necessary to prepare the records for release. It includes only the first examination and processing of the requested documents for purposes of determining whether a specific exemption applies to a particular record or portion of a record.


Search means looking for records or portions of records responsive to a request. It includes reading and interpreting a request, and also page-by-page and line-by-line examination to identify responsive portions of a document. However, it does not include line-by-line examination where merely duplicating the entire page would be a less expensive and quicker way to comply with the request.


§ 503.2 Making a request.

(a) How to request records. All requests for documents shall be made in writing. Requests should be addressed to The Broadcasting Board of Governors (BBG), FOIA/Privacy Act Officer, Office of the General Counsel, 330 Independence Avenue, SW, Suite 3349, Washington, DC 20237; telephone (202) 260-4404; or fax (202) 260-4394. Write the words “Freedom of Information Act Request” on the envelope and letter.


(b) Details in your letter. Your request for documents should provide as many details as possible that will help us find the records you are requesting. If there is insufficient information, we will ask you to provide greater details. Include your telephone number(s) to help us reach you if we have questions. If you are not sure how to write your request or what details to include, you may call the FOIA Office to request a copy of the Agency’s booklet “Guide and Index of Records,” or access the same information via the Internet on BBG’s World Wide Web site (http://www.ibb.gov). The more specific the request for documents, the sooner the Agency will be able to respond to your request(s).


(c) Requests not handled under FOIA. We will not provide documents requested under the FOIA and this part if the records are currently available in the National Archives, subject to release through the Archives, or commonly sold to the public by it or another agency in accordance with statutory authority (for example, records currently available from the Government Printing Office or the National Technical Information Service). Agency records that are normally freely available to the general public, such as BBG press releases, are not covered by the FOIA. Requests for documents from Federal departments, Chairmen of Congressional committees or subcommittees and court orders are not FOIA requests.


(d) Referral of requests outside the agency. If you request records that were created by or provided to us by another Federal department, we may refer your request to or consult with that department. We may also refer requests for classified records to the department that classified them. In cases of referral, the other department is responsible for processing and responding to your request under that department’s regulation. When possible, we will notify you when we refer your request to another department.


(e) Responding to your request – (1) Retrieving records. The Agency is required to furnish copies of records only when they are in our possession and control. If we have stored the records you want in a record retention center, we will retrieve and review them for possible disclosure. However, the Federal Government destroys many old records, so sometimes it is impossible to fill requests. The Agency’s record retention policies are set forth in the General Records Schedules of the National Archives and Records Administration and in BBG’s Records Disposition Schedule, which establish time periods for keeping records before they may be destroyed.


(2) Furnishing records. (i) The Agency is only required to furnish copies of records that we have or can retrieve. We are not compelled to create new records. The Agency will aid requesters by providing records and information in the form requested, including electronic format, if we can readily reproduce them in that form or format.


(ii) We may decide to conserve government resources and at the same time supply the records you need by consolidating information from various records, in paper form or electronically, rather than copying them all. If the effort to produce records in electronic format would significantly interfere with the operations of the Agency, we will consider the effort to be an unreasonable search.


(iii) The Agency is required to furnish only one copy of a record. If we are unable to make a legible copy of a record to be released, we will not attempt to reconstruct it. Rather we will furnish the best copy possible and note its poor quality in our reply or on the copy.


(iv) If we cannot accommodate your request for form or format, we will provide responsive, nonexempt information in a reasonably accessible form.


§ 503.3 Availability of agency records.

(a) Release of records. If we have released a record or part of a record to others in the past, we will ordinarily release it to you also. This principle does not apply if the previous release was an unauthorized disclosure. However, we will not release it to you if a statute forbids this disclosure and we will not necessarily release it to you if an exemption applies in your situation and did not apply or applied differently in the previous situation.


(b) Denial of requests. All denials are in writing and describe in general terms the material withheld and state the reasons for the denial, including a reference to the specific exemption of the FOIA authorizing the withholding or deletion. The denial also explains your right to appeal the decision and it will identify the official to whom you should send the appeal. Denial letters are signed by the person who made the decision to deny all or part of the request, unless otherwise noted.


(c) Unproductive searches. We will make a diligent search for records to satisfy your request. Nevertheless, we may not be able always to find the records you want using the information you provided, or they may not exist. If we advise you that we have been unable to find the records despite a diligent search, you will nevertheless be provided the opportunity to appeal the adequacy of the Agency’s search. However, if your request is for records that are obviously not connected with this Agency or your request has been provided to us in error, a “no records” response will not be considered an adverse action and you will not be provided an opportunity to appeal.


(d) Appeal of denials. You have the right to appeal a partial or full denial of your FOIA request. To do so, you must put your appeal in writing and address it to the official identified in the denial letter. Your appeal letter must be dated and postmarked within 30 calendar days from the date of the Agency’s denial letter. Because we have some discretionary authority in deciding whether to release or withhold records, you may strengthen your appeal by explaining your reasons for wanting the records. However, you are not required to give any explanation. Your appeal will be reviewed by the Agency’s Access Appeal Committee that consists of senior Agency officials. When the Committee responds to your appeal, that constitutes the Agency’s final action on the request. If the Access Appeal Committee grants your appeal in part or in full, we will send the records to you promptly or set up an appointment for you to inspect them. If the decision is to deny your appeal in part or in full, the final letter will state the reasons for the decision, name the officials responsible for the decision, and inform you of the FOIA provisions for judicial review.


§ 503.4 Time limits.

(a) General. The FOIA sets certain time limits for us to decide whether to disclose the records you requested, and to decide appeals. If we fail to meet the deadlines, you may proceed as if we had denied your request or your appeal. Since requests may be misaddressed or misrouted, you should call or write to confirm that we have the request and to learn its status if you have not heard from us in a reasonable time.


(b) Time allowed. (1) We will decide whether to release records within 20 working days after your request reaches the appropriate area office that maintains the records you are requesting. When we decide to release records, we will actually provide the records at that time, or as soon as possible after that decision, or let you inspect them as soon as possible thereafter.


(2) We will decide an appeal within 20 working days after the appeal reaches the appropriate reviewing official.


(3)(i) The FOIA Officer or appeal official may extend the time limits in unusual circumstances for initial requests or appeals, up to 10 working days. We will notify you in writing of any extensions. “Unusual circumstances” include situations where we: Search for and collect records from field facilities, records centers or locations other than the office processing the records; search for, collect, or examine a great many records in response to a single request; consult with another office or department that has substantial interest in the determination of the request; and/or conduct negotiations with submitters and requesters of information to determine the nature and extent of non-disclosable proprietary materials.


(ii) If an extra ten days still does not provide sufficient time for the Agency to deal with your request, we will inform you that the request cannot be processed within the statutory time limit and provide you with the opportunity to limit the scope of your request and/or arrange with us a negotiated deadline for processing your request.


(iii) If you refuse to reasonably limit the scope of your request or refuse to agree upon a time frame, the Agency will process your case, as it would have, had no modification been sought. We will make a diligent, good faith effort to complete our review within the statutory time frame.


§ 503.5 Records available for public inspection.

(a) To the extent that they exist, we will make the following records of general interest available for you in paper form or electronically for inspection or copying:


(1) Orders and final opinions, including concurring and dissenting opinions in adjudications. (See § 503.8(e) of this part for availability of internal memoranda, including attorney opinions and advice.)


(2) Statements of policy and interpretations that we have adopted but which have not been published in the Federal Register.


(3) Administrative staff manuals and instructions to staff that affect the public. (We will not make available, however, manuals or instructions that reveal investigative or audit procedures as described in § 503.8(b) and (g) of this part.)


(4) In addition to such records as those described in this paragraph (a), we will make available to any person a copy of all other Agency records, in the format requested, if available, unless we determine that such records should be withheld from disclosure under subsection (b) of the Act and §§ 503.8 and 503.9 of this part.


(b) Before releasing these records, however, we may delete the names of people, or information that would identify them, if release would invade their personal privacy to a clearly unwarranted degree (See § 503.8(f)).


(c) The Agency’s FOIA Guide and Index is available electronically via the Internet, or you may request a copy of it by mail.


§ 503.6 Restrictions on some agency records.

Under the U.S. Information and Educational Exchange Act of 1948 (22 U.S.C. 1461, as amended), the BBG is prohibited from disseminating within the United States information about the U.S., its people, and its policies when such materials have been prepared by the Agency for audiences abroad. This includes films, radio scripts and tapes, videotapes, books, and similar materials produced by the Agency. However, this law does provide that upon request, such information shall be made available at BBG, for examination only, by representatives of the press, magazines, radio systems and stations, research students or scholars and available, for examination only, to Members of Congress.


§ 503.7 Fees.

(a) Fees to be charged – categories of requests. Paragraphs (a)(1) though (3) and (b) through (e) of this section explain each category of request and the type of fees that we will generally charge. However, for each of these categories, the fees may be limited, waived, or reduced for the reasons given in paragraph (e) of this section. “Request” means asking for records, whether or not you refer specifically to the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA). Requests from Federal agencies and court orders for documents are not included within this definition. “Review” means, when used in connection with processing records for a commercial use request, examining the records to determine what portions, if any, may be withheld, and any other processing that is necessary to prepare the records for release. It includes only the examining and processing that are done the first time we analyze whether a specific exemption applies to a particular record or portion of a record. It does not include the process of researching or resolving general legal, or policy issues regarding exemptions. “Search” means looking for records or portions of records responsive to a request. It includes reading and interpreting a request, and also and line-by-line examination to identify responsive portions of a document.


(1) Commercial use request. If your request is for a commercial use, BBG will charge you the costs of search, review and duplication. “Commercial use” means that the request is from or on behalf of one whom seeks information for a use or purpose that furthers the commercial, trade, or profit interests of the requester or of a person on whose behalf the request is made. Whether a request is for a commercial use depends on the purpose of the request and how the records will be used; the identity of the requester (individual, non-profit corporation, for-profit corporation), or the nature of the records, while in some cases may indicate the purpose or use is not necessarily determinative. When a request is made by a representative of the news media, a purpose of use which supports the requester’s news dissemination function is deemed to be a non-commercial use.


(2) Educational and scientific institutions and news media. If you are an educational institution or a non-commercial scientific institution, operated primarily for scholarly or scientific research, or a representative of the news media, and your request is not for a commercial use, BBG will charge you only for the duplication of documents. Also BBG will not charge you the copying costs for the first 100 pages of duplication. “Educational institution” means a preschool, elementary or secondary school, institution of undergraduate or graduate higher education, or institution of professional or vocational education. “Non-commercial scientific institution” means an institution that is not operated substantially for purposes of furthering its own or someone else’s business, trade, or profit interests, and that is operated for purposes of conducting scientific research whose results are not intended to promote any particular product or industry. “Representative of the news media” means a person actively gathering news for an entity organized and operated to publish or broadcast news to the public. “News” means information that is about current events or that would be of current interest to the public. News media entities include television and radio broadcasters, publishers of periodicals (to the extent they publish “news”) who make their products available for purchase or subscription by the general public, and entities that may disseminate news through other media (e.g., electronic dissemination of text). We will treat freelance journalists as representatives of a news media entity if they can show a solid basis for expecting publication through such an entity. A publication contract is such a basis and the requester’s past publication record may show such a basis.


(3) Other requesters. If your request is not the kind described by paragraph (a)(1) or (a)(2) of this section, then the BBG will charge you only for search and duplication. Also, we will not charge you for the first two hours of search time or for the copying costs of the first 100 pages of duplication.


(b) Fees to be charged – general provisions. (1) We may charge search fees even if the records we find are exempt from disclosure, or even if we do not find any records at all.


(2) We will not charge you any fee at all if the costs of routine collection and processing of the fee are likely to equal or exceed the amount of the fee. We have estimated that cost to be $5.00.


(3) If we determine that you are acting alone or with others to break down a single request into a series of requests in order to avoid or reduce the fees charged, we may aggregate all these requests for purposes of calculating the fees charged.


(4) We will charge interest on unpaid bills beginning on the 31st day following the day the bill was sent. The accrual of interest will stop upon receipt of the fee, rather than upon its processing by BBG. Interest will be at the rate prescribed in section 3717 of Title 32 U.S.C.


(c) Fee schedule – BBG will charge the following fees: (1) Manual searching for or reviewing of records:


(i) When performed by employees at salary grade GS-1 through GS-8 or FS-9 through FS-5 – an hourly rate of $10.00 will be charged;


(ii) When performed by employees at salary grade GS-9 through GS-13 or FS-5 through FS-2 – an hourly rate of $20.00 will be charged;


(iii) When performed by employees at salary grade GS-14 or above or FS-2 or above – an hourly rate of $36.00 will be charged.


(iv) When a search involves employees at more than one of these levels, we will charge the appropriate rate for each.


(2) Computer searching and printing. Except in unusual cases, the cost of computer time will not be a factor in calculating the two free hours of search time. In those unusual cases, where the cost of conducting a computerized search significantly detracts from the Agency’s ordinary operations, no more than the dollar cost of two hours of manual search time shall be allowed. For searches conducted beyond the first two hours, the Agency shall only charge the direct costs of conducting such searches.


(3) Photocopying standard size pages – $0.15 per page.


(4) Photocopying odd-size documents (such as punchcards or blueprints) or reproducing other records (such as tapes) – the actual cost of operating the machine, plus the actual cost of the materials used, plus charges for the time spent by the operator, at the rates given in paragraph (c)(1) of this section.


(5) Certifying that records are true copies – this service is not required by the FOIA. If we agree to provide it, we will charge $10.00 per certification.


(6) Sending records by express mail, certified mail, or other special methods. This service is not required by the FOIA. If we agree to provide it, we will charge our actual cost.


(7) Performing any other special service that you request and to which we agree – actual cost of operating any machinery, plus actual cost of any materials used, plus charges for the time of our employees, at the rates given in paragraph (c)(1) of this section.


(d) Procedures for assessing and collecting fees – (1) Agreement to pay. We generally assume that when you request records you are willing to pay the fees we charge for services associated with your request. You may specify a limit on the amount you are willing to spend. We will notify you if it appears that the fees will exceed the limit and ask whether you nevertheless want us to proceed with the search.


(2) Advance payment. If you have failed to pay previous bills in a timely manner, or if our initial review of your request indicates that we will charge you fees exceeding $250.00, we will require you to pay your past due fees and/or the estimated fees, or a deposit, before we start searching for the records you want, or before we send them to you. In such cases, the administrative time limits as described in Sec. 503.4(b), will begin only after we come to an agreement with you over payment of fees, or decide that a fee waiver or reduction is appropriate.


(e) Waiver or reduction of fees. We will waive or reduce the fees we would otherwise charge if disclosure of the information meets both of the following tests (paragraphs (e)(1) and (e)(2) of this section):


(1) It is in the public interest because it is likely to contribute significantly to public understanding of government operations or activities, regardless of any other public interest it may further. In making this determination, we may consider:


(i) Whether the requester is in a position to contribute to public understanding;


(ii) Whether the requester has such knowledge or expertise as may be necessary to understand the information; and


(iii) Whether the requester’s intended use of the information would be likely to disseminate the information among the public.


(2) It is not primarily in the commercial interest of the requester. Commercial interests include interests relating to business, trade, and profit. Not only profit-making corporations have commercial interests; so do nonprofit corporations, individuals, unions, and other associations.


(3) You must make your request for a waiver or reduction at the same time you make your request for records. Only the FOIA Officer may make the decision whether to waive or reduce the fees. If we do not completely grant your request for a waiver or reduction, the denial letter will designate the appeal official.


§ 503.8 Exemptions.

Section 552(b) of the Freedom of Information Act contains nine exemptions to the mandatory disclosure of records. These exemptions and their application by the Agency are described below. In some cases, more than one exemption may apply to the same document. This section does not itself authorize the giving of any pledge of confidentiality by any officer or employee of the Agency.


(a) Exemption one – National defense and foreign policy. We are not required to release records that are specifically authorized under criteria established by an Executive Order to be kept secret in the interest of national defense or foreign policy and are in fact properly classified according to such Executive Order. Executive Order No. 12958 (1995) provides for such classification. When the release of certain records may adversely affect U.S. relations with foreign countries, we usually consult with officials with knowledge of those countries and/or with officials of the Department of State. We may also have in our possession records classified by another agency. If we do, we may consult with that agency or may refer your request to that agency for their direct response to you. If possible, we will notify you that we have made such a referral.


(b) Exemption two – Internal personnel rules and practices. We are not required to release records that are related solely to the internal personnel rules and practices of an agency. We may withhold routine internal agency procedures such as guard schedules and luncheon periods. We may also withhold internal records the release of which would help some persons circumvent the law or Agency regulations.


(c) Exemption three – Records exempted by other statutes. We are not required to release records if another statute specifically allows us to withhold them. Another statute may be used only if it absolutely prohibits disclosure or if it sets forth criteria identifying particular types of material to be withheld (for example, the statute discussed in § 503.6).


(d) Exemption four – Trade secrets and confidential commercial or financial information. We will withhold trade secrets and commercial or financial information that is obtained from a person and is privileged or confidential.


(1) Trade secrets: A trade secret is a secret, commercially valuable plan, formula, process, or device that is used for the making, preparing, compounding, or processing of trade commodities and that can be said to be the end product of either innovation or substantial effort. A direct relationship is necessary between the trade secret and the productive process.


(2) Commercial or financial information, obtained from a person, and is privileged or confidential.


(i) Information is “commercial or financial” if it relates to businesses, commerce, trade, employment, profits, or finances (including personal finances).


(ii) Information is obtained from someone outside the Federal Government or from someone within the Government who has a commercial or financial interest in the information. “Person” includes an individual, partnership, corporation, association, state or foreign government, or other organization. Information is not “obtained from a person” if it is generated by BBG or another Federal agency.


(iii) Information is “privileged” if it would ordinarily be protected from disclosure in civil discovery by a recognized evidentiary privilege, such as the attorney-client privilege, or the work-product privilege. Information may be privileged for this purpose under a privilege belonging to a person outside the Government, unless the providing of the information to the Government rendered the information no longer protectible in civil discovery.


(iv) Information is “confidential” if it meets one of the following tests:


(A) Disclosure may impair the Government’s ability to obtain necessary information in the future;


(B) Disclosure would substantially harm the competitive position of the person who submitted the information;


(C) Disclosure would impair other Government interests, such as program effectiveness and compliance; or


(D) Disclosure would impair other private interests, such as an interest in controlling availability of intrinsically valuable records, which are sold in the market by their owner.


(3) Designation of certain confidential information. A person who submits records to the Government may designate part or all of the information in such records as exempt from disclosure under Exemption four. The person may make this designation either at the time the records are submitted to the Government or within a reasonable time thereafter. The designation must be in writing. The legend prescribed by a request for proposal or request for quotations according to any agency regulation establishing a substitute for the language is sufficient but not necessary for this purpose. Any such designation will expire ten years after the records were submitted to the Government.


(4) Predisclosure notification. The procedures in this paragraph apply to records that were submitted to the Government and where we have substantial reason to believe that information in the records could reasonably be considered exempt under Exemption four. Certain exceptions to these procedures are stated in paragraph (d)(5) of this section.


(i) When we receive a request for such records and we determine that we may be required to disclose them, we will make reasonable efforts to notify the submitter about these facts. The notice will inform the submitter about the procedures and time limits for submission and consideration of objections to disclosure. If we must notify a large number of submitters, we may do this by posting or publishing a notice in a place where the submitters are reasonably likely to become aware of it.


(ii) The submitter has ten (10) working days from receipt of the notice to object to disclosure of any part of the records and to state all bases for its objections.


(iii) We will give consideration to all bases that have been timely stated by the submitter. If we decide to disclose the records and the submitter still does not agree, we will send a written notice to the submitter stating briefly why we did not sustain its objections and we will provide a copy of the records as we intend to release them. The notice will state that we will disclose the records five (5) working days after the submitter receives the notice unless we are ordered by a United States District Court not to release them.


(iv) When a requester files suit under the FOIA to obtain records covered by this paragraph, we will promptly notify the submitter.


(v) Whenever we send a notice to a submitter under paragraph (d)(4)(i) of this section, we will notify you that we are giving the submitter a notice and an opportunity to object.


(5) Exceptions to predisclosure notification. The notice requirements in paragraph (d)(4) of this section do not apply in the following situations:


(i) We decide not to disclose the records;


(ii) The information has previously been published or made generally available;


(iii) We have already notified the submitter of previous requests for the same records and have come to an understanding with that submitter about the records;


(iv) Disclosure is required by a statute other than the FOIA;


(v) Disclosure is required by a regulation, issued after notice and opportunity for public comment that specifies narrow categories of records that are to be disclosed under the FOIA. In this case a submitter may still designate records as described in paragraph (d)(3) of this section and in exceptional cases, at our discretion, may follow the notice procedures in paragraph (d)(4) of this section;


(vi) The designation appears to be obviously frivolous, but in this case we will still give the submitter the written notice required by paragraph (d)(4)(iii) of this section (although this notice need not explain our decision or include a copy of the records); and


(vii) We withhold the information because another statute requires its withholding.


(e) Exemption five – Internal memoranda. This exemption covers internal Government communications and notes that fall within a generally recognized evidentiary privilege. Internal Government communications include an agency’s communications with an outside consultant or other outside person, with a court, or with Congress, when those communications are for a purpose similar to the purpose of privileged intra-agency communications. Some of the most common applicable privileges are:


(1) The deliberative process privilege. This privilege protects predecisional deliberative communications. A communication is protected under this privilege if it was made before a final decision was reached on some question of policy and if it expressed recommendations or opinions on that question. The purpose of this privilege is to prevent injury to the quality of the agency decision making process by encouraging open and frank internal policy discussions, by avoiding premature disclosure of policies not yet adopted, and by avoiding the public confusion that might result from disclosing reasons that were not in fact the ultimate grounds for an agency’s decision. This privilege continues to protect pre-decisional documents even after a decision is made. We will release purely factual material in a deliberative document unless that material is otherwise exempt. However, purely factual material in a deliberative document is within this privilege if:


(i) It is inextricably intertwined with the deliberative portions so that it cannot reasonably be segregated; or


(ii) It would reveal the nature of the deliberative portions, or


(iii) Its disclosure would in some other way make possible an intrusion into the decision making process.


(2) Attorney-client privilege. This privilege protects confidential communications between a lawyer and an employee or agent of the Government where an attorney-client relationship exists (for example, where the lawyer is acting as attorney for the agency and the employee is communicating on behalf of the agency) and where the employee has communicated information to the attorney in confidence in order to obtain legal advice or assistance, and/or when the attorney has given advice to the client.


(3) Attorney work product privilege. This privilege protects documents prepared by or for an agency, or by or for its representative (usually BBG attorneys) in anticipation of litigation or for trial. It includes documents prepared for purposes of administrative adjudications as well as court litigation. It includes factual material in such documents as well as material revealing opinions and tactics. The privilege continues to protect the documents even after the litigation is closed.


(f) Exemption six – Clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. We may withhold personnel, medical, and similar files, and personal information about individuals if disclosure would constitute a clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy.


(1) Balancing test. In deciding whether to release records that contain personal or private information about someone else to a requester, we weigh the foreseeable harm of invading that individual’s privacy against the public benefit that would result from the release of the information. In our evaluation of requests for records, we attempt to guard against the release of information that might involve a violation of personal privacy by a requester being able to “piece together items” or “read between the lines” information that would normally be exempt from mandatory disclosure.


(2) Information frequently withheld. We frequently withhold such information as home addresses, home telephone numbers, ages, minority group status, social security numbers, individual’s benefits, earning records, leave records, etc.


(g) Exemption seven – Law enforcement. We are not required to release information or records that the Government has compiled for law enforcement purposes. The records may apply to actual or potential violations of either criminal or civil laws or regulations. We can withhold these records only to the extent that releasing them would cause harm in at least one of the following situations:


(1) Enforcement proceedings. We may withhold information when release could reasonably be expected to interfere with prospective or ongoing law enforcement proceedings, investigations of fraud and mismanagement, employee misconduct, and civil rights violations may fall into this category. In certain cases, we may refuse to confirm or deny the existence of records that relate to violations in order not to disclose that an investigation is in progress or may be conducted.


(2) Fair trial or impartial adjudication. We may withhold records when release would deprive a person of a fair trial or an impartial adjudication because of prejudicial publicity.


(3) Personal privacy. We are careful not to disclose information that could reasonably be expected to constitute an unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. When a name surfaces in an investigation, that person is likely to be vulnerable to innuendo, rumor, harassment, or retaliation.


(4) Confidential sources and information. We may withhold records whose release could reasonably be expected to disclose the identity of a confidential source of information. A confidential source may be an individual; a state, local or foreign Government agency; or any private organization. The exemption applies whether the source provides information under an express promise of confidentiality or under circumstances from which such an assurance could be reasonably inferred. Also, where the record or information in it has been compiled by a criminal law enforcement authority conducting a criminal investigation or by an agency conducting a lawful national security investigation, the exemption also protects all information supplied by a confidential source. Also protected from mandatory disclosure is any information which, if disclosed, could reasonably be expected to jeopardize the system of confidentiality that assures a flow of information from sources to investigatory agencies.


(5) Techniques and procedures. We may withhold records reflecting special techniques or procedures of investigation or prosecution not otherwise generally known to the public. In some cases, it is not possible to describe even in general terms those techniques without disclosing the very material to be withheld. We may also withhold records whose release would disclose guidelines for law enforcement investigations or prosecutions if this disclosure could reasonably be expected to create a risk that someone could circumvent requirements of law or of regulation.


(6) Life and physical safety. We may withhold records whose disclosure could reasonably be expected to endanger the life or physical safety of any individual. This protection extends to threats and harassment as well as to physical violence.


(h) Exemptions eight and nine – Records on financial institutions and records on wells. (1) Exemption eight permits us to withhold records about regulation or supervision of financial institutions.


(2) Exemption nine permits the withholding of geological and geophysical information and data, including maps concerning wells.


§ 503.9 Electronic records.

(a) Introduction. This section applies to all records of the BBG, including all of its worldwide operations. Congress enacted the FOIA to require Federal agencies to make records available to the public through public inspections and at the request of any person for any public or private use. The increase in the Government’s use of computers enhances the public’s access to Government information. This section addresses and explains how records will be reviewed and released when the records are maintained in electronic format. Documentation not previously subject to the FOIA when maintained in a non-electronic format is not made subject to FOIA by this law.


(b) Definitions – (1) Compelling need. Obtaining records on an expedited basis because of an imminent threat to the life or physical safety of an individual, or urgently needed by an individual primarily engaged in disseminating information to the public concerning actual or alleged Federal Government activities.


(2) Discretionary disclosure. Records or information normally exempt from disclosure will be released whenever it is possible to do so without reasonably foreseeable harm to any interest protected by an FOIA exemption.


(3) Electronic reading room. The room provided which makes electronic records available.


(c) Electronic format of records. (1) Materials such as agency opinions and policy statements (available for public inspection and copying) will be available electronically by accessing the BBG’s Home Page via the Internet at http://www.ibb.gov. To set up an appointment to view such records in hard copy or to access the Internet via the BBG’s computer, please contact the FOIA/Privacy Act Officer at (202) 260-4404.


(2) We will make available for public inspection and copying, both electronically via the Internet and in hard copy, those records that have been previously released in response to FOIA requests, when we determine the records have been or are likely to be the subject of future requests.


(3) We will provide both electronically through our Internet address and in hard copy a “Guide” on how to make an FOIA request, and an Index of all Agency information systems and records that may be requested under the FOIA.


(4) We may delete identifying details when we publish or make available the index and copies of previously-released records to prevent a clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy.


(i) We will indicate the extent of any deletions made from the place the deletion was made, if possible.


(ii) We will not reveal information about deletions if such disclosure would harm an interest protected by an exemption.


(d) Honoring form or format requests. We will aid requesters by providing records and information in the form requested, including electronic format, if we can readily reproduce them in that form or format. However, if we cannot accommodate you, we will provide responsive, nonexempt information in a reasonably accessible form.


(1) We will make a reasonable effort to search for records kept in an electronic format. However, if the effort would significantly interfere with the operations of the agency or the agency’s use of its computers, we will consider the effort to be unreasonable.


(2) We need not create documents that do not exist, but computer records found in a database rather than in a file cabinet may require the application of codes or some form of programming to retrieve the information. This application of codes or programming of records will not amount to the creation of records.


(3) Except in unusual cases, the cost of computer time will not be a factor in calculating the two free hours of search time available under Sec. 503.7. In those unusual cases, where the cost of conducting a computerized search significantly detracts from the agency’s ordinary operations, no more than the dollar cost of two hours of manual search time shall be allowed. For searches conducted beyond the first two hours, the agency shall only charge the direct costs of conducting such searches.


(e) Technical feasibility of redacting non-releasable material. We will make every effort to indicate the place on the record where a redaction of non-releasable material is made, and an FOIA citation noting the applicable exemption for the deletion will also be placed at the site. If unable to do so, we will notify you of that fact.


(f) Ensuring timely response to request. We will make every attempt to respond to FOIA requests within the prescribed 20 working-day time limit. However, processing some requests may require additional time in order to properly screen material against the inadvertent disclosure of material covered by the exemptions.


(1) Multitrack first-in first-out processing. (i) Because the agency expects to be able to process its requests without a backlog of cases, BBG will not institute a multitract system. Those cases that may be handled easily, because they require only a few documents or a simple answer, will be handled immediately by an FOIA specialist.


(ii) If you wish to qualify for faster processing, you may limit the scope of your request so that we may respond more quickly.


(2) Unusual circumstances. (i) The agency may extend for a maximum of ten working days the statutory time limit for responding to an FOIA request by giving notice in writing as to the reason for such an extension. The reasons for such an extension may include: the need to search for and collect requested records from multiple offices; the volume of records requested; and, the need for consultation with other components within the agency.


(ii) If an extra ten days still does not provide sufficient time for the Agency to deal with your request, we will inform you that the request cannot be processed within the statutory time limit and provide you with the opportunity to limit the scope of your request and/or arrange with us a negotiated deadline for processing your request.


(iii) If you refuse to reasonably limit the scope of your request or refuse to agree upon a time frame, the agency will process your case, as it would have, had no modification been sought. We will make a diligent, good-faith effort to complete our review within the statutory time frame.


(3) Grouping of requests. We will group together requests that clearly involve related material that should be considered as a single request.


(i) If you make multiple or related requests for similar material for the purpose of avoiding costs, we will notify you that we are grouping together your requests, and the reasons why.


(ii) Multiple or related requests may also be grouped, such as those involving requests and schedules but you will be notified in advance if we intend to do so.


(g) Time periods for agency consideration of requests – (1) Expedited access. We will authorize expedited access to requesters who show a compelling need for access, but the burden is on the requester to prove that expedition is appropriate. We will determine within ten days whether or not to grant a request for expedited access and we will notify the requester of our decision.


(2) Compelling need for expedited access. Failure to obtain the records within an expedited deadline must pose an imminent threat to an individual’s life or physical safety; or the request must be made by someone primarily engaged in disseminating information, and who has an urgency to inform the public about actual or alleged Federal Government activity.


(3) How to request expedited access. We will be required to make factual and subjective judgments about the circumstances cited by requesters to qualify them for expedited processing. To request expedited access, your request must be in writing and it must explain in detail your basis for seeking expedited access. The categories for compelling need are intended to be narrowly applied:


(i) A threat to an individual’s life or physical safety. A threat to an individual’s life or physical safety should be imminent to qualify for expedited access to the records. You must include the reason why a delay in obtaining the information could reasonably be foreseen to cause significant adverse consequences to a recognized interest.


(ii) Urgency to inform. The information requested should pertain to a matter of a current exigency to the American public, where delay in response would compromise a significant recognized interest. The person requesting expedited access under an “urgency to inform,” must be primarily engaged in the dissemination of information. This does not include individuals who are engaged only incidentally in the dissemination of information. “Primarily engaged” requires that information dissemination be the main activity of the requester. A requester only incidentally engaged in information dissemination, besides other activities, would not satisfy this requirement. The public’s right to know, although a significant and important value, would not by itself be sufficient to satisfy this standard.


(4) Estimation of matter denied. The agency will try to estimate the volume of any denied material and provide the estimate to the requester, unless doing so would harm an interest protected by an exemption.


(h) Computer redaction. The agency will identify the location of deletions in the released portion of the records, and where technologically possible, will show the deletion at the place on the record where the deletion was made, unless including that indication would harm an interest protected by an exemption.


(i) Annual report on FOIA activities. Reports on FOIA activities are submitted each fiscal year to the Department of Justice, and are due by February 1 of every year. The BBG’s report will be available both in hard copy and through the Internet. The Department of Justice will also report all Federal agency FOIA activity through electronic means.


(j) Reference materials and guides. The agency has available in hard copy, and electronically through the Internet, a guide for requesting records under the FOIA, and an index and description of all major information systems of the agency. The guide is a simple explanation of what the FOIA is intended to do, and how you can use it to access BBG records. The Index explains the types of records that may be requested from the Agency through FOIA requests and why some records cannot, by law, be made available by the BBG.


PART 504 – TESTIMONY BY BBG EMPLOYEES, PRODUCTION OF OFFICIAL RECORDS, AND DISCLOSURE OF OFFICIAL INFORMATION IN LEGAL PROCEEDINGS


Authority:22 U.S.C. 6204.


Source:72 FR 19798, Apr. 20, 2007, unless otherwise noted.

Subpart A – General Provisions

§ 504.1 Scope and purpose.

(a) These regulations in this subpart establish policy, assign responsibilities and prescribe procedures with respect to:


(1) The production or disclosure of official information or records by BBG employees, and


(2) The testimony of current and former BBG employees, relating to official information, official duties, or the BBG’s records, in connection with federal or state litigation in which the BBG is not a party.


(b) The BBG intends these provisions to:


(1) Conserve the time of BBG employees for conducting official business;


(2) Minimize the involvement of BBG employees in issues unrelated to BBG’s mission;


(3) Maintain the impartiality of BBG employees in disputes between private litigants; and


(4) Protect sensitive, confidential information and the deliberative processes of the BBG.


(c) In providing for these requirements, the BBG does not waive the sovereign immunity of the United States.


(d) This part provides guidance for the internal operations of BBG. It does not create any right or benefit, substantive or procedural, that a party may rely upon in any legal proceeding against the United States.


§ 504.2 Applicability.

This part applies to demands and requests to current and former employees for factual or expert testimony relating to official information or official duties or for production of official records or information, in legal proceedings in which the BBG is not a named party. This part does not apply to:


(a) Demands upon or requests for a BBG employee to testify as to facts or events that are unrelated to his or her official duties or that are unrelated to the functions of the BBG;


(b) Demands upon or requests for a former BBG employee to testify as to matters in which the former employee was not directly or materially involved while at the BBG;


(c) Requests for the release of records under the Freedom of Information Act, 5 U.S.C. 552, or the Privacy Act, 5 U.S.C. 552a; or


(d) Congressional demands and requests for testimony, records or information.


§ 504.3 Definitions.

The following definitions apply to this part:


(a) Demand means an order, subpoena, or other command of a court or other competent authority for the production, disclosure, or release of records or for the appearance and testimony of a BBG employee in a legal proceeding.


(b) General Counsel means the General Counsel of the BBG or a person to whom the General Counsel has delegated authority under this part.


(c) Legal proceeding means any matter before a court of law, administrative board or tribunal, commission, administrative law judge, hearing officer or other body that conducts a legal or administrative proceeding. Legal proceeding includes all phases of litigation.


(d) BBG means the Broadcasting Board of Governors.


(e) BBG employee means:


(1) Any current or former employee of the BBG.


(2) This definition does not include persons who are no longer employed by the BBG and who agree to testify about general matters, matters available to the public, or matters with which they had no specific involvement or responsibility during their employment with the BBG.


(f) Records or official records and information means all information in the custody and control of the BBG, relating to information in the custody and control of the BBG, or acquired by a BBG employee in the performance of his or her official duties or because of his or her official status, while the individual was employed by the BBG.


(g) Request means any informal request, by whatever method, for the production of records and information or for testimony which has not been ordered by a court or other competent authority.


(h) Testimony means any written or oral statements, including depositions, answers to interrogatories, affidavits, declarations, interviews, and statements made by an individual in connection with a legal proceeding.


Subpart B – Demands or Requests for Testimony and Production of Documents

§ 504.4 General prohibition.

(a) In any United States federal, state, and local proceeding or administrative action, or proceeding or administrative action conducted in a foreign country, in which the BBG is not a party, no BBG employee shall, in response to a demand or request for official records or information, furnish or produce documents or testimony as to any material contained in BBG files, any information relating to or based upon material contained in BBG files, or any information or material acquired as part of the performance of that person’s official duties (or because of that person’s official status) without the prior written approval of the General Counsel.


(b) Whenever a request or demand for information is made upon a BBG employee, the employee, wherever located, shall immediately prepare a report that specifically describes the testimony or documents sought and immediately notify the General Counsel. The BBG employee shall then await instructions from the General Counsel concerning a response to the request or demand. The failure of any BBG employee to follow the procedures specified in this subpart neither creates nor confers any rights, privileges, or benefits on any person or party.


§ 504.5 Factors the BBG will consider.

The General Counsel, in his or her sole discretion, may grant an employee permission to testify on matters relating to official information, or produce official records and information, in response to a demand or request. Among the relevant factors that the General Counsel may consider in making this decision are whether:


(a) The purposes of this part are met;


(b) Allowing such testimony or production of records would be necessary to prevent a miscarriage of justice;


(c) Allowing such testimony or production of records would assist or hinder the BBG in performing its statutory duties;


(d) Allowing such testimony or production of records would be in the best interest of the BBG or the United States;


(e) The records or testimony can be obtained from other sources;


(f) The demand or request is unduly burdensome or otherwise inappropriate under the applicable rules of discovery or the rules of procedure governing the case or matter in which the demand or request arose;


(g) Disclosure would violate a statute, Executive Order or regulation;


(h) Disclosure would reveal confidential, sensitive, or privileged information, trade secrets or similar, confidential or financial information, otherwise protected information, or information which would otherwise be inappropriate for release;


(i) Disclosure would impede or interfere with an ongoing law enforcement investigation or proceeding, or compromise constitutional rights or national security interests;


(j) Disclosure would result in the BBG appearing to favor one litigant over another;


(k) The request was served before the demand;


(l) A substantial Government interest is implicated;


(m) The demand or request is within the authority of the party making it; and


(n) The demand or request is sufficiently specific to be answered and/or can be limited to information to that which would be consistent with the factors specified herein.


§ 504.6 Filing requirements for litigants seeking documents or testimony.

A litigant must comply with the following requirements when filing a request for official records and information or testimony under this subpart. A request should be filed before a demand.


(a) The request must be in writing and must be submitted to the General Counsel.


(b) The written request must contain the following information:


(1) The caption of the legal proceeding, docket number, and name and address of the court or other authority involved;


(2) A copy of the complaint or equivalent document setting forth the assertions in the case and any other pleading or document necessary to show relevance;


(3) A list of categories of records sought, a detailed description of how the information sought is relevant to the issues in the legal proceeding, and a specific description of the substance of the testimony or records sought;


(4) A statement as to how the need for the information outweighs any need to maintain the confidentiality of the information and outweighs the burden on the BBG to produce the records or provide testimony;


(5) A statement indicating that the information sought is not available from another source, from other persons or entities, or from the testimony of someone other than an BBG employee, such as a retained expert;


(6) If testimony is requested, the intended use of the testimony, and a showing that no document could be provided and used in lieu of testimony;


(7) A description of all prior decisions, orders, or pending motions in the case that bear upon the relevance of the requested records or testimony;


(8) The name, address, and telephone number of counsel to each party in the case; and


(9) An estimate of the amount of time that the requester and other parties will require for each BBG employee for time spent by the employee to prepare for testimony, in travel, and for attendance in the legal proceeding.


(c) The BBG reserves the right to require additional information to complete the request where appropriate.


(d) The request should be submitted at least 30 days before the date that records or testimony is required. Requests submitted in less than 30 days before records or testimony is required must be accompanied by a written explanation stating the reasons for the late request and the reasons for expedited processing.


(e) Failure to cooperate in good faith to enable the General Counsel to make an informed decision may serve as the basis for a determination not to comply with the request.


(f) The request should state that the requester will provide a copy of the BBG employee’s statement free of charge and that the requester will permit the BBG to have a representative present during the employee’s testimony.


§ 504.7 Service of requests or demands.

Requests or demands for official records or information or testimony under this Subpart must be served on the General Counsel, BBG, 330 Independence Ave., SW., Washington, DC 20237 by mail or fax at (202) 203-4585 and clearly marked “Part 504 – Request for Testimony or Official Records in Legal Proceedings.”


§ 504.8 Processing requests or demands.

(a) After receiving service of a request or demand for testimony, the General Counsel will review the request and, in accordance with the provisions of this Subpart, determine whether, or under what conditions, to authorize the employee to testify on matters relating to official information and/or produce official records and information.


(b) Absent exigent circumstances, the BBG will issue a determination within 30 days from the date the request is received.


(c) The General Counsel may grant a waiver of any procedure described by this Subpart where a waiver is considered necessary to promote a significant interest of the BBG or the United States, or for other good cause.


(d) Certification (authentication) of copies of records. The BBG may certify that records are true copies in order to facilitate their use as evidence. If a requester seeks certification, the requester must request certified copies from the BBG at least 30 days before the date they will be needed. The request should be sent to the BBG General Counsel.


§ 504.9 Final determinations.

The General Counsel makes the final determination on demands or requests to employees for production of official records and information or testimony in litigation in which the BBG is not a party. All final determinations are within the sole discretion of the General Counsel. The General Counsel will notify the requester and, when appropriate, the court or other competent authority of the final determination, the reasons for the grant or denial of the request, and any conditions that the General Counsel may impose on the release of records or information, or on the testimony of an BBG employee. The General Counsel’s decision exhausts administrative remedies for discovery of the information.


§ 504.10 Restrictions that apply to testimony.

(a) The General Counsel may impose conditions or restrictions on the testimony of BBG employees including, for example:


(1) Limiting the areas of testimony;


(2) Requiring the requester and other parties to the legal proceeding to agree that the transcript of the testimony will be kept under seal;


(3) Requiring that the transcript will be used or made available only in the particular legal proceeding for which testimony was requested. The General Counsel may also require a copy of the transcript of testimony at the requester’s expense.


(b) The BBG may offer the employee’s written declaration in lieu of testimony.


(c) If authorized to testify pursuant to this part, an employee may testify as to facts within his or her personal knowledge, but, unless specifically authorized to do so by the General Counsel, the employee shall not:


(1) Disclose confidential or privileged information; or


(2) For a current BBG employee, testify as an expert or opinion witness with regard to any matter arising out of the employee’s official duties or the functions of the BBG unless testimony is being given on behalf of the United States (see also 5 CFR 2635.805).


(d) The scheduling of an employee’s testimony, including the amount of time that the employee will be made available for testimony, will be subject to the BBG’s approval.


§ 504.11 Restrictions that apply to released records.

(a) The General Counsel may impose conditions or restrictions on the release of official records and information, including the requirement that parties to the proceeding obtain a protective order or execute a confidentiality agreement to limit access and any further disclosure. The terms of the protective order or of a confidentiality agreement must be acceptable to the General Counsel. In cases where protective orders or confidentiality agreements have already been executed, the BBG may condition the release of official records and information on an amendment to the existing protective order or confidentiality agreement.


(b) If the General Counsel so determines, original BBG records may be presented for examination in response to a request, but they may not be presented as evidence or otherwise used in a manner by which they could lose their identity as official BBG records, nor may they be marked or altered. In lieu of the original records, certified copies may be presented for evidentiary purposes.


§ 504.12 Procedure when a decision is not made prior to the time a response is required.

If a response to a demand or request is required before the General Counsel can make the determination referred to in § 504.9, the General Counsel, when necessary, will provide the court or other competent authority with a copy of this part, inform the court or other competent authority that the request is being reviewed, provide an estimate as to when a decision will be made, and seek a stay of the demand or request pending a final determination.


§ 504.13 Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling.

If the court or other competent authority fails to stay a demand or request, the employee upon whom the demand or request is made, unless otherwise advised by the General Counsel, will appear, if necessary, at the stated time and place, produce a copy of this part, state that the employee has been advised by counsel not to provide the requested testimony or produce documents, and respectfully decline to comply with the demand or request, citing United States ex rel. Touhy v. Ragen, 340 U.S. 462 (1951).


Subpart C – Schedule of Fees

§ 504.14 Fees.

(a) Generally. The General Counsel may condition the production of records or appearance for testimony upon advance payment of a reasonable estimate of the costs to the BBG.


(b) Fees for records. Fees for producing records will include fees for searching, reviewing, and duplicating records, costs of attorney time spent in reviewing the request, and expenses generated by materials and equipment used to search for, produce, and copy the responsive information. Costs for employee time will be calculated on the basis of the hourly pay of the employee (including all pay, allowances, and benefits). Fees for duplication will be the same as those charged by the BBG in its Freedom of Information Act regulations at 22 CFR Part 503.


(c) Witness fees. Fees for attendance by a witness will include fees, expenses, and allowances prescribed by the court’s rules. If no such fees are prescribed, witness fees will be determined based upon the rule of the Federal district court closest to the location where the witness will appear and on 28 U.S.C. 1821, as applicable. Such fees will include cost of time spent by the witness to prepare for testimony, in travel and for attendance in the legal proceeding, plus travel costs.


(d) Payment of fees. A requester must pay witness fees for current BBG employees and any record certification fees by submitting to the General Counsel a check or money order for the appropriate amount made payable to the Treasury of the United States. In the case of testimony of former BBG employees, the requester must pay applicable fees directly to the former BBG employee in accordance with 28 U.S.C. 1821 or other applicable statutes.


(e) Waiver or reduction of fees. The General Counsel, in his or her sole discretion, may, upon a showing of reasonable cause, waive or reduce any fees in connection with the testimony, production, or certification of records.


(f) De minimis fees. Fees will not be assessed if the total charge would be $10.00 or less.


Subpart D – Penalties

§ 504.15 Penalties.

(a) An employee who discloses official records or information or gives testimony relating to official information, except as expressly authorized by the BBG, or as ordered by a Federal court after the BBG has had the opportunity to be heard, may face penalties as provided in any applicable enforcement statute.


(b) A current BBG employee who testifies or produces official records and information in violation of this part shall be subject to disciplinary action and, if done for a valuable consideration, may subject that person to criminal prosecution.


PART 505 – PRIVACY ACT REGULATION


Authority:Pub. L. 93-579, 88 Stat. 1897; 5 U.S.C. 552a.


Source:67 FR 8875, Feb. 27, 2002, unless otherwise noted.

§ 505.1 Purpose and scope.

The Broadcasting Board of Governors (BBG) will protect individuals’ privacy from misuses of their records, and grant individuals access to records concerning them which are maintained by the Agency’s domestic and overseas offices, consistent with the provisions of Public Law 93-579, 88 Stat. 1897; 5 U.S.C. 552a, the Privacy Act of 1974, as amended. The Agency has also established procedures to permit individuals to amend incorrect records, to limit the disclosure of personal information to third parties, and to limit the number of sources of personal information. The Agency has also established internal rules restricting requirements of individuals to provide social security account numbers.


§ 505.2 Definitions.

(a) Access Appeal Committee (AAC). The body established by and responsible to the Broadcasting Board for reviewing appeals made by individuals to amend records held by the Agency.


(b) Agency, BBG, our, we or us. The BBG, its offices, divisions, branches and its worldwide operations.


(c) Amend. To make a correction to or expunge any portion of a record about an individual which that individual believes is not accurate, relevant, timely or complete.


(d) Individual or you. A citizen of the United States or an alien lawfully admitted for permanent residence.


(e) Maintain. Collect, use, store, disseminate or any combination of these record keeping functions; exercise of control over and hence responsibility and accountability for systems of records.


(f) Record. Any information maintained by the Agency about an individual that can be reproduced, including finger or voice prints and photographs, and which is retrieved by that particular individual’s name or personal identifier, such as a social security number.


(g) Routine use. With respect to the disclosure of a record, the use of such record for a purpose, which is compatible with the purpose for which it was collected. The common ordinary purposes for which records are used and all of the proper and necessary uses even if any such uses occur infrequently.


(h) Statistical record. A record in a system of records maintained for statistical research or reporting purposes only and not used in whole or in part in making any determination about an identifiable individual, except as provided in 12 U.S.C.8.


(i) System of records. A group of records under the maintenance and control of the Agency from which information is retrieved by the name or personal identifier of the individual.


(j) Personnel record. Any information about an individual that is maintained in a system of records by the Agency that is needed for personnel management or processes such as staffing, employee development, retirement, grievances and appeals.


(k) Worldwide Operations. Any of the foreign service establishments of the Agency.


§ 505.3 Procedures for requests.

(a) The agency will consider all written requests received from an individual for records pertaining to herself/himself as a request made under the Privacy Act of 1974, as amended (5 U.S.C. 552a) whether or not the individual specifically cites the Privacy Act when making the request.


(b) All requests under the Privacy Act should be directed to the FOIA/Privacy Act Office, Office of the General Counsel, Broadcasting Board of Governors, Suite 3349, 330 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, DC 20237, which will coordinate the search of all systems of records specified in the request. Requests should state name, date of birth, and social security number.


(c) Requests directed to any of the Agency’s worldwide establishments which involve routine unclassified, administrative and personnel records available only at those establishments may be released to the individual by the establishment if it determines that such a release is authorized by the Privacy Act. All other requests shall be submitted by the establishment to the FOIA/Privacy Act Office, Office of the General Counsel, Broadcasting Board of Governors, Suite 3349, 330 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, DC 20237, and the individual shall be so notified of this section in writing, when possible.


(d) In those instances where an individual requests records pertaining to herself/himself, as well as records pertaining to another individual, group or some other category of the Agency’s records, only that portion of the request which pertains to records concerning the individual will be treated as a Privacy Act request. The remaining portions of such a request will be processed as a Freedom of Information Act request and sent to the office noted in paragraph (b) of this section.


§ 505.4 Requirements and identification for making requests.

(a) When you seek access to Agency records, you may present your written request, fax it to (202) 260-4394 or mail it to the FOIA/Privacy Act Office, Office of the General Counsel, Broadcasting Board of Governors, Suite 3349, 330 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, DC 20237. The FOIA/Privacy Act Office may be visited between the hours of 9 a.m. and 3 p.m., Monday through Friday, except for legal holidays.


(b) When you seek access to Agency records, you will be requested to present identification. You must state your full name, date of birth and social security number. You must also include your present mailing address and zip code, and if possible, a telephone number.


(c) When signing a statement confirming your identity, you should understand that knowingly and willfully seeking or obtaining access to records about another person under false pretenses is punishable by a fine of up to $5,000.


§ 505.5 Disclosure of information.

(a) In order to locate the system of records that you believe may contain information about you, you should first obtain a copy of the Agency’s Notice of Systems of Records. By identifying a particular record system and by furnishing all the identifying information requested by that record system, it would enable us to more easily locate those records which pertain to you. At a minimum, any request should include the information specified in Sec. 505.4(b).


(b) In certain circumstances, it may be necessary for us to request additional information from you to ensure that the retrieved record does, in fact, pertain to you.


(c) All requests for information on whether or not the Agency’s systems of records contain information about you will be acknowledged within 20 working days of receipt of that request. The requested records will be provided as soon as possible thereafter.


(d) If the Agency determines that the substance of the requested record is exceptionally sensitive, we will require you to furnish a signed, notarized statement that you are in fact the person named in the file before granting access to the records.


(e) Original records will not be furnished subject to and in accordance with fees established in § 505.11.


(f) Denial of access to records:


(1) The requirements of this section do not entitle you access to any information compiled in reasonable anticipation of a civil action or proceeding.


(2) Under the Privacy Act, we are not required to permit access to records if the information is not retrievable by your name or other personal identifier; those requests will be processed as Freedom of Information Act requests.


(3) We may deny you access to a record, or portion thereof, if following a review it is determined that the record or portion falls within a system of records that is exempt from disclosure according to 5 U.S.C. 552a(j) and 552a(k). See §§ 505.13 and 505.14 for a listing of general and specific exemptions.


(4) The decision to deny access to a record or a portion of the record is made by the Agency’s Privacy Act Officer. The denial letter will advise you of your right to appeal the denial (See § 505.9 on Access Appeal Committee’s review).


§ 505.6 Medical records.

If, in the judgment of the Agency, the release of medical information to you could have an adverse effect, the Agency will arrange an acceptable alternative to granting access of such records directly to you. This normally involves the release of the information to a doctor named by you. However, this special procedure provision does not in any way limit your absolute right to receive a complete copy of your medical record.


§ 505.7 Correction or amendment of record.

(a) You have the right to request that we amend a record pertaining to you which you believe is not accurate, relevant, timely, or complete. At the time we grant access to a record, we will furnish guidelines for you to request amendment to the record.


(b) Requests for amendments to records must be in writing and mailed or delivered to the FOIA/Privacy Act Officer, FOIA/Privacy Act Office, Office of the General Counsel, Broadcasting Board of Governors, Suite 3349, 330 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, DC 20237, who will coordinate the review of the request to amend the record with the appropriate office(s). Such requests must contain, at a minimum, identifying information needed to locate the record, a brief description of the item or items of information to be amended, and the reason for the requested change. The requester should submit as much documentation, arguments or other data as seems warranted to support the request for amendment.


(c) We will review all requests for amendments to records within 20 working days of receipt of the request and either make the changes or inform you of our refusal to do so and the reasons.


§ 505.8 Agency review of requests for changes.

(a) In reviewing a record in response to a request to amend or correct a file, we will incorporate the criteria of accuracy, relevance, timeliness, and completeness of the record in the review.


(b) If we agree with you to amend your records, we will:


(1) Advise you in writing;


(2) Correct the record accordingly;


(3) And, to the extent that an accounting of disclosure was maintained, advise all previous recipients of the record of the corrections.


(c) If we disagree with all or any portion of your request to amend a record, we will:


(1) Advise you of the reasons for the determination; and


(2) Inform you of your right to further review (see Sec. 505.9).


§ 505.9 Review of adverse agency determination.

(a) When we determine to deny a request to amend a record, or portion of the record, you may request further review by the Agency’s Access Appeal Committee. The written request for review should be mailed to the Chairperson, Access Appeal Committee, FOIA/Privacy Act Office, Office of the General Counsel, Broadcasting Board of Governors, Suite 3349, 330 Independence Avenue, SW., Washington, DC 20237. The letter should include any documentation, information or statement, which substantiates your request for review.


(b) The Agency’s Access Appeal Committee will review the Agency’s initial denial to amend the record and your documentation supporting amendment, within 30 working days. If additional time is required, you will be notified in writing of the reasons for the delay and the approximate date when the review is expected to be completed. Upon completion of the review, the Chairperson will notify you of the results.


(c) If the Committee upholds the Agency’s denial to amend the record, the Chairperson will advise you of:


(1) The reasons for our refusal to amend the record;


(2) Your right and the procedure to add to the file a concise statement supporting your disagreement with the decision of the Agency; and


(3) Your right to seek judicial review of the Agency’s refusal to amend the file.


(d) When you file a statement disagreeing with our refusal to amend a record, we will clearly annotate the record so that the fact that the record is disputed is apparent to anyone who may subsequently have access to, use of, or reason to disclose the file. If information is disclosed regarding the area of dispute, we will provide a copy of your statement in the disclosure. Any statement, which may be included by the Agency regarding the dispute, will be limited to the reasons given to you for not amending the record. Copies of our statement shall be treated as part of your record, but will not be subject to amendment by you under these regulations.


§ 505.10 Disclosure to third parties.

We will not disclose any information about you to any person or another agency without your prior consent, except as provided for in the following paragraphs:


(a) Medical records. May be disclosed to a doctor or other medical practitioner, named by you, as prescribed in Sec. 505.6.


(b) Accompanying individual. When you are accompanied by any other person, we will require that you sign a statement granting consent to the disclosure of the contents of your record to that person.


(c) Designees. If a person requests another person’s file, he or she must present a signed statement from the person of record that authorizes and consents to the release of the file to the designated individual.


(d) Guardians. Parents or legal guardians) of dependent minors or of an individual who has been declared by a court to be incompetent due to physical, mental or age incapacity, may act for and on behalf of the individual on whom the Agency maintains records.


(e) Other disclosures. A record may be disclosed without a request by or written consent of the individual to whom the record pertains if such disclosure conditions are authorized in accordance, with 5 U.S.C. 552a(b). These conditions are:


(1) Disclosure within the Agency. This condition is based upon a “need-to-know” concept, which recognizes that Agency personnel may require access to discharge their duties.


(2) Disclosure to the public. No consent by an individual is necessary if the record is required to be released under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), 5 U.S.C. 552. The record may be exempt, however, under one of the nine exemptions of the FOIA.


(3) Disclosure for a routine use. No consent by an individual is necessary if the condition is necessary for a “routine use” as defined in Sec. 505.2(g). Information may also be released to other government agencies, that have statutory or other lawful authority to maintain such information.


(4) Disclosure to the Bureau of the Census. For purposes of planning or carrying out a census or survey or related activity. Title 13 U.S.C. Section 8 limits the uses of these records and also makes them immune from compulsory disclosure.


(5) Disclosure for statistical research and reporting. The Agency will provide the statistical information requested only after all names and personal identifiers have been deleted from the records.


(6) Disclosure to the National Archives. For the preservation of records of historical value, according to 44 U.S.C. 2103.


(7) Disclosure for law enforcement purposes. Upon receipt of a written request by another Federal agency or a state or local government describing the law enforcement purpose for which a record is required, and specifying the particular record. Blanket requests for all records pertaining to an individual are not permitted under the Privacy Act.


(8) Disclosure under emergency circumstances. For the safety or health of an individual (e.g., medical records on a patient undergoing emergency treatment).


(9) Disclosure to the Congress. For matters within the jurisdiction of any House or Senate committee or subcommittee, and/or joint committee or subcommittee, but only when requested in writing from the Chairman of the committee or subcommittee.


(10) Disclosure to the General Accounting Office (GAO). For matters within the jurisdiction of the duties of the GAO’s Comptroller General.


(11) Disclosure according to court order. According to the order of a court of competent jurisdiction. This does not include a subpoena for records requested by counsel and issued by a clerk of court.


§ 505.11 Fees.

(a) The first copy of any Agency record about you will be provided free of charge. A fee of $0.15 per page will be charged for any additional copies requested by you.


(b) Checks or money orders should be made payable to the United States Treasurer and mailed to the FOIA/Privacy Act Office, Office of the General Counsel, Broadcasting Board of Governors, Suite 3349, 330 Independence Avenue, SW., Washington, DC 20237. The Agency will not accept cash.


§ 505.12 Civil remedies and criminal penalties.

(a) Grounds for court action. You will have a remedy in the Federal District Court under the following circumstances:


(1) Denial of access. You may challenge our decision to deny you access to records to which you consider yourself entitled.


(2) Refusal to amend a record. Under the conditions of 5 U.S.C. 552a(g), you may seek judicial review of the Agency’s refusal to amend a record.


(3) Failure to maintain a record accurately. You may bring suit against the Agency for any alleged intentional and willful failure to maintain a record accurately, if it can be shown that you were subjected to an adverse action resulting in the denial of aright, benefit, entitlement or employment you could reasonably have been expected to be granted if the record had not been deficient.


(4) Other failures to comply with the Act. You may bring an action for any alleged failure by the Agency to comply with the requirements of the Act or failure to comply with any rule published by the Agency to implement the Act provided it can be shown that:


(i) The action was intentional or willful;


(ii) The Agency’s action adversely affected you; and


(iii) The adverse action was caused by the Agency’s actions.


(b) Jurisdiction and time limits. (1) Action may be brought in the district court for the jurisdiction in which you reside or have a place of residence or business, or in which the Agency records are situated, or in the District of Columbia.


(2) The statute of limitations is two years from the date upon which the cause of action arises, except for cases in which the Agency has materially and willfully misrepresented any information requested to be disclosed and when such misrepresentation is material to the liability of the Agency. In such cases the statute of limitations is two years from the date of discovery of the misrepresentation by you.


(3) A suit may not be brought on the basis of injury, which may have occurred as a result of the Agency’s disclosure of a record prior to September 27, 1975.


(c) Criminal penalties – (1) Unauthorized disclosure. It is a criminal violation of the provisions of the Act for any officer or employee of the Agency to knowingly and willfully disclose a record in any manner to any person or agency not entitled to receive it, for failure to meet the conditions of disclosure listed in S U.S.C. 552a(b), or without the written consent or at the request of the individual to whom the record pertains. Any officer or employee of the Agency found guilty of such misconduct shall be fined not more than $5,000.


(2) Failure to publish a public notice. It is a criminal violation of the Act to willfully maintain a system of records and not publish the prescribed public notice. Any officer or employee of the Agency found guilty of such misconduct shall be fined not more than $5,000.


(3) Obtaining records under false pretenses. The Act makes it a criminal offense to knowingly and willfully request or gain access to a record about an individual under false pretenses. Any person found guilty of such an offense may be fined not more than $5,000.


§ 505.13 General exemptions (Subsection (j)).

(a) General exemptions are available for systems of records which are maintained by the Central Intelligence Agency (Subsection (j)(1)), or maintained by an agency which performs as its principal function any activity pertaining to the enforcement of the criminal laws (Subsection (j)(2)).


(b) The Act does not permit general one exemption of records compiled primarily for a non-criminal purpose, even though there are some quasi-criminal aspects to the investigation and even though the records are in a system of records to which the general exemption applies.


§ 505.14 Specific exemptions (Subsection (k)).

The specific exemptions focus more on the nature of the records in the system of records than on the agency. The following categories of records may be exempt from disclosure:


(a) Subsection (k)(1). Records which are specifically authorized under criteria established under an Executive Order to be kept secret in the interest of national defense or foreign policy, and which are in fact properly classified according to such Executive Order;


(b) Subsection (k)(2). Investigatory records compiled for law enforcement purposes (other than material within the scope of subsection (j)(2) as discussed in § 505.13(a)). If any individual is denied any right, privilege, or benefit for which she/he would otherwise be eligible, as a result of the maintenance of such material, the material shall be provided to the individual, unless disclosure of the material would reveal the identity of a source who has been pledged confidentiality;


(c) Subsection (k)(3). Records maintained in connection with protection of the President and other VIPs accorded special protection by statute;


(d) Subsection (k)(4). Records required by statute to be maintained and used solely as statistical records.


(e) Subsection (k)(5). Records compiled solely for the purpose of determining suitability, eligibility, or qualifications for Federal civilian employment, military service, Federal contracts, or access to classified information, but only if disclosure of the material would reveal the identity of a confidential source that furnished information to the Government.


(f) Subsection (k)(6). Testing or examination records used solely to determine individual qualifications for appointment or promotion in the Federal service when the disclosure of such would compromise the objectivity or fairness of the testing or examination process.


(g) Subsection (k)(7). Evaluation records used to determine potential for promotion in the armed services, but only if disclosure would reveal the identity of a confidential source.


§ 505.15 Exempt systems of records used.

The BBG is authorized to use exemptions (k)(1), (k)(2), (k)(4), (k)(5) and (k)(6).


PART 506 – PART-TIME CAREER EMPLOYMENT PROGRAM


Authority:5 U.S.C. 3401 (note and 3402).


Source:44 FR 63098, Nov. 2, 1979, unless otherwise noted.

§ 506.1 Purpose of program.

Many individuals in society possess great productive potential which goes unrealized because they cannot meet the requirements of a standard workweek. Permanent part-time employment also provides benefits to other individuals in a variety of ways, such as providing older individuals with a gradual transition into retirement, providing employment opportunities to handicapped individuals or others who require a reduced workweek, providing parents opportunities to balance family responsibilities with the need for additional income, providing employment opportunities for women returning to the workforce and assisting students who must finance their own education or vocational training. In view of this, the Broadcasting Board of Governors will operate a part-time career employment program, consistent with the needs of its beneficiaries and its responsibilities.


§ 506.2 Review of positions.

Positions becoming vacant unless excepted as provided by § 506.7, will be reviewed to determine the feasibility of converting them to part-time. Among the criteria which may be used when conducting this review are:


(a) Mission requirements and occupational mix.


(b) Workload fluctuations.


(c) Employment ceilings and budgetary considerations.


(d) Size of workforce, turnover rate and employment trends.


(e) Affirmative action.


§ 506.3 Establishing and converting part-time positions.

Position management and other internal reviews may indicate that positions may be either converted from full-time or initially established as part-time positions. Criteria listed above may be used during these reviews. If a decision is made to convert to or to establish a part-time position, regular position management and classification procedures will be followed.


§ 506.4 Annual goals and timetables.

A Board-wide plan for promoting part-time employment opportunities will be developed annually by the Office of Personnel after consultation with the operating elements. This plan will establish annual goals and set deadlines for achieving these goals.


[44 FR 63098, Nov. 2, 1979, as amended at 51 FR 11015, Apr. 1, 1986]


§ 506.5 Review and evaluation.

The part-time career employment program will be reviewed through semiannual reports submitted by the Director, Office of Personnel to the Associate Director for Management. Regular employment reports will be used to determine levels of part-time employment.


[44 FR 63098, Nov. 2, 1979, as amended at 51 FR 11016, Apr. 1, 1986]


§ 506.6 Publicizing vacancies.

When applicants from outside the Federal service are desired, part-time vacancies may be publicized through various recruiting means, such as:


(a) Federal Job Information Centers.


(b) State Employment Offices.


(c) Broadcasting Board of Governors Vacancy Announcements.


(d) College and University Placement Offices.


§ 506.7 Exceptions.

The Director of the Board and the Associate Director for Management may except positions from inclusion in this program as necessary to carry out the mission of the Board.


PART 507 – RULES FOR IMPLEMENTING OPEN MEETINGS UNDER THE SUNSHINE ACT FOR THE BROADCASTING BOARD OF GOVERNORS


Authority:Pub. L. 93-129, 87 Stat. 956, 5 U.S.C. 552b.


Source:67 FR 76112, Dec. 11, 2002, unless otherwise noted.

§ 507.1 General policies.

The Broadcasting Board of Governors will provide the public with the fullest practical information regarding its decision making process while protecting the rights of individuals and its abilities to carry out its responsibilities.


§ 507.2 Definitions.

The following definitions apply:


(a) The term agency includes any establishment in the executive branch of the government headed by a collegial body composed of two or more individual members, a majority of whom are appointed to such position by the President with the advice and consent of the Senate, and any subdivision thereof authorized to act on behalf of the agency. The Broadcasting Board of Governors is a government agency headed by a nine-member board, eight of whom are appointed by the President with the advice and consent of the Senate, and the ninth being the Secretary of State. Therefore, the Broadcasting Board of Governors is an “agency” under these terms.


(b) The term meeting means the deliberation of this Board where such deliberations determine or result in the joint conduct or disposition of official Board business.


(c) The term member means an individual who belongs to the Board who has been appointed by the President and confirmed by the Senate or is the Secretary of State.


§ 507.3 Requirement for open meetings.

Members shall not jointly conduct or dispose of agency business other than in accordance with this part. Except as provided in § 507.4 every portion of every meeting of the agency shall be open to public observation.


§ 507.4 Grounds on which meetings may be closed.

The Board shall open every portion of every meeting of the agency for public observation except where the agency determines that such portion or portions of the meeting or the disclosure of such information is likely to:


(a) Disclose matters that are:


(1) Specifically authorized under criteria established by an Executive order to be kept secret in the interests of national defense or foreign policy, and


(2) In fact properly classified pursuant to such Executive order;


(b) Relate solely to the internal personnel rules and practice of the agency;


(c) Disclose matters specifically exempted from disclosure by statute: Provided, that such statute:


(1) Requires that the matters be withheld from the public in such manner as to leave no discretion on the issue, or


(2) Established practical criteria for withholding or refers to particular types of matters to be withheld;


(d) Disclose trade secrets and commercial or financial information obtained from a person and privileged or confidential;


(e) Involve accusing any person of a crime, or formally censuring any person;


(f) Disclose information of a personal nature where disclosure would constitute a clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy;


(g) Disclose investigatory records compiled for law enforcement purposes, or information which if written would be contained in such records, but only to the extent that the production of such records or information would:


(1) Interfere with enforcement proceedings,


(2) Deprive a person of a right to a fair trial on an impartial adjudication,


(3) Constitute an unwarranted invasion of personal privacy,


(4) Disclose the identity of a confidential source and, in the case of a record compiled by a criminal law enforcement authority in the course of a criminal investigation, or by an agency conducting a lawful national security intelligence investigation, confidential source,


(5) Disclose investigative techniques and procedures, or


(6) Endanger the life or physical safety of law enforcement personnel;


(h) Disclose information, the premature disclosure of which would be likely to significantly frustrate implementation of a proposed agency action. This shall not apply in any instance where the Board has already disclosed to the public the content or the nature of its proposed action, or where the Board is required by law to make such disclosures on its own initiative prior to taking final Board action on such proposal; or


(i) Specifically concern the Board’s issuance of a subpoena, or the Board’s participation in a civil action or proceeding, an action in a foreign court or international tribunal, or an arbitration, or the initiation, conduct or disposition by the Board of a particular case of formal agency adjudication, or otherwise involving a determination on the record after opportunity for a hearing.


§ 507.5 Procedures for announcing meetings.

(a) In the case of each meeting, the Board shall make public, at least one week before the meeting, the time, place, and subject matter of the meeting, whether it is to be open or closed to the public, and the name and phone number of the official designated by the Board to respond to requests for information about the meeting. Such announcement shall be made unless a majority of the members of the Board determine by a recorded vote that such meeting must be called at an earlier date, in which case the Board shall make public announcement of the time, place, subject matter of such meeting and whether it is open or closed to the public, at the earliest practical time.


(b) Immediately following the public announcement, the Board will publish it in the Federal Register.


§ 507.6 Procedures for closing meetings.

(a) The closing of a meeting shall occur only when:


(1) A majority of the membership of the Board votes to take such action. A separate vote of the Board members shall be taken with respect to each Board meeting, a portion or portions of which are proposed to be closed to the public pursuant to § 507.4, or with respect to any information which is proposed to be withheld under § 507.4. A single vote may be taken with respect to a series of meetings, a portion or portions of which are proposed to be closed to the public, or with respect to any information concerning such series of meetings, so long as each meeting in such series involves the same particular matters and is scheduled to be held not more than thirty days after the initial meeting in such series. The vote of each Board member participating in such vote shall be recorded and no proxies shall be allowed.


(2) Whenever any person whose interest may be directly affected by a portion of the meeting requests that the Board close such a portion to the public for any of the reasons referred to in § 507.4 (e), (f) or (g), the Board, upon request of any of its Board members, shall take a recorded vote, whether to close such portion of the meeting.


(b) Within one day of any vote taken, the Board shall make publicly available a written copy of such vote reflecting the vote of each member on the question and full written explanation of its action closing the entire or portion of the meeting together with a list of all persons expected to attend the meeting and their affiliation.


(c) The Board shall announce the time, place and subject matter of the meeting at least eight (8) days before the meeting.


(d) For every closed meeting, the Board’s Legal Counsel shall publicly certify that, in his or her opinion, the meeting may be closed to the public and shall state each relevant exemptive provision. A copy of such certification, together with a statement from the presiding officer of the meeting setting forth the time and place of the meeting, and the persons present, shall be retained by the Board.


§ 507.7 Reconsideration of opening or closing a meeting.

The time or place of a Board meeting may be changed following the public announcement only if the Board publicly announces such change at the earliest practicable time. The subject matter of a meeting, or the determination of the agency to open or close a meeting, or a portion of a meeting, to the public, may be changed following the public announcement only if a majority of the Board members determines by a recorded vote that Board business so requires and that no earlier announcement of the change was possible, and the Board publicly announces such change and the vote of each member upon such change at the earliest practicable time.


§ 507.8 Recording keeping of closed meetings.

(a) The Board shall maintain an electronic recording of the proceedings of each meeting, or portion of a meeting, closed to the public.


(b) The Board, after review by the Chairman, shall make promptly available to the public in a place easily accessible to the public, a complete transcript or electronic record of the discussion of any item on the agenda, or any item of testimony of any witness received at the Board meeting, except for such item or items of such discussion or testimony as the Board determines to contain information which may be withheld under § 507.4. Copies of such record, disclosing the identity of each speaker, shall be furnished to any person at the actual cost of duplication. The Board shall maintain a complete transcript or electronic copy of each meeting, or portion of a meeting, closed to the public, for a period of at least two years after such meeting, or until one year after the conclusion of any Board proceeding with respect to which the meeting or portion was held, whichever occurs later.


PART 510 – SERVICE OF PROCESS


Authority:5 U.S.C. 552(a)(1)(A).

§ 510.1 Service of process.

(a) The General Counsel of the Broadcasting Board of Governors or any of his/her designees shall act as agent for the receipt of legal process against the Broadcasting Board of Governors, as well as against employees of the Board to the extent that the process relates to the official functions of the employees.


(b) When accepting service of process for an employee in his/her official capacity, the General Counsel or his/her designee shall endorse on the server’s return of process form, registered mail receipt, certified mail receipt, or express mail receipt: “Service accepted in official capacity only.”


(c) Process shall be delivered to:



Mailing address: Office of the General Counsel, Broadcasting Board of Governors, 330 Independence Ave., SW., Cohen Building, Washington, DC 20237.

Location: Office of the General Counsel, Broadcasting Board of Governors, 330 Independence Ave., SW., Cohen Building, Room 3349, Washington, DC 20237.

[53 FR 50515, Dec. 16, 1988, as amended at 74 FR 7562, Feb. 18, 2009]


PART 511 – FEDERAL TORT CLAIMS PROCEDURE


Authority:5 U.S.C. 301.


Source:34 FR 20430, Dec. 31, 1969, unless otherwise noted.

§ 511.1 Definitions.

Board. Board means the Broadcasting Board of Governors.


Act. Act means the Federal Tort Claims Act, as amended, and codified in 28 U.S.C., sections 2671-2680.


§ 511.2 Scope of regulations.

The regulations in this part shall apply only to claims asserted under the Federal Tort Claims Act, as amended, or as incorporated by reference in any appropriation Act or other statutes, for money damages against the United States for injury, loss of property, personal injury, or death caused by the negligent or wrongful act or omission of any employee of the Board while acting within the scope of his/her office or employment, under circumstances where the United States, if a private person, would be liable to the claimant in accordance with the law of the place where the act or omission occurred.


[43 FR 14301, Apr. 4, 1978]


§ 511.3 Exceptions.

Claims not compensable hereunder are listed in 2680 of the Act with the exception that 2680(k) (claims arising in a foreign country) has been removed by 22 U.S.C. 1474(5).


[44 FR 16374, Mar. 19, 1979]


§ 511.4 Administrative claim; when presented.

(a) For the purposes of the provisions of section 2672 of the Act and of this part, a claim shall be deemed to have been presented when the Board receives, in the office designated in paragraph (b) of this section, an executed “Claim for Damage or Injury”, Standard Form 95, or other written notification of an incident, accompanied by a claim for money damages in a sum certain, for injury to or loss of property, personal injury or death, alleged to have occurred by reason of the incident. The claimant may, if he/she desires, file a brief with his/her claim setting forth the law or other arguments in support of his/her claim. In cases involving claims by more than one person arising from a single accident or incident, individual claim forms shall be used. A claim which should have been presented to the Board, but which was mistakenly addressed to or filed with another Federal Agency, shall be deemed to have been presented to the Board as of the date the claim is received by the Board. If a claim is mistakenly addressed to or filed with the Board, the Board shall transfer it forthwith to the appropriate Agency.


(b) A claimant shall mail, or deliver his/her claim to the Office of the General Counsel and Congressional Liaison, Broadcasting Board of Governors, 301 4th Street, SW., Washington, DC 20547.


[34 FR 20430, Dec. 31, 1969, as amended at 51 FR 11016, Apr. 1, 1986]


§ 511.5 Who may file claim.

(a) Claims for loss or damage of property may be filed by the owner of the property, or his/her legal representatives. Claims for personal injury or death may be made by the injured person or a legal representative of the injured or deceased person. The claim, if filed by a legal representative, should show the capacity of the person signing and be accompanied by evidence of this authority to act.


(b) The claim and all other papers requiring the signature of the claimant should be signed by him/her personally or by his/her representative. Signatures should be identical throughout.


§ 511.6 Board authority to adjust, determine, compromise, and settle claims and limitations upon that authority.

(a) The General Counsel of the Board, or his/her designee, is delegated authority to consider, ascertain, adjust, determine, compromise, and settle claims asserted under the provisions of section 2672 of the Act and under this part.


(b) Limitation on Board authority: An award, compromise, or settlement of a claim by the Board under the provisions of section 2672 of the Act, in excess of $25,000, shall be effected only with the prior written approval of the Attorney General or his/her designee.


§ 511.7 Investigations.

The Board may request any other Federal agency to investigate a claim filed under section 2672 of the Act, or to conduct a physical or mental examination of the claimant and provide a report of such examination.


§ 511.8 Limitations.

(a) Pursuant to the provisions of section 2401(b) of title 28 of the United States Code, a tort claim against the United States shall be forever barred unless presented in writing to the Board within two (2) years after such claim accrues.


(b) A suit may not be filed until the claim shall have been finally denied by the Board. Failure of the Board to make final disposition of the claim within six (6) months after it has been presented shall, at the option of the claimant any time thereafter, be deemed a final denial of the claim for purposes of the Act and of this part.


(c) A suit shall not be filed for a sum greater than the amount of the claim presented to the Board, except where the increased amount is based upon newly discovered evidence not reasonably discoverable at the time for presenting the claim to the Board, or upon allegation and proof of intervening facts, relating to amount of the claim.


§ 511.9 Supporting evidence.

(a) In support of claims for personal injury or death, the claimant should submit a written report by the attending physician. The report should show the nature and extent of injury, the nature and extent of treatment, the effect upon earning capacity, either temporarily or permanently, the degree of permanent disability, if any, the prognosis, and the period of hospitalization, or incapacitation. Itemized bills for medical, hospital, or burial expenses actually incurred should be attached to report.


(b) In support of claims for damage to property which as been or can be economically repaired, the claimant should submit at least two itemized signed statements, or estimates by reliable, disinterested firms or itemized signed receipts if payment has been made.


(c) In support of claims for loss or damage to property which is not economically repairable, the claimant should submit statements of the original cost of the property, date of purchase, and the value of the property before and after the accident together with a statement setting forth the basis used in arriving at such value. Such statements should be from at least two disinterested, competent persons, preferably reputable dealers or other qualified persons familiar with the type of property in question.


§ 511.10 Settlement of claim.

The General Counsel will review the findings from the standpoint of questions of law applicable to the claim and will determine disposition. The General Counsel will make final review for settlement of the claim and will sign SF-1145, Voucher for Payment Under Federal Tort Claims Act, and forward it to the Financial Operations Division for payment of claim. Payment of any award or settlement in the amount of $2,500 or less will be authorized from the appropriation and allotment current for obligation on the date of settlement irrespective of when the cause of action arose. Payment of any award, compromise or settlement in an amount in excess of $2,500, shall be paid in a manner similar to judgments and compromises out of the appropriation provided by section (c), Pub. L. 89-506 (28 U.S.C. 2672).


§ 511.11 Acceptance of award.

The acceptance by the claimant of any award will be final and conclusive on the claimant. The acceptance will constitute a complete release of any claim by reason of the same subject matter against the United States and against the employee whose act or omission resulted in the claim. Adjudication and payment shall likewise be conclusive on all officers of the United States, unless procured by fraud.


§ 511.12 When litigation is involved in claim.

If a claimant does not agree to a settlement of a claim of which is considered fair and equitable by the Board’s responsible officials, the claimant, upon the final disposition thereof by the Board, may elect to file suit. Relief from claims which are disallowed may be sought by filing suit in the U.S. District Court for the district where the claimant resides or wherein the act of omission complained of occurred. The failure of the Board to make final disposition of a claim within 6 months after it has been filed shall, pursuant to 28 U.S.C. 2672, and at the option of the claimant at any time thereafter, is deemed a final denial of the claim. If a suit is filed against the Government involving the Board, the Department of Justice will request the Board to furnish the complete file on the case. The Office of the General Counsel will represent the Board in all negotiations with the Department of Justice.


PART 512 – COLLECTION OF DEBTS UNDER THE DEBT COLLECTION ACT OF 1982


Authority:31 U.S.C. 3701; 31 U.S.C. 3711 et seq.; 5 U.S.C. 5514; 4 CFR Parts 101-105; 5 CFR Part 550.


Source:52 FR 43897, Nov. 17, 1987, unless otherwise noted.

Subpart A – General Provisions

§ 512.1 Definitions.

(a) The term Board means the Broadcasting Board of Governors.


(b) The term Board head means the Director, Broadcasting Board of Governors.


(c) The term appropriate Board official or designee means the Chief, Financial Operations Division or such other official as may be named in the future by the Director, Broadcasting Board of Governors.


(d) The terms debt or claim refer to an amount of money which has been determined by an appropriate Board official to be owed to the United States from any person, organization or entity, except another Federal Agency.


(e) A debt is considered delinquent if it has not been paid by the date specified in the Board’s written notification or applicable contractual agreement, unless other satisfactory arrangements have been made by that date, or at any time thereafter the debtor fails to satisfy obligations under a payment agreement with the Board.


(f) The term referral for litigation means referral to the Department of Justice for appropriate legal proceedings.


§ 512.2 Exceptions.

(a) Claims arising from the audit of transportation accounts pursuant to 31 U.S.C. 3726 shall be determined, collected, compromised, terminated, or settled in accordance with the regulations published under 31 U.S.C. 3726 (refer to 41 CFR part 101-41).


(b) Claims arising out of acquisition contracts subject to the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) shall be determined, collected, compromised, terminated or settled in accordance with those regulations (see 48 CFR part 32). If not otherwise provided for in the FAR system, contract claims that have been the subject of a contracting officer’s final decision in accordance with section 6(a) of the Contracts Disputes Act of 1978 (41 U.S.C. 605(a)), may be determined, collected, compromised, terminated, or settled under the provisions of this regulation, except no additional review of the debt shall be granted beyond that provided by the contracting officer in accordance with the provisions of section 6 of the Contract Disputes Act of 1978 (41 U.S.C. 605), and the amount of any interest, administrative charge, or penalty charge shall be subject to the limitations, if any, contained in the contract out of which the claim arose.


(c) Claims based in whole or in part on conduct in violation of the antitrust laws, or in regard to which there is an indication of fraud, presentation of a false claim, or misrepresentation on the part of the debtor or any other party having an interest in the claim, shall be referred to the Department of Justice (DOJ) as only the DOJ has the authority to compromise, suspend or terminate collection action on such claims.


(d) Tax claims are excluded from the coverage of this regulation.


§ 512.3 Use of procedures.

Procedures authorized by this regulation (including but not limited to referral to a debt collection agency, administrative offset, or salary offset) may be used singly or in combination, providing the requirements of the applicable law and regulation are satisfied.


§ 512.4 Conformance to law and regulations.

(a) The requirements of applicable law (31 U.S.C. 3701-3719 as amended by Pub. L. 97-365, (96 Stat. 1749) have been implemented in Government-wide standards:


(1) The regulations of the Office of Personnel Management (5 CFR part 550).


(2) The Federal Claims Collection Standards issued jointly by the General Accounting Office and the Department of Justice (4 CFR parts 101-105), and


(3) The procedures prescribed by the Office of Management and Budget in Circular A-129 of May 9, 1985.


(b) Not every item in the above described standards has been incorporated or referenced in this regulation. To the extent, however, that circumstances arise which are not covered by the terms stated in this regulation, Broadcasting Board of Governors will proceed in any actions taken in accordance with applicable requirements found in the sources referred to in paragraphs (a)(1), (2), and (3) of this section.


§ 512.5 Other procedures.

Nothing contained in this regulation is intended to require Broadcasting Board of Governors to duplicate administrative proceedings required by contract or other laws or regulations.


§ 512.6 Informal action.

Nothing in this regulation is intended to preclude utilization of informal administrative actions or remedies which may be available.


§ 512.7 Return of property.

Nothing contained in this regulation is intended to deter Broadcasting Board of Governors from demanding the return of specific property or from demanding the return of the property or the payment of its value.


§ 512.8 Omissions not a defense.

The failure of Broadcasting Board of Governors to comply with any provision in this regulation shall not serve as a defense to the debt.


Subpart B – Administrative Offset and Referral to Collection Agencies

§ 512.9 Demand for payment.

Prior to initiating administrative offset, demand for payment will be made as follows:


(a) Written demands will be made promptly upon the debtor in terms which inform the debtor of the consequences of failure to cooperate. A total of three progressively stronger written demands at not more than 30-day intervals will normally be made unless a response to the first or second demand indicates that further demand would be futile and the debtor’s response does not require rebuttal. In determining the timing of demand letters, Broadcasting Board of Governors will give due regard to the need to act promptly so that, as a general rule, debt referrals to the Department of Justice for litigation, where necessary, can be made within one year of the Board’s final determination of the fact and the amount of the debt. When necessary to protect the Government’s interests (e.g., to prevent the statute of limitations, 28 U.S.C. 2415, from expiring) written demand may be preceded by other appropriate actions under this chapter, including immediate referral for litigation.


(b) The initial demand letter will inform the debtor of: The basis for the indebtedness and the right of the debtor to request review within the Board; the applicable standards for assessing interest, penalties, and administrative costs (Subpart D of this regulation) and; the date by which payment is to be made, which normally will not be more than 30 days from the date that the initial demand letter was mailed or hand delivered. Broadcasting Board of Governors will exercise care to insure that demand letters are mailed or hand-delivered on the same day that they are actually dated.


(c) As appropriate to the circumstances, Broadcasting Board of Governors will include in the demand letters matters relating to alternative methods of payment, the debtor’s rights to representation by his respective bargaining unit, policies relating to referral to collection agencies, the Board’s intentions relative to referral of the debt to the Department of Justice for litigation, and, depending on the statutory authority, the debtor’s entitlement to consideration of waiver.


(d) Broadcasting Board of Governors will respond promptly to communications from the debtor and will advise debtors who dispute the debt that they must furnish available evidence to support their contention.


§ 512.10 Collection by administrative offset.

(a) Collection by administrative offset will be undertaken in accordance with these regulations on all claims which are liquidated and certain in amount, in every instance where the appropriate Board official determines such collection to be feasible and not otherwise prohibited.


(1) For purpose of this section, the term administrative offset has the same meaning as provided in 31 U.S.C. 3716(a)(1).


(2) Whether collection by administrative offset is feasible is a determination to be made by the Board on a case-by-case basis, in the exercise of sound discretion. Broadcasting Board of Governors will consider not only the practicalities of administrative offset, but whether such offset is best suited to protect and further all of the Government’s interests. Broadcasting Board of Governors will give consideration to the debtor’s financial condition, and is not required to use offset in every instance where there is an available source of funds. Broadcasting Board of Governors will also consider whether offset would tend to substantially disrupt or defeat the purpose of the program authorizing the payments against which offset is contemplated.


(b) Before the offset is made, a debtor shall be provided with the following: written notice of the nature and the amount of the debt and the Board’s intention to collect by offset; opportunity to inspect and copy Board records pertaining to the debt; opportunity to obtain review within the Board of the determination of indebtedness; and opportunity to enter into written agreement with the Board to repay the debt. Broadcasting Board of Governors may also make requests to other agencies holding funds payable to the debtor, and process requests for offset that are received from other agencies.


(1) Broadcasting Board of Governors will exercise sound judgment in determining whether to accept a repayment agreement in lieu of offset. The determination will weigh the Government’s interest in collecting the debt against fairness to the debtor.


(2) In cases where the procedural requirements specified in this paragraph (b) have previously been provided to the debtor in connection with the same debt under some other statutory or regulatory authority, such as pursuant to an audit allowance, the Board is not required to duplicate those requirements before taking administrative offset.


(3) Broadcasting Board of Governors may not initiate administrative offset to collect a debt more than 10 years after the Government’s right to collect the debt first accrued, unless facts material to the Government’s right were not known and could not reasonably have been known by the official or officials of the Government who were charged with the responsibility to discover and collect the debt. When the debt first accrued is to be determined according to existent law regarding the accrual of debts (e.g., 28 U.S.C. 2415).


(4) Broadcasting Board of Governors is not authorized by 31 U.S.C. 3716 to use administrative offset with respect to: Debts owed by any State or local Government; debts arising under or payments made under the Social Security Act, the Internal Revenue Code of 1954 or the tariff laws of the United States; or any case in which collection of the type of debt involved by administrative offset is explicitly provided for or prohibited by another statute. Unless otherwise provided by contract or law, debts or payments which are not subject to administrative offset under 31 U.S.C. 3716 may be collected by administrative offset under the common law or other applicable statutory authority.


(5) Broadcasting Board of Governors may effect administrative offset against a payment to be made to a debtor prior to completion of the procedures required by paragraph (b) of this section if failure to take offset would substantially prejudice the Government’s ability to collect the debt, and the time before the payment is to be made does not reasonably permit the completion of those procedures. Amounts recovered by offset but later determined not to be owed to the Government shall be promptly refunded 30 days after the Board has notified the debtor in writing that the debt is not owed. Such written notification will be issued within 15 days after the Board has confirmed through a review of its official records that the debt is not owed.


(c) Type of hearing or review: (1) For purposes of this section, whenever Broadcasting Board of Governors is required to afford a hearing or review within the Board, the Board will provide the debtor with a reasonable opportunity for an oral hearing when: An applicable statute authorizes or requires the Board to consider waiver of the indebtedness involved, the debtor requests waiver of the indebtedness, and the waiver determination turns on an issue of veracity; or the debtor requests reconsideration of the debt and the Board determines that the question of the indebtedness cannot be resolved by review of the documentary evidence. Unless otherwise required by law, an oral hearing under this section is not required to be a formal evidentiary type hearing.


(2) This section does not require an oral hearing with respect to debt collection systems in which determinations of indebtedness or waiver rarely involve issues of veracity and the Board has determined that the review of the written record is ordinarily enough to correct prior mistakes.


(3) In those cases where an oral hearing is not required by this section, the Board will make its determination on the request for waiver or reconsideration based upon a review of the written record.


(d) Appropriate use will be made of the cooperative efforts of other agencies in effecting collection by administrative offset. Broadcasting Board of Governors will not refuse to initiate administrative offset to collect debts owed the United States, unless the requesting agency has not complied with the applicable provisions of these standards.


(e) Collection by offset against a judgment obtained against the United States shall be accomplished in accordance with 31 U.S.C. 3728.


(f) Whenever the creditor agency is not the agency which is responsible for making the payment against which offset is sought, the latter agency shall not initiate the requested offset until it has been provided by the creditor agency with an appropriate written certification that the debtor owes the debt (including the amount) and that full compliance with the provisions of this section has taken place.


(g) When collecting multiple debts by administrative offset, Broadcasting Board of Governors will apply the recovered amounts to those debts in accordance with the best interests of the United States, as determined by the facts and circumstances of the particular case, paying particular attention to the applicable statutes of limitations.


§ 512.11 Administrative offset against amounts payable from Civil Service Retirement and Disability Fund.

(a) Unless otherwise prohibited by law, Broadcasting Board of Governors may request that monies that are due and payable to a debtor from the Civil Service Retirement and Disability Fund be administratively offset in reasonable amounts in order to collect in one full payments, or a minimal number of payment, debts owed the United States by the debtor. Such requests shall be made to the appropriate officials within the Office of Personnel Management in accordance with such regulations as may be prescribed by the Director of that Office.


(b) When making a request for administrative offset under paragraph (a) of this section, Broadcasting Board of Governors shall include written statements that:


(1) The debtor owes the United States a debt, including the amount of the debt;


(2) The Broadcasting Board of Governors has complied with the applicable statutes, regulations, and procedures of the Office of Personnel Management; and


(3) The Broadcasting Board of Governors has complied with the requirements of § 512.10 of this part, including any required hearing or review.


(c) Once Broadcasting Board of Governors decides to request offset under paragraph (a) of this section, it will make the request as soon as practical after completion of the applicable procedures in order that the Office of Personnel Management may identify the debtor’s account in anticipation of the time when the debtor requests or becomes eligible to receive payments from the Fund. This will satisfy any requirement that offset be initiated prior to expiration of the applicable statute of limitations.


(d) If Broadcasting Board of Governors collects part or all of the debt by other means before deductions are made or completed pursuant to paragraph (a) of this section, Broadcasting Board of Governors shall act promptly to modify or terminate its request for offset under paragraph (a) of this section.


(e) This section does not require or authorize the Office of Personnel Management to review the merits of the Broadcasting Board of Governors determination relative to the amount and validity of the debt, its determination on waiver under an applicable statute, or its determination whether to provide an oral hearing.


§ 512.12 Collection in installments.

(a) Whenever feasible, and except as required otherwise by law, debts owed to the United States, together with interest, penalties, and administrative costs as required by this regulation, should be collected in one lump sum. This is true whether the debt is being collected under administrative offset or by another method, including voluntary payment. However, if the debtor is financially unable to pay the indebtedness in one lump sum, payment may be accepted in regular installments. If Broadcasting Board of Governors agrees to accept payment in installments, it will obtain a legally enforceable written agreement from the debtor that specifies all of the terms of the arrangement and which contains a provision accelerating the debt in the event the debtor defaults. The size and frequency of the payments should bear a reasonable relation to the size of the debt and ability to the debtor to pay. If possible the installment payments should be sufficient in size and frequency to liquidate the Government’s claim within 3 years.


(b) If the debtor owes more than one debt and designates how a voluntary installment plan is to be applied among those debts, the Board will follow that designation. If no such designation is made, the Board will apply payments to the various debts in accordance with the best interest of the United States as as determined by the facts and circumstances of each case, with particular attention to application statutes of limitation.


§ 512.13 Exploration of compromise.

Broadcasting Board of Governors may attempt to effect compromise in accordance with the standards set forth in part 103 of the Federal Claims Collection Standards (4 CFR part 103).


§ 512.14 Suspending or terminating collection action.

The suspension or termination of collection action shall be made in accordance with the standards set forth in part 104 of the Federal Claims Collection Standard (4 CFR part 104).


§ 512.15 Referrals to the Department of Justice or the General Accounting Office.

Referrals to the Department of Justice or the General Accounting Office shall be made in accordance with the standards set forth in part 105 of the Federal Claims Collection Standards (4 CFR part 105).


§ 512.16 Collection services.

(a) Broadcasting Board of Governors has authority to contract for collection services to recover delinquent debts in accordance with 31 U.S.C. 3718(c) and 4 CFR 102.6.


(b) Contracts with collection agencies will provide that:


(1) The authority to resolve disputes, compromise claims, suspend or terminate collection action, and refer the matter to the Justice Department for litigation will be retained by Broadcasting Board of Governors;


(2) Contractors are subject to 5 U.S.C. 552a, the Privacy Act of 1974, as amended, to the extent specified in 5 U.S.C. 552a(m) and to applicable Federal and State laws and regulations pertaining to debt collection practices, such as the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, 15 U.S.C. 1692;


(3) The contractor is required to strictly account for all amounts collected;


(4) The contractor must agree that uncollectible accounts shall be returned with appropriate documentation to enable Broadcasting Board of Governors to determine whether to pursue collection through litigation or to terminate collection;


(5) The contractor must agree to provide any data in its files relating to paragraphs (a)(1), (2), and (3) of § 105.2 of the Federal Claims Collection Standards (4 CFR part 105) upon returning the account to Broadcasting Board of Governors for subsequent referral to the Department of Justice for litigation.


(c) Broadcasting Board of Governors will not use a collection agency to collect a debt owed by a currently employed or retired Federal employee, if collection by salary or annuity offset is available.


Subpart C – Salary Offset

§ 512.17 Purpose.

This subpart provides the standards to be followed by Broadcasting Board of Governors in implementing 5 U.S.C. 5514 to recover a debt from the pay of an Board employee or former employee, and establishes the procedural guidelines to recover debts when the employee’s creditor and paying agencies are not the same.


[52 FR 43897, Nov. 17, 1987, as amended at 55 FR 3050, Jan. 30, 1990]


§ 512.18 Scope.

(a) Coverage. This subpart applies to Executive agencies, military departments, an agency or court in the judicial branch, an agency of the legislative branch and other independent entities of the Federal Government as defined in 5 CFR 550.1103, under the heading “Agency”.


(b) Applicability. This subpart and 5 U.S.C. 5514 apply in recovering debts by offset without the employee’s consent from the current pay of that employee. Debt collection procedures which are not specified in 5 U.S.C. 5514 and these regulations will be consistent with the Federal Claims Collection Standards (4 CFR parts 101-105).


(1) The procedures contained in this subpart do not apply to debts or claims arising under the Internal Revenue Code of 1954 as amended (26 U.S.C. 1 et seq.), the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. 301 et seq.), or the tariff laws of the United States or to any case where collection of a debt is explicitly provided for or prohibited by another statute (e.g., travel advances in 5 U.S.C. 5705).


(2) This subpart does not preclude an employee from requesting a waiver of a salary overpayment under 5 U.S.C. 5584, 10 U.S.C. 2774, or 32 U.S.C. 716, or in any way questioning the amount or validity of a debt by submitting a subsequent claim to the General Accounting Office in accordance with procedures prescribed by the General Accounting Officer, nor does it preclude an employee from requesting waiver when waiver is available under any statutory provision.


[52 FR 43897, Nov. 17, 1987, as amended at 55 FR 3051, Jan. 30, 1990]


§ 512.19 Definitions.

For purposes of this subpart:


Board means the Broadcasting Board of Governors.


Creditor Agency means the agency to which the debt is owed.


Debt means an amount owed to the United States.


Disposable Pay means that part of current basic pay, special pay, incentive pay, retired pay, retainer pay or authorized pay remaining after the deduction of any amount required to be withheld by law. The Board will exclude deductions described in 5 CFR 581.105 (b) through (f) to determine disposable pay subject to salary offset.


Employee means a current employee of Broadcasting Board of Governors or of another Executive Agency.


Executive Agency means:


(a) An Executive Agency as defined in section 105 of title 5, United States Code, including the U.S. Postal Service and the U.S. Postal Rate Commission;


(b) A military department as defined in section 102 of title 5, United States Code;


(c) An agency or court in the judicial branch, including a court as defined in section 610 of title 28, United States Code, the District Court for the Northern Mariana Islands, and the Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation;


(d) An agency of the legislative branch, including the U.S. Senate and the U.S. House of Representatives; and


(e) Other independent establishments that are entities of the Federal Government.


FCCS means the Federal Claims Collection Standards jointly published by the Justice Department and the General Accounting Office at 4 CFR parts 101-105.


Paying agency means the agency employing the individual and authorizing the payment of his or her current pay.


Salary offset means an administrative offset to collect a debt under 5 U.S.C. 5514 by deductions at one or more officially established pay intervals from the current pay account of an employee without his or her consent.


Waiver means the cancellation, remission, forgiveness, or non-recovery of a debt allegedly owed by an employee to an agency as permitted or required by U.S.C. 5584, 10 U.S.C. 2774, or 32 U.S.C. 710, 5 U.S.C. 8346(b), or any other law.


[52 FR 43897, Nov. 17, 1987, as amended at 55 FR 3051, Jan. 30, 1990]


§ 512.20 Notification.

(a) Salary offset deductions shall not be made unless the Director, Financial Operations Division of Broadcasting Board of Governors, or such other official as may be named in the future by the Director of Broadcasting Board of Governors, provides to the employee a written notice, 30 calendar days prior to any deduction, stating at a minimum:


(1) The Board’s determination that a debt is owed including the nature, origin, and amount of the debt;


(2) The Board’s intent to collect the debt by means of deduction from the employee’s current disposable pay account;


(3) The amount, frequency and proposed beginning date and duration of the intended deductions;


(4) An explanation of the Board’s policy concerning interest, penalties, and administrative costs;


(5) The employee’s right to inspect and copy Government records pertaining to the debt;


(6) The opportunity to establish a schedule for the voluntary repayment of the debt or to enter into a written agreement to establish a schedule for repayment in lieu of offset per the requirements of 4 CFR 102.2(e).


(7) The employee’s right to a hearing arranged by the Board and conducted by an administrative law judge or, alternatively, an official not under the control of the head of the Board;


(8) The method and time period for filing a petition for a hearing;


(9) That timely filing of the petition will stay the commencement of collection proceedings;


(10) That final decision on the hearing will be issued not later than 60 days after the filing of the petition for hearing unless the employee requests and the hearing officer grants a delay in the proceedings.


(11) That knowingly false, misleading, or frivolous statements, representations or evidence may subject the employee to:


(i) Disciplinary procedures under chapter 75 of title 5, United States Code or any other applicable statutes;


(ii) Penalties under the False Claims Act, sections 3729-3731 of title 31 U.S.C. or any other applicable statutes.


(iii) Criminal penalties under sections 286, 287, 1001, 1002 of title 18 United States Code or any other applicable statutes.


(12) Any other rights or remedies available to the employee, including representation by counsel or his respective bargaining unit, under the statutes or regulations governing the program for which collection is being made.


(13) That amounts paid on or deducted for the debts that are later waived or found not owed to the United States will be promptly refunded to the employee.


(b) Notifications under this section shall be hand delivered with a record made of the delivery, or shall be mailed certified mail with return receipt requested.


(c) No notification hearing, written responses or final decisions under this regulation are required of Broadcasting Board of Governors for any adjustment to pay arising from an employee’s election of coverage under a Federal benefit program requiring periodic deductions from pay, if the amount to be recovered was accumulated over four pay periods or less.


§ 512.21 Hearing.

(a) Petition for hearing. (1) A hearing may be requested by filing a written petition with the Director, Financial Operations Division of Broadcasting Board of Governors, or such other official as may be named in the future by the Director of Broadcasting Board of Governors, stating why the employee believes the Board’s determination of the existence or amount of the debt is in error.


(2) The petition must be signed by the employee and fully identify and explain with reasonable specificity all the facts, evidence and witnesses which the employee believes support his or her position.


(3) The petition must be filed no later than fifteen (15) calendar days from the date the notification under § 512.20(b) was hand delivered or the date of delivery by certified mail.


(4) Where petition is received after the 15 calendar day limit, Broadcasting Board of Governors will accept the petition if the employee can show that the delay was beyond his or her control or because of failure to receive notice.


(5) If the petition is not filed within the time limit, and is not accepted pursuant to paragraph (a)(4) of this section, the employee’s right to hearing will be considered waived, and salary offset will be implemented.


(b) Type of hearing. (1) The form and content of the hearing will be determined by the hearing official who shall be a person outside the control or authority of Broadcasting Board of Governors.


(2) The employee may represent him or herself, or may be represented by counsel.


(3) The hearing official shall maintain a summary record of the hearing.


(4) The hearing official will prepare a written decision which will state:


(i) The facts purported to evidence nature and origin of the alleged debt;


(ii) The hearing official’s analysis, findings, and conclusions relative to:


(A) The employee’s and/or the Board’s grounds;


(B) The amount and the validity of the alleged debt;


(C) The repayment schedule, if applicable.


(5) The decision of the hearing official shall constitute the final administrative decision of the Board.


§ 512.22 Deduction from pay.

(a) Deduction by salary offset, from an employee’s disposable current pay, shall be subject to the following circumstances:


(1) When funds are available, the Board will collect debts owed the United States in full in one lump-sum. If funds are not available or the debt exceeds 15% of disposable pay for an officially established pay interval, collection will normally be made in installments.


(2) The installments shall not exceed 15% of the disposable pay from which the deduction is made, unless the employee has agreed in writing to a larger amount.


(3) Deduction will commence with the next full pay interval following notice that deductions will commence.


(4) Installment deductions will not be made over a period greater than the anticipated period of employment.


[52 FR 43897, Nov. 17, 1987, as amended at 55 FR 3051, Jan. 30, 1990]


§ 512.23 Liquidation from final check or recovery from other payment.

(a) If an employee retires or resigns before collection of the debt is completed, offset of the entire remaining balance may be made from a final payment of any nature to such extent as is necessary to liquidate the debt.


(b) Where debt cannot be liquidated by offset from final payment, offset may be made from later payments of any kind due from the United States inclusive of Civil Service Retirement and Disability Fund pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 8347 and 5 CFR 831.1801 et seq of this regulation.


[52 FR 43897, Nov. 17, 1987, as amended at 55 FR 3051, Jan. 30, 1990]


§ 512.24 Non-waiver of rights by payments.

An employee’s voluntary payment of all or part of a debt being collected under 5 U.S.C. 5514 shall not be construed as a waiver of any rights which the employee may have under 5 U.S.C., or any other provision of contract or law, unless statutory or contractual provisions provide to the contrary.


§ 512.25 Refunds.

(a) Refunds shall be promptly made when:


(1) A debt is waived or otherwise found not to be owed to the United States; or


(2) The employee’s paying agency is directed by an administrative or judicial order to refund amounts deducted from his or her current pay.


(b) Refunds do not bear interest unless required or permitted by law or contract.


§ 512.26 Interest, penalties, and administrative costs.

The assessment of interest, penalties and administrative costs shall be in accordance with subpart D of this regulation.


§ 512.27 Recovery when paying agency is not creditor agency.

(a) Format for request for recovery. (1) Upon completion of the procedures prescribed under 5 CFR 550.1104 and its own regulations, the creditor agency shall certify the debt in writing to the paying agency.


(2) The creditor agency shall certify in writing that the employee owes the debt, the amount and basis of the debt; the date on which payment is due, the date the Government’s right to collect first accrued, and that the creditor agency’s regulations implementing section 5514 have been approved by OPM.


(3) If collection must be made in installments, the creditor agency must advise the paying agency of the number of installments to be collected, the amount of each installment, and the commencing date of the first installment.


(b) Submitting the request for recovery – (1) Current employees. The creditor agency shall submit the debt claim, agreement, or other instruction on the payment schedule to the employee’s paying agency.


(2) Separated employees – (i) Employees who are in the process of separating. If the employee is in the process of separating, the creditor agency will submit its debt claim to the employee’s paying agency for collection as provided in §§ 512.22 and 512.23. The paying agency shall certify the total amount of its collection and notify the creditor agency and the employee as provided in paragraph (b)(2)(iii) of this section. Where the paying agency is aware that the employee is entitled to payments from the Civil Service Retirement and Disability Fund, it will send a copy of the certified debt claim to the agency responsible for making such payments as notice that a debt is outstanding. It is the responsibility of the creditor agency for pursuing the claim.


(ii) Employees who have already separated. If the employee is already separated and all payments due from his or her former paying agency have been paid, the creditor agency may request that monies which are due and payable to the employee from the Civil Service Retirement and Disability Fund (5 CFR 831.1801) or other similar funds be administratively offset in order to collect the debt (31 U.S.C. 3716 and the FCCS).


(iii) Employees who transfer from one paying agency to another. If an employee transfers to a position served by a different paying agency subsequent to the creditor agency’s debt claim but before complete collection, the paying agency from which the employee separates shall certify the total of collection made on the debt. One copy of the certification will be supplied to the employee, and another to the creditor agency with notice of the employee’s transfer. The original shall be inserted in the employees official personnel folder. The creditor agency shall submit a properly certified claim to the new paying agency before collection can be resumed. The paying agency will then resume collection from the employee’s current pay account, and notify the employee and the creditor agency of the resumption. The creditor agency will not need to repeat the due process procedure described by 5 U.S.C. 5514 and 5 CFR 550.1101 et seq.” Upon settlement or repayment of the debt all records of the debt will be removed from official personnel records.


(c) Processing the debt claim upon receipt by the paying agency:


(1) Incomplete claims. If the paying agency receives an improperly completed debt certification, it shall return the request with a notice that procedures under 5 CFR 550.1101 et seq. and the creditor agency’s own regulations must be completed and a properly completed debt certification form received before action will be taken to effect collection.


(2) Complete claim. If the paying agency receives a properly completed debt form, deductions will begin prospectively at the next officially established pay interval. A copy of the debt form will be given to the debtor along with notice of the date deductions will commence.


(3) The paying agency is not required or authorized to review the merits of the creditor agency’s determination with respect to the amount or validity of the debt as stated in the debt claim.


[52 FR 43897, Nov. 17, 1987, as amended at 55 FR 3051, Jan. 30, 1990]


Subpart D – Interest, Penalties, and Administrative Costs

§ 512.28 Assessment.

(a) Except as provided in paragraph (h) of this section, or § 512.29, Broadcasting Board of Governors shall assess interest, penalties, and administrative costs on debts owed to the United States pursuant to 31 U.S.C. 3717. Before assessing these charges, Broadcasting Board of Governors will mail or hand deliver a written notice to the debtor. This notice will include a statement of the Board’s requirements concerning §§ 512.9 and 512.21.


(b) Interest shall accrue from the date on which notice of the debt is first mailed or hand-delivered to the debtor, using the most current address available to the Board.


(c) The rate of interest assessed shall be the rate of the current value of funds to the United States Treasury (i.e., the Treasury Tax and Loan account rate), as prescribed and published by the Secretary of the Treasury in the Federal Register and the Treasury Fiscal Requirements Manual Bulletins annually or quarterly, in accordance with 31 U.S.C. 3717. The rate of interest as initially assessed shall remain fixed for the duration of the indebtedness. However, in cases where the debtor has defaulted on a repayment agreement and seeks a new agreement, Broadcasting Board of Governors may set a new rate which reflects the current value of funds to the Treasury at the time the agreement is executed. Interest will not be assessed on interest, penalties, or administrative costs required by this section.


(d) Broadcasting Board of Governors shall assess charges to cover administrative costs incurred as a result of a delinquent debt. Calculation of administrative costs shall be based upon actual costs incurred. Administrative costs include costs incurred to obtain credit reports in the case of employee debt or in using a private debt collector in the case of non-employee debt.


(e) Broadcasting Board of Governors shall assess a penalty charge not to exceed 6% per year on any portion of a debt that is delinquent for more than 90 days. This charge need not be calculated until the 91st day of delinquency, but shall accrue from the date that the debt became delinquent.


(f) When a debt is paid in partial or installment payments, amounts received shall be applied first to the outstanding penalty and administrative cost charges, second to accrued interest and third to outstanding principal.


(g) Broadcasting Board of Governors will waive the collection of interest on the debt or any portion of the debt that is paid within 30 days after the date on which interest began to accrue. Broadcasting Board of Governors may extend this 30-day period, on a case-by-case basis, if it reasonably determines such action is appropriate. Broadcasting Board of Governors may also waive in whole or in part the collection of interest, penalties, and administrative costs assessed under this section per the criteria specified in part 103 of the Federal Claims Collection Standards (4 CFR part 103) relating to the compromise of claims or if the Board determines that collection of these charges is not in the best interest of the United States. Waiver under the first sentence of this paragraph is mandatory. Under the second and third sentences, it may be exercised under the following circumstances:


(1) Waiver of interest pending consideration of a request for reconsideration, administrative review, or waiver of the underlying debt under a permissive statute, and


(2) Waiver of interest where Broadcasting Board of Governors has accepted an installment plan under § 512.12, there is no indication of fault or lack of good faith on the part of the debtor and the amount of the interest is large enough, in relation to the size of the installments that the debtor can reasonably afford to pay, that the debt will never be repaid.


(h) Where a mandatory waiver or review statute applies, interest and related charges may not be assessed for those periods during which collection must be suspended under § 104.2(c)(1) of the Federal Claims Collection Standards (4 CFR part 104).


§ 512.29 Exemptions.

(a) The provisions of 31 U.S.C. 3717 do not apply –


(1) To debts owned by any State or local government;


(2) To debt arising under contracts which were executed prior to, and were in effect on October 25, 1982;


(3) To debts where an applicable statute, loan agreement, or contract either prohibits such charges or explicitly fixes the charges that apply to the debts arising under the Social Security Act, the Internal Revenue Code of 1954, or the tariff laws of the United States.


(b) However Broadcasting Board of Governors is authorized to assess interest and related charges on debts which are not subject to 31 U.S.C. 3717 to the extent authorized under the common law or other applicable statutory authority.


PART 513 – GOVERNMENT DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) AND GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (GRANTS)


Authority:40 U.S.C. 486 (c); 41 U.S.C. 701 et seq.; Sec. 2455, Pub. L. 103-355, 108 Stat. 3327 (31 U.S.C. 6101 note); E. O. 12549, 3 CFR, 1986 Comp., p. 189; E.O. 12689, 3 CFR, 1989 comp., p. 235.


Source:53 FR 19179, 19204, May 26, 1988, unless otherwise noted.


Cross Reference:

See also Office of Management and Budget notice published at 55 FR 21679, May 25, 1990, and 60 FR 33036, June 26, 1995.

Subpart A – General

§ 513.100 Purpose.

(a) Executive Order (E.O.) 12549 provides that, to the extent permitted by law, Executive departments and agencies shall participate in a governmentwide system for nonprocurement debarment and suspension. A person who is debarred or suspended shall be excluded from Federal financial and nonfinancial assistance and benefits under Federal programs and activities. Debarment or suspension of a participant in a program by one agency shall have governmentwide effect.


(b) These regulations implement section 3 of E.O. 12549 and the guidelines promulgated by the Office of Management and Budget under section 6 of the E.O. by:


(1) Prescribing the programs and activities that are covered by the governmentwide system;


(2) Prescribing the governmentwide criteria and governmentwide minimum due process procedures that each agency shall use;


(3) Providing for the listing of debarred and suspended participants, participants declared ineligible (see definition of “ineligible” in § 513.105), and participants who have voluntarily excluded themselves from participation in covered transactions;


(4) Setting forth the consequences of a debarment, suspension, determination of ineligibility, or voluntary exclusion; and


(5) Offering such other guidance as necessary for the effective implementation and administration of the governmentwide system.


(c) These regulations also implement Executive Order 12689 (3 CFR, 1989 Comp., p. 235) and 31 U.S.C. 6101 note (Public Law 103-355, sec. 2455, 108 Stat. 3327) by –


(1) Providing for the inclusion in the List of Parties Excluded from Federal Procurement and Nonprocurement Programs all persons proposed for debarment, debarred or suspended under the Federal Acquisition Regulation, 48 CFR Part 9, subpart 9.4; persons against which governmentwide exclusions have been entered under this part; and persons determined to be ineligible; and


(2) Setting forth the consequences of a debarment, suspension, determination of ineligibility, or voluntary exclusion.


(d) Although these regulations cover the listing of ineligible participants and the effect of such listing, they do not prescribe policies and procedures governing declarations of ineligibility.


[60 FR 33040, 33045, June 26, 1995]


§ 513.105 Definitions.

The following definitions apply to this part:


Adequate evidence. Information sufficient to support the reasonable belief that a particular act or omission has occurred.


Affiliate. Persons are affiliates of each other if, directly or indirectly, either one controls or has the power to control the other, or, a third person controls or has the power to control both. Indicia of control include, but are not limited to: interlocking management or ownership, identity of interests among family members, shared facilities and equipment, common use of employees, or a business entity organized following the suspension or debarment of a person which has the same or similar management, ownership, or principal employees as the suspended, debarred, ineligible, or voluntarily excluded person.


Agency. Any executive department, military department or defense agency or other agency of the executive branch, excluding the independent regulatory agencies.


Civil judgment. The disposition of a civil action by any court of competent jurisdiction, whether entered by verdict, decision, settlement, stipulation, or otherwise creating a civil liability for the wrongful acts complained of; or a final determination of liability under the Program Fraud Civil Remedies Act of 1988 (31 U.S.C. 3801-12).


Conviction. A judgment or conviction of a criminal offense by any court of competent jurisdiction, whether entered upon a verdict or a plea, including a plea of nolo contendere.


Debarment. An action taken by a debarring official in accordance with these regulations to exclude a person from participating in covered transactions. A person so excluded is “debarred.”


Debarring official. An official authorized to impose debarment. The debarring official is either:


(1) The agency head, or


(2) An official designated by the agency head.


Indictment. Indictment for a criminal offense. An information or other filing by competent authority charging a criminal offense shall be given the same effect as an indictment.


Ineligible. Excluded from participation in Federal nonprocurement programs pursuant to a determination of ineligibility under statutory, executive order, or regulatory authority, other than Executive Order 12549 and its agency implementing regulations; for exemple, excluded pursuant to the Davis-Bacon Act and its implementing regulations, the equal employment opportunity acts and executive orders, or the environmental protection acts and executive orders. A person is ineligible where the determination of ineligibility affects such person’s eligibility to participate in more than one covered transaction.


Legal proceedings. Any criminal proceeding or any civil judicial proceeding to which the Federal Government or a State or local government or quasi-governmental authority is a party. The term includes appeals from such proceedings.


List of Parties Excluded from Federal Procurement and Nonprocurement Programs. A list compiled, maintained and distributed by the General Services Administration (GSA) containing the names and other information about persons who have been debarred, suspended, or voluntarily excluded under Executive Orders 12549 and 12689 and these regulations or 48 CFR part 9, subpart 9.4, persons who have been proposed for debarment under 48 CFR part 9, subpart 9.4, and those persons who have been determined to be ineligible.


Notice. A written communication served in person or sent by certified mail, return receipt requested, or its equivalent, to the last known address of a party, its identified counsel, its agent for service of process, or any partner, officer, director, owner, or joint venturer of the party. Notice, if undeliverable, shall be considered to have been received by the addressee five days after being properly sent to the last address known by the Board.


Participant. Any person who submits a proposal for, enters into, or reasonably may be expected to enter into a covered transaction. This term also includes any person who acts on behalf of or is authorized to commit a participant in a covered transaction as an agent or representative of another participant.


Person. Any individual, corporation, partnership, association, unit of government or legal entity, however organized, except: foreign governments or foreign governmental entities, public international organizations, foreign government owned (in whole or in part) or controlled entities, and entities consisting wholly or partially of foreign governments or foreign governmental entities.


Preponderance of the evidence. Proof by information that, compared with that opposing it, leads to the conclusion that the fact at issue is more probably true than not.


Principal. Officer, director, owner, partner, key employee, or other person within a participant with primary management or supervisory responsibilities; or a person who has a critical influence on or substantive control over a covered transaction, whether or not employed by the participant. Persons who have a critical influence on or substantive control over a covered transaction are:


(1) Principal investigators.


Proposal. A solicited or unsolicited bid, application, request, invitation to consider or similar communication by or on behalf of a person seeking to participate or to receive a benefit, directly or indirectly, in or under a covered transaction.


Respondent. A person against whom a debarment or suspension action has been initiated.


State. Any of the States of the United States, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, any territory or possession of the United States, or any agency of a State, exclusive of institutions of higher education, hospitals, and units of local government. A State instrumentality will be considered part of the State government if it has a written determination from a State government that such State considers that instrumentality to be an agency of the State government.


Suspending official. An official authorized to impose suspension. The suspending official is either:


(1) The agency head, or


(2) An official designated by the agency head.


Suspension. An action taken by a suspending official in accordance with these regulations that immediately excludes a person from participating in covered transactions for a temporary period, pending completion of an investigation and such legal, debarment, or Program Fraud Civil Remedies Act proceedings as may ensue. A person so excluded is “suspended.”


Voluntary exclusion or voluntarily excluded. A status of nonparticipation or limited participation in covered transactions assumed by a person pursuant to the terms of a settlement.


Broadcasting Board of Governors.


[53 FR 19204, 19179, May 26, 1988, as amended at 60 FR 33041, 33045, June 26, 1995]


§ 513.110 Coverage.

(a) These regulations apply to all persons who have participated, are currently participating or may reasonably be expected to participate in transactions under Federal nonprocurement programs. For purposes of these regulations such transactions will be referred to as “covered transactions.”


(1) Covered transaction. For purposes of these regulations, a covered transaction is a primary covered transaction or a lower tier covered transaction. Covered transactions at any tier need not involve the transfer of Federal funds.


(i) Primary covered transaction. Except as noted in paragraph (a)(2) of this section, a primary covered transaction is any nonprocurement transaction between an agency and a person, regardless of type, including: grants, cooperative agreements, scholarships, fellowships, contracts of assistance, loans, loan guarantees, subsidies, insurance, payments for specified use, donation agreements and any other nonprocurement transactions between a Federal agency and a person. Primary covered transactions also include those transactions specially designated by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development in such agency’s regulations governing debarment and suspension.


(ii) Lower tier covered transaction. A lower tier covered transaction is:


(A) Any transaction between a participant and a person other than a procurement contract for goods or services, regardless of type, under a primary covered transaction.


(B) Any procurement contract for goods or services between a participant and a person, regardless of type, expected to equal or exceed the Federal procurement small purchase threshold fixed at 10 U.S.C. 2304(g) and 41 U.S.C. 253(g) (currently $25,000) under a primary covered transaction.


(C) Any procurement contract for goods or services between a participant and a person under a covered transaction, regardless of amount, under which that person will have a critical influence on or substantive control over that covered transaction. Such persons are:


(1) Principal investigators.


(2) Providers of federally-required audit services.


(2) Exceptions. The following transactions are not covered:


(i) Statutory entitlements or mandatory awards (but not subtier awards thereunder which are not themselves mandatory), including deposited funds insured by the Federal Government;


(ii) Direct awards to foreign governments or public international organizations, or transactions with foreign governments or foreign governmental entities, public international organizations, foreign government owned (in whole or in part) or controlled entities, entities consisting wholly or partially of foreign governments or foreign governmental entities;


(iii) Benefits to an individual as a personal entitlement without regard to the individual’s present responsibility (but benefits received in an individual’s business capacity are not excepted);


(iv) Federal employment;


(v) Transactions pursuant to national or agency-recognized emergencies or disasters;


(vi) Incidental benefits derived from ordinary governmental operations; and


(vii) Other transactions where the application of these regulations would be prohibited by law.


(b) Relationship to other sections. This section describes the types of transactions to which a debarment or suspension under the regulations will apply. Subpart B, “Effect of Action,” 513.200, “Debarment or suspension,” sets forth the consequences of a debarment or suspension. Those consequences would obtain only with respect to participants and principals in the covered transactions and activities described in 513.110(a). Sections 513.325, “Scope of debarment,” and 513.420, “Scope of suspension,” govern the extent to which a specific participant or organizational elements of a participant would be automatically included within a debarment or suspension action, and the conditions under which affiliates or persons associated with a participant may also be brought within the scope of the action.


(c) Relationship to Federal procurement activities. In accordance with E.O. 12689 and section 2455 of Public Law 103-355, any debarment, suspension, proposed debarment or other governmentwide exclusion initiated under the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) on or after August 25, 1995 shall be recognized by and effective for Executive Branch agencies and participants as an exclusion under this regulation. Similarly, any debarment, suspension or other governmentwide exclusion initiated under this regulation on or after August 25, 1995 shall be recognized by and effective for those agencies as a debarment or suspension under the FAR.


[53 FR 19179, 19204, May 26, 1988, as amended at 60 FR 33041, 33045, June 26, 1995]


§ 513.115 Policy.

(a) In order to protect the public interest, it is the policy of the Federal Government to conduct business only with responsible persons. Debarment and suspension are discretionary actions that, taken in accordance with Executive Order 12549 and these regulations, are appropriate means to implement this policy.


(b) Debarment and suspension are serious actions which shall be used only in the public interest and for the Federal Government’s protection and not for purposes of punishment. Agencies may impose debarment or suspension for the causes and in accordance with the procedures set forth in these regulations.


(c) When more than one agency has an interest in the proposed debarment or suspension of a person, consideration shall be given to designating one agency as the lead agency for making the decision. Agencies are encouraged to establish methods and procedures for coordinating their debarment or suspension actions.


Subpart B – Effect of Action

§ 513.200 Debarment or suspension.

(a) Primary covered transactions. Except to the extent prohibited by law, persons who are debarred or suspended shall be excluded from primary covered transactions as either participants or principals throughout the Executive Branch of the Federal Government for the period of their debarment, suspension, or the period they are proposed for debarment under 48 CFR part 9, subpart 9.4. Accordingly, no agency shall enter into primary covered transactions with such excluded persons during such period, except as permitted pursuant to § 513.215.


(b) Lower tier covered transactions. Except to the extent prohibited by law, persons who have been proposed for debarment under 48 CFR part 9, subpart 9.4, debarred or suspended shall be excluded from participating as either participants or principals in all lower tier covered transactions (see § 513.110(a)(1)(ii)) for the period of their exclusion.


(c) Exceptions. Debarment or suspension does not affect a person’s eligibility for –


(1) Statutory entitlements or mandatory awards (but not subtier awards thereunder which are not themselves mandatory), including deposited funds insured by the Federal Government;


(2) Direct awards to foreign governments or public international organizations, or transactions with foreign governments or foreign governmental entities, public international organizations, foreign government owned (in whole or in part) or controlled entities, and entities consisting wholly or partially of foreign governments or foreign governmental entities;


(3) Benefits to an individual as a personal entitlement without regard to the individual’s present responsibility (but benefits received in an individual’s business capacity are not excepted);


(4) Federal employment;


(5) Transactions pursuant to national or agency-recognized emergencies or disasters;


(6) Incidental benefits derived from ordinary governmental operations; and


(7) Other transactions where the application of these regulations would be prohibited by law.


[60 FR 33041, 33045, June 26, 1995]


§ 513.205 Ineligible persons.

Persons who are ineligible, as defined in § 513.105(i), are excluded in accordance with the applicable statutory, executive order, or regulatory authority.


§ 513.210 Voluntary exclusion.

Persons who accept voluntary exclusions under § 513.315 are excluded in accordance with the terms of their settlements. Broadcasting Board of Governors shall, and participants may, contact the original action agency to ascertain the extent of the exclusion.


§ 513.215 Exception provision.

may grant an exception permitting a debarred, suspended, or voluntarily excluded person, or a person proposed for debarment under 48 CFR part 9, subpart 9.4, to participate in a particular covered transaction upon a written determination by the agency head or an authorized designee stating the reason(s) for deviating from the Presidential policy established by Executive Order 12549 and § 513.200. However, in accordance with the President’s stated intention in the Executive Order, exceptions shall be granted only infrequently. Exceptions shall be reported in accordance with § 513.505(a).


[60 FR 33041, 33045, June 26, 1995]


§ 513.220 Continuation of covered transactions.

(a) Notwithstanding the debarment, suspension, proposed debarment under 48 CFR part 9, subpart 9.4, determination of ineligibility, or voluntary exclusion of any person by an agency, agencies and participants may continue covered transactions in existence at the time the person was debarred, suspended, proposed for debarment under 48 CFR part 9, subpart 9.4, declared ineligible, or voluntarily excluded. A decision as to the type of termination action, if any, to be taken should be made only after thorough review to ensure the propriety of the proposed action.


(b) Agencies and participants shall not renew or extend covered transactions (other than no-cost time extensions) with any person who is debarred, suspended, proposed for debarment under 48 CFR part 9, subpart 9.4, ineligible or voluntary excluded, except as provided in § 513.215.


[60 FR 33041, 33045, June 26, 1995]


§ 513.225 Failure to adhere to restrictions.

(a) Except as permitted under § 513.215 or § 513.220, a participant shall not knowingly do business under a covered transaction with a person who is –


(1) Debarred or suspended;


(2) Proposed for debarment under 48 CFR part 9, subpart 9.4; or


(3) Ineligible for or voluntarily excluded from the covered transaction.


(b) Violation of the restriction under paragraph (a) of this section may result in disallowance of costs, annulment or termination of award, issuance of a stop work order, debarment or suspension, or other remedies as appropriate.


(c) A participant may rely upon the certification of a prospective participant in a lower tier covered transaction that it and its principals are not debarred, suspended, proposed for debarment under 48 CFR part 9, subpart 9.4, ineligible, or voluntarily excluded from the covered transaction (See appendix B of these regulations), unless it knows that the certification is erroneous. An agency has the burden of proof that a participant did knowingly do business with a person that filed an erroneous certification.


[60 FR 33041, 33045, June 26, 1995]


Subpart C – Debarment

§ 513.300 General.

The debarring official may debar a person for any of the causes in § 513.30, using procedures established in §§ 513.310 through 513.314. The existence of a cause for debarment, however, does not necessarily require that the person be debarred; the seriousness of the person’s acts or omissions and any mitigating factors shall be considered in making any debarment decision.


§ 513.305 Causes for debarment.

Debarment may be imposed in accordance with the provisions of §§ 513.300 through 513.314 for:


(a) Conviction of or civil judgment for:


(1) Commission of fraud or a criminal offense in connection with obtaining, attempting to obtain, or performing a public or private agreement or transaction;


(2) Violation of Federal or State antitrust statutes, including those proscribing price fixing between competitors, allocation of customers between competitors, and bid rigging;


(3) Commission of embezzlement, theft, forgery, bribery, falsification or destruction of records, making false statements, receiving stolen property, making false claims, or obstruction of justice; or


(4) Commission of any other offense indicating a lack of business integrity or business honesty that seriously and directly affects the present responsibility of a person.


(b) Violation of the terms of a public agreement or transaction so serious as to affect the integrity of an agency program, such as:


(1) A willful failure to perform in accordance with the terms of one or more public agreements or transactions;


(2) A history of failure to perform or of unsatisfactory performance of one or more public agreements or transactions; or


(3) A willful violation of a statutory or regulatory provision or requirement applicable to a public agreement or transaction.


(c) Any of the following causes:


(1) A nonprocurement debarment by any Federal agency taken before October 1, 1988, the effective date of these regulations, or a procurement debarment by any Federal agency taken pursuant to 48 CFR subpart 9.4;


(2) Knowingly doing business with a debarred, suspended, ineligible, or voluntarily excluded person, in connection with a covered transaction, except as permitted in § 513.215 or § 513.220;


(3) Failure to pay a single substantial debt, or a number of outstanding debts (including disallowed costs and overpayments, but not including sums owed the Federal Government under the Internal Revenue Code) owed to any Federal agency or instrumentality, provided the debt is uncontested by the debtor or, if contested, provided that the debtor’s legal and administrative remedies have been exhausted;


(4) Violation of a material provision of a voluntary exclusion agreement entered into under § 513.315 or of any settlement of a debarment or suspension action; or


(5) Violation of any requirement of subpart F of this part, relating to providing a drug-free workplace, as set forth in § 513.615 of this part.


(d) Any other cause of so serious or compelling a nature that it affects the present responsibility of a person.


[53 FR 19179, 19204, May 26, 1988, as amended at 54 FR 4950, 4955, Jan. 31, 1989]


§ 513.310 Procedures.

Broadcasting Board of Governors shall process debarment actions as informally as practicable, consistent with the principles of fundamental fairness, using the procedures in §§ 513.311 through 513.314.


§ 513.311 Investigation and referral.

Information concerning the existence of a cause for debarment from any source shall be promptly reported, investigated, and referred, when appropriate, to the debarring official for consideration. After consideration, the debarring official may issue a notice of proposed debarment.


§ 513.312 Notice of proposed debarment.

A debarment proceeding shall be initiated by notice to the respondent advising:


(a) That debarment is being considered;


(b) Of the reasons for the proposed debarment in terms sufficient to put the respondent on notice of the conduct or transaction(s) upon which it is based;


(c) Of the cause(s) relied upon under § 513.305 for proposing debarment;


(d) Of the provisions of § 513.311 through § 513.314, and any other Broadcasting Board of Governors procedures, if applicable, governing debarment decisionmaking; and


(e) Of the potential effect of a debarment.


§ 513.313 Opportunity to contest proposed debarment.

(a) Submission in opposition. Within 30 days after receipt of the notice of proposed debarment, the respondent may submit, in person, in writing, or through a representative, information and argument in opposition to the proposed debarment.


(b) Additional proceedings as to disputed material facts. (1) In actions not based upon a conviction or civil judgment, if the debarring official finds that the respondent’s submission in opposition raises a genuine dispute over facts material to the proposed debarment, respondent(s) shall be afforded an opportunity to appear with a representative, submit documentary evidence, present witnesses, and confront any witness the agency presents.


(2) A transcribed record of any additional proceedings shall be made available at cost to the respondent, upon request, unless the respondent and the agency, by mutual agreement, waive the requirement for a transcript.


§ 513.314 Debarring official’s decision.

(a) No additional proceedings necessary. In actions based upon a conviction or civil judgment, or in which there is no genuine dispute over material facts, the debarring official shall make a decision on the basis of all the information in the administrative record, including any submission made by the respondent. The decision shall be made within 45 days after receipt of any information and argument submitted by the respondent, unless the debarring official extends this period for good cause.


(b) Additional proceedings necessary. (1) In actions in which additional proceedings are necessary to determine disputed material facts, written findings of fact shall be prepared. The debarring official shall base the decision on the facts as found, together with any information and argument submitted by the respondent and any other information in the administrative record.


(2) The debarring official may refer disputed material facts to another official for findings of fact. The debarring official may reject any such findings, in whole or in part, only after specifically determining them to be arbitrary and capricious or clearly erroneous.


(3) The debarring official’s decision shall be made after the conclusion of the proceedings with respect to disputed facts.


(c)(1) Standard of proof. In any debarment action, the cause for debarment must be established by a preponderance of the evidence. Where the proposed debarment is based upon a conviction or civil judgment, the standard shall be deemed to have been met.


(2) Burden of proof. The burden of proof is on the agency proposing debarment.


(d) Notice of debarring official’s decision. (1) If the debarring official decides to impose debarment, the respondent shall be given prompt notice:


(i) Referring to the notice of proposed debarment;


(ii) Specifying the reasons for debarment;


(iii) Stating the period of debarment, including effective dates; and


(iv) Advising that the debarment is effective for covered transactions throughout the executive branch of the Federal Government unless an agency head or an authorized designee makes the determination referred to in § 513.215.


(2) If the debarring official decides not to impose debarment, the respondent shall be given prompt notice of that decision. A decision not to impose debarment shall be without prejudice to a subsequent imposition of debarment by any other agency.


§ 513.315 Settlement and voluntary exclusion.

(a) When in the best interest of the Government, Broadcasting Board of Governors may, at any time, settle a debarment or suspension action.


(b) If a participant and the Board agree to a voluntary exclusion of the participant, such voluntary exclusion shall be entered on the Nonprocurement List (see subpart E).


§ 513.320 Period of debarment.

(a) Debarment shall be for a period commensurate with the seriousness of the cause(s). If a suspension precedes a debarment, the suspension period shall be considered in determining the debarment period.


(1) Debarment for causes other than those related to a violation of the requirements of subpart F of this part generally should not exceed three years. Where circumstances warrant, a longer period of debarment may be imposed.


(2) In the case of a debarment for a violation of the requirements of subpart F of this part (see 513.305(c)(5)), the period of debarment shall not exceed five years.


(b) The debarring official may extend an existing debarment for an additional period, if that official determines that an extension is necessary to protect the public interest. However, a debarment may not be extended solely on the basis of the facts and circumstances upon which the initial debarment action was based. If debarment for an additional period is determined to be necessary, the procedures of §§ 513.311 through 513.314 shall be followed to extend the debarment.


(c) The respondent may request the debarring official to reverse the debarment decision or to reduce the period or scope of debarment. Such a request shall be in writing and supported by documentation. The debarring official may grant such a request for reasons including, but not limited to:


(1) Newly discovered material evidence;


(2) Reversal of the conviction or civil judgment upon which the debarment was based;


(3) Bona fide change in ownership or management;


(4) Elimination of other causes for which the debarment was imposed; or


(5) Other reasons the debarring official deems appropriate.


[53 FR 19179, 19204, May 26, 1988, as amended at 54 FR 4950, 4955, Jan. 31, 1989]


§ 513.325 Scope of debarment.

(a) Scope in general. (1) Debarment of a person under these regulations constitutes debarment of all its divisions and other organizational elements from all covered transactions, unless the debarment decision is limited by its terms to one or more specifically identified individuals, divisions or other organizational elements or to specific types of transactions.


(2) The debarment action may include any affiliate of the participant that is specifically named and given notice of the proposed debarment and an opportunity to respond (see §§ 513.311 through 513.314).


(b) Imputing conduct. For purposes of determining the scope of debarment, conduct may be imputed as follows:


(1) Conduct imputed to participant. The fraudulent, criminal or other seriously improper conduct of any officer, director, shareholder, partner, employee, or other individual associated with a participant may be imputed to the participant when the conduct occurred in connection with the individual’s performance of duties for or on behalf of the participant, or with the participant’s knowledge, approval, or acquiescence. The participant’s acceptance of the benefits derived from the conduct shall be evidence of such knowledge, approval, or acquiescence.


(2) Conduct imputed to individuals associated with participant. The fraudulent, criminal, or other seriously improper conduct of a participant may be imputed to any officer, director, shareholder, partner, employee, or other individual associated with the participant who participated in, knew of, or had reason to know of the participant’s conduct.


(3) Conduct of one participant imputed to other participants in a joint venture. The fraudulent, criminal, or other seriously improper conduct of one participant in a joint venture, grant pursuant to a joint application, or similar arrangement may be imputed to other participants if the conduct occurred for or on behalf of the joint venture, grant pursuant to a joint application, or similar arrangement may be imputed to other participants if the conduct occurred for or on behalf of the joint venture, grant pursuant to a joint application, or similar arrangement or with the knowledge, approval, or acquiescence of these participants. Acceptance of the benefits derived from the conduct shall be evidence of such knowledge, approval, or acquiescence.


Subpart D – Suspension

§ 513.400 General.

(a) The suspending official may suspend a person for any of the causes in § 513.405 using procedures established in §§ 513.410 through 513.413.


(b) Suspension is a serious action to be imposed only when:


(1) There exists adequate evidence of one or more of the causes set out in § 513.405, and


(2) Immediate action is necessary to protect the public interest.


(c) In assessing the adequacy of the evidence, the Board should consider how much information is available, how credible it is given the circumstances, whether or not important allegations are corroborated, and what inferences can reasonably be drawn as a result. This assessment should include an examination of basic documents such as grants, cooperative agreements, loan authorizations, and contracts.


§ 513.405 Causes for suspension.

(a) Suspension may be imposed in accordance with the provisions of §§ 513.400 through 513.413 upon adequate evidence:


(1) To suspect the commission of an offense listed in § 513.305(a); or


(2) That a cause for debarment under § 513.305 may exist.


(b) Indictment shall constitute adequate evidence for purposes of suspension actions.


§ 513.410 Procedures.

(a) Investigation and referral. Information concerning the existence of a cause for suspension from any source shall be promptly reported, investigated, and referred, when appropriate, to the suspending official for consideration. After consideration, the suspending official may issue a notice of suspension.


(b) Decisionmaking process. Broadcasting Board of Governors shall process suspension actions as informally as practicable, consistent with principles of fundamental fairness, using the procedures in § 513.411 through § 513.413.


§ 513.411 Notice of suspension.

When a respondent is suspended, notice shall immediately be given:


(a) That suspension has been imposed;


(b) That the suspension is based on an indictment, conviction, or other adequate evidence that the respondent has committed irregularities seriously reflecting on the propriety of further Federal Government dealings with the respondent;


(c) Describing any such irregularities in terms sufficient to put the respondent on notice without disclosing the Federal Government’s evidence;


(d) Of the cause(s) relied upon under § 513.405 for imposing suspension;


(e) That the suspension is for a temporary period pending the completion of an investigation or ensuing legal, debarment, or Program Fraud Civil Remedies Act proceedings;


(f) Of the provisions of § 513.411 through § 513.413 and any other Broadcasting Board of Governors procedures, if applicable, governing suspension decisionmaking; and


(g) Of the effect of the suspension.


§ 513.412 Opportunity to contest suspension.

(a) Submission in opposition. Within 30 days after receipt of the notice of suspension, the respondent may submit, in person, in writing, or through a representative, information and argument in opposition to the suspension.


(b) Additional proceedings as to disputed material facts. (1) If the suspending official finds that the respondent’s submission in opposition raises a genuine dispute over facts material to the suspension, respondent(s) shall be afforded an opportunity to appear with a representative, submit documentary evidence, present witnesses, and confront any witness the Board presents, unless:


(i) The action is based on an indictment, conviction or civil judgment, or


(ii) A determination is made, on the basis of Department of Justice advice, that the substantial interests of the Federal Government in pending or contemplated legal proceedings based on the same facts as the suspension would be prejudiced.


(2) A transcribed record of any additional proceedings shall be prepared and made available at cost to the respondent, upon request, unless the respondent and the Board, by mutual agreement, waive the requirement for a transcript.


§ 513.413 Suspending official’s decision.

The suspending official may modify or terminate the suspension (for example, see § 513.320(c) for reasons for reducing the period or scope of debarment) or may leave it in force. However, a decision to modify or terminate the suspension shall be without prejudice to the subsequent imposition of suspension by any other agency or debarment by any agency. The decision shall be rendered in accordance with the following provisions:


(a) No additional proceedings necessary. In actions: based on an indictment, conviction, or civil judgment; in which there is no genuine dispute over material facts; or in which additional proceedings to determine disputed material facts have been denied on the basis of Department of Justice advice, the suspending official shall make a decision on the basis of all the information in the administrative record, including any submission made by the respondent. The decision shall be made within 45 days after receipt of any information and argument submitted by the respondent, unless the suspending official extends this period for good cause.


(b) Additional proceedings necessary. (1) In actions in which additional proceedings are necessary to determine disputed material facts, written findings of fact shall be prepared. The suspending official shall base the decision on the facts as found, together with any information and argument submitted by the respondent and any other information in the administrative record.


(2) The suspending official may refer matters involving disputed material facts to another official for findings of fact. The suspending official may reject any such findings, in whole or in part, only after specifically determining them to be arbitrary or capricious or clearly erroneous.


(c) Notice of suspending official’s decision. Prompt written notice of the suspending official’s decision shall be sent to the respondent.


§ 513.415 Period of suspension.

(a) Suspension shall be for a temporary period pending the completion of an investigation or ensuing legal, debarment, or Program Fraud Civil Remedies Act proceedings, unless terminated sooner by the suspending official or as provided in paragraph (b) of this section.


(b) If legal or administrative proceedings are not initiated within 12 months after the date of the suspension notice, the suspension shall be terminated unless an Assistant Attorney General or United States Attorney requests its extension in writing, in which case it may be extended for an additional six months. In no event may a suspension extend beyond 18 months, unless such proceedings have been initiated within that period.


(c) The suspending official shall notify the Department of Justice of an impending termination of a suspension, at least 30 days before the 12-month period expires, to give that Department an opportunity to request an extension.


§ 513.420 Scope of suspension.

The scope of a suspension is the same as the scope of a debarment (see § 513.325), except that the procedures of §§ 513.410 through 513.413 shall be used in imposing a suspension.


Subpart E – Responsibilities of GSA, Board and Participants

§ 513.500 GSA responsibilities.

(a) In accordance with the OMB guidelines, GSA shall compile, maintain, and distribute a list of all persons who have been debarred, suspended, or voluntarily excluded by agencies under Executive Order 12549 and these regulations, and those who have been determined to be ineligible.


(b) At a minimum, this list shall indicate:


(1) The names and addresses of all debarred, suspended, ineligible, and voluntarily excluded persons, in alphabetical order, with cross-references when more than one name is involved in a single action;


(2) The type of action;


(3) The cause for the action;


(4) The scope of the action;


(5) Any termination date for each listing; and


(6) The agency and name and telephone number of the agency point of contact for the action.


§ 513.505 Broadcasting Board of Governors responsibilities.

(a) The Board shall provide GSA with current information concerning debarments, suspension, determinations of ineligibility, and voluntary exclusions it has taken. Until February 18, 1989, the Board shall also provide GSA and OMB with information concerning all transactions in which Broadcasting Board of Governors has granted exceptions under § 513.215 permitting participation by debarred, suspended, or voluntarily excluded persons.


(b) Unless an alternative schedule is agreed to by GSA, the Board shall advise GSA of the information set forth in § 513.500(b) and of the exceptions granted under § 513.215 within five working days after taking such actions.


(c) The Board shall direct inquiries concerning listed persons to the agency that took the action.


(d) Board officials shall check the Nonprocurement List before entering covered transactions to determine whether a participant in a primary transaction is debarred, suspended, ineligible, or voluntarily excluded (Tel. #).


(e) Board officials shall check the Nonprocurement List before approving principals or lower tier participants where Board approval of the principal or lower tier participant is required under the terms of the transaction, to determine whether such principals or participants are debarred, suspended, ineligible, or voluntarily excluded.


§ 513.510 Participants’ responsibilities.

(a) Certification by participants in primary covered transactions. Each participant shall submit the certification in appendix A to this part for it and its principals at the time the participant submits its proposal in connection with a primary covered transaction, except that States need only complete such certification as to their principals. Participants may decide the method and frequency by which they determine the eligibility of their principals. In addition, each participant may, but is not required to, check the Nonprocurement List for its principals (Tel. #). Adverse information on the certification will not necessarily result in denial of participation. However, the certification, and any additional information pertaining to the certification submitted by the participant, shall be considered in the administration of covered transactions.


(b) Certification by participants in lower tier covered transactions. (1) Each participant shall require participants in lower tier covered transactions to include the certification in appendix B to this part for it and its principals in any proposal submitted in connection with such lower tier covered transactions.


(2) A participant may rely upon the certification of a prospective participant in a lower tier covered transaction that it and its principals are not debarred, suspended, ineligible, or voluntarily excluded from the covered transaction by any Federal agency, unless it knows that the certification is erroneous. Participants may decide the method and frequency by which they determine the eligiblity of their principals. In addition, a participant may, but is not required to, check the Nonprocurement List for its principals and for participants (Tel. #).


(c) Changed circumstances regarding certification. A participant shall provide immediate written notice to Broadcasting Board of Governors if at any time the participant learns that its certification was erroneous when submitted or has become erroneous by reason of changed circumstances. Participants in lower tier covered transactions shall provide the same updated notice to the participant to which it submitted its proposals.


Subpart F – Drug-Free Workplace Requirements (Grants)


Source:55 FR 21688, 21694, May 25, 1990, unless otherwise noted.

§ 513.600 Purpose.

(a) The purpose of this subpart is to carry out the Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988 by requiring that –


(1) A grantee, other than an individual, shall certify to the Board that it will provide a drug-free workplace;


(2) A grantee who is an individual shall certify to the Board that, as a condition of the grant, he or she will not engage in the unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensing, possession or use of a controlled substance in conducting any activity with the grant.


(b) Requirements implementing the Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988 for contractors with the Board are found at 48 CFR subparts 9.4, 23.5, and 52.2.


§ 513.605 Definitions.

(a) Except as amended in this section, the definitions of § 513.105 apply to this subpart.


(b) For purposes of this subpart –


(1) Controlled substance means a controlled substance in schedules I through V of the Controlled Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 812), and as further defined by regulation at 21 CFR 1308.11 through 1308.15;


(2) Conviction means a finding of guilt (including a plea of nolo contendere) or imposition of sentence, or both, by any judicial body charged with the responsibility to determine violations of the Federal or State criminal drug statutes;


(3) Criminal drug statute means a Federal or non-Federal criminal statute involving the manufacture, distribution, dispensing, use, or possession of any controlled substance;


(4) Drug-free workplace means a site for the performance of work done in connection with a specific grant at which employees of the grantee are prohibited from engaging in the unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensing, possession, or use of a controlled substance;


(5) Employee means the employee of a grantee directly engaged in the performance of work under the grant, including:


(i) All direct charge employees;


(ii) All indirect charge employees, unless their impact or involvement is insignificant to the performance of the grant; and,


(iii) Temporary personnel and consultants who are directly engaged in the performance of work under the grant and who are on the grantee’s payroll.


This definition does not include workers not on the payroll of the grantee (e.g., volunteers, even if used to meet a matching requirement; consultants or independent contractors not on the payroll; or employees of subrecipients or subcontractors in covered workplaces);

(6) Federal agency or agency means any United States executive department, military department, government corporation, government controlled corporation, any other establishment in the executive branch (including the Executive Office of the President), or any independent regulatory agency;


(7) Grant means an award of financial assistance, including a cooperative agreement, in the form of money, or property in lieu of money, by a Federal agency directly to a grantee. The term grant includes block grant and entitlement grant programs, whether or not exempted from coverage under the grants management government-wide common rule on uniform administrative requirements for grants and cooperative agreements. The term does not include technical assistance that provides services instead of money, or other assistance in the form of loans, loan guarantees, interest subsidies, insurance, or direct appropriations; or any veterans’ benefits to individuals, i.e., any benefit to veterans, their families, or survivors by virtue of the service of a veteran in the Armed Forces of the United States;


(8) Grantee means a person who applies for or receives a grant directly from a Federal agency (except another Federal agency);


(9) Individual means a natural person;


(10) State means any of the States of the United States, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, any territory or possession of the United States, or any agency of a State, exclusive of institutions of higher education, hospitals, and units of local government. A State instrumentality will be considered part of the State government if it has a written determination from a State government that such State considers the instrumentality to be an agency of the State government.


§ 513.610 Coverage.

(a) This subpart applies to any grantee of the Board.


(b) This subpart applies to any grant, except where application of this subpart would be inconsistent with the international obligations of the United States or the laws or regulations of a foreign government. A determination of such inconsistency may be made only by the Board head or his/her designee.


(c) The provisions of subparts A, B, C, D and E of this part apply to matters covered by this subpart, except where specifically modified by this subpart. In the event of any conflict between provisions of this subpart and other provisions of this part, the provisions of this subpart are deemed to control with respect to the implementation of drug-free workplace requirements concerning grants.


§ 513.615 Grounds for suspension of payments, suspension or termination of grants, or suspension or debarment.

A grantee shall be deemed in violation of the requirements of this subpart if the Board head or his or her official designee determines, in writing, that –


(a) The grantee has made a false certification under § 513.630;


(b) With respect to a grantee other than an individual –


(1) The grantee has violated the certification by failing to carry out the requirements of paragraphs (A)(a)-(g) and/or (B) of the certification (Alternate I to appendix C) or


(2) Such a number of employees of the grantee have been convicted of violations of criminal drug statutes for violations occurring in the workplace as to indicate that the grantee has failed to make a good faith effort to provide a drug-free workplace.


(c) With respect to a grantee who is an individual –


(1) The grantee has violated the certification by failing to carry out its requirements (Alternate II to appendix C); or


(2) The grantee is convicted of a criminal drug offense resulting from a violation occurring during the conduct of any grant activity.


§ 513.620 Effect of violation.

(a) In the event of a violation of this subpart as provided in § 513.615, and in accordance with applicable law, the grantee shall be subject to one or more of the following actions:


(1) Suspension of payments under the grant;


(2) Suspension or termination of the grant; and


(3) Suspension or debarment of the grantee under the provisions of this part.


(b) Upon issuance of any final decision under this part requiring debarment of a grantee, the debarred grantee shall be ineligible for award of any grant from any Federal agency for a period specified in the decision, not to exceed five years (see § 513.320(a)(2) of this part).


§ 513.625 Exception provision.

The Board head may waive with respect to a particular grant, in writing, a suspension of payments under a grant, suspension or termination of a grant, or suspension or debarment of a grantee if the Board head determines that such a waiver would be in the public interest. This exception authority cannot be delegated to any other official.


§ 513.630 Certification requirements and procedures.

(a)(1) As a prior condition of being awarded a grant, each grantee shall make the appropriate certification to the Federal agency providing the grant, as provided in appendix C to this part.


(2) Grantees are not required to make a certification in order to continue receiving funds under a grant awarded before March 18, 1989, or under a no-cost time extension of such a grant. However, the grantee shall make a one-time drug-free workplace certification for a non-automatic continuation of such a grant made on or after March 18, 1989.


(b) Except as provided in this section, all grantees shall make the required certification for each grant. For mandatory formula grants and entitlements that have no application process, grantees shall submit a one-time certification in order to continue receiving awards.


(c) A grantee that is a State may elect to make one certification in each Federal fiscal year. States that previously submitted an annual certification are not required to make a certification for Fiscal Year 1990 until June 30, 1990. Except as provided in paragraph (d) of this section, this certification shall cover all grants to all State agencies from any Federal agency. The State shall retain the original of this statewide certification in its Governor’s office and, prior to grant award, shall ensure that a copy is submitted individually with respect to each grant, unless the Federal agency has designated a central location for submission.


(d)(1) The Governor of a State may exclude certain State agencies from the statewide certification and authorize these agencies to submit their own certifications to Federal agencies. The statewide certification shall name any State agencies so excluded.


(2) A State agency to which the statewide certification does not apply, or a State agency in a State that does not have a statewide certification, may elect to make one certification in each Federal fiscal year. State agencies that previously submitted a State agency certification are not required to make a certification for Fiscal Year 1990 until June 30, 1990. The State agency shall retain the original of this State agency-wide certification in its central office and, prior to grant award, shall ensure that a copy is submitted individually with respect to each grant, unless the Federal agency designates a central location for submission.


(3) When the work of a grant is done by more than one State agency, the certification of the State agency directly receiving the grant shall be deemed to certify compliance for all workplaces, including those located in other State agencies.


(e)(1) For a grant of less than 30 days performance duration, grantees shall have this policy statement and program in place as soon as possible, but in any case by a date prior to the date on which performance is expected to be completed.


(2) For a grant of 30 days or more performance duration, grantees shall have this policy statement and program in place within 30 days after award.


(3) Where extraordinary circumstances warrant for a specific grant, the grant officer may determine a different date on which the policy statement and program shall be in place.


§ 513.635 Reporting of and employee sanctions for convictions of criminal drug offenses.

(a) When a grantee other than an individual is notified that an employee has been convicted for a violation of a criminal drug statute occurring in the workplace, it shall take the following actions:


(1) Within 10 calendar days of receiving notice of the conviction, the grantee shall provide written notice, including the convicted employee’s position title, to every grant officer, or other designee on whose grant activity the convicted employee was working, unless a Federal agency has designated a central point for the receipt of such notifications. Notification shall include the identification number(s) for each of the Federal agency’s affected grants.


(2) Within 30 calendar days of receiving notice of the conviction, the grantee shall do the following with respect to the employee who was convicted.


(i) Take appropriate personnel action against the employee, up to and including termination, consistent with requirements of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended; or


(ii) Require the employee to participate satisfactorily in a drug abuse assistance or rehabilitation program approved for such purposes by a Federal, State, or local health, law enforcement, or other appropriate agency.


(b) A grantee who is an individual who is convicted for a violation of a criminal drug statute occurring during the conduct of any grant activity shall report the conviction, in writing, within 10 calendar days, to his or her Federal agency grant officer, or other designee, unless the Federal agency has designated a central point for the receipt of such notices. Notification shall include the identification number(s) for each of the Federal agency’s affected grants.


(Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control number 0991-0002)


Appendix A to Part 513 – Certification Regarding Debarment, Suspension, and Other Responsibility Matters – Primary Covered Transactions

Instructions for Certification

1. By signing and submitting this proposal, the prospective primary participant is providing the certification set out below.


2. The inability of a person to provide the certification required below will not necessarily result in denial of participation in this covered transaction. The prospective participant shall submit an explanation of why it cannot provide the certification set out below. The certification or explanation will be considered in connection with the department or Board’s determination whether to enter into this transaction. However, failure of the prospective primary participant to furnish a certification or an explanation shall disqualify such person from participation in this transaction.


3. The certification in this clause is a material representation of fact upon which reliance was placed when the department or Board determined to enter into this transaction. If it is later determined that the prospective primary participant knowingly rendered an erroneous certification, in addition to other remedies available to the Federal Government, the department or Board may terminate this transaction for cause or default.


4. The prospective primary participant shall provide immediate written notice to the department or Board to which this proposal is submitted if at any time the prospective primary participant learns that its certification was erroneous when submitted or has become erroneous by reason of changed circumstances.


5. The terms covered transaction, debarred, suspended, ineligible, lower tier covered transaction, participant, person, primary covered transaction, principal, proposal, and voluntarily excluded, as used in this clause, have the meanings set out in the Definitions and Coverage sections of the rules implementing Executive Order 12549. You may contact the department or Board to which this proposal is being submitted for assistance in obtaining a copy of those regulations.


6. The prospective primary participant agrees by submitting this proposal that, should the proposed covered transaction be entered into, it shall not knowingly enter into any lower tier covered transaction with a person who is proposed for debarment under 48 CFR part 9, subpart 9.4, debarred, suspended, declared ineligible, or voluntarily excluded from participation in this covered transaction, unless authorized by the department or Board entering into this transaction.


7. The prospective primary participant further agrees by submitting this proposal that it will include the clause titled “Certification Regarding Debarment, Suspension, Ineligibility and Voluntary Exclusion-Lower Tier Covered Transaction,” provided by the department or Board entering into this covered transaction, without modification, in all lower tier covered transactions and in all solicitations for lower tier covered transactions.


8. A participant in a covered transaction may rely upon a certification of a prospective participant in a lower tier covered transaction that it is not proposed for debarment under 48 CFR part 9, subpart 9.4, debarred, suspended, ineligible, or voluntarily excluded from the covered transaction, unless it knows that the certification is erroneous. A participant may decide the method and frequency by which it determines the eligibility of its principals. Each participant may, but is not required to, check the List of Parties Excluded from Federal Procurement and Nonprocurement Programs.


9. Nothing contained in the foregoing shall be construed to require establishment of a system of records in order to render in good faith the certification required by this clause. The knowledge and information of a participant is not required to exceed that which is normally possessed by a prudent person in the ordinary course of business dealings.


10. Except for transactions authorized under paragraph 6 of these instructions, if a participant in a covered transaction knowingly enters into a lower tier covered transaction with a person who is proposed for debarment under 48 CFR part 9, subpart 9.4, suspended, debarred, ineligible, or voluntarily excluded from participation in this transaction, in addition to other remedies available to the Federal Government, the department or Board may terminate this transaction for cause or default.


Certification Regarding Debarment, Suspension, and Other Responsibility Matters – Primary Covered Transactions

(1) The prospective primary participant certifies to the best of its knowledge and belief, that it and its principals:


(a) Are not presently debarred, suspended, proposed for debarment, declared ineligible, or voluntarily excluded by any Federal department or Board;


(b) Have not within a three-year period preceding this proposal been convicted of or had a civil judgment rendered against them for commission of fraud or a criminal offense in connection with obtaining, attempting to obtain, or performing a public (Federal, State or local) transaction or contract under a public transaction; violation of Federal or State antitrust statutes or commission of embezzlement, theft, forgery, bribery, falsification or destruction of records, making false statements, or receiving stolen property;


(c) Are not presently indicted for or otherwise criminally or civilly charged by a governmental entity (Federal, State or local) with commission of any of the offenses enumerated in paragraph (1)(b) of this certification; and


(d) Have not within a three-year period preceding this application/proposal had one or more public transactions (Federal, State or local) terminated for cause or default.


(2) Where the prospective primary participant is unable to certify to any of the statements in this certification, such prospective participant shall attach an explanation to this proposal.


[60 FR 33042, 33045, June 26, 1995]


Appendix B to Part 513 – Certification Regarding Debarment, Suspension, Ineligibility and Voluntary Exclusion – Lower Tier Covered Transactions

Instructions for Certification

1. By signing and submitting this proposal, the prospective lower tier participant is providing the certification set out below.


2. The certification in this clause is a material representation of fact upon which reliance was placed when this transaction was entered into. If it is later determined that the prospective lower tier participant knowingly rendered an erroneous certification, in addition to other remedies available to the Federal Government the department or Board with which this transaction originated may pursue available remedies, including suspension and/or debarment.


3. The prospective lower tier participant shall provide immediate written notice to the person to which this proposal is submitted if at any time the prospective lower tier participant learns that its certification was erroneous when submitted or had become erroneous by reason of changed circumstances.


4. The terms covered transaction, debarred, suspended, ineligible, lower tier covered transaction, participant, person, primary covered transaction, principal, proposal, and voluntarily excluded, as used in this clause, have the meaning set out in the Definitions and Coverage sections of rules implementing Executive Order 12549. You may contact the person to which this proposal is submitted for assistance in obtaining a copy of those regulations.


5. The prospective lower tier participant agrees by submitting this proposal that, should the proposed covered transaction be entered into, it shall not knowingly enter into any lower tier covered transaction with a person who is proposed for debarment under 48 CFR part 9, subpart 9.4, debarred, suspended, declared ineligible, or voluntarily excluded from participation in this covered transaction, unless authorized by the department or Board with which this transaction originated.


6. The prospective lower tier participant further agrees by submitting this proposal that it will include this clause titled “Certification Regarding Debarment, Suspension, Ineligibility and Voluntary Exclusion-Lower Tier Covered Transaction,” without modification, in all lower tier covered transactions and in all solicitations for lower tier covered transactions.


7. A participant in a covered transaction may rely upon a certification of a prospective participant in a lower tier covered transaction that it is not proposed for debarment under 48 CFR part 9, subpart 9.4, debarred, suspended, ineligible, or voluntarily excluded from covered transactions, unless it knows that the certification is erroneous. A participant may decide the method and frequency by which it determines the eligibility of its principals. Each participant may, but is not required to, check the List of Parties Excluded from Federal Procurement and Nonprocurement Programs.


8. Nothing contained in the foregoing shall be construed to require establishment of a system of records in order to render in good faith the certification required by this clause. The knowledge and information of a participant is not required to exceed that which is normally possessed by a prudent person in the ordinary course of business dealings.


9. Except for transactions authorized under paragraph 5 of these instructions, if a participant in a covered transaction knowingly enters into a lower tier covered transaction with a person who is proposed for debarment under 48 CFR part 9, subpart 9.4, suspended, debarred, ineligible, or voluntarily excluded from participation in this transaction, in addition to other remedies available to the Federal Government, the department or Board with which this transaction originated may pursue available remedies, including suspension and/or debarment.


Certification Regarding Debarment, Suspension, Ineligibility an Voluntary Exclusion – Lower Tier Covered Transactions

(1) The prospective lower tier participant certifies, by submission of this proposal, that neither it nor its principals is presently debarred, suspended, proposed for debarment, declared ineligible, or voluntarily excluded from participation in this transaction by any Federal department or agency.


(2) Where the prospective lower tier participant is unable to certify to any of the statements in this certification, such prospective participant shall attach an explanation to this proposal.


[60 FR 33042, 33045, June 26, 1995]


Appendix C to Part 513 – Certification Regarding Drug-Free Workplace Requirements

Instructions for Certification

1. By signing and/or submitting this application or grant agreement, the grantee is providing the certification set out below.


2. The certification set out below is a material representation of fact upon which reliance is placed when the Board awards the grant. If it is later determined that the grantee knowingly rendered a false certification, or otherwise violates the requirements of the Drug-Free Workplace Act, the Board, in addition to any other remedies available to the Federal Government, may take action authorized under the Drug-Free Workplace Act.


3. For grantees other than individuals, Alternate I applies.


4. For grantees who are individuals, Alternate II applies.


5. Workplaces under grants, for grantees other than individuals, need not be identified on the certification. If known, they may be identified in the grant application. If the grantee does not identify the workplaces at the time of application, or upon award, if there is no application, the grantee must keep the identity of the workplace(s) on file in its office and make the information available for Federal inspection. Failure to identify all known workplaces constitutes a violation of the grantee’s drug-free workplace requirements.


6. Workplace identifications must include the actual address of buildings (or parts of buildings) or other sites where work under the grant takes place. Categorical descriptions may be used (e.g., all vehicles of a mass transit authority or State highway department while in operation, State employees in each local unemployment office, performers in concert halls or radio studios).


7. If the workplace identified to the Board changes during the performance of the grant, the grantee shall inform the Board of the change(s), if it previously identified the workplaces in question (see paragraph five).


8. Definitions of terms in the Nonprocurement Suspension and Debarment common rule and Drug-Free Workplace common rule apply to this certification. Grantees’ attention is called, in particular, to the following definitions from these rules:


Controlled substance means a controlled substance in Schedules I through V of the Controlled Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 812) and as further defined by regulation (21 CFR 1308.11 through 1308.15);


Conviction means a finding of guilt (including a plea of nolo contendere) or imposition of sentence, or both, by any judicial body charged with the responsibility to determine violations of the Federal or State criminal drug statutes;


Criminal drug statute means a Federal or non-Federal criminal statute involving the manufacture, distribution, dispensing, use, or possession of any controlled substance;


Employee means the employee of a grantee directly engaged in the performance of work under a grant, including: (i) All direct charge employees; (ii) All indirect charge employees unless their impact or involvement is insignificant to the performance of the grant; and, (iii) Temporary personnel and consultants who are directly engaged in the performance of work under the grant and who are on the grantee’s payroll. This definition does not include workers not on the payroll of the grantee (e.g., volunteers, even if used to meet a matching requirement; consultants or independent contractors not on the grantee’s payroll; or employees of subrecipients or subcontractors in covered workplaces.


Certification Regarding Drug-Free Workplace Requirements

Alternate I. (Grantees Other Than Individuals)

A. The grantee certifies that it will or will continue to provide a drug-free workplace by:


(a) Publishing a statement notifying employees that the unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensing, possession, or use of a controlled substance is prohibited in the grantee’s workplace and specifying the actions that will be taken against employees for violation of such prohibition;


(b) Establishing an ongoing drug-free awareness program to inform employees about –


(1) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace;


(2) The grantee’s policy of maintaining a drug-free workplace;


(3) Any available drug counseling, rehabilitation, and employee assistance programs; and


(4) The penalties that may be imposed upon employees for drug abuse violations occurring in the workplace;


(c) Making it a requirement that each employee to be engaged in the performance of the grant be given a copy of the statement required by paragraph (a);


(d) Notifying the employee in the statement required by paragraph (a) that, as a condition of employment under the grant, the employee will –


(1) Abide by the terms of the statement; and


(2) Notify the employer in writing of his or her conviction for a violation of a criminal drug statute occurring in the workplace no later than five calendar days after such conviction;


(e) Notifying the Board in writing, within ten calendar days after receiving notice under paragraph (d)(2) from an employee or otherwise receiving actual notice of such conviction. Employers of convicted employees must provide notice, including position title, to every grant officer or other designee on whose grant activity the convicted employee was working, unless the Federal agency has designated a central point for the receipt of such notices. Notice shall include the identification number(s) of each affected grant;


(f) Taking one of the following actions, within 30 calendar days of receiving notice under paragraph (d)(2), with respect to any employee who is so convicted –


(1) Taking appropriate personnel action against such an employee, up to and including termination, consistent with the requirements of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended; or


(2) Requiring such employee to participate satisfactorily in a drug abuse assistance or rehabilitation program approved for such purposes by a Federal, State, or local health, law enforcement, or other appropriate agency;


(g) Making a good faith effort to continue to maintain a drug-free workplace through implementation of paragraphs (a), (b), (c), (d), (e) and (f).


B. The grantee may insert in the space provided below the site(s) for the performance of work done in connection with the specific grant:


Place of Performance (Street address, city, county, state, zip code)







Check □ if there are workplaces on file that are not identified here.

Alternate II. (Grantees Who Are Individuals)

(a) The grantee certifies that, as a condition of the grant, he or she will not engage in the unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensing, possession, or use of a controlled substance in conducting any activity with the grant;


(b) If convicted of a criminal drug offense resulting from a violation occurring during the conduct of any grant activity, he or she will report the conviction, in writing, within 10 calendar days of the conviction, to every grant officer or other designee, unless the Federal agency designates a central point for the receipt of such notices. When notice is made to such a central point, it shall include the identification number(s) of each affected grant.


[55 FR 21690, 21694, May 25, 1990]


PART 518 – UNIFORM ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS FOR GRANTS AND AGREEMENTS WITH INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION, HOSPITALS, AND OTHER NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS


Authority:22 U.S.C. 2658; 31 U.S.C. 503 and 1111; Reorganization Plan No. 2 of 1977, 42 FR 62461, 3 CFR, 1977 Comp. p. 200; E.O. 12048, 43 FR 13361, 3 CFR, 1978 Comp. p. 168.


Source:59 FR 39440, Aug. 3, 1994, unless otherwise noted.

Subpart A – General

§ 518.1 Purpose.

This part establishes uniform administrative requirements for Federal grants and agreements awarded to institutions of higher education, hospitals, and other non-profit organizations. Federal awarding agencies shall not impose additional or inconsistent requirements, except as provided in §§ 518.4 and 518.14 or unless specifically required by Federal statute or executive order. Non-profit organizations that implement Federal programs for the States are also subject to State requirements.


§ 518.2 Definitions.

(a) Accrued expenditures means the charges incurred by the recipient during a given period requiring the provision of funds for:


(1) Goods and other tangible property received;


(2) Services performed by employees, contractors, subrecipients, and other payees; and,


(3) Other amounts becoming owed under programs for which no current services or performance is required.


(b) Accrued income means the sum of:


(1) Earnings during a given period from:


(i) Services performed by the recipient, and


(ii) Goods and other tangible property delivered to purchasers; and


(2) Amounts becoming owed to the recipient for which no current services or performance is required by the recipient.


(c) Acquisition cost of equipment means the net invoice price of the equipment, including the cost of modifications, attachments, accessories, or auxiliary apparatus necessary to make the property usable for the purpose for which it was acquired. Other charges, such as the cost of installation, transportation, taxes, duty or protective in-transit insurance, shall be included or excluded from the unit acquisition cost in accordance with the recipient’s regular accounting practices.


(d) Advance means a payment made by Treasury check or other appropriate payment mechanism to a recipient upon its request either before outlays are made by the recipient or through the use of predetermined payment schedules.


(e) Award means financial assistance that provides support or stimulation to accomplish a public purpose. Awards include grants and other agreements in the form of money or property in lieu of money, by the Federal Government to an eligible recipient. The term does not include: technical assistance, which provides services instead of money; other assistance in the form of loans, loan guarantees, interest subsidies, or insurance; direct payments of any kind to individuals; and, contracts which are required to be entered into and administered under procurement laws and regulations.


(f) Cash contributions means the recipient’s cash outlay, including the outlay of money contributed to the recipient by third parties.


(g) Closeout means the process by which a Federal awarding agency determines that all applicable administrative actions and all required work of the award have been completed by the recipient and Federal awarding agency.


(h) Contract means a procurement contract under an award or subaward, and a procurement subcontract under a recipient’s or subrecipient’s contract.


(i) Cost sharing or matching means that portion of project or program costs not borne by the Federal Government.


(j) Date of completion means the date on which all work under an award is completed or the date on the award document, or any supplement or amendment thereto, on which Federal sponsorship ends.


(k) Disallowed costs means those charges to an award that the Federal awarding agency determines to be unallowable, in accordance with the applicable Federal cost principles or other terms and conditions contained in the award.


(l) Equipment means tangible nonexpendable personal property including exempt property charged directly to the award having a useful life or more than one year and an acquisition cost of $5,000 or more per unit. However, consistent with recipient policy, lower limits may be established.


(m) Excess property means property under the control of any Federal awarding agency that, as determined by the head thereof, is no longer required for its needs or the discharge of its responsibilities.


(n) Exempt property means tangible personal property acquired in whole or in part with Federal funds, where the Federal awarding agency has statutory authority to vest title in the recipient without further obligation to the Federal Government. An example of exempt property authority is contained in the Federal Grant and Cooperative Agreement Act (31 U.S.C. 6306), for property acquired under an award to conduct basic or applied research by a non-profit institution or higher education or non-profit organization whose principal purpose is conducting scientific research.


(o) Federal awarding agency means the Federal agency that provides an award to the recipient.


(p) Federal funds authorized means the total amount of Federal funds obligated by the Federal Government for use by the recipient. This amount may include any authorized carryover of unobligated funds from prior funding periods when permitted by agency regulations or agency implementing instructions.


(q) Federal share of real property, equipment, or supplies means that percentage of the property’s acquisition costs and any improvement expenditures paid with Federal funds.


(r) Funding period means the period of time when Federal funding is available for obligation by the recipient.


(s) Intangible property and debt instruments means, but is not limited to, trademarks, copyrights, patents and patent applications and such property as loans, notes and other debt instruments, lease agreements, stock and other instruments of property ownership, whether considered tangible or intangible.


(t) Obligations means the amounts of orders placed, contracts and grants awarded, services received and similar transactions during a given period that require payment by the recipient during the same or a future period.


(u) Outlays or expenditures means charges made to the project or program. They may be reported on a cash or accrual basis. For reports prepared on a cash basis, outlays are the sum of cash disbursements for direct charges for goods and services, the amount of indirect expense charged, the value of third party in-kind contributions applied and the amount of cash advances and payments made to subrecipients. For reports prepared on an accrual basis, outlays are the sum of cash disbursements for direct charges for goods and services, the amount of indirect expense incurred, the value of in-kind contributions applied, and the net increase (or decrease) in the amounts owed by the recipient for goods and other property received, for services performed by employees, contractors, subrecipients and other payees and other amounts becoming owed under programs for which no current services or performance are required.


(v) Personal property means property of any kind except real property. It may be tangible, having physical existence, or intangible, having no physical existence, such as copyrights, patents, or securities.


(w) Prior approval means written approval by an authorized official evidencing prior consent.


(x) Program income means gross income earned by the recipient that is directly generated by a supported activity or earned as a result of the award (see exclusions in §§ 518.24 (e) and (h)). Program income includes, but is not limited to, income from fees for services performed, the use or rental of real or personal property acquired under federally-funded projects, the sale of commodities or items fabricated under an award, license fees and royalties on patents and copyrights, and interest on loans made with award funds. Interest earned on advances of Federal funds is not program income. Except as otherwise provided in Federal awarding agency regulations or the terms and conditions of the award, program income does not include the receipt of principal on loans, rebates, credits, discounts, etc., or interest earned on any of them.


(y) Project costs means all allowable costs, as set forth in the applicable Federal cost principles, incurred by a recipient and the value of the contributions made by third parties in accomplishing the objectives of the award during the project period.


(z) Project period means the period established in the award document during which Federal sponsorship begins and ends.


(aa) Property means, unless otherwise stated, real property, equipment, intangible property and debt instruments.


(bb) Real property means land, including land improvements, structures and appurtenances thereto, but excludes movable machinery and equipment.


(cc) Recipient means an organization receiving financial assistance directly from Federal awarding agencies to carry out a project or program. The term includes public and private institutions of higher education, public and private hospitals, and other quasi-public and private non-profit organizations such as, but not limited to, community action agencies, research institutes, educational associations, and health centers. The term may include commercial organizations, foreign or international organizations (such as agencies of the United Nations) which are recipients, subrecipients, or contractors or subcontractors of recipients or subrecipients at the discretion of the Federal awarding agency. The term does not include government-owned contractor-operated facilities or research centers providing continued support for mission-oriented, large-scale programs that are government-owned or controlled, or are designated as federally-funded research and development centers.


(dd) Research and development means all research activities, both basic and applied, and all development activities that are supported at universities, colleges, and other non-profit institutions. “Research” is defined as a systematic study directed toward fuller scientific knowledge or understanding of the subject studied. “Development” is the systematic use of knowledge and understanding gained from research directed toward the production of useful materials, devices, systems, or methods, including design and development of prototypes and processes. The term research also includes activities involving the training of individuals in research techniques where such activities utilize the same facilities as other research and development activities and where such activities are not included in the instruction function.


(ee) Small awards means a grant or cooperative agreement not exceeding the small purchase threshold fixed at 41 U.S.C. 403(11) (currently $25,000).


(ff) Subaward means an award of financial assistance in the form of money, or property in lieu of money, made under an award by a recipient to an eligible subrecipient or by a subrecipient to a lower tier subrecipient. The term includes financial assistance when provided by any legal agreement, even if the agreement is called a contract, but does not include procurement of goods and services nor does it include any form of assistance which is excluded from the definition of “award” in paragraph (e) of this section.


(gg) Subrecipient means the legal entity to which a subaward is made and which is accountable to the recipient for the use of the funds provided. The term may include foreign or international organizations (such as agencies of the United Nations) at the discretion of the Federal awarding agency.


(hh) Supplies means all personal property excluding equipment, intangible property, and debt instruments as defined in this section, and inventions of a contractor conceived or first actually reduced to practice in the performance of work under a funding agreement (“subject inventions”), as defined in 37 CFR part 401, “Rights to Inventions Made by Nonprofit Organizations and Small Business Firms Under Government Grants, Contracts, and Cooperative Agreements.”


(ii) Suspension means an action by a Federal awarding agency that temporarily withdraws Federal sponsorship under an award, pending corrective action by the recipient or pending a decision to terminate the award by the Federal awarding agency. Suspension of an award is a separate action from suspension under Federal agency regulations implementing E.O.’s 12549 and 12689, “Debarment and Suspension.”


(jj) Termination means the cancellation of Federal sponsorship, in whole or in part, under an agreement at any time prior to the date of completion.


(kk) Third party in-kind contributions means the value of non-cash contributions provided by non-Federal third parties. Third party in-kind contributions may be in the form of real property, equipment, supplies and other expendable property, and the value of goods and services directly benefiting and specifically identifiable to the project or program.


(ll) Unliquidated obligations, for financial reports prepared on a cash basis, means the amount of obligations incurred by the recipient that have not been paid. For reports prepared on an accrued expenditure basis, they represent the amount of obligations incurred by the recipient for which an outlay has not been recorded.


(mm) Unobligated balance means the portion of the funds authorized by the Federal awarding agency that has not been obligated by the recipient and is determined by deducting the cumulative obligations from the cumulative funds authorized.


(nn) Unrecovered indirect cost means the difference between the amount awarded and the amount which could have been awarded under the recipient’s approved negotiated indirect cost rate.


(oo) Working capital advance means a procedure whereby funds are advanced to the recipient to cover its estimated disbursement needs for a given initial period.


§ 518.3 Effect on other issuances.

For awards subject to this part, all administrative requirements of codified program regulations, program manuals, handbooks and other non-regulatory materials which are inconsistent with the requirements of this part shall be superseded, except to the extent they are required by statute, or authorized in accordance with the deviations provision in § 518.4.


§ 518.4 Deviations.

The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) may grant exceptions for classes of grants or recipients subject to the requirements of this part when exceptions are not prohibited by statute. However, in the interest of maximum uniformity, exceptions from the requirements of this part shall be permitted only in unusual circumstances. Federal awarding agencies may apply more restrictive requirements to a class of recipients when approved by OMB. Federal awarding agencies may apply less restrictive requirements when awarding small awards, except for those requirements which are statutory. Exceptions on a case-by-case basis may also be made by Federal awarding agencies.


§ 518.5 Subawards.

Unless sections of this part specifically exclude subrecipients from coverage, the provisions of this part shall be applied to subrecipients performing work under awards if such subrecipients are institutions of higher education, hospitals or other non-profit organizations. State and local government subrecipients are subject to the provisions of regulations implementing the grants management common rule, “Uniform Administrative Requirements for Grants and Cooperative Agreements to State and Local Governments,” published at 53 FR 9034 (3/11/88).


Subpart B – Pre-Award Requirements

§ 518.10 Purpose.

Sections 518.11 through 518.17 prescribes forms and instructions and other pre-award matters to be used in applying for Federal awards.


§ 518.11 Pre-award policies.

(a) Use of Grants and Cooperative Agreements, and Contracts. In each instance, the Federal awarding agency shall decide on the appropriate award instrument (i.e., grant, cooperative agreement, or contract). The Federal Grant and Cooperative Agreement Act (31 U.S.C. 6301-08) governs the use of grants, cooperative agreements and contracts. A grant or cooperative agreement shall be used only when the principal purpose of a transaction is to accomplish a public purpose of support or stimulation authorized by Federal statute. The statutory criterion for choosing between grants and cooperative agreements is that for the latter, “substantial involvement is expected between the executive agency and the State, local government, or other recipient when carrying out the activity contemplated in the agreement.” Contracts shall be used when the principal purpose is acquisition of property or services for the direct benefit or use of the Federal Government.


(b) Public Notice and Priority Setting. Federal awarding agencies shall notify the public of its intended funding priorities for discretionary grant programs, unless funding priorities are established by Federal statute.


§ 518.12 Forms for applying for Federal assistance.

(a) Federal awarding agencies shall comply with the applicable report clearance requirements of 5 CFR part 1320, “Controlling Paperwork Burdens on the Public,” with regard to all forms used by the Federal awarding agency in place of or as a supplement to the Standard Form 424 (SF-424) series.


(b) Applicants shall use the SF-424 series or those forms and instructions prescribed by the Federal awarding agency.


(c) For Federal programs covered by E.O. 12372, “Intergovernmental Review of Federal Programs,” the applicant shall complete the appropriate sections of the SF-424 (Application for Federal Assistance) indicating whether the application was subject to review by the State Single Point of Contact (SPOC). The name and address of the SPOC for a particular State can be obtained from the Federal awarding agency or the Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance. The SPOC shall advise the applicant whether the program for which application is made has been selected by that State for review.


(d) Federal awarding agencies that do not use the SF-424 form should indicate whether the application is subject to review by the State under E.O. 12372.


§ 518.13 Debarment and suspension.

Federal awarding agencies and recipients shall comply with the nonprocurement debarment and suspension rule, implementing E.O.’s 12549 and 12689, “Debarment and Suspension.” This rule restricts subawards and contracts with certain parties that are debarred, suspended or otherwise excluded from or ineligible for participation in Federal assistance programs or activities.


§ 518.14 Special award conditions.

(a) Federal awarding agencies may impose additional requirements as needed, if an applicant or recipient:


(1) Has a history of poor performance,


(2) Is not financially stable,


(3) Has a management system that does not meet the standards prescribed in this part,


(4) Has not conformed to the terms and conditions of a previous award, or


(5) Is not otherwise responsible.


(b) Additional requirements may only be imposed provided that such applicant or recipient is notified in writing as to:


(1) The nature of the additional requirements,


(2) The reason why the additional requirements are being imposed,


(3) The nature of the corrective action needed,


(4) The time allowed for completing the corrective actions, and


(5) The method for requesting reconsideration of the additional requirements imposed.


§ 518.15 Metric system of measurement.

The Metric Conversion Act, as amended by the Omnibus Trade and Competitiveness Act (15 U.S.C. 205), declares that the metric system is the preferred measurement system for U.S. trade and commerce. The Act requires each Federal agency to establish a date or dates in consultation with the Secretary of Commerce, when the metric system of measurement will be used in the agency’s procurements, grants, and other business-related activities. Metric implementation may take longer where the use of the system is initially impractical or likely to cause significant inefficiencies in the accomplishment of federally-funded activities. Federal awarding agencies shall follow the provisions of E.O. 12770, “Metric Usage in Federal Government Programs.”


§ 518.16 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.

Under the Act, any State agency or agency of a political subdivision of a State which is using appropriated Federal funds must comply with section 6002. Section 6002 requires that preference be given in procurement programs to the purchase of specific products containing recycled materials identified in guidelines developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR Parts 247-254). Accordingly, State and local institutions of higher education, hospitals, and non-profit organizations that receive direct Federal awards or other Federal funds shall give preference in their procurement programs funded with Federal funds to the purchase of recycled products pursuant to the EPA guidelines.


§ 518.17 Certification and representations.

Unless prohibited by statute or codified regulation, each Federal awarding agency is authorized and encouraged to allow recipients to submit certifications and representations required by statute, executive order, or regulation on an annual basis, if the recipients have ongoing and continuing relationships with the agency. Annual certifications and representations shall be signed by responsible officials with the authority to ensure recipients’ compliance with the pertinent requirements.


Subpart C – Post-Award Requirements

Financial and Program Management

§ 518.20 Purpose of financial and program management.

Sections 518.21 through 518.28 prescribe standards for financial management systems, methods for making payments and rules for: satisfying cost sharing and matching requirements, accounting for program income, budget revision approvals, making audits, determining allowability of cost, and establishing fund availability.


§ 518.21 Standards for financial management systems.

(a) Federal awarding agencies shall require recipients to relate financial data to performance data and develop unit cost information whenever practical.


(b) Recipients’ financial management systems shall provide for the following.


(1) Accurate, current and complete disclosure of the financial results of each federally-sponsored project or program in accordance with the reporting requirements set forth in § 19.52. If a Federal awarding agency requires reporting on an accrual basis from a recipient that maintains its records on other than an accrual basis, the recipient shall not be required to establish an accrual accounting system. These recipients may develop such accrual data for its reports on the basis of an analysis of the documentation on hand.


(2) Records that identify adequately the source and application of funds for federally-sponsored activities. These records shall contain information pertaining to Federal awards, authorizations, obligations, unobligated balances, assets, outlays, income and interest.


(3) Effective control over and accountability for all funds, property and other assets. Recipients shall adequately safeguard all such assets and assure they are used solely for authorized purposes.


(4) Comparison of outlays with budget amounts for each award. Whenever appropriate, financial information should be related to performance and unit cost data.


(5) Written procedures to minimize the time elapsing between the transfer of funds to the recipient from the U.S. Treasury and the issuance or redemption of checks, warrants or payments by other means for program purposes by the recipient. To the extent that the provisions of the Cash Management Improvement Act (CMIA) (Pub. L. 101-453) govern, payment methods of State agencies, instrumentalities, and fiscal agents shall be consistent with CMIA Treasury-State Agreements or the CMIA default procedures codified at 31 CFR part 205, “Withdrawal of Cash from the Treasury for Advances under Federal Grant and Other Programs.”


(6) Written procedures for determining the reasonableness, allocability and allowability of costs in accordance with the provisions of the applicable Federal cost principles and the terms and conditions of the award.


(7) Accounting records including cost accounting records that are supported by source documentation.


(c) Where the Federal Government guarantees or insures the repayment of money borrowed by the recipient, the Federal awarding agency, at its discretion, may require adequate bonding and insurance if the bonding and insurance requirements of the recipient are not deemed adequate to protect the interest of the Federal Government.


(d) The Federal awarding agency may require adequate fidelity bond coverage where the recipient lacks sufficient coverage to protect the Federal Government’s interest.


(e) Where bonds are required in the situations described above, the bonds shall be obtained from companies holding certificates of authority as acceptable sureties, as prescribed in 31 CFR part 223, “Surety Companies Doing Business with the United States.”


§ 518.22 Payment.

(a) Payment methods shall minimize the time elapsing between the transfer of funds from the United States Treasury and the issuance or redemption of checks, warrants, or payment by other means by the recipients. Payment methods of State agencies or instrumentalities shall be consistent with Treasury-State CMIA agreements or default procedures codified at 31 CFR part 205.


(b)(1) Recipients are to be paid in advance, provided they maintain or demonstrate the willingness to maintain:


(i) Written procedures that minimize the time elapsing between the transfer of funds and disbursement by the recipient, and


(ii) Financial management systems that meet the standards for fund control and accountability as established in section § 518.21.


(2) Cash advances to a recipient organization shall be limited to the minimum amounts needed and be timed to be in accordance with the actual, immediate cash requirements of the recipient organization in carrying out the purpose of the approved program or project. The timing and amount of cash advances shall be as close as is administratively feasible to the actual disbursements by the recipient organization for direct program or project costs and the proportionate share of any allowable indirect costs.


(c) Whenever possible, advances shall be consolidated to cover anticipated cash needs for all awards made by the Federal awarding agency to the recipient.


(1) Advance payment mechanisms include, but are not limited to, Treasury check and electronic funds transfer.


(2) Advance payment mechanisms are subject to 31 CFR part 205.


(3) Recipients shall be authorized to submit requests for advances and reimbursements at least monthly when electronic fund transfers are not used.


(d) Requests for Treasury check advance payment shall be submitted on SF-270, “Request for Advance or Reimbursement,” or other forms as may be authorized by OMB. This form is not to be used when Treasury check advance payments are made to the recipient automatically through the use of a predetermined payment schedule or if precluded by special Federal awarding agency instructions for electronic funds transfer.


(e) Reimbursement is the preferred method when the requirements in paragraph (b) cannot be met. Federal awarding agencies may also use this method on any construction agreement, or if the major portion of the construction project is accomplished through private market financing or Federal loans, and the Federal assistance constitutes a minor portion of the project.


(1) When the reimbursement method is used, the Federal awarding agency shall make payment within 30 days after receipt of the billing, unless the billing is improper.


(2) Recipients shall be authorized to submit request for reimbursement at least monthly when electronic funds are not used.


(f) If a recipient cannot meet the criteria for advance payments and the Federal awarding agency has determined that reimbursement is not feasible because the recipient lacks sufficient working capital, the Federal awarding agency may provide cash on a working capital advance basis. Under this procedure, the Federal awarding agency shall advance cash to the recipient to cover its estimated disbursement needs for an initial period generally geared to the awardee’s disbursing cycle. Thereafter, the Federal awarding agency shall reimburse the recipient for its actual cash disbursements. The working capital advance method of payment shall not be used for recipients unwilling or unable to provide timely advances to their subrecipient to meet the subrecipient’s actual cash disbursements.


(g) To the extent available, recipients shall disburse funds available from repayments to and interest earned on a revolving fund, program income, rebates, refunds, contract settlements, audit recoveries and interest earned on such funds before requesting additional cash payments.


(h) Unless otherwise required by statute, Federal awarding agencies shall not withhold payments for proper charges made by recipients at any time during the project period unless the conditions in paragraphs (h)(1) or (2) of this section apply.


(1) A recipient has failed to comply with the project objectives, the terms and conditions of the award, or Federal reporting requirements.


(2) The recipient or subrecipient is delinquent in a debt to the United States as defined in OMB Circular A-129, “Managing Federal Credit Programs.” Under such conditions, the Federal awarding agency may, upon reasonable notice, inform the recipient that payments shall not be made for obligations incurred after a specified date until the conditions are corrected or the indebtedness to the Federal Government is liquidated.


(i) Standards governing the use of banks and other institutions as depositories of funds advanced under awards are as follows:


(1) Except for situations described in paragraph (i)(2) of this section, Federal awarding agencies shall not require separate depository accounts for funds provided to a recipient or establish any eligibility requirements for depositories for funds provided to a recipient. However, recipients must be able to account for the receipt, obligation and expenditure of funds.


(2) Advances of Federal funds shall be deposited and maintained in insured accounts whenever possible.


(j) Consistent with the national goal of expanding the opportunities for women-owned and minority-owned business enterprises, recipients shall be encouraged to use women-owned and minority-owned banks (a bank which is owned at least 50 percent by women or minority group members).


(k) Recipients shall maintain advances of Federal funds in interest bearing accounts, unless the conditions in paragraphs (k)(1), (2) or (3) of this section apply.


(1) The recipient receives less than $120,000 in Federal awards per year.


(2) The best reasonably available interest bearing account would not be expected to earn interest in excess of $250 per year on Federal cash balances.


(3) The depository would require an average or minimum balance so high that it would not be feasible within the expected Federal and non-Federal cash resources.


(l) For those entities where CMIA and its implementing regulations do not apply, interest earned on Federal advances deposited in interest bearing accounts shall be remitted annually to Department of Health and Human Services, Payment Management System, P.O. Box 6021, Rockville, MD 20852. Interest amounts up to $250 per year may be retained by the recipient for administrative expense. In keeping with Electric Funds Transfer rules, (31 CFR part 206), interest should be remitted to the HHS Payment Management System through an electric medium such as the FEDWIRE Deposit system. Recipients which do not have this capability should use a check. State universities and hospitals shall comply with CMIA, as it pertains to interest. If an entity subject to CMIA uses its own funds to pay pre-award costs for discretionary awards without prior written approval from the Federal awarding agency, it waives its right to recover the interest under CMIA.


(m) Except as noted elsewhere in this part, only the following forms shall be authorized for the recipients in requesting advances and reimbursements. Federal agencies shall not require more than an original and two copies of these forms.


(1) SF-270, Request for Advance or Reimbursement. Each Federal awarding agency shall adopt the SF-270 as a standard form for all nonconstruction programs when electronic funds transfer or predetermined advance methods are not used. Federal awarding agencies, however, have the option of using this form for construction programs in lieu of the SF-271, “Outlay Report and Request for Reimbursement for Construction Programs.”


(2) SF-271, Outlay Report and Request for Reimbursement for Construction Programs. Each Federal awarding agency shall adopt the SF-271 as the standard form to be used for requesting reimbursement for construction programs. However, a Federal awarding agency may substitute the SF-270 when the Federal awarding agency determines that it provides adequate information to meet Federal needs.


§ 518.23 Cost sharing or matching.

(a) All contributions, including cash and third party in-kind, shall be accepted as part of the recipient’s cost sharing or matching when such contributions meet all of the following criteria.


(1) Are verifiable from the recipient’s records.


(2) Are not included as contributions for any other federally-assisted project or program.


(3) Are necessary and reasonable for proper and efficient accomplishment of project or program objectives.


(4) Are allowable under the applicable cost principles.


(5) Are not paid by the Federal Government under another award, except where authorized by Federal statute to be used for cost sharing or matching.


(6) Are provided for in the approved budget when required by the Federal awarding agency.


(7) Conform to other provisions of this part, as applicable.


(b) Unrecovered indirect costs may be included as part of cost sharing or matching only with the prior approval of the Federal awarding agency.


(c) Values for recipient contributions of services and property shall be established in accordance with the applicable cost principles. If a Federal awarding agency authorizes recipients to donate buildings or land for construction/facilities acquisition projects or long-term use, the value of the donated property for cost sharing or matching shall be the lesser of paragraph (c) (1) or (2) of this section.


(1) The certified value of the remaining life of the property recorded in the recipient’s accounting records at the time of donation.


(2) The current fair market value. However, when there is sufficient justification, the Federal awarding agency may approve the use of the current fair market value of the donated property, even if it exceeds the certified value at the time of donation to the project.


(d) Volunteer services furnished by professional and technical personnel, consultants, and other skilled and unskilled labor may be counted as cost sharing or matching if the service is an integral and necessary part of an approved project or program. Rates for volunteer services shall be consistent with those paid for similar work in the recipient’s organization. In those instances in which the required skills are not found in the recipient organization, rates shall be consistent with those paid for similar work in the labor market in which the recipient competes for the kind of services involved. In either case, paid fringe benefits that are reasonable, allowable, and allocable may be included in the valuation.


(e) When an employer other than the recipient furnishes the services of an employee, these services shall be valued at the employee’s regular rate of pay (plus an amount of fringe benefits that are reasonable, allowable, and allocable, but exclusive of overhead costs), provided these services are in the same skill for which the employee is normally paid.


(f) Donated supplies may include such items as expendable equipment, office supplies, laboratory supplies or workshop and classroom supplies. Value assessed to donated supplies included in the cost sharing or matching share shall be reasonable and shall not exceed the fair market value of the property at the time of the donation.


(g) The method used for determining cost sharing or matching for donated equipment, buildings and land for which title passes to the recipient may differ according to the purpose of the award, if the conditions in paragraphs (g)(1) or (2) of this section apply.


(1) If the purpose of the award is to assist the recipient in the acquisition of equipment, buildings or land, the total value of the donated property may be claimed as cost sharing or matching.


(2) If the purpose of the award is to support activities that require the use of equipment, buildings or land, normally only depreciation or use charges for equipment and buildings may be made. However, the full value of equipment or other capital assets and fair rental charges for land may be allowed, provided that the Federal awarding agency has approved the charges.


(h) The value of donated property shall be determined in accordance with the usual accounting policies of the recipient, with the following qualifications.


(1) The value of donated land and buildings shall not exceed its fair market value at the time of donation to the recipient as established by an independent appraiser (e.g., certified real property appraiser or General Services Administration representative) and certified by a responsible official of the recipient.


(2) The value of donated equipment shall not exceed the fair market value of equipment of the same age and condition at the time of donation.


(3) The value of donated space shall not exceed the fair rental value of comparable space as established by an independent appraisal of comparable space and facilities in a privately-owned building in the same locality.


(4) The value of loaned equipment shall not exceed its fair rental value.


(5) The following requirements pertain to the recipient’s supporting records for in-kind contributions from third parties.


(i) Volunteer services shall be documented and, to the extent feasible, supported by the same methods used by the recipient for its own employees.


(ii) The basis for determining the valuation for personal service, material, equipment, buildings and land shall be documented.


§ 518.24 Program income.

(a) Federal awarding agencies shall apply the standards set forth in this section in requiring recipient organizations to account for program income related to projects financed in whole or in part with Federal funds.


(b) Except as provided in paragraph (h) of this section, program income earned during the project period shall be retained by the recipient and, in accordance with Federal awarding agency regulations or the terms and conditions of the award, shall be used in one or more of the ways listed in the following.


(1) Added to funds committed to the project by the Federal awarding agency and recipient and used to further eligible project or program objectives.


(2) Used to finance the non-Federal share of the project or program.


(3) Deducted from the total project or program allowable cost in determining the net allowable costs on which the Federal share of costs is based.


(c) When an agency authorizes the disposition of program income as described in paragraphs (b)(1) or (b)(2) of this section, program income in excess of any limits stipulated shall be used in accordance with paragraph (b)(3) of this section.


(d) In the event that the Federal awarding agency does not specify in its regulations or the terms and conditions of the award how program income is to be used, paragraph (b)(3) of this section shall apply automatically to all projects or programs except research. For awards that support research, paragraph (b)(1) of this section shall apply automatically unless the awarding agency indicates in the terms and conditions another alternative on the award or the recipient is subject to special award conditions, as indicated in § 518.14.


(e) Unless Federal awarding agency regulations or the terms and conditions of the award provide otherwise, recipients shall have no obligation to the Federal Government regarding program income earned after the end of the project period.


(f) If authorized by Federal awarding agency regulations or the terms and conditions of the award, costs incident to the generation of program income may be deducted from gross income to determine program income, provided these costs have not been charged to the award.


(g) Proceeds from the sale of property shall be handled in accordance with the requirements of the Property Standards (See §§ 518.30 through 518.37).


(h) Unless Federal awarding agency regulations or the terms and condition of the award provide otherwise, recipients shall have no obligation to the Federal Government with respect to program income earned from license fees and royalties for copyrighted material, patents, patent applications, trademarks, and inventions produced under an award. However, Patent and Trademark Amendments (35 U.S.C. 18) apply to inventions made under an experimental, developmental, or research award.


§ 518.25 Revision of budget and program plans.

(a) The budget plan is the financial expression of the project or program as approved during the award process. It may include either the Federal and non-Federal share, or only the Federal share, depending upon Federal awarding agency requirements. It shall be related to performance for program evaluation purposes whenever appropriate.


(b) Recipients are required to report deviations from budget and program plans, and request prior approvals for budget and program plan revisions, in accordance with this section.


(c) For nonconstruction awards, recipients shall request prior approvals from Federal awarding agencies for one or more of the following program or budget related reasons.


(1) Change in the scope or the objective of the project or program (even if there is no associated budget revision requiring prior written approval).


(2) Change in a key person specified in the application or award document.


(3) The absence for more than three months, or a 25 percent reduction in time devoted to the project, by the approved project director or principal investigator.


(4) The need for additional Federal funding.


(5) The transfer of amounts budgeted for indirect costs to absorb increases in direct costs, or vice versa, if approval is required by the Federal awarding agency.


(6) The inclusion, unless waived by the Federal awarding agency, of costs that require prior approval in accordance with OMB Circular A-21, “Cost Principles for Institutions of Higher Education,” OMB Circular A-122, “Cost Principles for Non-Profit Organizations,” or 45 CFR part 74 Appendix E, “Principles for Determining Costs Applicable to Research and Development under Grants and Contracts with Hospitals,” or 48 CFR part 31, “Contract Cost Principles and Procedures,” as applicable.


(7) The transfer of funds allotted for training allowances (direct payment to trainees) to other categories of expense.


(8) Unless described in the application and funded in the approved awards, the subaward, transfer or contracting out of any work under an award. This provision does not apply to the purchase of supplies, material, equipment or general support services.


(d) No other prior approval requirements for specific items may be imposed unless a deviation has been approved by OMB.


(e) Except for requirements listed in paragraphs (c)(1) and (c)(4) of this section, Federal awarding agencies are authorized, at their option, to waive cost-related and administrative prior written approvals required by this part and OMB Circulars A-21 and A-122. Such waivers may include authorizing recipients to do any one or more of the following:


(1) Incur pre-award costs 90 calendar days prior to award or more than 90 calendar days with the prior approval of the Federal awarding agency. All pre-award costs are incurred at the recipient’s risk (i.e., the Federal awarding agency is under no obligation to reimburse such costs if for any reason the recipient does not receive an award or if the award is less than anticipated and inadequate to cover such costs).


(2) Initiate a one-time extension of the expiration date of the award of up to 12 months unless one or more of the following conditions apply. For one-time extensions, the recipient must notify the Federal awarding agency in writing with the supporting reasons and revised expiration date at least 10 days before the expiration date specified in the award. This one-time extension may not be exercised merely for the purpose of using unobligated balances.


(i) The terms and conditions of award prohibit the extension.


(ii) The extension requires additional Federal funds.


(iii) The extension involves any change in the approved objectives or scope of the project.


(3) Carry forward unobligated balances to subsequent funding periods.


(4) For awards that support research, unless the Federal awarding agency provides otherwise in the award or in the agency’s regulations, the prior approval requirements described in paragraph (e) of this section are automatically waived (i.e., recipients need not obtain such prior approvals) unless one of the conditions included in paragraph (e)(2) of this section applies.


(f) The Federal awarding agency may, at its option, restrict the transfer of funds among direct cost categories or programs, functions and activities for awards in which the Federal share of the project exceeds $100,000 and the cumulative amount of such transfers exceeds or is expected to exceed 10 percent of the total budget as last approved by the Federal awarding agency. No Federal awarding agency shall permit a transfer that would cause any Federal appropriation or part thereof to be used for purposes other than those consistent with the original intent of the appropriation.


(g) All other changes to nonconstruction budgets, except for the changes described in paragraph (j) of this section, do not require prior approval.


(h) For construction awards, recipients shall request prior written approval promptly from Federal awarding agencies for budget revisions whether the conditions in paragraphs (h) (1), (2) or (3) of this section apply.


(1) The revision results from changes in the scope or the objective of the project or program.


(2) The need arises for additional Federal funds to complete the project.


(3) A revision is desired which involves specific costs for which prior written approval requirements may be imposed consistent with applicable OMB cost principles listed in § 518.27


(i) No other prior approval requirements for specific items may be imposed unless a deviation has been approved by OMB.


(j) When a Federal awarding agency makes an award that provides support for both construction and nonconstruction work, the Federal awarding agency may require the recipient to request prior approval from the Federal awarding agency before making any fund or budget transfers between the two types of work supported.


(k) For both construction and nonconstruction awards, Federal awarding agencies shall require recipients to notify the Federal awarding agency in writing promptly whenever the amount of Federal authorized funds is expected to exceed the needs of the recipient for the project period by more than $5000 or five percent of the Federal award, whichever is greater. This notification shall not be required if an application for additional funding is submitted for a continuation award.


(l) When requesting approval for budget revisions, recipients shall use the budget forms that were used in the application unless the Federal awarding agency indicates a letter of request suffices.


(m) Within 30 calendar days from the date of receipt of the request for budget revisions, Federal awarding agencies shall review the request and notify the recipient whether the budget revisions have been approved. If the revision is still under consideration at the end of 30 calendar days, the Federal awarding agency shall inform the recipient in writing of the date when the recipient may expect the decision.


§ 518.26 Non-Federal audits.

(a) Recipients and subrecipients that are institutions of higher education or other non-profit organizations (including hospitals) shall be subject to the audit requirements contained in the Single Audit Act Amendments of 1996 (31 U.S.C. 7501-7507) and revised OMB Circular A-133, “Audits of States, Local Governments, and Non-Profit Organizations.”


(b) State and local governments shall be subject to the audit requirements contained in the Single Audit Act Amendments of 1996 (31 U.S.C. 7501-7507) and revised OMB Circular A-133, “Audits of States, Local Governments, and Non-Profit Organizations.”


(c) For-profit hospitals not covered by the audit provisions of revised OMB Circular A-133 shall be subject to the audit requirements of the Federal awarding agencies.


(d) Commercial organizations shall be subject to the audit requirements of the Federal awarding agency or the prime recipients as incorporated into the award document.


[59 FR 39440, Aug. 3, 1994, as amended at 62 FR 45939, 45941, Aug. 29, 1997]


§ 518.27 Allowable costs.

For each kind of recipient, there is a set of Federal principles for determining allowable costs. Allowability of costs shall be determined in accordance with the cost principles applicable to the entity incurring the costs. Thus, allowability of costs incurred by State, local or federally-recognized Indian tribal governments is determined in accordance with the provisions of OMB Circular A-87, “Cost Principles for State and Local Governments.” The allowability of costs incurred by non-profit organizations is determined in accordance with the provisions of OMB Circular A-122, “Cost Principles for Non-Profit Organizations.” The allowability of costs incurred by institutions of higher education is determined in accordance with the provisions of OMB Circular A-21, “Cost Principles for Educational Institutions.” The allowability of costs incurred by hospitals is determined in accordance with the provisions of Appendix E of 45 CFR part 74, “Principles for Determining Costs Applicable to Research and Development Under Grants and Contracts with Hospitals.” The allowability of costs incurred by commercial organizations and those non-profit organizations listed in Attachment C to Circular A-122 is determined in accordance with the provisions of the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) at 48 CFR part 31.


§ 518.28 Period of availability of funds.

Where a funding period is specified, a recipient may charge to the grant only allowable costs resulting from obligations incurred during the funding period and any pre-award costs authorized by the Federal awarding agency.


Property Standards

§ 518.30 Purpose of property standards.

(a) Sections 518.31 through 518.37 set forth uniform standards governing management and disposition of property furnished by the Federal Government whose cost was charged to a project supported by a Federal award. Federal awarding agencies shall require recipients to observe these standards under awards and shall not impose additional requirements, unless specifically required by Federal statute. The recipient may use its own property management standards and procedures provided it observes the provisions of §§ 518.31 through 518.37.


§ 518.31 Insurance coverage.

Recipients shall, at a minimum, provide the equivalent insurance coverage for real property and equipment acquired with Federal funds as provided to property owned by the recipient. Federally-owned property need not be insured unless required by the terms and conditions of the award.


§ 518.32 Real property.

Each Federal awarding agency shall prescribe requirements for recipients concerning the use and disposition of real property acquired in whole or in part under awards. Unless otherwise provided by statute, such requirements, at a minimum, shall contain the following.


(a) Title to real property shall vest in the recipient subject to the condition that the recipient shall use the real property for the authorized purpose of the project as long as it is needed and shall not encumber the property without approval of the Federal awarding agency.


(b) The recipient shall obtain written approval by the Federal awarding agency for the use of real property in other federally-sponsored projects when the recipient determines that the property is no longer needed for the purpose of the original project. Use in other projects shall be limited to those under federally-sponsored projects (i.e., awards) or programs that have purposes consistent with those authorized for support by the Federal awarding agencies.


(c) When the real property is no longer needed as provided in paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section, the recipient shall request disposition instructions from the Federal awarding agency or its successor Federal awarding agency. The Federal awarding agency shall observe one or more of the following disposition instructions.


(1) The recipient may be permitted to retain title without further obligation to the Federal Government after it compensates the Federal Government for that percentage of the current fair market value of the property attributable to the Federal participation in the project.


(2) The recipient may be directed to sell the property under guidelines provided by the Federal awarding agency and pay the Federal Government for that percentage of the current fair market value of the property attributable to the Federal participation in the project (after deducting actual and reasonable selling and fix-up expenses, if any, from the sales proceeds). When the recipient is authorized or required to sell the property, proper sales procedures shall be established that provide for competition to the extent practicable and result in the highest possible return.


(3) The recipient may be directed to transfer title to the property to the Federal Government or to an eligible third party provided that, in such cases, the recipient shall be entitled to compensation for its attributable percentage of the current fair market value of the property.


§ 518.33 Federally-owned and exempt property.

(a) Federally-owned property. (1) Title to federally-owned property remains vested in the Federal Government. Recipients shall submit annually an inventory listing of federally-owned property in their custody to the Federal awarding agency. Upon completion of the award or when the property is no longer needed, the recipient shall report the property to the Federal awarding agency for further Federal agency utilization.


(2) If the Federal awarding agency has no further need for the property, it shall be declared excess and reported to the General Services Administration, unless the Federal awarding agency has statutory authority to dispose of the property by alternative methods (e.g., the authority provided by the Federal Technology Transfer Act (15 U.S.C. 3710(I)) to donate research equipment to educational and non-profit organizations in accordance with E.O. 12821, “Improving Mathematics and Science Education in Support of the National Education Goals.”) Appropriate instructions shall be issued to the recipient by the Federal awarding agency.


(b) Exempt property. When statutory authority exists, the Federal awarding agency has the option to vest title to property acquired with Federal funds in the recipient without further obligation to the Federal Government and under conditions the Federal awarding agency considers appropriate. Such property is “exempt property.” Should a Federal awarding agency not establish conditions, title to exempt property upon acquisition shall vest in the recipient without further obligation to the Federal Government.


§ 518.34 Equipment.

(a) Title to equipment acquired by a recipient with Federal funds shall vest in the recipient, subject to conditions of this section.


(b) The recipient shall not use equipment acquired with Federal funds to provide services to non-Federal outside organizations for a fee that is less than private companies charge for equivalent services, unless specifically authorized by Federal statute, for as long as the Federal Government retains an interest in the equipment.


(c) The recipient shall use the equipment in the project or program for which it was acquired as long as needed, whether or not the project or program continues to be supported by Federal funds and shall not encumber the property without approval of the Federal awarding agency. When no longer needed for the original project or program, the recipient shall use the equipment in connection with its other federally-sponsored activities, in the following order or priority:


(1) Activities sponsored by the Federal awarding agency which funded the original project, then


(2) Activities sponsored by other Federal awarding agencies.


(d) During the time that equipment is used on the project or program for which it was acquired, the recipient shall make it available for use on other projects or programs if such other use will not interfere with the work on the project or program for which the equipment was originally acquired. First preference for such other use shall be given to other projects or programs sponsored by the Federal awarding agency that financed the equipment; second preference shall be given to projects or programs sponsored by other Federal awarding agencies. If the equipment is owned by the Federal Government, use on other activities not sponsored by the Federal Government shall be permissible if authorized by the Federal awarding agency. User charges shall be treated as program income.


(e) When acquiring replacement equipment, the recipient may use the equipment to be replaced as trade-in or sell the equipment and use the proceeds to offset the costs of the replacement equipment subject to the approval of the Federal awarding agency.


(f) The recipient’s property management standards for equipment acquired with Federal funds and federally-owned equipment shall include all of the following.


(1) Equipment records shall be maintained accurately and shall include the following information.


(i) A description of the equipment.


(ii) Manufacturer’s serial number, model number, Federal stock number, national stock number, or other identification number.


(iii) Source of the equipment, including the award number.


(iv) Whether title vests in the recipient or the Federal Government.


(v) Acquisition date (or date received, if the equipment was furnished by the Federal Government) and cost.


(vi) Information from which one can calculate the percentage of Federal participation in the cost of the equipment (not applicable to equipment furnished by the Federal Government).


(vii) Location and condition of the equipment and the date the information was reported.


(viii) Unit acquisition cost.


(ix) Ultimate disposition data, including date of disposal and sales price or the method used to determine current fair market value where a recipient compensates the Federal awarding agency for its share.


(2) Equipment owned by the Federal Government shall be identified to indicate Federal ownership.


(3) A physical inventory of equipment shall be taken and the results reconciled with the equipment records at least once every two years. Any differences between quantities determined by the physical inspection and those shown in the accounting records shall be investigated to determine the causes of the difference. The recipient shall, in connection with the inventory, verify the existence, current utilization, and continued need for the equipment.


(4) A control system shall be in effect to insure adequate safeguards to prevent loss, damage, or theft of the equipment. Any loss, damage, or theft of equipment shall be investigated and fully documented; if the equipment was owned by the Federal Government, the recipient shall promptly notify the Federal awarding agency.


(5) Adequate maintenance procedures shall be implemented to keep the equipment in good condition.


(6) Where the recipient is authorized or required to sell the equipment, proper sales procedures shall be established which provide for competition to the extent practicable and result in the highest possible return.


(g) When the recipient no longer needs the equipment, the equipment may be used for other activities in accordance with the following standards. For equipment with a current per unit fair market value of $5,000 or more, the recipient may retain the equipment for other uses provided that compensation is made to the original Federal awarding agency or its successor. The amount of compensation shall be computed by applying the percentage of Federal participation in the cost of the original project or program to the current fair market value of the equipment. If the recipient has no need for the equipment, the recipient shall request disposition instructions from the Federal awarding agency. The Federal awarding agency shall determine whether the equipment can be used to meet the agency’s requirements. If no requirement exists within that agency, the availability of the equipment shall be reported to the General Services Administration by the Federal awarding agency to determine whether a requirement for the equipment exists in other Federal agencies. The Federal awarding agency shall issue instructions to the recipient no later than 120 calendar days after the recipient’s request and the following procedures shall govern.


(1) If so instructed or if disposition instructions are not issued within 120 calendar days after the recipient’s request, the recipient shall sell the equipment and reimburse the Federal awarding agency an amount computed by applying to the sales proceeds the percentage of Federal participation in the cost of the original project or program. However, the recipient shall be permitted to deduct and retain from the Federal share $500 or ten percent of the proceeds, whichever is less, for the recipient’s selling and handling expenses.


(2) If the recipient is instructed to ship the equipment elsewhere, the recipient shall be reimbursed by the Federal Government by an amount which is computed by applying the percentage of the recipient’s participation in the cost of the original project or program to the current fair market value of the equipment, plus any reasonable shipping or interim storage costs incurred.


(3) If the recipient is instructed to otherwise dispose of the equipment, the recipient shall be reimbursed by the Federal awarding agency for such costs incurred in its disposition.


(4) The Federal awarding agency may reserve the right to transfer the title to the Federal Government or to a third party named by the Federal Government when such third party is otherwise eligible under existing statutes. Such transfer shall be subject to the following standards.


(i) The equipment shall be appropriately identified in the award or otherwise made known to the recipient in writing.


(ii) The Federal awarding agency shall issue disposition instructions within 120 calendar days after receipt of a final inventory. The final inventory shall list all equipment acquired with grant funds and federally-owned equipment. If the Federal awarding agency fails to issue disposition instructions within the 120 calendar day period, the recipient shall apply the standards of this section, as appropriate.


(iii) When the Federal awarding agency exercises its right to take title, the equipment shall be subject to the provisions for federally-owned equipment.


§ 518.35 Supplies and other expendable property.

(a) Title to supplies and other expendable property shall vest in the recipient upon acquisition. If there is a residual inventory of unused supplies exceeding $5000 in total aggregate value upon termination or completion of the project or program and the supplies are not needed for any other federally-sponsored project or program, the recipient shall retain the supplies for use on non-Federal sponsored activities or sell them, but shall, in either cases, compensate the Federal Government for its share. The amount of compensation shall be computed in the same manner as for equipment.


(b) The recipient shall not use supplies acquired with Federal funds to provide services to non-Federal outside organizations for a fee that is less than private companies charge for equivalent services, unless specifically authorized by Federal statute as long as the Federal Government retains an interest in the supplies.


§ 518.36 Intangible property.

(a) The recipient may copyright any work that is subject to copyright and was developed, or for which ownership was purchased, under an award. The Federal awarding agency(ies) reserve a royalty-free, nonexclusive and irrevocable right to reproduce, publish, or otherwise use the work for Federal purposes, and to authorize others to do so.


(b) Recipients are subject to applicable regulations governing patents and inventions, including government-wide regulations issued by the Department of Commerce at 37 CFR part 401, “Rights to Inventions Made by Nonprofit Organizations and Small Business Firms Under Government Grants, Contracts and Cooperative Agreements.”


(c) Unless waived by the Federal awarding agency, the Federal Government has the right to the following:


(1) Obtain, reproduce, publish or otherwise use the data first produced under an award.


(2) Authorize others to receive, reproduce, publish, or otherwise use such data for Federal purposes.


(d) Title to intangible property and debt instruments acquired under an award or subaward vests upon acquisition in the recipient. The recipient shall use that property for the originally-authorized purpose, and the recipient shall not encumber the property without approval of the Federal awarding agency. When no longer needed for the originally authorized purpose, disposition of the intangible property shall occur in accordance with the provisions of paragraph § 19.34(g).


§ 518.37 Property trust relationship.

Real property, equipment, intangible property and debt instruments that are acquired or improved with Federal funds shall be held in trust by the recipient as trustee for the beneficiaries of the project or program under which the property was acquired or improved. Agencies may require recipients to record liens or other appropriate notices of record to indicate that personal or real property has been acquired or improved with Federal funds and that use and disposition conditions apply to the property.


Procurement Standards

§ 518.40 Purpose of procurement standards.

Sections 518.41 through 518.48 set forth standards for use by recipients in establishing procedures for the procurement of supplies and other expendable property, equipment, real property and other services with Federal funds. These standards are furnished to ensure that such materials and services are obtained in an effective manner and in compliance with the provisions of applicable Federal statutes and executive orders. No additional procurement standards or requirements shall be imposed by the Federal awarding agencies upon recipients, unless specifically required by Federal statute or executive order or approved by OMB.


§ 518.41 Recipient responsibilities.

The standards contained in this section do not relieve the recipient of the contractual responsibilities arising under its contract(s). The recipient is the responsible authority, without recourse to the Federal awarding agency, regarding the settlement and satisfaction of all contractual and administrative issues arising out of procurements entered into in support of an award or other agreement. This includes disputes, claims, protests of award, source evaluation or other matters of a contractual nature. Matters concerning violation of statute are to be referred to such Federal, State or local authority as may have proper jurisdiction.


§ 518.42 Codes of conduct.

The recipient shall maintain written standards of conduct governing the performance of its employees engaged in the award and administration of contracts. No employee, officer, or agent shall participate in the selection, award, or administration of a contract supported by Federal funds if a real or apparent conflict of interest would be involved. Such a conflict would arise when the employee, officer, or agent, any member of his or her immediate family, his or her partner, or an organization which employs or is about to employ any of the parties indicated herein, has a financial or other interest in the firm selected for an award. The officers, employees, and agents of the recipient shall neither solicit nor accept gratuities, favors, or anything of monetary value from contractors, or parties to subagreements. However, recipients may set standards for situations in which the financial interest is not substantial or the gift is an unsolicited item of nominal value. The standards of conduct shall provide for disciplinary actions to be applied for violations of such standards by officers, employees, or agents of the recipient.


§ 518.43 Competition.

All procurement transactions shall be conducted in a manner to provide, to the maximum extent practical, open and free competition. The recipient shall be alert to organizational conflicts of interest as well as noncompetitive practices among contractors that may restrict or eliminate competition or otherwise restrain trade. In order to ensure objective contractor performance and eliminate unfair competitive advantage, contractors that develop or draft specifications, requirements, statements of work, invitations for bids and/or requests for proposals shall be excluded from competing for such procurements. Awards shall be made to the bidder or offeror whose bid or offer is responsive to the solicitation and is most advantageous to the recipient, price, quality and other factors considered. Solicitations shall clearly set forth all requirements that the bidder or offeror shall fulfill in order for the bid or offer to be evaluated by the recipient. Any and all bids or offers may be rejected when it is in the recipient’s interest to do so.


§ 518.44 Procurement procedures.

(a) All recipients shall establish written procurement procedures. These procedures shall provide for, at a minimum, that the conditions in paragraphs (a)(1), (2) and (3) of this section apply.


(1) Recipients avoid purchasing unnecessary items.


(2) Where appropriate, an analysis is made of lease and purchase alternatives to determine which would be the most economical and practical procurement for the Federal Government.


(3) Solicitations for goods and services provide for all of the following:


(i) A clear and accurate description of the technical requirements for the material, product or service to be procured. In competitive procurements, such a description shall not contain features which unduly restrict competition.


(ii) Requirements which the bidder/offeror must fulfill and all other factors to be used in evaluating bids or proposals.


(iii) A description, whenever practicable, of technical requirements in terms or functions to be performed or performance required, including the range of acceptable characteristics or minimum acceptable standards.


(iv) The specific features of “brand name or equal” descriptions that bidders are required to meet when such items are included in the solicitation.


(v) The acceptance, to the extent practicable and economically feasible, of products and services dimensioned in the metric system of measurement.


(vi) Preference, to the extent practicable and economically feasible, for products and services that conserve natural resources and protect the environment and are energy efficient.


(b) Positive efforts shall be made by recipient to utilize small businesses, minority-owned firms, and women’s business enterprises, whenever possible. Recipients of Federal awards shall take all of the following steps to further this goal.


(1) Ensure that small businesses, minority-owned firms, and women’s business enterprises are used to the fullest extent practicable.


(2) Make information on forthcoming opportunities available and arrange timeframes for purchases and contracts to encourage and facilitate participation by small businesses, minority-owned firms, and women’s business enterprises.


(3) Consider in the contract process whether firms competing for larger contracts intend to subcontract with small businesses, minority-owned firms, and women’s business enterprises.


(4) Encourage contracting with consortiums of small businesses, minority-owned firms and women’s business enterprises when a contract is too large for one of these firms to handle individually.


(5) Use of services and assistance, as appropriate, of such organizations as the Small Business Administration and the Department of Commerce’s Minority Business Development Agency in the solicitation and utilization of small businesses, minority-owned firms, and women’s business enterprises.


(c) The type of procuring instruments used (e.g., fixed price contracts, cost reimbursable contracts, purchase orders, and incentive contracts) shall be determined by the recipient but shall be appropriate for the particular procurement and for promoting the best interest of the program or project involved. The “cost-plus-a-percentage-of-cost” or “percentage of construction cost” methods of contracting shall not be used.


(d) Contracts shall be made only with responsible contractors who possess the potential ability to perform successfully under the terms and conditions of the proposed procurement. Consideration shall be given to such matters as contractor integrity, record of past performance, financial and technical resources or accessibility to other necessary resources. In certain circumstances, contracts with certain parties are restricted by the implementation of E.O.’s 12549 and 12689, “Debarment and Suspension.”


(e) Recipients shall, on request, make available for the Federal awarding agency, pre-award review and procurement documents, such as request for proposals or invitations for bids, independent cost estimates, etc., when any of the following conditions apply.


(1) A recipient’s procurement procedures or operation fails to comply with the procurement standards in this part.


(2) The procurement is expected to exceed the small purchase threshold fixed at 41 U.S.C. 403 (11) (currently $25,000) and is to be awarded without competition or only one bid or offer is received in response to a solicitation.


(3) The procurement, which is expected to exceed the small purchase threshold, specifies a “brand name” product.


(4) The proposed award over the small purchase threshold is to be awarded to other than the apparent low bidder under a sealed bid procurement.


(5) A proposed contract modification changes the scope of a contract or increases the contract amount by more than the amount of the small purchase threshold.


§ 518.45 Cost and price analysis.

Some form of cost or price analysis shall be made and documented in the procurement files in connection with every procurement action. Price analysis may be accomplished in various ways, including the comparison of price quotations submitted, market prices and similar indicia, together with discounts. Cost analysis is the review and evaluation of each element of cost to determine reasonableness, allocability and allowability.


§ 518.46 Procurement records.

Procurement records and files for purchases in excess of the small purchase threshold shall include the following at a minimum:


(a) Basis for contractor selection,


(b) Justification for lack of competition when competitive bids or offers are not obtained, and


(c) Basis for award cost or price.


§ 518.47 Contract administration.

A system for contract administration shall be maintained to ensure contractor conformance with the terms, conditions and specifications of the contract and to ensure adequate and timely follow up of all purchases. Recipients shall evaluate contractor performance and document, as appropriate, whether contractors have met the terms, conditions, and specifications of the contract.


§ 518.48 Contract provisions.

The recipient shall include, in addition to provisions to define a sound and complete agreement, the following provisions in all contracts. The following provisions shall also be applied to subcontracts.


(a) Contracts in excess of the small purchase threshold shall contain contractual provisions or conditions that allow for administrative, contractual, or legal remedies in instances in which a contractor violates or breaches the contract terms, and provide for such remedial actions as may be appropriate.


(b) All contracts in excess of the small purchase threshold shall contain suitable provisions for termination by the recipient, including the manner by which termination shall be effected and the basis for settlement. In addition, such contracts shall describe conditions under which the contract may be terminated for default as well as conditions where the contract may be terminated because of circumstances beyond the control of the contractor.


(c) Except as otherwise required by statute, an award that requires the contracting (or subcontracting) for construction or facility improvements shall provide for the recipient to follow its own requirements relating to bid guarantees, performance bonds, and payment bonds unless the construction contract or subcontract exceeds $100,000. For those contracts or subcontracts exceeding $100,000, the Federal awarding agency may accept the bonding policy and requirements of the recipient, provided the Federal awarding agency has made a determination that the Federal Government’s interest is adequately protected. If such a determination has not been made, the minimum requirements shall be as follows.


(1) A bid guarantee from each bidder equivalent to five percent of the bid price. The “bid guarantee” shall consist of a firm commitment such as a bid bond, certified check, or other negotiable instrument accompanying a bid as assurance that the bidder shall, upon acceptance of his bid, execute such contractual documents as may be required within the time specified.


(2) A performance bond on the part of the contractor for 100 percent of the contract price. A “performance bond” is one executed in connection with a contract to secure fulfillment of all the contractor’s obligations under such contract.


(3) A payment bond on the part of the contractor for 100 percent of the contract price. A “payment bond” is one executed in connection with a contract to assure payment as required by statute of all persons supplying labor and material in the execution of the work provided for in the contract.


(4) Where bonds are required in the situations described herein, the bonds shall be obtained from companies holding certificates of authority as acceptable sureties pursuant to 31 CFR part 223, “Surety Companies Doing Business with the United States.”


(d) All negotiated contracts (except those for less than the small purchase threshold) awarded by recipients shall include a provision to the effect that the recipient, the Federal awarding agency, the Comptroller General of the United States, or any of their duly authorized representatives, shall have access to any books, documents, papers and records of the contractor which are directly pertinent to a specific program for the purpose of making audits, examinations, excerpts and transcriptions.


(e) All contracts, including small purchases, awarded by recipients and their contractors shall contain the procurement provisions of Appendix A to this part, as applicable.


Reports and Records

§ 518.50 Purpose of reports and records.

Sections 518.51 through 518.53 set forth the procedures for monitoring and reporting on the recipient’s financial and program performance and the necessary standard reporting forms. They also set forth record retention requirements.


§ 518.51 Monitoring and reporting program performance.

(a) Recipients are responsible for managing and monitoring each project, program, subaward, function or activity supported by the award. Recipients shall monitor subawards to ensure subrecipients have met the audit requirements as delineated in § 518.26.


(b) The Federal awarding agency shall prescribe the frequency with which the performance reports shall be submitted. Except as provided in § 518.51(f), performance reports shall not be required more frequently than quarterly or, less frequently than annually. Annual reports shall be due 90 calendar days after the grant year; quarterly or semi-annual reports shall be due 30 days after the reporting period. The Federal awarding agency may require annual reports before the anniversary dates of multiple year awards in lieu of these requirements. The final performance reports are due