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Title 32 – National Defense–Volume 5

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Title 32 – National Defense–Volume 5



SUBTITLE A – Department of Defense (Continued)

Part


chapter vi – Department of the Navy

700


Subtitle A – Department of Defense (Continued)

CHAPTER VI – DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY

SUBCHAPTER A – UNITED STATES NAVY REGULATIONS AND OFFICIAL RECORDS

PART 701 – AVAILABILITY OF DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY RECORDS AND PUBLICATION OF DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY DOCUMENTS AFFECTING THE PUBLIC [RESERVED]

PART 705 – PUBLIC AFFAIRS REGULATIONS


Authority:5 U.S.C. 301; 10 U.S.C. 5031.


Source:41 FR 29101, July 15, 1976, unless otherwise noted.

§ 705.1 Purpose.

The regulations and rules in this part prescribe policies and procedures for the Department of the Navy pertaining to public affairs practices.


§ 705.2 Chief of Information and the Office of Information (CHINFO).

(a) The Chief of Information is the direct representative of the Secretary of the Navy and of the Chief of Naval Operations in all public affairs and internal relations matters. As such, the Chief of Information has the authority to implement public affairs and internal relations policies and to coordinate Navy and Marine Corps public affairs and internal relations activities of mutual interest.


(b) The Chief of Information will keep Navy commands informed of Department of Defense policies and requirements. No command within the Department of the Navy, except Headquarters, Marine Corps, will deal directly with the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Public Affairs) on public affairs matters unless authorized to do so by the Chief of Information.


(c) The Chief of Information will be consulted on all Navy public affairs and internal relations matters and informed of all operations and proposed plans and policies which have national or international (and in the case of audio-visual material, regional) public affairs aspects.


(d) The Chief of Information heads the Navy Office of Information, the Navy Internal Relations Activity (NIRA), the Office of Information Branch Offices (NAVINFOs), the Navy Public Affairs Center (NAVPACENs) and the Fleet Home Town News Center (FHTNC). In addition, the Chief of Information has responsibility (on behalf of the Secretary of the Navy as Executive Agent for the Department of Defense) for the High School News Service and has operational control of the U.S. Navy Band, Washington, DC.


(e) The Navy Office of Information Branch Offices (NAVINFOs) are located in Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, Dallas, Los Angeles, and New York. As representatives of the Secretary of the Navy, Chief of Naval Operations, and Chief of Information, the NAVINFOs have a primary mission of providing direct liaison with local and regional mass communications media.


(1) The function of the NAVINFOs are as follows:


(i) Establish and maintain close personal relationships with local television, radio, film, publishing, and other mass-media organizations including minority-group-oriented media.


(ii) Seek ways through these media to inform the public about naval personnel and activities.


(iii) Provide assistance to media organizations and respond to their interest in Navy programs, stories, and features. In this regard, maintain informal liaison with various information offices afloat and ashore in order to respond to requests from local media representatives, particularly those from inland areas, who desire to visit fleet units or activities ashore.


(iv) Provide advice on Navy cooperation and assistance, as appropriate, to representatives of national industrial and commercial organizations, including advertising agencies.


(v) Maintain a library of Navy motion picture films for use by local television stations, distribute news films and audio material, and otherwise perform normal audio-visual functions at the local level.


(vi) Provide personnel and other assistance as appropriate, to special Command Information Bureaus and public information staffs of other naval activities as directed by the Chief of Information.


(vii) Advise the Chief of Information on current trends and significant problems relating to local media requirements.


(viii) Seek ways to support the long-range goals and immediate priorities of the Navy.


(ix) Provide advice and assistance in the placement of news and feature materials to the field activities of the Navy Recruiting Command.


(x) Perform such other tasks as may be assigned by the Chief of Information.


(2) Additionally, NAVINFO Los Angeles is the Navy representative for all appropriate liaison with motion picture and network television offices in the Hollywood area. Naval activities will channel all requests for information or assistance from these media to NAVINFO Los Angeles, which will coordinate with CHINFO.


(3) Additionally, NAVINFO New York is the Navy representative for all appropriate liaison with television and radio networks in the New York area and with magazine and book publishers in that area. Requests for assistance originating from these media should be directed to NAVINFO New York, which will coordinate with CHINFO.


(4) Except as specifically directed by CHINFO, the Branch Offices do not have responsibility or authority for community relations or internal relations.


(5) Direct liaison between NAVINFOs and Naval District public affairs offices, Navy recruiters and other naval activities afloat and ashore is encouraged.


(f) Areas covered by the respective offices are:


(1) NAVINFO Atlanta: Alabama, the District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Maryland, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, and Southern West Virginia.


(2) NAVINFO Boston: Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont.


(3) NAVINFO Chicago: Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, Wisconsin, and Northern West Virginia.


(4) NAVINFO Dallas: Arkansas, Colorado, Kansas, Louisiana, Missouri, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas.


(5) NAVINFO Los Angeles: Arizona, California, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming.


(6) NAVINFO New York: Connecticut, Delaware, New Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania.


(g) The Navy Public Affairs Centers (NAVPACENs) are located in Norfolk and San Diego. The centers have a primary mission of producing Navy stories for dissemination to the media through normal information channels.


(1) The following tasks are included among the functions of the NAVPACENs.


(i) Produce written, audio and photographic feature public information material about fleet and shore personnel, units and activities, as coordinated with and approved for policy and concept by the respective fleet and shore commander concerned.


(ii) Serve as public affairs emergency reaction teams/resource personnel responsive to the requirements of the CNO and CHINFO, and when feasible and appropriate and as approved by CNO or CHINFO, serve as public affairs emergency reaction teams/resource personnel in support of Fleet Commanders.


(iii) Develop feature material to support the long range goals and the immediate priorities of the Navy. Direct liaison is authorized with the Navy Recruiting Command, Recruiting Areas, Recruiting Districts, and other Commanders as appropriate to achieve this function.


(iv) Perform such other tasks as may be assigned by the Chief of Information.


(2) NAVPACENs will have no public affairs news media responsibilities which conflict with the basic public affairs responsibilities of Fleet Commanders-in-Chief. Specifically, NAVPACENs are excluded from responding to news media queries, releasing news information, arranging news media embarkations, or any other day-to-day news media services concerning the respective fleets. These responsibilities remain with the Fleet Commander.


(3) NAVPACENs have no direct responsibility or authority for community relations or internal relations and shall defer in these areas to the cognizant Naval District Commandant.


(4) Direct liaison with Fleet Commanders-in-Chief and NAVINFOs is appropriate and authorized. As approved by the Fleet CINCs, direct liaison with forces afloat and shore activities under the Fleet CINCs is appropriate.


(5) NAVPACENs will carry out their mission and functions in such a manner as not to interfere with the public affairs responsibilities of the District Commandants.


[44 FR 6389, Feb. 1, 1979]


§ 705.3 [Reserved]

§ 705.4 Communication directly with private organizations and individuals.

(a) Questions from the public and requests from groups or individuals for pamphlets, photos, biographies, historical matter, etc., must be promptly answered. (32 CFR part 701, subparts A-D refers.)


(b) Assistance within the command’s capabilities should (and in some cases, must) be given. Where an established channel for obtaining the item exists, such as a publication stocked by the Superintendent of Documents (Government Printing Office), or photos, as explained in the subparagraph below, the requester may be directed to it. Under some circumstances, a charge may be made. (Consult part 701 or the command’s Freedom of Information authority for details.) If a lengthy search, beyond the convenient manpower resources of the command, would be required, the requester may be offered the opportunity of examining the material at the command instead of copies being made.


(c) If a request is refused, the reason must be fully and courteously explained, as required by part 701 of this chapter.


(d) Copies of released U.S. Navy photos may be purchased by the general public.


(1) Photos made within the last 10 years may be purchased from the Naval Photographic Center. Information on the conditions of sale can be obtained by writing to the Commanding Officer, Naval Photographic Center, Naval Station, Washington, DC 20390.


(2) Photos made more than 10 years prior to the current date may be purchased from the National Archives. Details are available from: Audio-Visual Branch National Archives and Records Service, General Services Administration, Washington, DC 20408.


[41 FR 29101, July 15, 1976, as amended at 44 FR 6390, Feb. 1, 1979]


§ 705.5 Taking of photos on board naval ships, aircraft and installations by members of the general public.

(a) Visitors will not be allowed to take photographic equipment on board a naval ship or aircraft or into a naval activity or to take photographs within a naval jurisdiction unless specially authorized by the officer in command or higher authority.


(b) Guests of the Navy who wish to take photos within naval jurisdictions will be advised of areas where photography is permitted. An escort will be assigned to assure that security is maintained, unless photography is permitted throughout the ship, aircraft or installation, or the areas in which it is not permitted are appropriately guarded or secured.


(c) If there is reason to believe that film exposed by a visitor or media photographer contains classified information, the film will be processed under Navy jurisdiction.


(1) Classified photos, if any, will be retained. All unclassified film will be returned to the owner.


(2) When film exposed by civilian visitors or media representatives in sensitive areas is beyond the capability of the local command to process, it may be forwarded to the Commanding Officer, Naval Photographic Center, for processing. Any special processing instructions should be sent with the film.


§ 705.6 Releasing public information material to the media.

(a) Methods of releasing information:


(1) Release at the seat of government and/or as approved by the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Public Affairs).


(i) Overall responsibility for release of information rests with the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Public Affairs). The Chief of Information is responsible for coordinating with him releases of national and international interest (and in the case of audiovisual material of regional interest) and for arranging for local release of such material if considered appropriate by OASD(PA). Information of the above types and also information proposed for release at the seat of government, with the exception of “spot news,” as described in paragraph (b) of this section, following.


(2) Releases by local commands:


(i) News of purely local interest may be released by the command concerned. Higher and coordinating authorities (such as the District Commandant) will be informed, when appropriate, that the release has been made.


(ii) News of national or other wide interest may be released by a local command under the following circumstances:


(A) The Assistant Secretary of Defense (Public Affairs), having approved a release, directs that it be issued by the command concerned.


(B) An event of immediate and urgent news interest, such as a disasterous accident, occurs at the command, and emergency announcements must be made as delay in issuing information would be against the best interests of the Navy. The officer in command will make a “spot news” release of all appropriate information considered releasable.


(1) Copies of spot news releases made (or a description if the announcement is made orally) will be forwarded promptly to the Chief of Information.


(2) If the situation is considered critical, the spot news release will be forwarded by telephone or message.


(b) Means through which information is released to media:


(1) Navy oriented information material (written, taped, motion picture, still photo) is regularly released to all media presumed to be interested.


(2) Similar material is provided in response to query from a news media representative. The material may be produced by the Navy, or the newsman may be assisted in researching, filming, etc. himself.


(3) Exclusive releases:


(i) Information concerning naval activities may be provided on an exclusive basis only when a specific request or inquiry is received from one news media representative for material not requested by other media.


(ii) In such cases, and assuming that the information is properly releasable, the following rules will apply:


(A) If prior to the time information is given to the newsman making the original inquiry or request substantially similar inquiries or requests are received from other newsmen, the first inquirer will be so informed, and subsequent inquirers will be advised that a prior request has been received. None of the inquirers will be told the identity of the individuals or media who have placed these similar inquiries.


(B) If not more than three similar requests are received, the information will be provided simultaneously to each inquirer.


(C) If more than three requests for substantially the same information have been received before any are answered, inquirers will be advised as soon as possible that the information cannot be given on an exclusive or limited basis, and a general release covering the subject will be issued to all media.


(4) News conferences:


(i) A news conference is held when a command has something specific to announce to the press that cannot be handled in a news release or by phone call. A news conference should not be called just to get together with the press. A request from the press is also a reason for conducting a news conference. Special events, significant operations or serious accidents are frequent reasons for calling news conferences. If requested, spokesmen may be made available to the press for questions without specific subject matter in mind, but the press should be clearly informed of the nature of this meeting. Technically, this is not considered a news conference.


(ii) When a news conference is held, it is essential that all interested media be invited to attend.


(iii) A record of what is said should be kept. Ideally, the news conference should be tape recorded and a public affairs officer should be present.


(iv) Official spokesmen will be prepared to answer questions in a frank and candid manner. If the answer would compromise military security, the inquirer should be so advised. If the answer is not known to the spokesman, he should say so and add that the matter will be checked and any available unclassified information provided later.


(v) Newsmen are not normally asked to submit their questions in advance. If this is considered advisable, as in cases where highly technical answers may be required, the answers are prepared in advance and given to all attending newsmen (not just the questioner) at the news conference.


(5) Interviews. These are similar to news conferences except that they involve a single newsman (who has usually requested the interview) and a single Navy spokesman.


(i) Required procedures are essentially the same as for news conferences. However, a public affairs officer should be present only if desired by the person being interviewed. The interview may be taped, if the newsman agrees.


(ii) Without penalizing initiative displayed by a newsman in asking pertinent questions, care should be exercised by the naval spokesman not to make a major revelation of news material to a single media outlet in the course of a routine interview.


(iii) If major areas of difficulty arise in the interview, the Chief of Information should be notified of them.


(6) Background briefings; “Not for attribution”; or “Off the record.”


(i) Since there is a possibility or risk of a misunderstanding arising in these briefings, it is important that all concerned understand and agree to the ground rules.


(ii) In general, information will not be made public unless it can be openly attributed to the Navy and disseminated without reservation. Occasionally, a backgrounder may be helpful. An example is a briefing of embarked newsmen in advance of an operation, providing information which may not be reported until the operation is over. The purpose is to help the newsmen understand the operation while it is taking place.


§ 705.7 Radio and television.

(a) Navy relationships with radio and TV representatives are of two types:


(1) Dissemination to them of Navy produced tapes, photos, films, etc. (This is discussed in more detail in § 705.17).


(2) Cooperation with them when they produce a program on a Navy subject. This is discussed in the paragraph following:


(b) Requirement for approval by higher authority.


(1) Commanding officers may:


(i) Release audiovisual material which is spot news, as defined in § 705.6(a)(2)(ii) preceding, or is of purely local interest.


(ii) Participate in local community audiovisual projects of benefit to the Department of Defense or in the national interest.


(iii) Approve one-time, one-station participation by personnel of their commands (as individuals) in programs of purely local interest.


(2) All other audiovisual material originated by the Department of the Navy or requiring Navy cooperation must be approved by the Chief of Information, who will effect the necessary coordination and/or approval of the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Public Affairs).


(i) Requests for assistance from non-governmental audiovisual media will be forwarded, with the maximum available details and an evaluation of the request, through the chain of command to the Chief of Information.


(ii) No direct coordination or contact between local naval commands and the Assistant Secretary of Defense (PA) is authorized unless specifically provided for by separate directives or correspondence.


(c) Navy cooperation in productions by audiovisual media representatives (nongovernment).


(1) The production or project must:


(i) Be consistent with the goals and aims of the Department of Defense and/or be in the national interest.


(ii) Portray military operation, historical incidents, persons and places, in such a manner as to give a true portrayal and interpretation of military life.


(iii) Comply with accepted standards of dignity and propriety in the industry.


(2) There will be no deviation from established safety standards.


(3) Operational readiness shall not be impaired.


(4) Official activities of military personnel assisting the production must be within the scope of normal military activities. Exceptions to this policy will be made only in unusual circumstances.


(5) Diversion of ships, equipment, personnel and material resources from normal military locations or military operations will not normally be authorized for filming. Exceptions to such policy must be authorized by the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Public Affairs), through the Chief of Information.


(i) The production company concerned must reimburse the government for any extra expense involved. A strict accounting of the additional expenses incurred and charged to the production company must be maintained by the designated project officer. A copy of this accounting will be forwarded to the Chief of Information.


(ii) [Reserved]


(6) Naval material and personnel will not be employed in such a manner as to compete with commercial and private enterprise. In this regard, any person or agency requesting their use will furnish a noncompetitive certification.


(7) Additional details on procedures will be found in DOD Instruction 5410.16.


(8) In addition to cooperation requested by the media, commands will be alert to the advantages of providing Navy programming and/or encouraging participation by Navy personnel in local radio and TV programming. Examples are community forums, local talent shows, educational and religious programs, children’s shows, sports programs, etc.


(d) Participation by individual Navy personnel on radio or TV programs:


(1) In general, such participation is encouraged if it is:


(i) Dignified and considered in the interests of the Navy.


(ii) Compatible with operational commitments.


(iii) Not in competition with the regular employment of professional performers.


(2) The public affairs officer will screen requests for such appearances for members of his command to see that the programs are in good taste, and that neither the Navy nor its personnel are exposed to embarrassment for the sake of entertainment.


(3) Approval of participation by Navy individuals:


(i) Approval is not required for personnel attending audience participation broadcasts if they are selected at random from the audience.


(ii) One-time, one-station participation of purely local interest may be approved by the officer in command concerned.


(iii) If participation will be on a network (defined as more than one station, even if local) of if the same person or program is requested by two or more unrelated stations, approval by the Chief of Information must be obtained even if the show is of local interest only.


(e) Use of official footage:


(1) Use of official U.S. Navy stock film footage on TV broadcasts is not authorized without approval and clearance by the Chief of Information and the Department of Defense.


(2) Use of Navy public information motion pictures cleared for TV is authorized and encouraged except that such films may be used on subscription or pay TV only when offered to the viewers at no cost.


(3) Navy films will not be cut or portions duplicated for TV use in lieu of stock footage without prior approval by the Chief of Information.


(f) Music clearance. The Navy assumes no responsibility for clearance of music used on Navy recordings, transcriptions, or films not specially produced or authorized for radio or TV broadcast.


(g) Disclaimers. A disclaimer is not necessary if a product is advertised on a program in which the Navy participates, but there must be no stated or implied endorsement of it by the Navy or by naval personnel appearing on the program.


(h) Requests for courtesy prints of commercial television programs:


(1) Requests will not be made directly to the producer or network concerned, but will be forwarded to the Chief of Information by the Navy requester.


(2) These courtesy prints will be exhibited only under circumstances which cannot be construed as competitive with commercial ventures.


§ 705.8 Motion pictures.

(a) The rules and procedures given in the preceding for TV will also apply to cooperation with commercial motion picture producers.


(b) The Navy assists in the production of commercial, privately financed, nontheatrical motion pictures of institutional or of educational value to the public. They Navy will not:


(1) Solicit their production.


(2) Provide lists of subjects the Navy considers “desirable.”


(3) State that the Navy will use a commercially produced film.


(4) Imply endorsement of a product.


(5) Permit the use of official Navy seals.


(c) Navy assistance to motion pictures and all other audio-visual products produced by Navy contractors will be subject to the same rules and procedures that apply to other non-government producers. Audio-visual products produced by Navy contractors, with or without Navy assistance, will be submitted to the Chief of Information via the appropriate Navy headquarters activity for coordination with the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Public Affairs) for clearance for public release. They will be accompained by five copies of the script and a statement from the producer that costs were paid from corporate (vice contract) funds.


(d) When a commercial film which has been produced with Navy cooperation is screened in a community, local commands can provide Navy exhibits for display in theater lobbies, coordinate displays of recruiting material, and arrange for personal appearances of Department of Defense and Department of the Navy military and civilian personnel, provided such cooperation is approved by the Chief of Information and the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Public Affairs).


[41 FR 29101, July 15, 1976, as amended at 44 FR 6390, Feb. 1, 1979]


§ 705.9 Availability of motion pictures to external audiences.

(a) Public access. Navy and Marine Corps general motion pictures and motion picture projects not previously cleared for public exhibition will require clearance by the Chief of Information or the Marine Corps Director of Information, as appropriate, prior to public viewing. Concurrent review of legal rights and instruments associated with the production will be carried out by Patent Counsel, Naval Air Systems Command (AIR-OOP). Cleared motion pictures may also be made available for free loan as determined by the individual services. In addition, cleared motion pictures may be provided for rent or sale through the National Audio-Visual Center, National Archives and Records Service (GSA), Washington, DC 20409.


(b) Foreign military training. Motion pictures from the Navy inventory may be made available for foreign military training programs on approval by the Chief of Naval Operations. Classified motion pictures selected for such use will also require a security review by the Chief of Naval Operations.


§ 705.10 Still photography.

(a) Policy and procedures on taking photos by the general public, given in § 705.5 apply also to media representatives.


(b) Basic policy and procedures for still photos are set forth in the Manual of Naval Photography, OPNAVINST 3150.6D.


(c) Authority to forbid photography:


(1) On Navy property, the officer in command may forbid the taking of photographs and may confiscate film, reviewing it if it is suspected that classified material has been photographed. In such cases, all unclassified photos will be returned promptly to the photographer.


(2) Navy personnel have no authority to confiscate film off Navy property. If, as in an accident, classified equipment is exposed which cannot be removed or covered, Navy representatives will ask news media photographers not to photograph it and will inform them of 18 U.S.C. 793(e), 795, 797, which makes it a criminal offense to photograph classified material. Navy personnel will not use force if media photographers refuse to cooperate, but will instead seek the assistance of appropriate civil authorities and/or the photographer’s superior in recovering film or photographs presumed to be of classified nature.


(3) If media photographers are uncooperative in regard to protection of classified material, an account of the matter will be forwarded to the Chief of Information.


(d) Release of photographs:


(1) Most unclassified photographs of interest to the public may be released to news media. However, the rights of individuals photographed and special constraints such as those described in section 0403 of the Public Affairs Regulations must be taken into consideration before a decision is made to release a photograph. In addition, photos which might be harmful to recruiting or otherwise not be in the Navy’s best interests will not be used unless this failure to release them constitutes suppression of legitimate news.


(2) Photographs of strictly local interest can be made available by the command to local media without being submitted to review by higher authority.


(3) If a feature type photo released locally is considered of possible interest elsewhere, because of its human interest or artistic merit, a single print should be forwarded to the Chief of Information, together with a notation of the distribution made.


(4) Photographs of national interest:


(i) “Spot news” photos may be released by a District Commandant or Fleet or Force Commander.


(ii) If a photo has been released by a local command to national news media:


(A) The original negative or transparency will be forwarded by the fastest available means to the Commanding Officer, Naval Photographic Center, Naval Station, Washington, DC 20390. Such forwarding will be in accordance with the Manual of Naval Photography, par. 0445, subparagraphs 3 and 4.


(B) One print, a copy of the letter of transmittal, and the distribution list will be forwarded to the Chief of Information.


(C) Navy units with a Unified Command will forward the photos through Unified Command channels.


(D) All other commands will forward the photos to the Chief of Information who will effect coordination with the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Public Affairs) and, if necessary, arrange for security review.


(iii) Photography of research activities is normally considered to be of national interest.


(iv) Still photographs of national news interest may be forwarded, unprocessed, for release by the Chief of Information by any command not subject to the authority of a Unified or Specified Commander. Such forwarding will be in accordance with paragraph 0445, subparagraph 3, of the Manual of Naval Photography. All available caption material will be forwarded with this unprocessed photography.


§ 705.11 Supplying photographs and services to other than Navy and Marine Corps.

(a) To avoid competition with civilian photographic organizations, naval aircraft will not be used to take photographs for, nor will photographs or mosaic maps be provided to any individuals, corporations, or agencies other than departments or agencies of the federal government, without specific permission from the Chief of Naval Operations.


(b) In the case of natural catastrophe, or other circumstances where prompt action is required, the senior officer present may authorize a departure from the preceding paragraph. In all such cases, a report of the circumstances will be made to the Chief of Naval Operations.


(c) This policy does not preclude releases to the media, news companies, and others in accordance with established procedures, or the sale of released photographs to private agencies or individuals under existing Department of Defense regulations and part 701, subparts A-D, Availability to the public of Department of the Navy Information and Records. Normally, requests by individuals for still photographs and motion picture photography for private use are forwarded to the Commanding Officer, Naval Photographic Center, Naval Station, Washington, DC 20390, for action. Procedures for the collection or authority for waiver of fees for service and material provided are set forth in Volume III, NAVCOMPT Manual, and part 701, subparts A-D.


(d) Navy aerial photography released for sale to the public is transferred to the United States Department of the Interior. Inquirers regarding the purchase of this photography should be directed to Chief, Map Information Office, Geological Survey, Department of the Interior, Washington, DC 20025.


(e) Navy training films suitable for sale to the public are transferred to the National Audio-Visual Center, National Archives and Records Service, General Services Administration, Washington, DC 20408. Inquires regarding the sale of Navy training films should be addressed to the National Audio-Visual Center.


(f) This policy does not preclude releases to contractors and others properly engaged in the conduct of the Navy’s business. However, when services are performed for other agencies of the government, and under certain conditions, for other military departments, the Navy Comptroller Manual prescribes that such are subject to reimbursement.


(g) All private inquiries from foreign nationals should be returned, advising the addressee to contact his local U.S. Information Service officer for the desired materials.


§ 705.12 Print media.

Requests for reprints of items published in national media will be addressed to the Chief of Information. Commands will be careful not to reproduce on their own authority any copyrighted material without advance permission from the copyright holder.


§ 705.13 Commercial advertising.

(a) The Navy encourages cooperation with advertisers. However, the layout, artwork and text of the proposed advertisement must be submitted to the Chief of Information for review and for clearance by other appropriate authorities.


(b) Requests from commercial enterprises (including those with Navy contracts) for use of Navy personnel, facilities, equipment or supplies for advertising purposes must be referred to the Chief of Information.


(c) Official Navy photos which have been cleared and are released for open publication may be furnished for commercial advertising, if properly identified and captioned. No photos will be taken exclusively for the use of an advertiser.


(d) Navy cooperation in commercial advertising, publicity and other promotional activities will be based on the following requirements.


(1) It must be in accordance with the provisions of 32 CFR part 721.


(2) It must be in good taste and not reflect discredit on the Navy or the U.S. Government. Statements made must be matters of fact, without misleading information or other objectionable features.


(3) It must not indicate that a product is used by the Navy to the exclusion of similar products offered by other manufacturers or appear to endorse or selectively benefit or favor (directly or indirectly) any private individual, sect, fraternal organization, commercial venture or political group, or be associated with solicitation of votes in a political election. It will not infer Navy responsibility for the accuracy of the advertiser’s claims or for his compliance with laws protecting the rights of privacy of military personnel whose photographs, names or statements appear in the advertisement. It will neither indicate that a product has undergone Navy tests nor disclose data from any Navy tests which may have been made.


(4) It may not promote the use of tobacco or alcohol.


(e) Use of uniforms and naval insignias. These may be used provided it is done in a dignified manner.


(f) Use of Naval personnel:


(1) Personnel may receive no compensation.


(2) Personnel will not be inconvenienced or have their training or normal duties interrupted.


(3) Written consent from the person concerned must be obtained before a photo may be used.


(4) Navy civilians and military personnel on active duty may not use their position titles or ranks in connection with any commercial enterprise or endorsement of a commercial product. (Retired personnel and Reserves not on active duty may use their military titles in connection with commercial enterprises if this does not give rise to the appearance of sponsorship of the enterprise by the Navy or Department or in any way reflect discredit upon them.)


(5) Testimonials from naval personnel are not banned, but the person giving the testimonial must not be specifically identified.


(i) The use of name, initials, rank or rate of Navy personnel appearing in testimonial advertising is not permitted, but such expressions as, “says a Navy chief,” may be used.


(ii) Care will be taken to ensure that testimonials from Navy personnel are presented in such a way as to make clear that the views expressed are those of the individual and not of the Department of the Navy.


§ 705.14 Embarkation of media representatives.

(a) General. (1) Although this paragraph applies primarily to embarkation in ships, provisions which are applicable to embarkation on aircraft or visits to shore installations apply also to those situations.


(2) See also § 705.37 on transportation of non-Navy civilians.


(b) Invitations to embark. (1) Invitations should be extended as far in advance as possible and inclusive information on the following should be provided:


(i) Type, scope and duration of operation or cruise.


(ii) Communications, methods of press transmission, and charges, if any.


(iii) Transportation arrangements.


(iv) Approximate cost of meals and/or quarters, and the statement that the newsman will be expected to pay for these and other personal expenses incurred.


(2) It should be made clear to the newsman that there may be limits on movement from one participating unit to another. If helicopters or highline transfers are to be used, their limitations and hazards should be explained.


(3) On operations where security is critical, embarkation of newsmen may be made contingent to their agreement to submit copy for security review. Under such circumstances, the reason for the review will be made clear prior to embarkation, and every effort will be made to avoid any interpretation of such review as “censorship” or interference with freedom of the press.


(c) Arrangements aboard ship. (1) Where appropriate, a briefing should be held at the earliest convenient time after embarkation at which newsmen may meet the commanding officer and other key personnel and guests and at which previously supplied information is reviewed.


(2) If feasible, an escort officer will be assigned to each newsman (or group of newsmen having similar requirements).


(3) It should be reported in the ship’s newspaper (and on radio and closed-circuit TV, if any) that newsmen will be embarked, giving their names and the media they represent.


(4) If a correspondent is interested in home town material, personnel from his area should be contacted in advance, if possible, to determine if and when they would be available for interviews and photos.


(5) Representatives of press associations and radio and TV networks will be embarked in the Exercise Commander’s flagship or the Exercise Control ship, when possible. This ship should also control the ship-to-shore press radio and teletype (RATT).


(6) When more than one representative from the same medium is embarked, an attempt should be made to have them located at separate vantage points.


(d) Communications. (1) Every effort will be made to provide suitable communication facilities for newsmen embarked (including equipment and personnel, if feasible).


(2) All persons embarked with permission of proper authority and accredited as correspondents are eligible to file press traffic, as authorized by the procedures set forth in Naval Telecommunication Procedures (NTP-9), “Commercial Communications.”


(3) Navy radio or wire transmission facilities, where available, may be made available to news media (including accredited civilian photographers) when operational requirements permit, in accordance with instructions set forth by the Director of Naval Communications. This includes making live broadcasts or telecasts. (A live network broadcast or telecast must, however, be approved by the Chief of Information.)


(4) Messages and instructions from editors and station managers to embarked newsmen will be handled as press traffic, as authorized in Naval Telecommunication Procedures (NTP-9).


(5) Stations receiving press circuits will be authorized to receipt for press traffic without asking for time-consuming “repeats.”


(6) Under normal circumstances, press copy will be transmitted on a first-come, first-served basis; however, newsmen will be informed that the prerogative of limiting the amount to be filed during any one period rests with the Exercise Commander.


(7) If it becomes necessary for operational reasons for newsmen to pool copy, such messages shall be filed as “multiple address messages” or book messages, as appropriate, or when requested by the newsmen concerned.


(8) If the locale of the exercise permits newsfilm and press mail to be flown ashore, flights should be scheduled on a high priority basis to connect with scheduled commercial air traffic. Operational aircraft as well as scheduled government air flights should be considered for delivery of television news film, radio tapes and photography to the nearest commercial communications facility.


(e) Voluntary submission of material by a newsman for security review. When a review is not required but is sought by the newsman, no attempt will be made to delete or change any material, whether or not it appears critical of the Navy or of naval personnel. If any classified information is included, the newsman will be asked to delete it. In addition, his attention will be drawn to any inaccurate or possibly misleading statements.


[41 FR 29101, July 15, 1976, as amended at 44 FR 6390, Feb. 1, 1979]


§ 705.15 Employment of Navy personnel as correspondents or staff members of civilian news media.

(a) A member of the naval service on active duty or Navy civilian may act as correspondent for a news periodical or service, radio or TV station or network, or may work part-time for such an organization. The Secretary of the Navy will, however, be immediately informed, via the Chief of Information.


(1) See section 0307 (par. 5), section 0308 (par. 4), and section 0309 (par. 3) of the Navy Public Affairs Regulations for regulations referring to personnel assigned to public affairs staffs receiving compensation for such work.


(2) In time of war, only personnel assigned to public affairs billets and such other personnel as the Secretary of the Navy may authorize can act as correspondents for civilian media.


(b) Military personnel on active duty and Navy civilians may not serve on the staff of a “civilian enterprise” newspaper published for personnel of a Navy installation or activity.


§ 705.16 Navy produced public information material.

(a) Still photo – (1) General. (i) The policy and procedures given for media produced still photos in § 705.10, apply to Navy produced photos.


(ii) The Office of Information does not issue, nor have funds available for the purchases of, any photographic equipment or supplies for Navy commands. Details on the establishment of authorized laboratories and acquisition of equipment and supplies are given in the Manual of Navy Photography (OPNAVINST 3150.6D).


(2) Photographic coverage of command events. (i) If more than two photographers are required to cover a public event, consideration should be given to having them wear appropriate civilian attire.


(ii) Personnel in uniform who are amateur photographers and who are attending the event as spectators will not be discouraged from taking photos.


(3) Unofficial photos taken by Navy personnel. (i) The following regulations apply to Navy civilian employees and to Navy personnel in transit through a command, as well as to active duty personnel assigned to the command.


(ii) Personal cameras and related equipment are permitted on Navy ships, aircraft and stations at the discretion of the officer in command.


(iii) An officer in command may screen all photos taken by naval personnel with personal cameras within the jurisdiction of the command to protect classified information or to acquire photos for official use, including public affairs. Photographs taken by bystanders at times of accident, combat, or similar significant events can be valuable for preparation of official report and public release. They should be collected for screening and review as expeditiously as possible.


(iv) Amateur photographers should also be encouraged to volunteer the use of interesting or significant photos for public affairs use.


(v) Photos made by naval personnel, with either personal cameras and film, Navy equipment and film, or any combination thereof, may be designated “Official Navy Photo” if it is considered in the best interests of the Navy.


(A) All precautions will be taken to protect such film from loss or damage, and all unclassified personal photos not designated as “official” will be returned to the owner immediately after review.


(B) When a photo taken by an individual who is not an official photographer is selected for public affairs release:


(1) The photographer will receive credit for his work in the same manner as an official photographer.


(2) The original negative or transparency will be retained and assigned an official file number. It will then be handled like any other official Navy photograph.


(3) At least one duplicate negative or transparency of each unclassified personal photo which has been designated as “official” will be prepared and delivered to the photographer. A black-and-white print may also be prepared for the photographer’s personal use.


(b) Audiovisual. (1) The Chief of Information releases TV featurettes directly to local TV stations and the Office of Information’s Branch Offices (NAV INFO’s). After such featurettes have been cleared for public release by the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Public Affairs).


(2) The Assistant Secretary of Defense (PA) must approve, prior to commitment of funds, the initiation of Navy audiovisual productions intended for public release.


(3) Motion picture film.


(i) Film of major news value will be forwarded immediately, unprocessed, to the Commanding Officer, U.S. Naval Photographic Center. The package should be labeled as follows:



News Film – Do Not Delay

Commanding Officer, U.S. Naval Photographic Center (ATTN: CHINFO Liaison), Washington, DC 20374.

News Film – Do Not Delay

The Commanding Officer of the Naval Photographic Center will be advised (with an information copy to the Chief of Information) of its forwarding, the subject, type and amount of footage, method of delivery, and estimated time of arrival in Washington.

(ii) The original negative of motion picture photography of feature value (photography which will not lose its timeliness over a reasonable length of time) will be forwarded to the Naval Photographic Center, and a copy of the forwarding letter will be sent to the Chief of Information.


(c) Fleet Home Town News Center (FHTNC). (1) All public affairs officers will assure that appropirate news and photo releases on personnel of their commands are regularly sent to the Fleet Home Town News Center.


(2) Procedures, requirements and formats are contained in CHIN-FOINST 5724.1.


[41 FR 29101, July 15, 1976, as amended at 44 FR 6390, Feb. 1, 1979]


§ 705.17 Participation guidelines.

(a) The provisions of this section refer to participation by naval personnel and use of Navy facilities and material in events sponsored by nongovernment organizations except where otherwise stated.


(b) In accordance with the established responsibilities of local officers in command, these officers will continue to determine whether facilities, equipment and personnel within their cognizance may be provided for such programs (except in the Washington, DC area where the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Public Affairs) is the authorizing authority).


(c) Officers in command will ensure that participation is appropriate in scope and type, and is limited to those occasions which are: In keeping with the dignity of the Department of the Navy, in good taste and in conformance with the provisions of part 721 of this chapter. The national, regional, state or local significance of the event and the agency sponsoring the event will be used as guides in determining the scope and type of Navy participation to be authorized.


(d) Participation in community relations programs is authorized and encouraged to accomplish the aims and purposes as set forth in § 705.18 (following). Where mutually beneficial to the Department of Defense and the public, support authorized and provided is always subject to operational considerations, availability of requested support and the policy guidance provided herein.


(e) Military personnel, facilities, and materiel may be used to support non-government public affairs programs when:


(1) The use of such facilities, equipment and personnel will not interfere with the military mission or the training or operational commitments of the command.


(2) Such programs are sponsored by responsible organizations.


(3) Such programs are known to be nonpartisan in character, and there is no reason to believe that the views to be expressed by the participants will be contrary to established national policy.


(f) The sponsoring organizations or groups will be clearly identified in all cases where naval personnel participate as speakers, or military support is furnished.


(g) Public affairs programs sponsored by civilian organizations will not be cosponsored by a naval command unless expressly authorized by the Chief of Information.


(h) Participation will not normally be authorized in public events when the presence of military participants deprives civilians of employment. Officers in command will screen all requests for use of material and personnel in Navy-sponsored social functions held off military installations.


(i) Navy participation and cooperation must not directly or indirectly endorse, or selectively benefit, or appear to endorse, benefit or favor, any private individual, group, corporation (whether for profit or nonprofit), sect, quasi-religious or ideological movement, fraternal, or political organization, or commercial venture, or be associated with the solicitation of votes in a political election.


(1) Providing use of government facilities, such as transportation, housing, or messing, at government expense to private groups is normally interpreted as a selective benefit or favor and is not authorized as part of a community relations program. Therefore, such provisions are normally not authorized as part of a community relations program, even though certain uses of facilities may be authorized under directives on domestic action or other programs.


(2) The above does not bar private groups from providing entertainment on base. However, the appearance must be for entertainment and not for fund-raising, or any political or promotional purpose.


(j) Community relations programs must always be conducted in a manner free from any discrimination because of race, creed, color, national origin, or sex.


(1) Navy participation in a public event is not authorized if admission, seating and other accommodations and facilities are restricted in a discriminatory manner.


(2) Exceptions for participation may be made under certain circumstances for an ethnic or ideological group when they do not entertain any purpose of discriminating against any other group. Any such exceptions must be referred to the Chief of Information for consideration.


(3) Support to nationally recognized veterans’ organizations is authorized when the participation is in support of positive programs which are not in themselves discriminatory.


(4) Navy support to nonpublic school activities is authorized when the participation is clearly in support of educational programs or Navy recruiting.


(5) Commands should ensure minority participation in all community relations activities and events, as appropriate. This includes but is not limited to the following:


(i) Ensure that the minority community is aware of the procedure for obtaining Navy support for community events and that they are appraised of the use of Navy demonstration teams, units, and speakers.


(ii) Encourage Navy involvement in, and attention to, local minority community events.


(iii) Continue to cultivate a rapport with key members of all minority communities.


(k) Participation is not authorized if there is fund raising of any type connected with the event, except as provided for in § 705.34.


(l) No admission charge may be levied on the public solely to see an Armed Forces demonstration, unit, or exhibit.


(1) When admission is charged, the Armed Forces activity must not be the sole or primary attraction.


(2) A general admission charge need not be considered prohibitory to Navy participation, but no specific or additional charge may be made because of Navy participation.


(3) Participation shall be incidental to the event except for programs of a patriotic nature, celebration of national holidays, or events which are open to the general public at no charge for admission.


(4) The provisions of this paragraph do not apply to the Navy’s Blue Angel Flight Demonstration Team or to the Navy Band and other special bands engaged in authorized concert tours conducted at no additional cost to the government.


(m) Some participation in or support of commercially sponsored programs on audio or visual media is allowable. See §§ 705.7 and 705.8.


(n) Some participation which supports commercial advertising, publicity and promotional activities or events is allowable. See section 0405, par. 3 of the Navy Public Affairs Regulations.


(o) Navy speakers may be provided for certain events at which other forms of Navy participation may not be appropriate. See section 0604, par. 8 of the Navy Public Affairs Regulations.


(p) When participation is in the mutual interest of the Navy and the sponsor of the event, participation will be authorized at no additional cost to the government. Additional costs to the government (travel and transportation of military personnel, meals and quarters, or standard per diem allowances, etc.) will be borne by the sponsor.


(q) Department of Defense policy prohibits payment by the Armed Forces for rental of exhibit space, utilities, or janitorial costs. Other exceptions may be given under unusual circumstances.


(r) Navy participation in professional sports events and post-season bowl games will frequently be authorized at no additional cost to the government, will emphasize Joint Service activity when possible, and must support recruiting programs. Chief of Information approval is required.


(s) Navy participation in public events shall be authorized only when it can be reasonably expected to bring credit to the individuals involved and to the Armed Forces and their recruiting objectives. Naval personnel will not be used in such capacities as ushers, guards, parking lot attendants, runner or messengers, baggage handlers or for crowd control, or in any installations.


(t) Maximum advantage of recruiting potential will be taken at appropriate events for which Navy participation has been authorized.


(u) Navy support will not normally be authorized for commercially-oriented events such as shopping center promotions, Christmas parades, and other such events clearly sponsored by, or conducted for the benefit of commercial interests. However, this policy does not preclude participation of Navy recruiting personnel and their organic equipment, materials and exhibits so long as their participation is not used to stimulate sales or increase the flow of business traffic or to give that appearance. Requests for exceptions will be considered on a case-by-case basis by the Chief of Information.


(v) Questions as to appropriateness of Navy participation, or as to existing Navy and OASD (PA) policy, may be referred to the Chief of Information.


(w) Procedures for requesting participation are addressed in § 705.21.


[41 FR 29101, July 15, 1976, as amended at 44 FR 6390, Feb. 1, 1979]


§ 705.18 Authority and coordination.

(a) Each naval command will coordinate its community relations program with the senior authority having responsibility for community relations in its area (District Commandant, Unified Commander, or other).


(b) Within policy limitations outlined in this section, the command receiving a request for Navy participation, and processing the required resources, has the authority to process the request and provide the support requested.


(c) Requests for support exceeding local capability, or requiring approval from higher authority, or requiring an exception to policy will be referred as directed in § 705.21 for determination.


(d) The Assistant Secretary of Defense (Public Affairs) has the overall responsibility for the Department of Defense community relations program. Civilian sponsors should be advised to address requests for approval of the following types of programs directly to the Director of Community Relations, Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Public Affairs), Pentagon, Washington, DC 20301:


(1) National and international events, including conventions, except those taking place in overseas areas which are primarily of internal concern to Unified Commanders.


(2) Events outside the United States which have an interest and impact extending beyond the Unified Command areas, or which require assistance from outside the command area.


(3) Public events in the Washington, DC area.


(4) Aerial, parachute, or simulated tactical demonstrations held in the public domain, except those held in areas assigned to overseas Unified Commands.


(5) Aerial reviews on military installations within the United States if the review involves more than one Service.


(6) Programmed national sports, professional athletic events, formal international competitions, and contests between a Navy and professional team in the public domain. See section 0605, par. 18 of the Navy Public Affairs Regulations.


(7) Performing Navy units appearing on regional or national television.


(8) Overall planning for Armed Forces Day (not including local activities).


(9) Granting exceptions to policy.


(e) Overseas, Unified Commanders are designated to act for and on behalf of the Secretary of Defense in implementing community relations programs within their command areas and in granting any exceptions to policy or regulations. This authority may be delegated.


(1) Policy, direction and guidance for Unified Command community relations programs are provided to Navy components of these commands by the Unified Commander concerned.


(2) Authority of the Commander-in-Chief, Pacific extends to planning and execution of community relations programs in Alaska and Hawaii. Participation in events held in Alaska and Hawaii will be governed by the same principles as policies applicable to other states.


(3) Community relations programs and events taking place within the United States which have an effect on a Unified or Specified Command as a whole, or are otherwise of significant concern to the Unified Command, require complete coordination through appropriate channels between the Unified Command and naval activities concerned.


(4) Unified Commanders overseas requiring Navy support for a community reltaions program or participation in a public event should coordinate their requirements with the appropriate Navy component command.


(f) The Secretary of the Navy will plan and execute Navy community relations programs and approve Navy participation in public events not otherwise reserved or assigned to the Secretary of Defense. This authority may be delegated.


§ 705.19 Financing.

(a) The financial requirements for community relations purposes will be kept to the minimum necessary to accomplish Department of Defense objectives.


(b) Costs of participation will normally be at government expense for the following types of events and programs when they are in the primary interest of the Department of Defense:


(1) Public observances of national holidays.


(2) Official ceremonies and functions.


(3) Speaking engagements.


(4) Programmed, scheduled tours by Navy information activity support units (e.g., an exhibit from the Navy Exhibit Center) when this method of reaching special audiences is considered by the Secretary of the Navy to be the most effective and economical way of accomplishing a priority public affairs program.


(5) Tours by units (e.g., the Navy Band) for which appropriated funds have been specifically provided.


(6) Support of recruiting.


(7) Events considered to be in the national interest, or in the professional, scientific, or technical interests of the Navy or Department of Defense, when approved by the Secretary of Defense or the overseas Unified Commander, as appropriate.


(c) Navy participation in all other public events will normally be at no additional costs to the government.


(1) Continuing type costs to the government which would have existed had the Navy not participated in the event will not be reimbursed by the sponsor.


(2) Transportation costs may be excluded from the costs to be borne by the sponsor when the transportation can be accomplished by government aircraft on a normal training flight or opportune airlift.


§ 705.20 Use of Navy material and facilities.

(a) The loan of equipment and permission to use facilities will be dependent on the following:


(1) The program support must be within the command’s public affairs responsibility.


(2) The loan of the equipment must not interfere with the military mission of the command.


(3) Equipment must be available within the command or obtainable from another Navy command in the local area.


(4) The event must be of the type for which participation is considered appropriate.


(5) It must not be in any direct or implied competition with a commercial source.


(6) There must be no potential danger to persons or private property that could result in a claim against the government. Safety requirements will be observed.


(b) Use of open mess facilities will be permitted only under one of the following conditions:


(1) Incident to the holding of a professional or technical seminar at the command.


(2) Incident to an official visit to the command by a civic group.


(3) Navy League Council luncheon or dinner meetings (not to exceed one per quarter per group).


(4) Incident to group visits by the Boy Scouts of America, Boys Clubs of America, the Navy League Sea Cadets (by virtue of their federal charters), Girl Scouts and the Navy League Shipmates, and a few representative adult leaders.


(c) Use of the official Navy flag will be in accordance with SECNAVINST 10520.2C and of official emblem in accordance with OPNAVINST 5030.11B.


(d) Requests not meeting the criteria cited here, but which are considered by the officer in command to have merit, may be referred to the Chief of Information.


[41 FR 29101, July 15, 1976, as amended at 44 FR 6391, Feb. 1, 1979]


§ 705.21 Requests for Navy participation.

(a) Decisions will be made on a case-by-case basis. Events which are inappropriate for one type of participation may be entirely appropriate for another type of participation. A positive and flexible approach should be employed.


(b) Requests by civilian organizations for Navy participation in programs or events they sponsor should be addressed to the nearest naval installation and should be evaluated and authorized at that level if possible. Request exceeding local resoures, or requiring authorization from higher authority, should be forwarded through appropriate channels.


(c) Requests for Armed Forces participation in public events are to be submitted on official request forms (§§ 705.33, 705.34 and 705.36) by the sponsors of events occurring outside a command’s area of direct knowledge and local capability, or involving a type or level of participation unavailable locally, or requiring approval of higher authority.


(d) Fact sheets expounding upon normally requested assets are enclosed in §§ 705.33, 705.34 and 705.36 and may be reproduced and distributed locally.


(e) The official request form is to be used on all requests referred to the Chief of Information and to the Office of Assistant Secretary of Defense (Public Affairs).


§ 705.22 Relations with community groups.

(a) Naval commands will cooperate with and assist community groups within their capabilities, to the event authorized by current instructions, and will participate in their activitis to the extent feasible.


(b) Navy commands will encourage membership of personnel in community organizations.


(c) Officers in command will withhold approval of requests from community groups, organizations or individuals whose purposes are unclear, pending advice from the Chief of Information.


(d) Commands may make facilities, less housing and messing, available to community groups, at no expense to the government, when it is in the best interest of the Navy to do so. Mess facilities may not be used for meetings of civic groups or other asociations unless all the members of the group concerned are authorized participants of the mess as prescribed in NAVPERS 15951, except as provided below:


(1) Requests to make open mess facilities available to professional or technical seminars or civic groups meeting in connection with an official visit to the activity may be submitted to the officer in charge of the mess, or other appropriate authority. Such requests may be approved when it is shown that the inspection of the activity or the holding of a professional seminar is of principal importance and the use of mess facilities is incidental thereto.


(2) Because of the exceptional nature of the Navy League, as recognized by the Secretary of the Navy, open mess facilities may be used for luncheon or dinner meetings of Navy League Councils, but not more often than once per quarter per group.


(e) Relations with Industry and Labor in the Community (refer to SECNAVINST 5370.2F and DOD Directive 5500.7):


(1) Relations with Navy contractors and with industry and business in general are the responsibility of the officer in command, with the assistance of his public affairs officer.


(2) Navy commands will cooperate with industry and its representatives in planning and executing community relations projects of mutual interest.


(i) Visits to commands will be scheduled for industrial and employee groups under the same conditions as for other civilian groups.


(ii) A contractor may be identified in a news release, exhibit, or the like whenever the major responsibility for the product can be clearly and fairly credited to him. In such cases, both the manufacturer’s name for the product and the Navy designation of it will be used.


(iii) Commands will not solicit, nor authorize others to solicit, contractors to provide advertising, contributions, donations, subscriptions, etc. Where there is a legitimate need for industrial promotion items, such as scale models, the command will contact the Chief of Information for advice as to the procedure for requesting procurement.


(iv) Similarly, if Defense contractors wish to distribute information material through official Navy channels, the Office of Information will be queried as to the desirability and feasibility of undertaking the desired distribution.


(v) Visits to contractor facilities are governed by the provisions of DOD Manual 5520.22-M (Industrial Security Manual for Safeguarding Classified Information). If nationally known press representatives will be involved, prior approval must be obtained both from the contractor (via the Chief of Information) and from the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Public Affairs).


(3) Commands will maintain the same relationship with labor unions as with other community groups and will not take action in connection with labor disputes. Personnel inadvertently or incidentally involved in labor disputes will consult officers in command for guidance.


(f) Emergency Assistance to the Community:


(1) Navy commands will offer and provide assistance to adjacent communities in the event of disaster or other emergency.


(2) The Chief of Information will be advised immediately of action when taken, and copies of subsequent reports to the Chief of Naval Operations will be forwarded to the Chief of Information.


(3) Navy commands will participate in planning by local Civil Defense officials.


[41 FR 29101, July 15, 1976, as amended at 44 FR 6391, Feb. 1, 1979]


§ 705.23 Guest cruises.

(a) General policy. (1) The embarkation of civilian guests in Navy ships is appropriate in the furtherance of continuing public awareness of the Navy and its mission.


(i) Examples of embarkations for public affairs purposes are (but not limited to): Individuals, community service clubs, civic groups, the Navy League, and trade and professional associations.


(ii) Embarkation of media representatives on assignment is discussed in § 705.14.


(iii) Other categories may be established by the Secretary of the Navy, subject to the approval of the Secretary of Defense.


(2) It has also been demonstrated that the occasional embarkation on cruises of families and personal guests of naval personnel has contributed materially to the morale of the family circle and has instilled in each individual a sense of pride in his ship. For further information see OPNAVINST 5720.2G.


(3) Embarkations should be conducted within the framework of regularly scheduled operations; underway periods solely to accommodate guests are not authorized.


(4) Commander-in-Chief, Pacific Fleet, Commander-in-Chief, Atlantic Fleet, Commander-in-Chief, U.S. Naval Forces Europe, Commander Military Sealift Command (and their subordinate commands if so designated), Chief of Naval Education and Training, and District Commandants may authorize the embarkation of female civilians for daylight cruises. Embarkation of civilians for overnight cruises must be authorized by the Chief of Naval Operations via the Chief of Information.


(5) All guest visits are normally authorized on an unclassified basis.


(6) In all instances, due precautions must be taken for the safety of the guests. (See section 0403, pars. 6(b) and, 6(e), of the Navy Public Affairs Regulations, for procedures to be followed in the case of death of, or injury to, civilians embarked on naval ships.)


(7) For further information on policy, procedures, and eligibility criteria, see OPNAVINST 5720.2G.


(b) Authority. (1) Authority to establish procedures for the conduct of the embarkation of guests for public affairs purposes (including the Secretary of the Navy Guest Cruise and Guest of the Navy Cruise programs, which are discussed in § 705.24) is vested in the Secretary of the Navy. This authority is limited only insofar as the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and the commanders of the Unified and Specified Commands (and their component commanders, if so designated) have the authority to use Navy ships to embark individuals other than news media representatives for public affairs purposes.


(i) Public affairs embarkations originating within the geographical limits of the Unified Command will be approved by and coordinated with the commanders of such commands. This authority may be delegated. Requests for such embarkations originating with the subordinate fleet or force command of a Unified Command will be submitted via the operational chain of command, to the appropriate commander of the Unified Command, unless delegated.


(ii) Requests for public affairs embarkations originating from any Navy source other than the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, or the Unified and Specified Commanders or their subordinate commands, will be submitted to the Chief of Information, who will effect coordination with the Chief of Naval Operations and/or the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Public Affairs) as appropriate.


(iii) When guests debark in a foreign port which is in the geographic area of a Unified Command other than that in which the cruise originated, the Chief of Information will coordinate travel by obtaining concurrence of all appropriate commanders and the approval of the Chief of Naval Operations, and the Assistant secretary of Defense (Public Affairs) as appropriate.


(2) Officers in command to whom authority to embark guests for public affairs purposes is delegated will make maximum use of this authority.


(c) Secretary of the Navy Guest Cruise and Guest of the Navy Cruise Programs. (1) The objective of these two programs is: To expose top-level and middle-level opinion leaders in the fields of business, industry, science, education, and labor to the operation of the U.S. Navy, in order that they may gain a better understanding of its capabilities and problems, the complicated nature of modern sea-based equipment, and the high levels of responsibility and training required of Navy men and women.


(2) In addition to policy contained in paragraph (c)(1) of this section, the following policy guidelines apply to the conduct of the Secretary of the Navy Guest Cruise and the Guest of the Navy Cruise Programs.


(i) Secretary of the Navy Guest Cruise Program. (A) Only aircraft carriers and cruisers will be used.


(B) Cruises will be conducted once each quarter on each coast, contingent upon the availability of appropriate ships.


(C) The optimum number of guests is 15.


(D) Guests will be drawn from top-level executives and leaders who have not had previous exposure to the Navy. “Previous exposure” is defined as active or reserve service in the U.S. Navy or U.S. Marine Corps within the last 10 years; membership in the Navy League or any other Navy-oriented organization; or participation in a cruise on a U.S. Navy ship in the last 10 years.


(E) Whenever feasible, Secretary of the Navy Guests will be greeted by CINCLANTFLT or CINCPACFLT, or in their absence by the SOPA. Comprehensive unclassified briefings will be given dealing with the Navy’s mission, fleet operations, and current problems.


(F) Cruises will vary in length from 3 to 7 days, when appropriate, to conform with the operating schedule of the ship.


(ii) Guests of the Navy Cruise Program. (A) All types of ships will be used. This will include carriers when available, after selection of a cruise for the Secretary of the Navy Guest Cruise Program.


(B) Guest of the Navy Cruise guests will be drawn from middle-level executives and leaders who have not had previous exposure to the Navy. Guests should include persons who have direct impact on recruiting, such as secondary school principals, guidance counselors, coaches and teachers.


(C) Cruises of relatively short duration (3 to 5 days) are preferred, although cruises up to 7 days are authorized. Protracted cruises will not be approved except for special circumstances.


(D) Invitations will be extended by the District of Commandants. Invitations will include:


(1) Statement of the purpose of the Guest of the Navy Cruise Program.


(2) Authorization for embarkation and, if applicable, for COD flights, with instructions for reporting on board.


(3) Name and rank of the commanding officer and, if applicable, name and rank of embarked flag officer.


(4) A caution that guests should not accept the invitation unless they are in good health.


(5) Statement to the effect that the tempo of operations might cause changes in scheduling which could result in the invitation having to be withdrawn.


(E) The following necessary information may be included separately with a letter of invitation: Recommended wardrobe, passport and immunization requirements, availability of emergency medical and dental facilities, ship’s store and laundry facilities, statement that guest’s use of a camera will be authorized subject to certain restrictions, and a listing of those restrictions. In addition, the following statement will be included with each invitation, or form part of the attached information sheets:



The Department of the Navy has no specific authority to use its funds to defray or reimburse any personal expenses of a navy guest. As a result, the Department of the Navy cannot provide you with transportation to the port of embarkation or from the port of debarkation back to your home. Your expenses for meals will be quite nominal while you are on board a naval ship or facility. You should make provision for any extraordinary expense which may arise. For example, if a personal or other emergency arises which necessitates your returning home during the cruise, you should be prepared to take commercial transportation at your own expense from the most distant point on the cruise itinerary.


Navy ships and aircraft, by their very nature, present certain hazards not normally encountered on shore. These hazards require persons on board to exercise a high degree of care for their own safety.


Acceptance of this invitation will be considered your understanding of the above arrangements and limitations.


(iii) Applicable to both programs. (A) Guests will provide their own transportation from home to the ship and return, and must reimburse the Navy for living and incidental expenses while embarked so that the program may be conducted at no additional expense to the government.


(B) Because the number of billets available to accommodate all of the potential guests is limited, the guest’s opportunity to communicate his experience to his associates must be considered. For this reason, one of the criteria for selection of guests will be their level of activity in civic, professional, and social organizations. In nominating and selecting guests, effort will be made to ensure that minority citizens are included as appropriate.


(C) Atlantic cruises will be made on ships operating between East Coast ports, or between CONUS and the U.S. Caribbean ports of San Juan, PR, or Charlotte Amalie (St. Thomas), Virgin Islands. Pacific cruises will be made on ships operating between West Coast ports: Between CONUS and ports in Hawaii, Alaska, Mexico or Canada; or between ports within Hawaii or Alaska.


(D) Guests will be informed of security restrictions. Unclassified photography should be permitted on board, as pictures renew guests’ feelings of identification with a ship. Guests will be advised of areas, however, where photography is prohibited, and security regulations will be courteously but firmly enforced.


(E) Guests will be billeted in officers quarters and normally subsisted in the wardroom. It is not necessary that guests be assigned individual rooms. Billeting with ship’s officers promotes mutual understanding, and guests feel more closely identified with the ship’s company. They will be invited to dine at least once in each mess on board, if the length of the cruise permits. Guests will be encouraged to speak freely and mingle with the crew.


(F) Guests will be accorded privileges of the cigar mess commissioned officers mess (open) ashore – with the exception of package store privileges – and the use of ship’s or Navy Exchange laundry and tailor shops. Other Navy Exchange privileges will be limited to purchase of items for immediate personal use.


(G) Only emergency medical and dental care will be provided and then only where civilian care is not conveniently available.


(1) In the event of injury to civilians embarked in Navy ships and aircraft or visiting naval activities, commanding officers will notify the Chief of information, the appropriate Commandant, and operational commanders, by message, of the injury and action taken.


(2) In the event of an emergency not covered by Navy Regulations, the facts and circumstances will be reported immediately to the Secretary of the Navy.


(H) Guests may be allotted time for side trips at their own expense when an itinerary includes naval activities or ports adjacent to recognized points of interest.


(I) As a souvenir of the cruise, it is suggested that guests be provided with a photograph of the ship, perhaps suitably inscribed by the commanding officer prior to debarkation.


(J) Any publicity will be limited to that initiated by the participants. Navy-sponsored publicity will be avoided unless sought by the participants. At the same time, media inquiries or inquiries from the general public will be answered fully, the purposes of the cruise program outlined and the fact stressed that no cost to the government is incurred.


[41 FR 29101, July 15, 1976, as amended at 44 FR 6391, Feb. 1, 1979]


§ 705.24 Exhibits.

(a) Navy exhibits are representations or collections of naval equipment, models, devices and information and orientation material placed on public display for information purposes before audiences at conventions, conferences, seminars, demonstrations, exhibits, fairs, or similar events. Also included are general purpose displays in public buildings or public locations. Museums also occasionally request a Navy exhibit on a permanent or temporary loan basis.


(1) Exhibits may be displayed in any appropriate location or event (including commercially owned spaces such as shopping centers, malls, etc.) provided it is clearly established that such areas are places the general public frequents and that the exhibit is not for the purpose of drawing the public to that location, and that it is determined that participation is in the best interests of the Department of Defense and the Department of the Navy.


(2) [Reserved]


(b) Exhibits will be used for the following purposes only:


(1) To inform the public of the Navy’s mission and operations.


(2) To disseminate technical and scientific information.


(3) To assist recruiting of personnel for Navy military service and for civilian employment in the Department of the Navy.


(c) Exhibit requests and procedures:


(1) Requests for Navy exhibits, other than local exhibits may be forwarded to the Navy Recruiting Exhibit Center via the local Navy recruiter with an information copy to the Chief of Information. The primary mission of the Navy Recruiting Exhibit Center is to support local Navy recruiters. Requests for exhibits for community relations events will be considered favorably only when not in conflict with recruiting requirements.


(i) Requests for exhibits must be submitted well in advance of their proposed dates of use.


(ii) Requests for mobile exhibits requiring tractor-trailer transportation should be forwarded prior to November 15th previous to the year desired. A tour itinerary of mobile exhibits will then be established for the following year.


(iii) The period of time for which an exhibit is authorized will be determined by the nature of the event and the type of exhibit (e.g., equipment from local resources used for a local celebration would normally not be exhibited for more than three days; but, a formal exhibit at an exposition might remain for the duration of the event).


(2) The office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Public Affairs) is the approving authority for Navy exhibits in events of international or national scope, or those requiring major coordination among the Armed Forces, or with other agencies of the Federal Government.


(i) All Navy activities will forward such requests to the Chief of Information for coordination with the OASD (PA).


(ii) Subordinate commands of a Unified Command will forward exhibit requests of the above types to the Unified Commander concerned, via the chain of command.


(3) The official OASD(PA) Request Form for Armed Forces Participation will be used. See Armed Forces Request Form, § 705.36.


(4) Requests for exceptions to policy for exhibit displays should be forwarded to the Officer in Charge, Navy Recruiting Exhibit Center.


(5) Policy guidance on costs is defined in § 705.19.


(6) Occasionally, a project officer will be assigned to coordinate use of the exhibit with the sponsor.


(i) Project officers are normally commissioned officers, equivalent civilian personnel, local recruiters or reservists, who have been assigned the responsibility of coordinating Service participation in a special event.


(ii) The project officer should establish immediate liaison with the sponsor.


(iii) The project officer should assist in determining the actual location of the exhibit, make arrangements for assembling and disassembling the exhibit material, and supervise these operations.


(iv) The project officer will ensure Navy and Department of Defense policies are followed, and will coordinate local news releases concerning Navy participation.


[41 FR 29101, July 15, 1976, as amended at 44 FR 6391, Feb. 1, 1979]


§ 705.25 Navy Exhibit Center.

(a) The center is a field activity of the Chief of Information and is located in the Washington Navy Yard. Its primary mission is to produce, transport and display U.S. Navy exhibits throughout the United States. It also facilitates assignments of Navy combat artists and, additionally, produces exhibits for its own tours and for short-term loans to naval commands.


(b) [Reserved]


[41 FR 29101, July 15, 1976, as amended at 44 FR 6391, Feb. 1, 1979]


§ 705.26 Exhibit availability report.

(a) A center index of exhibits which are available at the local level in each Naval District is maintained by the exhibit center. To achieve maximum effectiveness for an overall integrated program, an up-to-date registry of all exhibits is required.


(b) A current inventory of exhibits headquartered in Washington, DC, and managed by the Navy Recruiting Exhibit Center for scheduling purposes may be obtained by writing to: Officer-in-Charge, Navy Recruiting Exhibit Center, Washington Navy Yard, Washington, DC 20374.


[41 FR 29101, July 15, 1976, as amended at 44 FR 6391, Feb. 1, 1979]


§§ 705.27-705.28 [Reserved]

§ 705.29 Navy Art Collection.

(a) The U.S. Navy has continued to record its military actions, explorations, launchings, etc., in fine art form since before World War II. The present Navy Combat Art Collection contains over 4,000 paintings and sketches. A significant number of new works is being added each year. The combat artists of World War II have been replaced by civilian artists who witness today’s Navy in action, record their impressions, and donate their works of art to the Department of the Navy.


(1) The voluntary services of most of the artists are arranged through the Navy Art Cooperation and Liaison Committee (NACAL) which operates in close cooperation with the Salmagundi Club of New York City and the Municipal Art Department of the City of Los Angeles.


(2) The Chief of Information has established liaison with the Salmagundi Club in order to maintain a continuing historical record of the Navy. Organized in 1871, the Salmagundi Club is the oldest club of professional artists in the United States. The Club appointed a Navy Art Cooperation and Liaison (NACAL) Committee to advise the Navy on art matters and to nominate artists for assignment to paint Navy activities through the world. The Chief of Information reviews the nominations, and issues SECNAV invitational travel orders to each artist approved.


(3) The following policy pertains:


(i) All finished art portraying the Navy and produced by Navy artists on active duty for that purpose and by guest artists working under invitational travel orders becomes the property of the Department of the Navy.


(ii) Civilian artists selected to paint Navy life through cooperation of a private sponsor and the Chief of Information may be authorized by the Chief of Information or the Office of the Secretary of Defense to retain their works.


(iii) Paintings, sketches, drawings and other forms of artwork will not be accepted by the Department of the Navy unless all reproduction rights are surrendered and unless they become the permanent property of the Department of the Navy.


(iv) Requests for reproduction of combat art for use in advertising or publication will be directed to the Chief of Information.


(b) Responsibilities:


(1) The Chief of Information exercises supervision and control of the Navy Art Program and issues SECNAV invitational travel orders and letters of invitation to artists selected for assignment.


(2) When directed by the Chief of Information or other appropriate Navy authority, a NACAL project officer will perform the following functions:


(i) Act as a local liaison officer for the NACAL Program.


(ii) Assist NACAL artists on assignments within his area.


(3) The Curator Navy Combat Art Center, in coordination with the Chief of Information, will:


(i) Plan trips for the NACAL Program.


(ii) Approve requests for art displays.


(iii) Provide logistic support for the maintenance, storage, shipment and display of the Navy Combat Art Program.


(c) Requests for art displays should be forwarded to the Director, Community Relations Division, Office of Information, Navy Department, Washington, DC 20350.


(d) Exhibition of Navy Art:


(1) Operation Palette I” is a carefully selected group of 75 to 100 combat art paintings depicting Navy and Marine Corps activities during World War II. The schedule of “Operation Palette I” is promulgated by the Officer-in-Charge, Navy Recruiting Exhibit Center and supervised by the Chief of Information, with the concurrence of District Commandants. Schedules are arranged so that the exhibition travels within a particular Naval District for several months at a time. District Commandants designate project officers for each city where “Operation Palette I” is exhibited. The project officer makes all arrangements, including suitable location, publicity and personnel to assist the chief petty officer who travels with the collection. Promotional kits are provided by the Officer-in-Charge, Navy Recruiting Exhibit Center. Requests for exhibitions are not desired, since the collection always travels on a prearranged tour.


(2) “Operation Palette II” consists of 75 to 100 paintings representative of the worldwide operations of the contemporary Navy and Marine Corps * * * the Navy today * * *, and travels on prearranged tours similar to “Operation Palette I.”


(3) Other exhibitions of original paintings from the Combat Art Collection may be scheduled on request by either Navy commands or civilian art groups. Requests should be directed to the Director, Community Relations Division, Office of Information, Navy Department, Washington, DC 20350 and contain the following:


(i) The occasion.


(ii) Inclusive dates. (Not less than 10 days or more than 90 days sub-custody.)


(iii) Expected attendance and type of publicity planned.


(iv) Amount of space allotted.


(v) If Navy-sponsored show, certification that 24-hour security will be provided for the paintings while in custody.


(vi) If civilian-sponsored show, statement that transportation and insurance requirements will be met. (Physical security must be available for exhibit, with an attendant on duty during open hours and locked building or other means of protecting exhibit when closed to the public.)


(e) Navy Combat Art Lithograph Program:


(1) This program makes available full color, high quality lithographs which are faithful reproductions of the original artwork on quality paper of selected works of art from the Navy Art Collection.


(2) Additional information and ordering details are contained in CHINFO NOTICE 5605, which is issued periodically.


[41 FR 29101, July 15, 1976, as amended at 44 FR 6391, Feb. 1, 1979]


§ 705.30 Aerospace Education Workshop.

(a) This program is devised by the Navy to give students at colleges and universities conducting teacher training a comprehensive background in the field of aviation. The teachers in turn integrate this knowledge into their education programs.


(b) Appropriate commands are encouraged to provide assistance to educational institutions sponsoring the workshop program: Provided, That such support does not interfere with the command’s primary mission and that such cooperation involves no additional expense to the government.


(c) The Chief of Naval Operations has cognizance of all assistance provided by the Navy to all Aerospace Education Workshop program. A summary report of local command participation in Aerospace projects will be submitted to the Chief of Naval Operations via the appropriate chain of command. Information copies of such reports will be sent to Commander, Navy Recruiting Command and the Chief of Information. For further information see OPNAVINST 5726.1C.


§ 705.31 USS Arizona Memorial, Pearl Harbor.

(a) Limited space and the desirability of keeping the Memorial simple and dignified require the following practices to be observed:


(1) Rendering of formal ceremonies on the USS Arizona Memorial will be confined to Memorial Day.


(2) Observances on December 7, or any other date, at the request of individuals or organizations, will consist of simple wreath-laying, or other appropriate expressions conducted with dignity.


(3) Plaques intended for display on the Memorial may be presented by headquarters of national organizations only. Plaques from regional, state or local organizations cannot be accepted. Only one plaque will be accepted from any organization. The overall size of the plaques, including mounting, must be no larger than 12 inches square.


(b) The Commandant, Fourteenth Naval District, is designated to coordinate all formal or informal observances involving the Memorial.


§ 705.32 Aviation events and parachute demonstrations.

(a) Armed Forces aircraft and parachutists may be authorized to participate in appropriate in public events which meet basic Department of Defense criteria. This participation may be one of the officially designated military flight or parachute demonstration teams, flyover by aircraft, a general demonstration of capabilities by aircraft, or the static display of aircraft.


(b) Events which are appropriate for aviation participation include: Dedication of airports; aviation shows; aircraft exposition; air fairs; recruiting programs; civic events which contribute to the public knowledge of naval aviation equipment and capabilities and to the advancement of general aviation; public observances of certain national holidays (Armed Forces Day, Veterans Day, Memorial Day and Independence Day); national conventions of major veterans organizations; memorial services for deceased, nationally recognized dignitaries; and receptions for foreign dignitaries.


(c) Support of Armed Forces recruiting is the primary purpose of military flight and parachute demonstration teams. Armed Forces recruiting teams are available to assist sponsors in coordinating advance publicity and information coverage to insure maximum exposure for the demonstration team and the event. This assistence is at no additional expense to the sponsor; however, the sponsor is required to give full support to the recruiting effort and to cooperate fully with local service officials. Such support could include (but is not limited to) the provision of prime space for recruiters at the event site and the provision of courtesy passes in controlled quantities to recruiters for the purpose of bringing recruit prospects and recruiting advisors to view the show.


(d) DOD support of air show fund raising efforts in the form of provision of military flight and parachute demonstration teams is limited to charities recognized by the Federal Services Fund-Raising Program. These include such agencies as the United Givers Fund, Community Chests, National Health Agencies (as a group), International Service Agencies and the military aid societies. Armed Forces support to fund-raising events for a single cause, even though the charity is a member of a federated or joint campaign or donates in part to one or several of the campaigns, is inconsistent with the basic position of Department of Defense. The name of the nearest Combined Federal Campaign coordinator will be supplied to the sponsor, or if he chooses, he might elect to work with the local United Givers Fund (Community Chest). As a minimum, the sponsor must agree to provide at least half of the profit above costs to the Combined Federal or United Givers Campaigns to receive Armed Forces support.


(e) Request form. This form is used to request military flight and parachute demonstration team participation in public events. The information is required to evaluate the event for appropriateness and compliance with Department of Defense policies and for coordination with the units involved.



General

1. Title of Event

Town or City: _______ State:

Date: ________ Time – From:

To: ____ Place: (Airport, etc.)

2. Sponsor:

3. The sponsor (is) (is not) a civic organization and the event (does) (does not) have the official backing of the mayor.

4. The sponsoring organization (does) (does not) exclude any person from its membership or practice any form of discrimination in its functins, based on race, creed, color or national origin.

5. Sponsor’s representative authorized to complete arrangements for Armed Forces participation and responsible for reimbursing Department of Defense for accrued expenses when required:

Name:

Address:

City, State: _________ Zip:

Telephone: (Office) ____ (AC)



(home) __________ (AC)



6. Purpose of this event (explain fully):



7. Expected attendance:

8. Is this event being used to promote funds for any purpose?

9. Admission charge:

“Charge for seating:

10. Disposition of profits which may accrue:

11. Will admission, seating and all other accommodations and facilities connected with the event be available to all persons without regard to race, creed, color or national origin?

12. Will the standard Military Services allowance for quarters and meals be provided by the sponsor for Armed Forces participants?

13. Will transportation at sponsor’s expense be proviced for Armed Forces participants between the site of this event and hotel?



14. Will telephone facilities, at sponsor’s expense, be made available for necessary official communications regarding the event?



15. It may be necessary for representatives of the requested unit to visit the site prior to the event. Will transportation, meals and hotel accommodations be provided by the sponsor?



16. Please describe the space which will be provided to recruiters:







17. Designate charity beneficiary(s):



Flight Team, Parachute Team, Flyovers, Statics

1. This request is for (check appropriate line):

Flight Team Demonstration
U.S. Navy Blue Angels
U.S. Air Force Thunderbirds. (Cost for either team is $1500.00 for each day team scheduled at your event.)
Aircraft Flyover: (No cost to sponsor.)
Static Aircraft: (Cost is $25.00 per day per crewmember.)
U.S. Army Silver Eagles: (Cost for this team is $750.00 for each day team scheduled at your event.)
Parachute Team Demonstration U.S. Army Golden Knights: (Cost is $25.00 per day per man for each day required to support your event. Team consists of 10-14 personnel.)
(Other)

2. Flight and/or Parachute Team demonstrations are restricted to appropriate events at airports, over open bodies of water, or over suitable open areas of land. Please give the specific location of your event



If an airport, name of airdrome facility and longest usable landing runway. Airport:



Runway data:______________feet.

3. Flyovers, Flight and Parachute Team demonstrations require that sponsors secure FAA clearance or waiver. Will steps be taken by sponsor to accomplish this at least sixty days prior to the event?

4. Flight and Parachute Team demonstrations must adhere to FAA regulations which specify that spectators not be permitted within 1500 feet of an area over which the flight demonstration takes place, or 250 feet of the jump area over which parachutists are performing. What type of crowd control is planned?



5. Flight and Parachute Team demonstrations require that an ambulance and a doctor be on the site during the demonstration. Will this requirement be met?

6. Flight and Parachute Team demonstrations require that the sponsor provide a recent aerial photograph, taken vertically from an altitude of 5,000 feet or higher, to the team(s) giving the demonstration. Will this requirement be met?

7. Flight Team demonstrations and Static Aircraft displays require that the sponsor provide suitable aircraft fuel (JP jet fuel or aviation gas, as appropriate) and pay the cost of transporting and handling this fuel, if it is not available at the staging airport under military contract prices. Will this requirement be met?

8. Flight Team demonstrations and Static Aircraft displays require mobile firefighting, crash and ground-to-air communications equipment at the demonstration site. Will this requirement be met?

9. Flight Teams and Static Aircraft displays require that the sponsor provide guards for the aircraft that land and are parked at the site during their entire stay. Will this requirement be met?

10. Parachute Team demonstrations may require that the sponsor arrange aircraft transportation from the team’s home base to the location of the event, for use as a jump platform and return to the home base. Will this requirement be met, if necessary?



11. Name and address of any Armed Forces representative or government official with whom you have discussed possible participation:



Certification

I certify that the information provided above is complete and correct to the best of my knowledge and belief. I understand that representatives of the Military Services will contact me to discuss arrangements and costs involved prior to final commitments.


Signature:

(Sponsor’s Representative)

Date of Request:

Return this form to:

(f) Definitions. A flight team demonstration is an exhibition of precision aerial maneuvers flown by the official Department of Defense military flight demonstration teams, the U.S. Air Force Thunderbirds, the U.S. Navy Blue Angels and the U.S. Army Silver Eagles. An aircraft demonstration is a flight demonstration by aircraft other than those of the teams listed above and designed to portray tactical capabilities of aircraft by a single aircraft (i.e., the U.S. Marine Corps “Harrier”) or group of aircraft, including air-to-air refueling, helicopter hover and pick-up or rappelling capabilities, Low Altitude Parachute Extraction System, maximum performance take-off, etc. A parachute demonstration is an exhibition of free-fall and precision landing techniques by the official DOD parachute team, the U.S. Army Golden Knights. Other parachute demonstrations can be performed by the U.S. Navy Parachute Team, or another unofficial team or sports parachute club representing the Department of Defense. A flyover is a flight of not more than four aircraft over a fixed point at a specific time and does not involve precision maneuvers or demonstrations. Flyovers are authorized for certain events when the presence of Armed Forces aircraft overhead would contribute to the effectiveness of the event based on a direct correlation between the event and the aircraft. Flyovers can also be authorized for occasions primarily designed to encourage the advancement of aviation and which are of more than local interest. Flyovers by any of the official DOD flight teams are not authorized. Parades are not considered an appropriate event for authorizing flyover support. The static display of aircraft is the ground display of any military aircraft and its related equipment, not involving flight, taxiing or starting of engines.


(g) Events which are appropriate for Armed Forces aviation participation in the public domain include such activities as dedication of airports and facilities, aviation shows, expositions, and fairs; and other civic events which contribute to the public knowledge of the U.S. Military Services aviation equipment and capabilities. The number one priority for utilization of military aircraft and parachutists in such events in the public domain is to support the recruiting aspects of the all-volunteer force concept. The approval of any such military demonstration will only be authorized if a maximum recruiting benefit exists at each location.


(h) Costs. (1) The cost for either the United States Air Force Thunderbirds or the United States Navy Blue Angels will be $1500 for each day a demonstration is scheduled. If the United States Army Golden Knights precision parachute team is scheduled for your event, the cost will be $25 per man per day for each day required to support your event, to include the days of travel if required. Under normal conditions, this group is comprised of fourteen members: Nine jumpers, three aircraft crewmen, one ground controller, and a narrator. The sponsor will be advised by the Golden Knights in advance of the costs related to his event for which the government must be reimbursed. The United States Army Silver Eagles helicopter team, composed of seven helicopters, performs precision formation manuevers and solo helicopter aerobatics to demonstrate the capabilities of modern helicopters and the skill of Army aviators. The Silver Eagles performance lasts about 30 minutes and is conducted entirely in full view of spectators on the crowd line. The cost for the team is $750 for each day a demonstration is scheduled. The sponsor should make a check payable to the Treasurer of the United States for the required amount and present it to the appropriate demonstration team commander in advance of the scheduled event.


(2) Costs associated with static aircraft are normally $25 per day for each crew member plus possible fuel requirements discussed below. Charges for any other military parachuting demonstration (i.e., U.S. Navy Parachute Team, local Armed Forces sport parachute clubs, etc.) will depend on the number of personnel and transportation involved. Checks payable to the Treasurer of the United States should be made available to the appropriate aircraft commander for static displays or parachute team commander upon arrival at the event.


(i) As noted in the Department of Defense request form, the sponsor is required to pay per diem costs for team and static display crew members except for flyovers or aircraft demonstrations not involving landing.


(3) These costs are binding after a team or crew personnel have arrived at the show site, even though weather conditions or other unforeseen circumstances force the event to be cancelled. These funds provided by the sponsor will be utilized by team members or crew personnel for paying housing and subsistence costs. The actual breakdown of the per diem involved is $13.20 for housing, $9.30 for subsistence, and $2.50 for incidental expenses. In those locations where housing and subsistence cannot be procured for these amounts, it will be the responsibility of the sponsor to absorb the additional cost. As stated, these costs will cover participation but does not include certain ground support requirements (i.e., ground transportation, telephone, etc.) to be furnished by a sponsor as outlined in a team support packet.


(4) Other costs that could be incurred by the sponsor are in the area of the sponsor’s agreement to provide suitable aircraft fuel (defined as JP jet fuel or aviation gas and lubricants) at U.S. Government contract prices. Where fuel is available from local military stocks – usually military installations – or when fuel is available from commercial into-plane contract locations, the U.S. Government will pay all fuel costs. If military contract fuel is not available at the show site, the sponsor will be required to pay all costs above the contract price and that price charged by the local supplier. However, the sponsor may choose to transport military contract fuel from a military base or a commercial airport having a U.S. Government into-plane contract. In this case, his cost would be only the transporting and handling of this fuel to the show site.


(5) The Department of Defense no longer requires the sponsor to provide the Department with a public liability and property damage insurance policy. This should in no way deter the sponsor from obtaining such liability and property damage insurance he feels is necessary for his own protection. Due to the costs that could accrue to the sponsor in case of cancellations because of inclement weather, the sponsor may wish to consider rain insurance to protect his investment. Previous sponsors have advised us that such insurance is available from most commercial companies.


(i) Other information. (1) Flight and/or parachute team demonstrations are restricted to appropriate events at airports, over open bodies of water, or over suitable open areas of land. For the U.S. Air Force Thunderbirds or U.S. Navy Blue Angels to operate from an airport show site, the following operational requirements must be met:


(i) Minimum useable runway length for the Thunderbirds is 5000 feet by 150 feet in width.


(ii) Minimum useable runway length for the Blue Angels is 6000 feet by 150 feet in width.


(iii) Minimum single landing gear load bearing capacity for Thunderbirds is 45,000 pounds; for Blue Angels, 21,000 pounds. Tandem landing gear load bearing capacity is 155,000 pounds for Blue Angels and Thunderbirds.


(2) A staged performance may not be given if the location planned for the show site does not meet these minimums. The maximum distance for a staged performance” under normal conditions is 50 nautical miles. It should be noted that staged performances are seldom authorized since the recruiting potential is reduced at such events.


(3) The type and number of static and/or flyover aircraft which may be assigned is entirely dependent upon the Military Services’ capability to provide such resources at the time of your event. This capability is affected by operational commitments and sponsors are advised that confirmation of static/flyover aircraft cannot be made by the appropriate Service more than 15-30 days before your event.


(4) The U.S. Army Silver Eagles are normally restricted to performances at airports. Other open land areas may be operationally suitable but require the prior approval of the team commander in each case.


(5) Only one flight demonstration team and a parachute demonstration team may be authorized for any one event. Military aircraft demonstrations may not be authorized for events on the days a flight team is participating. A flyover is not authorized when a flight team is participating unless it can be provided by a locally-based National Guard or Reserve component.


(6) Participation by the U.S. Navy Blue Angels and the U.S. Air Force Thunderbirds is normally limited to two consecutive years in any one event. This usually involves one appearance by each of the two flight teams. This provision may be waived when other appropriate requests have not been received, when the team is performing in the same geographical area and has open dates or when the event is national or international in nature and participation would be in the best interests of Department of Defense. Participation in an event is normally limited to two days unless a third day can be included without preempting other requests.


(7) Sponsors are required to obtain a Federal Aviation Agency (FAA) waiver for any demonstration by military aircraft and/or parachutists in the public domain. The final authorization for such Armed Forces participation hinges upon the sponsor securing this waiver far enough in advance to permit adequate planning (normally not later than 60 days prior to the event). Further guidance on the details of obtaining this waiver will be contained in the team support packet or FAA. FAA regulations require that spectators be confined 1500 feet from a flight or aircraft demonstration and 250 feet from a parachute demonstration.


(i) In some cases, parachute demonstrations require that the sponsor arrange for appropriate transportation for the team and equipment from its home station to the event and return.


(ii) Mass parachute jumps, drops of equipment, assault aircraft demonstrations, or tactical helicopter troop landings under simulated tactical conditions, will be limited to military installations. These activities, except those scheduled as part of regular training programs, are not authorized for public events in the civil domain.


(8) When civilian air racing is involved in an event where Armed Forces participation has also been scheduled, prize monies must come from sources other than admission charges.


(9) Flight team, parachute and aircraft demonstrations also require that the sponsor provide: (i) Recent aerial photograph of the site; (ii) an ambulance and doctor at the site; and (iii) Guards for the Armed Forces aircraft during their entire stay. The aerial photograph should be recent, taken vertically from at least 5,000 feet.


(10) Maximum advantage of Armed Forces recruiting will be taken at appropriate events in the public domain where demonstrations by military aircraft and parachutists have been authorized.


(11) Exception to the policies contained herein will only be considered by OASD(PA) on events of national or international significance.


(12) Department of Defense hosts a scheduling conference in mid-December each year to prepare U.S. Air Force Thunderbirds, U.S. Navy Blue Angels, U.S. Army Golden Knights and U.S. Army Silver Eagles participation schedules for the ensuing year. All requests for such demonstrations from sponsors should reach OASD(PA) prior to the middle of November each year to be considered at this conference. In order to accommodate many requests Department of Defense receives for other parachuting demonstrations, aircraft demonstrations, static aircraft displays, and flyovers, each request must be received by OASD(PA) a minimum of 30 days in advance of the event and preferably 60 days in advance.


(13) If there are any points that a member of the public might wish to have clarified, contact Chief, Aerial Events Branch, OASD(PA), Room 1E790, The Pentagon, Washington, DC 20301. Telephone: AC (202) 695-6795 or 695-9900.


§ 705.33 Participation by Armed Forces bands, choral groups, and troops in the public domain.

(a) Military musical participation in public events which otherwise meet the criteria outlined herein will be limited to patriotic programs as opposed to pure entertainment and will not duplicate a performance within the capability of a civilian group. For example, music to accompany the presentation of the national colors, or a performance of military or patriotic music by a military band, drum and bugle corps or choral group may be authorized; background, dinner, dance or other social music is considered “entertainment.”


(b) Requests received for military musical participation in appropriate events in the civilian domain must include an indication from the sponsor that there is no conflict with the local civilian musicians concerning the appearance of Navy musicians. A statement to this effect from the cognizant local musicians’ union must be obtained by the sponsor and attached to his request.


(c) Armed Forces musical units may be authorized to provide certain specified musical programs in the public domain. The performance must not place military musicians in competition with professional civilian musicians. Background, dinner, dance or other social music cannot be authorized. The specified programs which may be authorized usually include a short opening or closing patriotic presentation. Musical selections normally consist of a medley of military or patriotic songs, honors to the President or Vice President (if he is there), or music to accompany the presentation of colors by a Color Detail.


(1) Armed Forces musical units may be authorized to participate in official government, military and civic functions.


(i) Official government functions include those in which senior officials of the Federal government are involved in the performance of their official duties.


(ii) Official military functions include social activities held on military installations (or off when the Military Service certifies that suitable facilities are not available on post) which are sponsored by the Military Services, have as their principal purpose the promotion of esprit de corps, and are conducted primarily for active duty personnel and their guests.


(iii) Official civic functions include such State, county or municipal events as inaugurals, dedication of public buildings and projects, the convening of legislative bodies, and ceremonies for officially invited government visitors.


(2) Armed Forces musical units may also be authorized to provide patriotic and military programs at national conventions and meetings of nationally-recognized civic, patriotic and veterans organizations.


(d) Bands, drill teams and other units can normally participate at no cost to the sponsor if the event is within the installation’s immediate community relations area (approximately 100-mile radius).


(1) Normally, not more than one band or other musical unit will be authorized for a parade in the civilian domain. This guidance intended to assure widest possible participation in public events of local interest (particularly on national holidays) does not apply to national convention of veterans’ groups or other events having national significance.


(2) All Armed Forces participation in international and national events, and in the Washington, DC area, must be authorized by the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Public Affairs).


(3) Requests for Armed Forces musical or troop units when no military installation is accessible, or for the Washington, DC-based ceremonial bands or troop units (when the event is outside the Washington, DC area), should be addressed to the parent Service of the unit:



(I) U.S. Army

Chief of Public Information, Department of the Army, Washington, DC 20310.

(II) U.S. Navy

Chief of Information, Code OI-321, Department of the Navy, Washington, DC 20350.

(III) U.S. Air Force

Director of Information, Secretary of the Air Force, Community Relations Division, Washington, DC 20330.

(IV) U.S. Marine Corps

Commandant of the Marine Corps, Code AG, Headquarters, U.S. Marine Corps, Washington, DC 20380.

(4) Armed Forces units may not be authorized to participate when:


(i) The event directly or indirectly endorses or selectively benefits or favors (or appears to do so) any private individual, commercial venture, sect, fraternal organization, political group, or if it is associated with solicitation of votes in a political election.


(ii) Admission, seating and other accommodations or facilities are restricted in any manner with regard to race, creed, color or national origin.


(iii) The sponsoring organization or group excludes any person from its membership or practices any form of discrimination in its functions, based on race, creed, color or national origin.


(iv) An admission charge is levied on the public primarily to see participation by an Armed Forces unit.


(v) There is fund-raising of any type connected with the event, unless all profits are to be donated to a charity which is one of the consolidated programs recognized by the Federal Services Fund-Raising Program. These are the United Givers Fund Community Chest, National Health Agencies (as a group), the International Service Agencies, and the American Red Cross (when not included in a consolidated campaign). The Military Services’ Welfare Societies (Army Emergency Relief, Navy Relief and Air Force Aid Society) are also included.


(5) Sponsors of an event must agree to reimburse the Military Services concerned for transportation and per diem when participation is authorized at no additional cost to the government.


(6) Participation by Armed Forces musical units in other areas is within the authority of local military commanders, and requests for participation should be made directly to those local military installations. All requests should be submitted no earlier than 60 days and preferably no later than 45 days prior to the event.


§ 705.34 Other special events.

(a) Ship visits. Requests for visits generally originate with civic groups desiring Navy participation in local events. Often, members of Congress endorse these requests, advising the Navy of their interest in a particular event. Because of the marked increase in requests for ship visits, and in order to give equal consideration to all requests, the Chief of Information has arranged for quarterly meetings of representatives from CHINFO, Commander, Navy Recruiting Command, Chief of Naval Operations and Chief of Legislative Affairs. Based on the importance of the event (nationally, regionally, or locally) location, and prospective audience, recommendations are consolidated and forwarded to the fleet commanders prior to their quarterly scheduling conferences.


(b) Visits to Naval activities – (1) Types of visits. (i) General visits or Open House are occasions when a ship or station acts as host to the general public. These visits will be conducted in accordance with instructions issued by Fleet and Force Commanders, District Commandants, or other cognizant authority.


(ii) Casual visits are visits to ships or stations by individuals or specific groups, as differentiated from the general public. Details and procedures concerning these visits are a matter of command discretion.


(iii) Tours are occasions when a ship or station is host to a specific group on a scheduled date. Some of the larger shore commands also regularly schedule one or more sightseeing type tours daily during seasons when many vacationers ask to visit the command.


(2) General rules. Prior approval for general visiting or Open House at any time other than civic-sponsored public observances and official ceremonies for Armed Forces Day, memorial Day, Independence Day, and Veterans Day, and for observances in overseas areas of similar significant holidays, will be requested as follows: Fleet units visiting U.S. ports, from Senior Officer present Afloat; fleet units visiting foreign ports, from commander ordering the visit; shore stations and district vessels in the United States, from District Commandants; and overseas shore stations, from the naval area commander.


(c) Official functions. (1) Navy units may be authorized by local commanding officers to participate in official government military and civic functions, except in the Washington DC area where OASD(PA) retains authority.


(2) Official government functions include those in which senior officials of the federal government are involved in the performance of their official duties.


(3) Official military functions include social activities held on military installations (or off, when it is certified that suitable facilities are not available on base), which are sponsored by the Navy, have as their principal purpose the promotion of esprit de corps, and are conducted primarily for active duty personnel and their guests.


(4) Official civic functions include such state, county or municipal events as inaugurals, dedications of public buildings and projects, and convening of legislative bodies and ceremonies for officially invited government visitors.


(5) Overseas, similar functions attended by comparable host-country officials in their official capacities might also be considered appropriate for Navy participation.


(d) A parade which is sponsored by the community as a whole (rather than by a single commercial venture) and held on a Sunday or holiday or at a time when shops are closed for business may be a public event for which participation could properly be authorized; representation by individual commercial ventures in such parades need not be a bar to Navy participation as long as the emphasis is planned and placed on the civic rather than commercial aspects. Such participation will be at no additional cost to the government.


(e) Fund-raising events. (1) Navy support of fund-raising events must be limited to recognized, joint or other authorized campaigns. Navy support of fund-raising events or projects for a single cause, even though the cause is a member of one of the federated, joint or authorized campaigns, or donates in part to one of several of the recognized campaigns, is not authorized by Department of Defense.


(2) Navy support for a single-cause fund-raising event may be authorized if the event is:


(i) In support of Navy recruiting objectives;


(ii) Supported by a letter indicating the local United Way representative has no objection; and


(iii) Approved by the local Navy Commander as a single-cause charity which has broad local benefit.


[41 FR 29101, July 15, 1976, as amended at 44 FR 6391, Feb. 1, 1979]


§ 705.35 Armed Forces participation in events in the public domain.

(a) Requests for bands, troops, units, teams, exhibits and other Armed Forces participation should be addressed to the nearest military installation. Local commanders have resources which they can commit to appropriate events if mission requirements permit. If no military installation is accessible, or if resources requested are not available locally or require approval by higher authorities, a standard Department of Defense Request Form should be completed. This form is used to evaluate the request, determine appropriateness of the event and compliance with Department of Defense policies, and eliminate repeated correspondence. The request form should be returned to the office or military command from which it was received unless another address is indicated.


(b) Basic criteria governing Armed Forces participation in public events have been developed by the Department of Defense to ensure compliance with public law, to assure equitable distribution of resources to as many appropriate events as possible, and to avoid excessive disruption of primary training and operational missions of the Military Services. the following general rules and information are included as an aid to you in understanding Department of Defense policies and in planning programs of mutual benefit to the Armed Forces and your community.


(1) When evaluating requests for Armed Forces participation in public events, the interests of the Department of Defense and the public at large, operational requirements of the Military services, and availability of resources are prime considerations. Commitment of resources to specific events must be balanced with the above factors and with requests for similar participation received from other sources.


(2) Department of Defense participation and cooperation must not directly or indirectly:


(i) Endorse or selectively benefit or favor or appear to endorse or selectively benefit or favor any private individual, group, corporation (whether for profit or nonprofit), sect, quasi-religious or ideological movement, fraternal organization, political organization, or commercial venture.


(ii) Be associated with the solicitation of votes in a political election. Sites such as commercial theaters or department stores, churches or fraternal halls; and events such as testimonials to private individuals or sectarian religious services, are generally inappropriate for Armed Forces participation.


(3) Participation by the Armed Forces in any event or activity may be authorized only if admission, seating and all other accommodations and facilities are available to all without regard to race, creed, color or national origin, and only if the sponsoring organization does not exclude any form of discrimination based on race, creed, color or national origin. This does not bar participation in events sponsored by nationally-recognized veteran’s organizations when the program is oriented toward the veterans’ interests, nor does it bar participation in non-public school events when the program is directed toward education or recruiting.


(i) No admission charge may be levied on the public solely to see an Armed Forces demonstration, unit or exhibit. When admission is charged, the Armed Forces activity must not be the sole or primary attraction.


(4) Armed Forces participation is authorized in a fund-raising event only when the sponsor certifies that all net profits in excess of actual operating costs will be donated to one of the consolidated programs recognized by the Federal Services Fund-Raising program. These include such agencies as the United Givers Fund, Community Chests, National Health Agencies (as a group), International Service Agencies and the military aid societies.


(5) When Armed Forces participation in an event is in the mutual interest of the Department of Defense and the sponsor of the event, participation will be authorized at no additional cost to the government. Additional costs to the government – travel and transportation of military personnel, meals and quarters or standard per diem allowance, etc. – will be borne by the sponsor.


(6) Department of Defense policy prohibits payment by the Armed Forces for rental of exhibit space, connection of electricity, or utility or janitorial costs.


(7) The duration of participation by military units in any one event is limited in the interests of proper utilization and equitable distribution of Armed Forces manpower and resources. While an exhibit might be scheduled for the duration of an event, a unit such as a military band is limited to three days.


(8) Armed Forces participation in professional sports events and post-season bowl games will normally be authorized at no additional cost to the government, will emphasize joint Service activity and must support recruiting programs. Participation in beauty contests, fashion shows, pageants, Christmas parades, and motion picture premieres is not authorized since military support would violate policy and appropriateness.


§ 705.36 Government transportation of civilians for public affairs purposes.

(a) General policy. (1) Regulations on transportation of civilians vary according to whether:


(i) The civilians are news media representatives or not.


(ii) The travel is local or nonlocal (see paragraph (b) of this section).


(iii) The purpose of the travel is to get to a desired destination or is to observe the Navy at first hand.


(2) Authority for embarkation of individuals in naval vessels and military aircraft is vested in the Chief of Naval Operations by § 700.710 of this chapter. Nothing in this part shall be construed as limiting his authority in this regard.


(3) The following policy has been established by DOD for providing all types of Navy transportation to non-Navy civilians.


(i) Military transport facilities shall not be placed in a position of competition with U.S. commercial carriers.


(A) When embarkation of a newsman is necessary for him to obtain news material about a ship, aircraft, cargo or embarked personnel, or when he is invited to report on a matter of special interest to the Navy, it is not considered that the transportation furnished him is in competition with commercial transport.


(B) An exception is also made for short trips between an airport (or other transportation center) and the command. Cars and buses within the resources of the command may be used for meeting guests or taking them to make their travel connections.


(ii) When authorization is requested for travel which is of interest to or will affect more than one command or Service, the approving authority will coordinate the request with all other interested commands, Services and Agencies.


(iii) Travel in connection with any public affairs program arranged by the Navy jointly with another Federal Department or Agency or a foreign government will be authorized only by the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Public Affairs, or those to whom he has delegated this authority. Navy commands desiring authorization of such travel will forward the request to the Chief of Information.


(iv) If a request for travel for nonlocal public affairs purposes is disapproved, sufficient reasons should be provided so that the action is clearly understood by the individual or group concerned.


(b) Definition of local v. nonlocal travel. (1) Local travel is travel within the immediate vicinity of the command concerned in connection with a public affairs program of local interest only. (For air travel within the continental U.S., about 150 miles or less is generally considered local.)


(2) Nonlocal travel is that conducted in connection with a public affairs program affecting more than one Service, geographic area or major command, usually of primary concern to higher authority.


(c) Transportation of news media representatives. (1) This section applies to media representatives who are embarked for the purpose of news gathering or of traveling to an area in order to cover a news event. It does not apply to:


(i) Correspondents when members of groups embarked as regular cruise guests of the Navy.


(ii) Casual trips by correspondents to ships in port or to shore stations in CONUS. Such visits may be authorized by officers in command or higher authority in accordance with instructions promulgated by the Chief of Naval Operations. Written orders are not required.


(2) Local travel. Commanding officers at all levels are authorized (under Defense Department policy) to approve local travel for public affairs purposes within the scope of the mission and responsibilities of their command, if:


(i) Public interest in the public affairs purpose involved is confined primarily to the vicinity of that command.


(ii) The travel is being provided for the benefit of local media and meets a naval public affairs objective.


(iii) Scheduled commercial air transportation is not readily available.


(iv) The aircraft to be used is a helicopter, or multiengine dual piloted aircraft, and is within the resources of the host command on a not-to-interfere basis. This provision does not apply to orientation flights.


(3) Nonlocal travel. (i) Requests for nonlocal travel will be submitted to the Chief of Information, who will forward them with his recommendations to the Chief of Naval Operations and/or the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Public Affairs), as appropriate.


(ii) When the proposed travel is for news coverage of a major emergency nature and the coverage will be impaired or delayed, to the serious detriment of the interests of the Department of Defense, if military transportation is not provided, requests for such travel will be submitted to the Chief of Information, who will forward the request – if approved – to the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Public Affairs). The most expeditious means (including telephone) will be used by commands requesting such emergency travel. Justification will include both the public affairs purpose and the necessity for military carriers.


(4) Travel between the U.S. and overseas area. (i) The Chief of Naval Operations may authorize military transportation for correspondents in unusual circumstances, upon recommendations of the Chief of Information and the Defense Department.


(ii) Requests for government transportation to cover specific assignments overseas should be made at least three weeks prior to the date required and should be addressed to the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Public Affairs) via the Chief of Information or Unified Commander, as appropriate. The requests should include:


(A) A statement that the correspondent is a full-time employee, or has a specific assignment, and that the trip is for the purpose of news gathering.


(B) Appropriate date of entry into area, port of entry, method of travel, proposed duration of visit and travel termination date.


(C) Assurance that the correspondent will observe currency control regulations, and sponsoring agency will guarantee financial obligations incurred.


(5) Embarkation of male correspondents between ports within CONUS. (i) Male correspondents may be embarked in naval ships for passage between ports within the area of a single Fleet command for the purpose of news gathering at the discretion of the Sea Frontier Commander, Commandants of the Naval Districts, the Chief of naval Air Training, Fleet, Force and Type commanders and flag officers afloat who have been delegated authority to arrange directly with appropriate Fleet, Force and Type commanders for embarkation of civilians on a local cruise basis.


(ii) Invitational travel orders may be issued.


(6) Embarkation of female correspondents in naval vessels. (i) Privileges equal to those given male correspondents will be accorded female correspondents whenever practicable.


(ii) Female correspondents may not be embarked overnight in a naval ship without prior approval of the appropriate Fleet Commander-in-Chief. This authority may be delegated to the numbered Fleet Commanders.


(7) Travel in ships of the Military Sealift Command. Correspondents may be carried in ships of the Military Sealift Command on either a space-required or space-available basis when travel is in the best interests of the Navy or the Department of Defense.


(i) Space-available travel will be used when practicable. A nominal charge is made by the Military Sealift Command and must be borne by the correspondents.


(ii) Space-required travel may be authorized when sufficiently in the interest of the Navy, and the charge may be borne by the Navy.


(iii) In either case, determination of Navy interests will be made by the Chief of Information, guided by the transportation policy of the Chief of Naval Operations, whose approval of such embarkation is required.


(iv) Requests for such travel will be submitted to the Chief of Information, who will coordinate with the Chief of Naval Operations and/or the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Public Affairs), as appropriate.


(8) Point to point transportation within the continental United States in naval aircraft other than those operated by the Military Airlift Command.


(i) SECNAVINST 4630.2A contains guidance for travel in military aircraft other than those operated by the Military Airlift Command.


(ii) Naval activities desiring to arrange such transportation will address requests via the chain of command to the operational command of the lowest echelon which has been delegated authority to approve such requests.


(iii) Upon approval of such a request, the naval activity sponsoring the correspondent shall:


(A) Prepare travel orders.


(B) Ensure that any waiver forms, as may be required by governing directives, are executed.


(9) Embarkation of news media representatives of foreign citizenship:


(i) Requests from foreign news media representatives to cruise with units of the U.S. Navy are usually made to the nearest U.S. military installation known to the correspondent, and are often not made in the proper chain of command to the Fleet Commander unless authorized to effect arrangements for an underway cruise.


(A) if the request is received by a command which is not a subordinate of the Fleet Commander concerned, it will be forwarded to the U.S. Naval Attache assigned to the foreign newsman’s country. The Attache will then forward the request to the appropriate Fleet Commander, with his recommendations and the result of a brief background check on the newsman and his employer.


(B) If the request is received by a subordinate of the appropriate Fleet Commander, it may be forwarded directly to the latter, but the U.S. Naval Attache in the newsman’s country will be given the opportunity to comment on the proposed embarkation.


(ii) Naval commands should not introduce an embarked third-party (i.e., a foreign media representative) into a foreign country other than his own without first obtaining appropriate clearance from the country to be visited. Approval for entry should be forwarded via appropriate command channels to the cognizant U.S. Naval Attache.


(10) Security considerations. (i) No media representative known to be affiliated with a group advocating the overthrow of the U.S. government will be permitted aboard naval ships or stations.


(ii) If security review is directed, the reason will be made clear to the correspondent prior to embarkation. News media people refusing to agree to observe security regulations may have their privileges suspended. Failure to observe security regulations will be reported to CHINFO and interested commands.


(d) Transportation of other civilians. (1) Although groups normally provide their own transportation to Navy commands, Navy transportation may be authorized when:


(i) Commercial transport is not available.


(ii) A professional group visit has been solicited by the Navy, such as participants in the Naval Academy Information Program (“Blue and Gold”) or educators invited to an Aerospace Education Workshop.


(2) Requests for nonlocal transportation under the above circumstances will be made to the Chief of Naval Operations.


(3) Carrier-on-board-delivery (COD) flights and helicopters flights to ships are considered local transportation.


(4) When units or areas of a Unified Command are involved in the public affairs program in connection with which travel authorization is requested by a Navy command which is not a component of the Unified Command concerned, coordination will be effected by the host command, through command channels, via the Chief of Information, to the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Public Affairs), who – as appropriate – will consult with the Unified Commander concerned.


(e) Special programs. (1) Cruises are discussed in Chapter 6, section 0604, para. 1 of the Navy Public Affairs Regulations.


(2) Embarkation of news media representatives, especially on operations and exercises, is discussed in Chapter 4, section 0405, paragraph 4 of the Navy Public Affairs Regulations.


(3) Other programs subject to special requirements or which have had exceptions authorized for them include:


(i) Naval Air Training Command Civilian Orientation Cruise Program, conducted by the Chief of Naval Air Training.


(ii) Joint Civilian Orientation Conference, conducted by the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Public Affairs).


(iii) Orientation flights in government aircraft, conducted in accordance with OPNAVINST 37107H.


(iv) Space-available air transportation may be provided Navy League members if they are invited to accompany a flag officer attending a Navy League convention or regional meeting and if the trip is economically justifiable, based on military travel considerations and not community relations or public affairs reasons. Approval in each instance will be obtained in advance from the Chief of Naval Operations.


(v) Air transportation for the Naval Sea Cadet Corps of the Navy League.


(A) Flights must be in Navy multiengine, transport type craft.


(B) Point-to-point flights on a space-required basis are governed by an annual quota set by the Chief of Naval Operations. Space-available transportation is authorized and will not be charged against this quota if it will not result in delays of takeoffs or a change in the itinerary planned for the primary mission.


(C) Flights must not interfere with operational commitments or training or results in additional expense to the government.


(D) This transportation is not available to other youth programs, including others sponsored by the Navy League.


(f) Other instructions on transportation of non-Navy civilians. Details on policy, procedures, and the transportation of certain categories of people will be found in OPNAVINST 5720.2G and DOD Directive 4515.13.


[41 FR 29101, July 15, 1976, as amended at 44 FR 6391, Feb. 1, 1979]


§ 705.37 Public affairs and public service awards.

(a) General. (1) A number of public service awards are presented by the Department of Defense and the Navy to business and civic leaders, scientists and other nongovernment civilians. Other awards – military and civilian – are presented to members of the naval establishment.


(2) These awards are of public affairs interest in the locale where they are presented and also in the home towns of those who receive them.


(b) Department of Defense awards. (1) The Department of Defense Medal for Distinguished Public Service is presented to individuals. The Department of Defense Meritorious Award honors organizations.


(2) Details, including nominating procedures, are given in SECNAVINST 5061.12.


(c) Secretary of the Navy awards. (1) The following awards are presented by the Secretary of the Navy: The Navy Distinguished Public Service Award and Navy Meritorious Public Service Citation to individuals; the Navy Certificate of Commendation to members of special committees and groups; and the Navy Certificate of Merit to organizations and associations.


(2) Details are given in SECNAVINST 5061.12.


(3) Nominations for awards to military personnel are considered by the Board of Decorations and Medals, in accordance with SECNAVINST 1650.24A.


(4) Nominations for honorary awards to Department of the Navy civilian employees are considered by the Distinguished Civilian Service Awards Panel. (See Civilian Manpower Management Instruction 451.)


(d) Chief of Information awards – (1) Certificate of Public Relations Achievement. (i) This certificate is signed by the Chief of Information. It honors individuals who are not Navy employees, corporations, or associations.


(ii) It was established to fill the need for a civilian award for public relations achievements which, while not meeting the criteria for public service awards presented by the Secretary of the Navy, are of such Navy-wide significance as to merit recognition at the Department level. Examples of these achievements might be a particularly well done feature article about the Navy in a nationally read newspaper or an outstanding contribution to a locally sponsored event, which ultimately gave national or regional recognition to the Navy.


(iii) The achievement for which the certificate is given shall meet the following criteria:


(A) Contribute to accomplishment of the public information objectives of the Navy.


(B) Be the result of a single outstanding project or program.


(C) Have been accomplished within one year of the date of the official letter of nomination.


(iv) Nominations will be submitted through appropriate administrative channels to the Chief of Information, and will include a description of the service rendered, a statement of its relevance to the accomplishment of the public affairs objectives of the Navy and a draft of the recommended citation. To avoid possible embarrassment, nominations shall be marked “For Official Use Only” and safeguarded until final action has been taken.


(2) CHINFO Merit Awards. (i) These awards, or certificates, are presented quarterly to Navy publications and broadcasts considered to be outstanding or to have shown improvement in meeting professional standards of journalism.


(ii) Publications and broadcasts eligible are those which inform the reader concerning aspects of service life or related matters which contribute to the well-being of naval personnel, their dependents, and civilian employees of the Navy. Civilian enterprise periodicals are included if produced for the exclusive use of a naval installation.


(iii) Nominations are made in two ways:


(A) Selection during regular review periodicals and broadast air-checks received by the Internal Relations Activity.


(B) Nominations from the field. Such nominations are informal and may be made by the officer-in-charge, publications editor, broadcast station manager, or public affairs officer to the chief of Information, Navy Department, Washington, DC 20350 (ATTN: OP-0071).


(3) Other awards pertaining to public affairs/internal relations. (i) Silver Anvil award is given by the Public Relations Society of America for outstanding public relations programs carried out during the preceding year. Entry blanks and details may be obtained by writing directly to Public Relations Society of America, 845 Third Ave., New York, NY 10022. All Navy entries will be forwarded via the Chief of Information.


(ii) Freedom Foundation Awards of cash and medals are annually given to service personnel for letters on patriotic themes. Details are carried in ship and station publications, or may be obtained by writing to Freedom Foundations, Valley Forge, PA 19481.


(iii) Thomas Jefferson Awards are the prizes in an annual interservice competition sponsored by civilian media through the Department of Defense’s Office of Information for the Armed Forces. The contest is open to all Armed Forces media – broadcast and print. Details can be obtained by writing to Office of Information, Department of the Navy, Washington, DC 20350.


(iv) Navy League Awards. Several annual awards are presented to naval personnel and civilians who have made a notable contribution to the importance of seapower. The awards are for inspirational leadership, scientific and technical progess, operational competence, literary achievement, etc. Nominations should be forwarded directly to Board of Awards, Navy League of the United States, 818 18th St., NW., Washington, DC 20006.


(v) Nonofficial awards to outstanding Navy students or training units.


(A) Various civilian organizations and private individuals have established awards to be presented to outstanding training units or naval students.


(B) Requests to establish an award for students in the Naval Air Training program should be forwarded to the Chief of Naval Air Training.


(C) Requests to establish an award which will involve more than one school (other than the Naval Air Training Program) will be forwarded to the Chief of Naval Personnel.


(D) All other cases may be decided by the Navy authority at the school concerned.


(E) Directives in the 5061, 1650 and 3590 series issued by pertinent authorities may provide further guidance in individual cases.


(vi) Awards established by a command to honor non-Navy civilians.


(A) Examples of such awards are “Good Neighbor” or “Honorary Crew Member” certificates.


(B) Established to honor persons who have been helpful to the command, they are a valuable community relations program. They should not be awarded to persons or organizations with which the command is associated in a commercial or governmental business capacity.


[41 FR 29101, July 15, 1976, as amended at 44 FR 6391, Feb. 1, 1979]


SUBCHAPTER B [RESERVED]

SUBCHAPTER C – PERSONNEL

PART 719 – REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTING THE MANUAL FOR COURTS-MARTIAL


Authority:3 U.S.C. 301; 5 U.S.C. 301; 10 U.S.C. 815, 5013, 5148; 32 CFR 700.206 and 700.1202.

Subparts A-B [Reserved]

Subpart C – Trial Matters

§ 719.112 Authority to grant immunity from prosecution.

(a) General. In certain cases involving more than one participant, the interests of justice may make it advisable to grant immunity, either transactional or testimonial, to one or more of the participants in the offense in consideration for their testifying for the Government or the defense in the investigation and/or the trial of the principal offender. Transactional immunity, as that term is used in this section, shall mean immunity from prosecution for any offense or offenses to which the compelled testimony relates. Testimonial immunity, as that term is used in this section, shall mean immunity from the use, in aid of future prosecution, of testimony or other information compelled under an order to testify (or any information directly or indirectly derived from such testimony or other information). The authority to grant either transactional or testimonial immunity to a witness is reserved to officers exercising general court-martial jurisdiction. This authority may be exercised in any case whether or not formal charges have been preferred and whether or not the matter has been referred for trial. The approval of the Attorney General of the United States on certain orders to testify may be required, as outlined below.


(b) Procedure. The written recommendation that a certain witness be granted either transactional or testimonial immunity in consideration for testimony deemed essential to the Government or to the defense shall be forwarded to an officer competent to convene a general court-martial for the witness for whom immunity is requested, i.e., any officer exercising general court-martial jurisdiction. Such recommendation will be forwarded by the trial counsel or defense counsel in cases referred for trial, the pretrial investigating officer conducting an investigation upon preferred charges, the counsel or recorder of any other fact-finding body, or the investigator when no charges have yet been preferred. The recommendation shall state in detail why the testimony of the witness is deemed so essential or material that the interests of justice cannot be served without the grant of immunity. The officer exercising general court-martial jurisdiction shall act upon such request after referring it to his staff judge advocate for consideration and advice. If approved, a copy of the written grant of immunity must be served upon the accused or his defense counsel within a reasonable time before the witness testifies. Additionally, if any witness is expected to testify in response to a promise of leniency, the terms of the promise of leniency must be reduced to writing and served upon the accused or his defense counsel in the same manner as a grant of immunity.


(c) Civilian witnesses. Pursuant to 18 U.S.C. 6002 and 6004, if the testimony or other information of a civilian witness at a court-martial may be necessary in the public interest, and if the civilian witness has refused or is likely to refuse to testify or provide other information on the basis of a privilege against self-incrimination, then the approval of the Attorney General of the United States, or his designee, must be obtained prior to the execution or issuance of an order to testify to such civilian witness. The cognizant officer exercising general court-martial jurisdiction may obtain the approval of the Attorney General in such a circumstance by directing a message or letter requesting the assistance of the Judge Advocate General (Code 20) in the form prescribed in paragraph (e) of this section.


(d) Cases involving national security. In all cases involving national security or foreign relations of the United States, the cognizant officer exercising general court-martial jurisdiction shall forward any proposed grant of immunity to the Judge Advocate General for the purpose of consultation with the Department of Justice. See section 0126 of the Manual of the Judge Advocate General regarding relations between the Departments of Defense and Justice. The cognizant officer exercising general court-martial jurisdiction may obtain approval by the Attorney General of a proposed grant of immunity by directing a letter requesting the assistance of the Judge Advocate General (Code 20) in the form prescribed in paragraph (e) of this section.


(e) Content of immunity requests. In all cases in which approval of the Attorney General of the United States is required prior to the issuance of a grant of immunity, whether under paragraph (c) or (d) of this section, the cognizant officer exercising general court-martial jurisdiction shall forward by message or letter the proposed order to testify and grant of immunity to the Judge Advocate General (Code 20). The order to testify should be substantially in the form set forth in appendix A-1-i(3) of the Manual of the Judge Advocate General. Requests for assistance shall be in writing, should allow at least three weeks for consideration, and must contain the following information:


(1) Name, citation, or other identifying information of the proceeding in which the order is to be used.


(2) Name of the witness for whom the immunity is requested.


(3) Name of the employer or company with which a witness is associated or the military unit or organization to which a witness is assigned.


(4) Date and place of birth, if known, of the witness.


(5) FBI or local police file number, if any, and if known.


(6) Whether any State or Federal charges are pending against the witness and the nature of the charges.


(7) Whether the witness is currently incarcerated, under what conditions, and for what length of time.


(8) A brief resume of the background of the investigation or proceeding before the agency or department.


(9) A concise statement of the reasons for the request, including:


(i) What testimony the witness is expected to give;


(ii) How this testimony will serve the public interest;


(iii) Whether the witness:


(A) Has invoked the privilege against self-incrimination; or


(B) Is likely to invoke the privilege;


(iv) If paragraph (e)(9)(iii)(B) of this section is applicable, then why it is anticipated that the prospective witness will invoke the privilege.


(10) An estimate as to whether the witness is likely to testify in the event immunity is granted.


(f) Post-testimony procedure. After a witness immunized in accordance with paragraphs (c) and (d) of this section has testified, the following information should be provided to the United States Department of Justice, Criminal Division, Immunity Unit, Washington, DC 20530, via the Judge Advocate General (Code 20).


(1) Name, citation, or other identifying information, of the proceeding in which the order was requested.


(2) Date of the examination of the witness.


(3) Name and residence address of the witness.


(4) Whether the witness invoked the privilege.


(5) Whether the immunity order was used.


(6) Whether the witness testified pursuant to the order.


(7) If the witness refused to comply with the order, whether contempt proceedings were instituted, or are contemplated, and the result of the contempt proceeding, if concluded. A verbatim transcript of the witness’ testimony, authenticated by the military judge, should be provided to the Judge Advocate General at the conclusion of the trial. No testimony or other information given by a civilian witness pursuant to such an order to testify (or any information directly or indirectly derived from such testimony or other information) may be used against him in any criminal case, except a prosecution for perjury, giving a false statement, or otherwise failing to comply with the order.


(g) Review. Under some circumstances, the officer granting immunity to a witness may be disqualified from taking reviewing action on the record of the trial before which the witness granted immunity testified. A successor in command not participating in the grant of immunity would not be so disqualified under those circumstances.


(h) Form of grant. In any case in which a military witness is granted transactional immunity, the general court-martial convening authority should execute a written grant, substantially in the form set forth in appendix section A-1-i(1) of the Manual of the Judge Advocate General. In any case in which a military witness is granted testimonial immunity, the general court-martial convening authority should execute a written grant substantially in the form set forth in appendix section A-1-i(2) of the Manual of the Judge Advocate General.


[56 FR 57803, Nov. 14, 1991]


§§ 719.113-719.114 [Reserved]

§ 719.115 Release of information pertaining to accused persons; spectators at judicial sessions.

(a) Release of information – (1) General. There are valid reasons for making information available to the public concerning the administration of military justice. The task of striking a fair balance among the protection of individuals accused of offenses, improper or unwarranted publicity pertaining to their cases, public understanding of the problems of controlling misconduct in the military service, and the workings of military justice requires the exercise of sound judgment by those responsible for administering military justice and by representatives of the press and other news media. At the heart of all guidelines pertaining to the furnishing of information concerning an accused or the allegations against him is the mandate that no statements or other information shall be furnished to news media for the purpose of influencing the outcome of an accused’s trial, or which could reasonably be expected to have such an effect.


(2) Applicability of regulations. These regulations apply to all persons who may obtain information as the result of duties performed in connection with the processing of accused persons, the investigation of suspected offenses, the imposition of nonjudicial punishment, or the trial of persons by court-martial. These regulations are applicable from the time of apprehension, the preferral of charges, or the commencement of an investigation directed to make recommendations concerning disciplinary action, until the imposition of nonjudicial punishment, completion of trial (court-martial sessions) or disposition of the case without trial. These regulations also prescribe guidelines for the release or dissemination of information to public news agencies, to other public news media, or to other persons or agencies for unofficial purposes.


(3) Release of information. (i) As a general matter, release of information pertaining to accused persons should not be initiated by persons in the naval service. Information of this nature should be released only upon specific request therefor, and, subject to the following guidelines, should not exceed the scope of the inquiry concerned.


(ii) Except in unusual circumstances, information which is subject to release under the regulation should be released by the cognizant public affairs officer; requests for information received from representatives of news media should be referred to the public affairs office for action. When an individual is suspected or accused of an offense, care should be taken to indicate that the individual is alleged to have committed or is suspected or accused of having committed an offense, as distinguished from stating or implying that the accused has committed the offense or offenses.


(4) Information subject to release. On inquiry, the following information concerning a person accused or suspected of an offense or offenses may generally be released except as provided in paragraph (6) of this section:


(i) The accused’s name, grade, age, unit, regularly assigned duties, duty station, and sex.


(ii) The substance of the offenses of which the individual is accused or suspected.


(iii) The identity of the victim of any alleged or suspected offense, except the victim of a sexual offense.


(iv) The identity of the apprehending and investigative agency, and the identity of accused’s counsel, if any.


(v) The factual circumstances immediately surrounding the apprehension of the accused, including the time and place of apprehension, resistance, pursuit, and use of weapons.


(vi) The type and place of custody, if any.


(vii) Information which has become a part of the record of proceedings of the court-martial in open session.


(viii) The scheduling of any stage in the judicial process.


(ix) The denial by the accused of any offense or offenses of which he may be accused or suspected (when release of such information is approved by the counsel of the accused).


(5) Prohibited information. The following information concerning a person accused or suspected of an offense or offenses generally may not be released, except as provided in paragraph (a)(6) of this section.


(i) Subjective opinions, observations, or comments concerning the accused’s character, demeanor at any time (except as authorized in paragraph (4)(v) of this section), or guilt of the offense or offenses involved.


(ii) The prior criminal record (including other apprehensions, charges or trials) or the character or reputation of the accused.


(iii) The existence or contents of any confession, admission, statement, or alibi given by the accused, or the refusal or failure of the accused to make any statement.


(iv) The performance of any examination or test, such as polygraph examinations, chemical tests, ballistics tests, etc., or the refusal or the failure of the accused to submit to an examination or test.


(v) The identity, testimony, or credibility of possible witnesses, except as authorized in paragraph (4)(iii), of this section.


(vi) The possibility of a plea of guilty to any offense charged or to a lesser offense and any negotiation or any offer to negotiate respecting a plea of guilty.


(vii) References to confidential sources or investigative techniques or procedures.


(viii) Any other matter when there is a reasonable likelihood that the dissemination of such matter will affect the deliberations of an investigative body or the findings or sentence of a court-martial or otherwise prejudice the due administration of military justice either before, during, or after trial.


(6) Exceptional cases. The provisions of this section are not intended to restrict the release of information designed to enlist public assistance in apprehending an accused or suspect who is a fugitive from justice or to warn the public of any danger that a fugitive accused or suspect may present. Further, since the purpose of this section is to prescribe generally applicable guidelines, there may be exceptional circumstances which warrant the release of information prohibited under paragraph (a)(5) of this section or the nonrelease of information permitted under paragraph (a)(4) of this section. Attention should be given to the Secretary of the Navy instructions implementing the Freedom of Information Act (5720.42 series) and the Privacy Act (5211.5C series). Consultation with the command judge advocate, if one is assigned, or with the cognizant Naval Legal Service Office concerning interpretation and application of these instructions is encouraged.


(b) Spectators. (1) The sessions of courts-martial shall be open to the public, which includes members of both the military and civilian communities. In order to maintain the dignity and decorum of the proceedings or for other good cause, the military judge may reasonably limit the number of spectators in, and the means of access to, the courtroom, exclude specific persons from the courtroom, and close a session. Video and audio recording and taking of photographs, except for the purpose of preparing the record of trial, in the courtroom during the proceedings and radio or television broadcasting of proceedings from the courtroom shall not be permitted. The military judge may, as a matter of discretion, permit contemporaneous closed-circuit video or audio transmission to permit viewing or hearing by an accused removed from the courtroom or by spectators when courtroom facilities are inadequate to accommodate a reasonable number of spectators.


(2) At pretrial investigations. Consistent with Rules for Courts-Martial 405(h)(3), Manual for Courts-Martial, the Convening Authority or investigating officer may direct that all or part of an Article 32 investigation under 10 U.S.C. 832 be held in closed session and that all persons not connected with the hearing be excluded therefrom. The decision to exclude spectators may be based on the need to protect classified information, to prevent disclosure of matters that will be inadmissible in evidence at a subsequent trial by Courts-Martial and are of such a nature as to interfere with a fair trial by an impartial tribunal, or consistent with appellate case law, for a reason deemed appropriate by the commander ordering the investigation or the investigating officer. The reasons for closing an Article 32 investigation, and any objections thereto, shall be memorialized and included as an attachment to the report of investigation. Ordinarily, the proceedings of a pretrial investigation should be open to spectators. In cases dealing with classified information, the investigating officer will ensure that any part of a pretrial investigation (e.g., rights advisement) that does not involve classified information will remain open to spectators.


[38 FR 5997, Mar. 6, 1973, as amended at 47 FR 49644, Nov. 2, 1982; 50 FR 23800, June 6, 1985; 69 FR 20540, Apr. 16, 2004]


Subpart D [Reserved]

Subpart E – Miscellaneous Matters

§ 719.138 Fees of civilian witnesses.

(a) Method of Payment. The fees and mileage of a civilian witness shall be paid by the disbursing officer of the command of a convening authority or appointing authority or by the disbursing officer at or near the place where the tribunal sits or where a deposition is taken when such disbursing officer is presented a properly completed public voucher for such fees and mileage, signed by the witness and certified by one of the following:


(1) Trial counsel or assistant trial counsel of the court-martial;


(2) Summary court officer;


(3) Counsel for the court in a court of inquiry;


(4) Recorder or junior member of a board to redress injuries to property, or


(5) Military or civil officer before whom a deposition is taken.


The public voucher must be accompanied by a subpoena or invitational orders (Joint Travel Regulations, vol. 2, chap. 6), and by a certified copy of the order appointing the court-martial, court of inquiry, or investigation. If, however, a deposition is taken before charges are referred for trial, the fees and mileage of the witness concerned shall be paid by the disbursing officer at or near the place where the deposition is taken upon presentation of a public voucher, properly completed as hereinbefore prescribed, and accompanied by an order from the officer who authorized the taking of the deposition, subscribed by him and directing the disbursing officer to pay to the witness the fees and mileage supported by the public voucher. When the civilian witness testifies outside the United States, its territories and possessions, the public voucher must be accompanied by a certified copy of the order appointing the court-martial, court of inquiry, or investigation, and by an order from the convening authority or appointing authority, subscribed by him and directing the disbursing officer to pay to the witness the fees and mileage supported by the public voucher.

(b) Obtaining money for advance tender or payment. Upon written request by one of the officers listed in paragraph (a) of this section, the disbursing officer under the command of the convening or appointing authority, or the disbursing officer nearest the place where the witness is found, will, at once, provide any of the persons listed in paragraph (a) of this section, or any other officer or person designated for the purpose, the required amount of money to be tendered or paid to the witness for mileage and fees for one day of attendance. The person so receiving the money for the purpose named shall furnish the disbursing officer concerned with a proper receipt.


(c) Reimbursement. If an officer charged with serving a subpoena pays from his personal funds the necessary fees and mileage to a witness, taking a receipt therefor, he is entitled to reimbursement upon submitting to the disbursing officer such receipt, together with a certificate of the appropriate person named in paragraph (a) of this section, to the effect that the payment was necessary.


(d) Certificate of person before whom deposition is taken. The certificate of the person named in paragraph (a) of this section, before whom the witness gave his deposition, will be evidence of the fact and period of attendance of the witness and the place from which summoned.


(e) Payment of accrued fees. The witness may be paid accrued fees at his request at any time during the period of attendance. The disbursing officer will make such interim payment(s) upon receipt of properly executed certificate(s). Upon his discharge from attendance, the witness will be paid, upon the execution of a certificate, a final amount covering unpaid fees and travel, including an amount for return travel. Payment for return travel will be made upon the basis of the actual fees and mileage allowed for travel to the court, or place designated for taking a deposition.


(f) Computation. Travel expenses shall be determined on the basis of the shortest usually traveled route in accordance with official schedules. Reasonable allowance will be made for unavoidable detention.


(g) Nontransferability of accounts. Accounts of civilian witnesses may not be transferred or assigned.


(h) Signatures. Signatures of witnesses signed by mark must be witnessed by two persons.


(i) Rates for civilian witnesses prescribed by law – (1) Civilian witnesses not in Government employ. A civilian not in Government employ, who is compelled or required to testify as a witness before a Naval tribunal at a specified place or to appear at a place where his deposition is to be taken for use before a court or fact-finding body, will receive fees, subsistence, and mileage as provided in 28 U.S.C. 1821. Witness and subsistence fees are not prorated. Instead any fractional part of a calendar day expended in attendance or qualifying for subsistence entitles the witness to payment for a full day. Further, nothing in this paragraph shall be construed as authorizing the payment of attendance fees to witnesses for:


(i) Attendance or travel which is not performed either as a direct result of being compelled to testify pursuant to a subpoena or as a direct result of invitational orders; or


(ii) For travel which is performed prior to being duly summoned as a witness; or


(iii) For travel returning to their places of residence if the travel from their places of residence does not qualify for payment under this paragraph.


(2) Civilian witnesses in Government employ. When summoned as a witness, a civilian in the employ of the Government shall be paid as authorized by Joint Travel Regulations.


(j) Supplemental construction of section. Nothing in this paragraph shall be construed as permitting or requiring the payment of fees to those witnesses not requested or whose testimony is determined not to meet the standards of relevancy and materiality set forth in accordance with MCM, 1984, R.C.M. 703.


(k) Expert witnesses. (1) The convening authority will authorize the employment of an expert witness and will fix the limit of compensation to be paid such expert on the basis of the normal compensation paid by United States attorneys for attendance of a witness of such standing in United States courts in the area involved. Information concerning such normal compensation may be obtained from the nearest officer exercising general court-martial jurisdiction having a judge advocate assigned in other than an additional duty, temporary duty, or temporary additional duty capacity. Convening authorities at overseas commands will adhere to fees paid such witnesses in the Hawaiian area and may obtain information as to the limit of such fees from the Commander, Naval Base, Pearl Harbor. See paragraph (l) of this section for fees payable to foreign nationals.


(2) The provisions of paragraph (i) of this section are applicable to expert witnesses. However, the expert witness fee prescribed by the convening authority will be paid in lieu of ordinary attendance fees on those days the witness is required to attend the court.


(3) An expert witness employed in strict accordance with MCM, 1984, R.C.M. 703(d), may be paid compensation at the rate prescribed in advance by the official empowered to authorize his employment (11 Comp. Gen. 504). In the absence of such authorization, no fees other than ordinary witness fees may be paid for the employment of an individual as an expert witness. After an expert witness has testified pursuant to such employment, the certificate of one of the officers listed in subsection a above, when presented to the disbursing officer, shall also enclose a certified copy of the authorization of the convening authority.


(l) Payment of witness fees to foreign nationals: Officers exercising general court-martial jurisdiction in areas other than a State of the United States shall establish rates of compensation for payment of foreign nationals who testify as witnesses, including expert witnesses, at courts-martial convened in such areas.


[38 FR 5997, Mar. 6, 1973, as amended at 47 FR 49644, Nov. 2, 1982; 50 FR 23801, June 6, 1985]


§§ 719.139-719.141 [Reserved]

§ 719.142 Suspension of counsel.

(a) Report of Allegations of Misconduct or Disability. When information comes to the attention of a member of a court-martial, a military judge, trial or defense counsel, staff judge advocate, member of the Navy-Marine Corps Court of Military Review or other directly interested or concerned party that a judge advocate or civilian who is acting or is about to act as counsel before a proceeding conducted under the UCMJ or MCM is or has been unable to discharge properly all the duties of his or her position by reason of mental or physical disability or has been engaged in professional or personal misconduct of such a serious nature as to demonstrate that he or she is lacking in integrity or is failing to meet the ethical standards of the profession or is otherwise unworthy or unqualified to perform the duties of a judge advocate or attorney, such information should be reported to the commanding officer of that judge advocate or, in the case of civilian counsel, to the officer exercising general court-martial jurisdiction over the command convening the proceedings or to the Judge Advocate General.


(b) Form of report. The report shall:


(1) Be in writing, under oath or affirmation, and made and signed by the individual reporting the information.


(2) State that the individual reporting the information has personal knowledge or belief or has otherwise received reliable information indicating that:


(i) The counsel is, or has been, unable to discharge properly all the duties of his or her office by reason of mental or physical disability; or


(ii) The counsel is or has been engaged in professional or personal misconduct of such a serious nature as to demonstrate that he or she is lacking in integrity or is failing to meet the ethical standards of the profession; or


(iii) The counsel is unworthy or unqualified to perform his or her duties;


(3) Set forth the grounds of the allegation together with all relevant facts; and


(4) Be forwarded to the appropriate authority as set forth in paragraph (a).


(c) Consideration of the Report – (1) Action by the Commanding Officer of a judge advocate. Upon receipt of the report, the commanding officer:


(i) Shall dismiss any report relating to the performance of a judge advocate more properly appealed under law or any report that is frivolous, unfounded, or vague and return it to the reporting individual;


(ii) May make further inquiry into the report at his or her discretion to determine the merits of the report. The commanding officer may appoint an officer to investigate informally the allegations of the report to determine whether further action is warranted. Any officer so appointed should be a judge advocate senior in rank to the judge advocate being investigated;


(iii) May take appropriate action to address and dispose of the matter being mindful of such measures as warning, counseling, caution, instruction, proceedings in contempt, therapy, and other punitive or administrative action; or


(iv) Shall, if the commanding officer is of the opinion that evidence of disability or professional or personal misconduct exists, and that remedial measures short of suspension or decertification are not appropriate or will not be effective, forward the original complaint, a written report of the inquiry or investigation, all other relevant information, and his or her comments and recommendations to the officer in the chain of command exercising general court-martial authority.


(2) Action by officer exercising general court-martial authority. (i) Upon receipt of a report of an allegation of misconduct or disability of a counsel, the officer exercising general court-martial convening authority:


(A) May take the action authorized by subsections (c)(1)(i), (ii) or (iii); or


(B) Shall, if he or she considers that evidence of disability or professional or personal misconduct exists and that other remedial measures short of suspension or decertification are not appropriate or will not be effective, appoint a board of officers to investigate the matter and to report its findings and its recommendations. This board shall be comprised of at least three officers, each an Article 27(b), Uniform Code of Military Justice, certified judge advocate. If practicable, each of the officers of the board should be senior to the judge advocate under investigation. If the counsel is a member of the Marine Corps, a majority of the members of the board should be Marine Corps judge advocates. The senior officer of the board shall cause notice to be given to the counsel, judge advocate or civilian (respondent), informing him or her of the misconduct or other disqualification alleged and affording him or her the opportunity to appear before the board for a hearing. The respondent shall be permitted at least ten (10) days’ notice prior to the hearing. Failure to appear on a set date after notice shall constitute waiver of appearance, absent good cause shown. The respondent shall be generally afforded the rights of a party as set out in section 0304 of this Manual, except that, in the event the judge advocate respondent wishes to have military counsel appointed, he or she shall not have the right to select or identify a particular military counsel. A civilian respondent may not be represented by military counsel, but may be represented by civilian counsel at no expense to the Government. Upon ascertaining the relevant facts after notice and hearing, a written report of the findings and recommendations of the board shall be made to the officer who convened the board. In all cases, a written copy of the board’s findings and recommendations shall be provided to the respondent. The respondent shall be given an opportunity to comment on the report in writing.


(ii) Upon receipt of the report of the board of investigation, the officer exercising general court-martial authority shall:


(A) Return the report to the board for further investigation, if the investigation is determined to be incomplete; or


(B) Forward the report of the board of investigation to the Judge Advocate General together with comments and recommendations concerning suspension of the counsel involved.


(3) Action by the Judge Advocate General. (i) Upon receipt of a report of an allegation of misconduct or disability of a counsel, the Judge Advocate General:


(A) May take the action authorized by subsections (c)(1)(i), (ii), or (iii);


(B) May appoint a board of officers for investigation and hearing in accordance with subsections (c)(2)(i)(B) or


(C) May request the officer exercising general court-martial jurisdiction over the command of the respondent (if judge advocate counsel) or over the proceedings (if civilian counsel) to take the matter for investigation and hearing in accordance with subsection (c)(2)(i)(B).


(ii) Upon receipt of the report of the investigating board, the Judge Advocate General:


(A) May determine whether the respondent is to be suspended or decertified and, if so, whether for a stated term or indefinitely;


(B) May determine that the findings of the board do not warrant further action; or


(C) May return the report to the sending officer with appropriate instructions for further inquiry or action. The Judge Advocate General may, sua sponte, or upon petition of the respondent, modify or revoke any prior order of suspension or dismissal of a report. Further, if the Judge Advocate General suspends counsel, the Judge Advocates General of the other armed forces will be notified.


(d) Grounds justifying suspension of counsel or suspension or decertification of a Judge Advocate. (1) Suspension or decertification is to be employed only after it has been established that a counsel has been unable to discharge properly all the duties of his or her office by reason of mental or physical disability or has been engaged in professional or personal misconduct of such a serious nature as to demonstrate that he or she is lacking in integrity or is failing to meet the ethical standards of the profession or is otherwise unworthy or unqualified to perform the duties of a counsel Action to suspend or decertify should not be initiated because of personal prejudice or hostility toward counsel, nor should such action be initiated because counsel has initiated an aggressive, zealous or novel defense, or the apparent misconduct stems from inexperience or lack of instruction.


(2) Specific grounds for suspension or decertification include, but are not limited to, the following:


(i) Demonstrated incompetence while acting as counsel before, during or after a court-martial.


(ii) Preventing or obstructing justice, including the deliberate use of frivolous or unwarranted dilatory tactics.


(iii) Fabricating papers or other evidence.


(iv) Tampering with a witness.


(v) Abusive conduct toward the court-martial, the Navy-Marine Corps Court of Military Review, the military judge, or opposing counsel.


(vi) Flagrant or repeated violations of any specific rules of conduct prescribed for counsel in the Manual for Courts-Martial.


(vii) Conviction of an offense involving moral turpitude or conviction for violation of article 48, UCMJ.


(viii) Disbarment by a State Bar, Federal Court, or the United States Court of Military Appeals.


(ix) Suspension as counsel by the Judge Advocate General of the Navy, Army, or Air Force or the General Counsel of the Department of Transportation.


(x) Flagrant or repeated violations of the Uniform Rules of Practice Before Navy-Marine Corps Courts-Martial as outlined in appendix A-1-p(1) of the Manual of the Judge Advocate General.


(xi) Flagrant or repeated violations of the provisions of section 0134 of this Manual of the Judge Advocate General dealing with the Release of Information Pertaining to Accused Persons; Spectators at Judicial Sessions.


(xii) Failure to meet the rules set forth in the ABA Code of Professional Responsibility and the ABA Standards on Fair Trial and Free Press and The Prosecution Function and the Defense Function. In view of the unique mission and personal requirements of the military, many of the rules and principles of the ABA Code or Standards are not applicable to the military lawyer. Accordingly, the rules are to be used as a guide only, and a failure to comply with the specific wording of a rule is not to be construed as a violation of the rule where common sense would indicate to a reasonable person that there is a distinction between the civilian context, which the codes were drafted to embrace, and the unique concerns of the military setting, where the codes serve as a general guide.


[50 FR 23801, June 6, 1985]


§ 719.143 Petition for new trial under 10 U.S.C. 873.

(a) Statutory provisions. 10 U.S.C. 873, provides, “At any time within 2 years after approval by the convening authority of a court-martial sentence, the accused may petition the Judge Advocate General for a new trial on the grounds of newly discovered evidence or fraud on the court. If the accused’s case is pending before a Court of Military Review or before the Court of Military Appeals, that Judge Advocate General shall refer the petition to the appropriate court for action. Otherwise the Judge Advocate General shall act upon the petition.”


(b) Submission procedures: At any time within 2 years after approval by the convening authority of a court-martial sentence, the accused may petition the Judge Advocate General for a new trial on the ground of newly discovered evidence or fraud on the court-martial. The petition for new trial may be submitted by the accused personally, or by accused’s counsel, regardless of whether the accused has been separated from the service. A petition may not be submitted after the death of the accused.


(c) Contents of petitions: The form and contents of petitions for new trial are specified in MCM, 1984, R.C.M. 1210(c). The petition for a new trial shall be written and shall be signed under oath or affirmation by the accused, by a person possessing the power of attorney of the accused for that purpose, or by a person with the authorization of an appropriate court to sign the petition as the representative of the accused. The petition shall contain the following information, or an explanation why such matters are not included:


(1) The name, service number, and current address of the accused;


(2) The date and location of the trial;


(3) The type of court-martial and the title or position of the convening authority;


(4) The request for the new trial;


(5) The sentence or a description thereof as approved or affirmed, with any later reduction thereof by clemency or otherwise,


(6) A brief description of any finding or sentence believed to be unjust;


(7) A full statement of the newly discovered evidence or fraud on the court-martial which is relied upon for the remedy sought;


(8) Affidavits pertinent to the matters in subsection (6)i; and


(9) Affidavit of each person whom the accused expects to present as a witness in the event of a new trial. Each affidavit should set forth briefly the relevant facts within the personal knowledge of the witness.


(d) Who may act on petition. If the accused’s case is pending before a Court of Military Review or the Court of Military Appeals, the Judge Advocate General shall refer the petition to the appropriate court for action. Otherwise, the Judge Advocate shall act on the petition.


(e) Ground for new trial. A new trial may be granted only on grounds of newly discovered evidence or fraud on the court-martial.


(1) A new trial shall not be granted on the grounds of newly discovered evidence unless the petition shows that;


(i) The evidence was discovered after the trial,


(ii) The evidence is not such that it would have been discovered by the petitioner at the time of trial in the exercise of due diligence; and


(iii) The newly discovered evidence, if considered by a court-martial in the light of all other pertinent evidence, would probably produce a substantially more favorable result for the accused.


(2) No fraud on the court-martial warrants a new trial unless it had a substantial contributing effect on a finding of guilty or the sentence adjudged.


(f) Action on the petition. (1) The authority considering the petition may cause such additional investigation to be made and such additional information to be secured as that authority believes appropriate. Upon written request, and in his discretion, the authority considering the petition may permit oral argument on the matter.


(2) When a petition is considered by the Judge Advocate General, any hearing may be before the Judge Advocate General or before an officer or officers designated by the Judge Advocate General.


(3) If the Judge Advocate General believes meritorious grounds for relief under Article 74, Uniform Code of Military Justice have been established but that a new trial is not appropriate, the Judge Advocate General may act under article 74, Uniform Code of Military Justice, if authorized, or transmit the petition and related papers to the Secretary concerned with a recommendation.


(4) The Judge Advocate may also, in cases which have been finally reviewed but have not been reviewed by a Court of Military Review, act under article 69, Uniform Code of Military Justice.


[50 FR 23803, June 6, 1985]


§ 719.144 Application for relief under 10 U.S.C. 869, in cases which have been finally reviewed.

(a) Statutory provisions. 10 U.S.C. 869 provides in pertinent part, “The findings or sentence, or both, in a court-martial case not reviewed under subsection (a) or under section 866 of this title (article 66) may be modified or set aside, in whole or in part, by the Judge Advocate General on the ground of newly discovered evidence, fraud on the court, lack of jurisdiction over the accused or the offense, error prejudicial to the substantial rights of the accused, or the appropriateness of the sentence. If such a case is considered upon application of the accused, the application must be filed in the Office of the Judge Advocate General by the accused on or before the last day of the two-year period beginning on the date the sentence is approved under section 860(c) of this title (article 60(c)), unless the accused establishes good cause for failure to file within that time.”


(b) Time limitations. In order to be considered by the Judge Advocate General, an application for relief must be placed in military channels if the applicant is on active duty, or be deposited in the mail if the applicant is no longer on active duty, on or before the last day of the two-year period beginning on the date the sentence is approved by the convening authority. An application not filed in compliance with these time limits may be considered if the Judge Advocate General determines, in his or her sole discretion, that “good cause” for failure to file within the time limits has been established by the applicant.


(c) Submission procedures. Applications for relief may be submitted to the Judge Advocate General by letter. If the accused is on active duty, the application shall be submitted via the applicant’s commanding officer, and the command that convened the court, and the command that reviewed the case under 10 U.S.C. 864(a) or (b). If the original record of trail is held by the command that reviewed the case under 10 U.S.C. 864(a) or (b), it shall be forwarded as an enclosure to the endorsement. If the original record of trial has been filed in the National Personnel Records Center, the endorsement will include all necessary retrieval data (accession number, box number, and shelf location) obtained from the receipt returned from the National Personnel Records Center to the sending activity. This endorsement shall also include information and specific comment on the grounds for relief asserted in the application, and an opinion on the merits of the application. If the applicant is no longer on active duty, the application may be submitted directly to the Judge Advocate General.


(d) Contents of applications. All applications for relief shall contain:


(1) Full name of the applicant;


(2) Social Security number and branch of service, if any;


(3) Present grade if on active duty or retired, or “civilian” or “deceased” as applicable;


(4) Address at time the application is forwarded;


(5) Date of trial;


(6) Place of trial;


(7) Command title of the organization at which the court-martial was convened (convening authority);


(8) Command title of the officer exercising review authority in accordance with 10 U.S.C. 864 over the applicant at the time of trial, if applicable;


(9) Type of court-martial which convicted the applicant, and sentence adjudged;


(10) General grounds for relief which must be one or more of the following:


(i) Newly discovered evidence;


(ii) Fraud on the court;


(iii) Lack of jurisdiction over the accused or the offense;


(iv) Error prejudicial to the substantial rights of the accused;


(v) Appropriateness of the sentence;


(11) An elaboration of the specific prejudice resulting from any error cited. (Legal authorities to support the applicant’s contentions may be included, and the format used may take the form of a legal brief if the applicant so desires.);


(12) Any other matter which the applicant desires to submit;


(13) Relief requested; and


(14) Facts and circumstances to establish “good cause” for a failure to file the application within the time limits prescribed in paragraph (b) of this section, if applicable; and


(15) If the application is signed by a person other than the applicant pursuant to subsection e, an explanation of the circumstances rendering the applicant incapable of making application. The applicant’s copy of the record of trial will not be forwarded with the application for relief, unless specifically requested by the Judge Advocate General.


(e) Signatures on applications. Unless incapable of making application, the applicant shall personally sign the application under oath before an official authorized to administer oaths. If the applicant is incapable of making application, the application may be signed under oath and submitted by the applicant’s spouse, next of kin, executor, guardian or other person with a proper interest in the matter. In this regard, one is considered incapable of making application for purposes of this section when unable to sign the application under oath due to physical or mental incapacity.


[50 FR 23804, June 6, 1985]


§§ 719.145-719.150 [Reserved]

§ 719.151 Furnishing of advice and counsel to accused placed in pretrial confinement.

The Department of the Navy Corrections Manual, SECNAVINST 1640.9, reiterates the requirement of Article 10, UCMJ, that, when a person is placed in pretrial confinement, immediate steps should be taken to inform the confinee of the specific wrong of which he is accused and try him or to dismiss the charges and release him. The Corrections Manual requires that this information normally will be provided within 48 hours along with advice as to the confinee’s right to consult with lawyer counsel and his right to prepare for trial. Lawyer counsel may be either a civilian lawyer provided by the confinee at his own expense or a military lawyer provided by the Government. If a confinee requests to confer with a military lawyer, such lawyer should normally be made available for consultation within 48 hours after the request is made.


[39 FR 18437, May 28, 1974]


§ 719.155 Application under 10 U.S.C. 874(b) for the substitution of an administrative form of discharge for a punitive discharge or dismissal.

(a) Statutory provisions. 10 U.S.C. 874(b) provides that the “Secretary concerned may, for good cause, substitute an administrative form of discharge for a discharge or dismissal executed in accordance with the sentence of a court-martial.”


(b) Submission procedures. Applications for relief will be submitted to the Secretary using the following address: Secretary of the Navy (Judge Advocate General, Code 20), 200 Stovall Street, Alexandria, VA 22332-2400. Except in unusual circumstances, applications will not normally be considered if received within five (5) years of the execution of the punitive discharge or dismissal, or within five (5) years of disapproval of a prior request under 10 U.S.C. 874(b).


(c) Contents of the application. All applications shall contain:


(1) Full name of the applicant;


(2) Social Security Number, service number (if different), and branch of service of the applicant;


(3) Present age and date of birth of the applicant;


(4) Present residence of the applicant;


(5) Date and place of the trial, and type of court-martial which resulted in the punitive discharge or dismissal;


(6) Command title of the convening authority of the court-martial which resulted in the punitive discharge or dismissal;


(7) Offense(s) of which the applicant was convicted, and sentence finally approved from the trial which resulted in the punitive discharge or dismissal;


(8) Date the punitive discharge or dismissal was executed;


(9) Applicant’s present marital status, and number and ages of dependents, if any;


(10) Applicant’s civilian criminal record (arrest(s) with disposition, and conviction(s)), both prior and subsequent to the court-martial which resulted in the punitive discharge or dismissal;


(11) Applicant’s entire court-martial record (offense(s) of which convicted and finally approved sentence(s)), and nonjudicial punishment record (including offense(s) and punishment(s) awarded);


(12) Any military administrative discharge proceedings (circumstances and disposition) initiated against the applicant;


(13) Applicant’s full employment record since the punitive discharge or dismissal was executed;


(14) The specific type and character of administrative discharge requested pursuant to 10 U.S.C. 874(b) (a more favorable administrative discharge than that requested will not be approved);


(15) At least three but not more than six character affidavits, (The character affidavits must be notarized, must indicate the relationship of the affiant to the applicant, and must include the address of the affiant as well as specific reasons why the affiant believes the applicant to be of good character. The affidavits should discuss the applicant’s character primarily as reflected in the civilian community subsequent to the punitive discharge or dismissal which is the subject of the application);


(16) Any matters, other than the character affidavits, supporting the considerations described in subparagraph (18) below;


(17) Any other relief sought within the Department of the Navy and outside the Department of the Navy including dates of application and final dispositions;


(18) A statement by the applicant, setting forth the specific considerations which the applicant believes constitute “good cause,” so as to warrant the substitution of an administrative form of discharge for the punitive discharge or dismissal previously executed. (In this connection, 10 U.S.C. 874(b) does not provide another regular or extraordinary procedure for the review of a court-martial. Questions of guilt or innocence, or legal issues attendant to the court-martial which resulted in the punitive discharge or dismissal, are neither relevant nor appropriate for consideration under 10 U.S.C. 874(b). As used in the statute, “good cause” was envisioned by Congress to encompass only Secretarial exercise of clemency and ultimate control of sentence uniformity. Accordingly, in determining what constitutes “good cause” under 10 U.S.C. 874(b), the primary Secretarial concern will be with the applicant’s record in the civilian community subsequent to his or her punitive separation. Material submitted by the 10 U.S.C. 874(b) applicant should be consistent with the foregoing.)


(d) Signature on application. Unless incapable of making application himself or herself, the applicant shall personally sign the application, under oath, before a notary or other official authorized to administer oaths. If the applicant is incapable of executing the application, the application may be signed under oath and submitted by the applicant’s spouse, next of kin, executor, guardian and other person recognized as a personal representative by the law of the applicant’s domicile. One is considered incapable of executing an application for purposes of this paragraph only when the applicant is unable to sign the application under oath due to physical or mental incapacity. When an application is signed by a person other than the applicant, the circumstances rendering the applicant incapable of making sworn application shall be set forth in the application, with appropriate documentation.


(e) Privacy Act Statement. Disclosure of personal information requested by paragraph (c) of this section is voluntary; however, failure to accurately provide all requested information may result in the application being denied because of inadequate documentation of good cause.


[47 FR 49645, Nov. 2, 1982, as amended at 50 FR 23804, June 6, 1985]


PART 720 – DELIVERY OF PERSONNEL; SERVICE OF PROCESS AND SUBPOENAS; PRODUCTION OF OFFICIAL RECORDS


Authority:5 U.S.C. 301; 10 U.S.C. 5031 and 5148; 32 CFR 700.206 and 700.1202.

Subpart A – Delivery of Personnel


Source:57 FR 5228, Feb. 13, 1992, unless otherwise noted.

§ 720.1 Delivery of persons requested by State authorities in criminal cases.

Subpart A of this part deals with requests by State authorities for the surrender of members or civilians pursuant to arrest warrants or similar process, generally in connection with a criminal prosecution. Responding to such requests by a State for delivery of members or civilian employees involves balancing the Federal interest in preserving sovereign immunity and the productivity, peace, good order, and discipline of the installation against the right of the State to exercise its jurisdiction. Additionally, by regulation, naval and Marine authorities are limited in the extent to which they can directly assist such an act. Commands should respond to such requests as set out below, generally using the minimum authority necessary to preserve the Federal interests without unduly restricting State jurisdiction.


§ 720.2 Delivery when persons are within the territorial limits of the requesting State.

When the delivery of any member or civilian is requested by local civil authorities of a State for an offense punishable under the laws of that jurisdiction, and such person is located at a Navy or Marine Corps installation within the requesting jurisdiction, or aboard a ship within the territorial waters of such jurisdiction, commanding officers are authorized to and normally will deliver such person when a proper warrant is issued. In the case of a member, delivery will only be effected upon compliance with § 720.6, subject to the exceptions in § 720.9. A judge advocate of the Navy or Marine Corps should be consulted before delivery is effected. The rule discussed above applies equally to civilian employees and civilian contractors and their employees when located on a Navy or Marine Corps installation, except that compliance with § 720.6 and consideration of § 720.9 are not required (for purposes of this part, “State” includes the District of Columbia, territories, commonwealths, and all possessions or protectorates of the United States). Commands should normally not become actively involved in civilian law enforcement. When a command has determined that a person is to be delivered in response to a valid warrant, the following guidance should be considered. If the person to be delivered is a military member, the member may be ordered to report to a location designated by the commanding officer and surrendered to civil authorities under Article 14, UCMJ (10 U.S.C. 814). If the person to be delivered is a civilian, the person may be invited to report to the designated space for delivery. If the civilian refuses, the civilian authorities may be escorted to a place where the civilian is located in order that delivery may be effected. A civilian may be directed to leave a classified area. All should be done with minimum interference to good order and discipline.


§ 720.3 Delivery when persons are beyond territorial limits of the requesting State.

(a) General. When State civil authorities request delivery of any member of the Navy or Marine Corps for an alleged crime or offense punishable under the law of the jurisdiction making the request, and such member is not attached to a Navy or Marine Corps activity within the requesting State or a ship within the territorial waters thereof, the following action will be taken. Any officer exercising general court-martial jurisdiction, or officer designated by him, or any commanding officer, after consultation with a judge advocate of the Navy or Marine Corps, is authorized (upon compliance with the provisions of this section and § 720.6, and subject to the exceptions in § 720.9) to deliver such member to make the member amenable to prosecution. The member may be delivered upon formal or informal waiver of extradition in accordance with § 720.3(b), or upon presentation of a fugitive warrant, in which case the procedures of § 720.3(c) apply. The rule discussed above applies equally to civilian employees and civilian contractors and their employees when located on a Department of the Navy installation not within the requesting State, except that compliance with § 720.6 and consideration of § 720.9 are not required.


(b) Waiver of extradition. (1) Any member may waive formal extradition. A waiver must be in writing and be witnessed. It must include a statement that the member signing it has received counsel of either a military or civilian attorney prior to executing the waiver, and it must further set forth the name and address of the attorney consulted.


(2) In every case where there is any doubt as to the voluntary nature of a waiver, such doubt shall be resolved against its use and all persons concerned will be advised to comply with the procedures set forth in § 720.3(c).


(3) Executed copies of all waivers will be mailed to the Judge Advocate General immediately after their execution.


(4) When a member declines to waive extradition, the nearest Naval Legal Service Office or Marine Corps staff judge advocate shall be informed and shall confer with the civil authorities as appropriate. The member concerned shall not be transferred or ordered out of the State in which he is then located without the permission of the Secretary of the Navy (Judge Advocate General), unless a fugitive warrant is obtained as set forth in § 720.3(c).


(c) Fugitive warrants. (1) A fugitive warrant, as used in this chapter, is a warrant issued by a State court of competent jurisdiction for the arrest of a member. Normally, a State requesting delivery of a member from another State will issue a fugitive warrant to the State where the member is then located.


(2) Upon issuance of a fugitive warrant by the requesting State to the State in which the member is located, the latter State will normally request delivery of the member to local State authorities. Delivery to local State authorities should be arranged by Navy or Marine Corps officers designated in § 720.3(a), upon compliance with the provisions of § 720.6, and subject to the conditions of §§ 720.9 and 720.3(c) (3) and (4).


(3) Upon receipt of a request for delivery of a member under fugitive warrant to State authorities, if the member voluntarily waives extradition, the provisions of § 720.3(b) apply. If the member is delivered to local authorities but refuses to waive extradition in the courts of the State in which he is located.


(4) No delivery of a member by Navy or Marine Corps officers pursuant to a fugitive warrant or waiver of extradition shall be effected without completion of the agreement required by § 720.6 and execution of such agreement either:


(i) By authorities of both the requesting State and the State in which the member is located, or


(ii) By authorities of the State in which the member is located if such authorities, on behalf of the requesting State, accept the full responsibility for returning the number to a command designated by the Department of the Navy.


(d) Members stationed outside the United States. When the member sought by State authorities is not located within the United States, see § 720.4.


§ 720.4 Persons stationed outside the United States.

(a) Persons desired by local U.S. authorities. When delivery of any member in the Navy or Marine Corps, or any civilian employee or dependent, is desired for trial by state authorities and the individual whose presence is sought is stationed outside the United States, the provisions of subpart D of this part will be followed. In all such cases, the nearest judge advocate of the Navy or Marine Corps shall be consulted before any action is taken.


(b) Members desired by U.S. Federal authorities. When delivery of any member of the Navy or Marine Corps is desired for trial in a Federal district court, upon appropriate representation by the Department of Justice to the Secretary of the Navy (Judge Advocate General), the member will be returned to the United States at the expense of the Department of the Navy and held at a military facility convenient to the Department of the Navy and to the Department of Justice. Delivery may be accomplished as set forth in § 720.7, subject to the exceptions in § 720.9.


§ 720.5 Authority of the Judge Advocate General and the General Counsel.

(a) Authority of the Judge Advocate General. The Judge Advocate General, the Deputy Judge Advocate General, and the Assistant Judge Advocates General are authorized to act for the Secretary of the Navy in performance of functions under this chapter.


(b) Authority of the General Counsel. The authority of the General Counsel of the Navy is prescribed by Navy Regulation (32 CFR 700.203 (a) and (g)) and by appropriate departmental directives and instructions (e.g., SECNAVINST 5430.25D).
1
The principal areas of responsibility of the Office of the General Counsel (OGC) are commercial law, including maritime contract matters; civilian employee law; real property law; and Freedom of Information Act and Privacy Act matters as delineated in 32 CFR part 701. The Office of the General Counsel shares responsibility with the Judge Advocate General for environmental law cases.




1 Copies may be obtained if needed, from the Commanding Officer, Naval Publication and Forms Center, 5801 Tabor Avenue, Philadelphia, PA 19120.


(c) Points of contact. Commanding officers are advised to contact their local area judge advocates for assistance in referring matters to the appropriate office of the Judge Advocate General or General Counsel.


(d) Coordination with the Commandant of the Marine Corps. Marine Corps commands shall inform the Commandant of the Marine Corps (CMC) of all matters referred to the Judge Advocate General or the Office of General Counsel. Copies of all correspondence and documents shall also be provided to CMC. The Staff Judge Advocate to the Commandant (CMC (JAR)) shall be advised of all matters referred to the Judge Advocate General. Counsel to the Commandant shall be advised of matters referred to the Office of General Counsel.


§ 720.6 Agreement required prior to delivery to State authorities.

(a) Delivery under Article 14, UCMJ. When delivery of any member of the Navy or Marine Corps to the civilian authorities of a State is authorized, the member’s commanding officer shall, before making such delivery, obtain from the Governor or other duly authorized officer of such State a written agreement. The State official completing the agreement must show that he is authorized to bind the State to the terms of the agreement. When indicating in the agreement the naval or Marine Corps activity to which the member delivered is to be returned by the State, care should be taken to designate the closest appropriate activity (to the command to which the member is attached) that possesses special court-martial jurisdiction. The Department of the Navy considers this agreement substantially complied with when:


(1) The member is furnished transportation (under escort in cases of delivery in accordance with § 720.12) to a naval or Marine Corps activity as set forth in the agreement;


(2) The member is provided cash to cover incidental expenses en route thereto; and


(3) The Department of the Navy is so informed.


As soon as practicable, a copy of the delivery agreement shall be forwarded to the Judge Advocate General.

(b) Delivery under Interstate Agreement on Detainers Act. Special forms are used when delivering prisoners under the Interstate Agreement on Detainers Act. The Act is infrequently used and most requests are pursuant to Article 14, UCMJ. See § 720.12 for a detailed discussion of the Detainers Act.


§ 720.7 Delivery of persons to Federal authorities.

(a) Authority to deliver. When Federal law enforcement authorities display proper credentials and Federal warrants for the arrest of members, civilian employees, civilian contractors and their employees, or dependents residing at or located on a Department of the Navy installation, commanding officers are authorized to and should allow the arrest of the individual sought. The exceptions in § 720.9 may be applied to members. A judge advocate of the Navy or Marine Corps should be consulted before delivery is effected.


(b) Agreement not required of Federal authorities. The agreement described in § 720.6 is not a condition to the delivery of members to Federal law enforcement authorities. Regardless of whether the member is convicted or acquitted, after final disposition of the case, the member will be returned to the Naval Service (provided that naval authorities desire his return) and the necessary expenses will be paid from an appropriation under the control of the Department of Justice.


§ 720.8 Delivery of persons to foreign authorities.

Except when provided by agreement between the United States and the foreign government concerned, commanding officers are not authorized to deliver members or civilian employees of the Department of the Navy, or their dependents residing at or located on a naval or Marine Corps installation, to foreign authorities. When a request for delivery of these persons is received in a country with which the United States has no agreement or when the commanding officer is in doubt, advice should be sought from the Judge Advocate General. Detailed information concerning the delivery of members, civilian employees, and dependents to foreign authorities when a status of forces agreement is in effect is contained in DoD Directive 5525.1 of 9 April 1985 and SECNAVINST 5820.4F.
2




2 See footnote 1 of § 720.5(b).


§ 720.9 Circumstances in which delivery is refused.

(a) Disciplinary proceedings pending. When disciplinary proceedings involving military offenses are pending, commanding officers should obtain legal guidance from a judge advocate of the Navy or Marine Corps prior to delivery of members to Federal or State authorities.


(b) When delivery may be refused. Delivery may be refused only in the following limited circumstances:


(1) Where the accused has been retained for prosecution; or


(2) When the commanding officer determines that extraordinary circumstances exist which indicate that delivery should be refused.


(c) Delivery under Detainers Act. When the accused is undergoing sentence of a court-martial, see § 720.12.


(d) Reports required. When delivery will be refused, the commanding officer shall report the circumstances to the Judge Advocate General by telephone, or by message if telephone is impractical. The initial report shall be confirmed by letter setting forth a full statement of the facts. A copy of the report shall be forwarded to the regional coordinator.


§ 720.10 Members released by civil authorities on bail or on their own recognizance.

A member of the Navy or Marine Corps arrested by Federal or State authorities and released on bail or on his own recognizance has a duty to return to his parent organization. Accordingly, when a member of the Navy or Marine Corps is arrested by Federal or State authorities and returns to his ship or station on bail, or on his own recognizance, the commanding officer, upon verification of the attesting facts, date of trial, and approximate length of time that should be covered by the absence, shall grant liberty or leave to permit appearance for trial, unless this would have a serious negative impact on the command. In the event that liberty or leave is not granted, a judge advocate of the Navy or Marine Corps should immediately be requested to act as liaison with the court. Nothing in this section is to be construed as permitting the member arrested and released to avoid the obligations of bond or recognizance by reason of the member’s being in the military service.


§ 720.11 Interviewing servicemembers or civilian employees by Federal civilian investigative agencies.

Requests by the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Naval Investigative Service Command, or other Federal civilian investigative agencies to interview members or civilian employees of the Department of the Navy suspected or accused of crimes should be promptly honored. Any refusal of such a request shall be immediately reported to the Judge Advocate General, or the Office of General Counsel, as appropriate, by telephone, or by message if telephone is impractical. When the employee in question is a member of an exclusive bargaining unit, a staff judge advocate or General Counsel attorney will be consulted to determine whether the employee has a right to have a bargaining unit representative present during the interview.


§ 720.12 Request for delivery of members serving sentence of court-martial.

(a) General. Article 14, UCMJ (10 U.S.C. 814), provides authority to honor requests for delivery of members serving a sentence of a court-martial. Although seldom utilized, additional authority and mandatory obligation to deliver such members are provided by the Interstate Agreement on Detainers Act (18 U.S.C. app. 9, hereinafter “the Act”), which applies to the Federal agency holding the prisoner. The Department of the Navy, as an agency of the Federal Government, shall comply with the Act. The Act is designed to avoid speedy-trial issues and to aid in rehabilitation efforts by securing a greater degree of certainty about a prisoner’s future. The Act provides a way for a prisoner to be tried on charges pending before State courts, either at the request of the State where the charges are pending or the prisoner’s request. When refusal of delivery under Article 14, UCMJ, is intended, comply with § 720.9(d).


(b) Interstate Agreement on Detainers Act. Upon request under the Act by either State authorities or the prisoner, the cognizant Navy or Marine Corps staff judge advocate, as appropriate, shall communicate with the appropriate State officials, and monitor and ensure that the cognizant commander acts on all such requests. The Act provides that court-martial sentences continue to run during temporary custody. This section does not cover requests between Federal authorities. The procedure set forth in § 720.12(c) shall be applied in such cases.


(1) State request. State officials may request delivery of prisoners in military custody under section 2, Article IV, of the Act. Where a detainer has been lodged against the prisoner, and the prisoner is serving a sentence (regardless of whether an appeal is in process), delivery is mandatory unless the request is disapproved by the Director of the Bureau of Prisons, Washington, DC, 20537 as the designee of the Attorney General for this purpose. 28 CFR 0.96(n). There has been no further delegation to military authority. The prisoner should be informed that he may request the Director of the Bureau of Prisons, Washington, DC 20537, within 30 days after such request is received, to deny the request. Upon the expiration of such 30-day period or upon the Director of the Bureau of Prisons’ denial of the prisoner’s request, whichever occurs first, the prisoner shall be delivered to the requesting authority.


(2) Prisoner request. The obligation to grant temporary custody under the Act also applies to prisoners’ requests to be delivered to State authority. Section 2, Article III(c) of the Act requires the custodial official to inform the prisoner of the existence of any detainer and of the prisoner’s right to request disposition. The prisoner’s request is directed to the custodial official who must forward it to the appropriate prosecuting official and court, with a certificate of prisoner status as provided by Article III of the Act.


(c) Article 14, UCMJ. When a request for custody does not invoke the Interstate Agreement on Detainers Act, delivery of custody shall be governed by Article 14, UCMJ, and §§ 720.2 through 720.9. The request shall be honored unless, in the exercise of discretion, there is an overriding reason for retaining the accused in military custody, e.g., additional courts-martial are to be convened or the delivery would severely prejudice the prisoner’s appellate rights. Execution of the agreement discussed in § 720.6 is a condition precedent to delivery to State authorities. It is not required before delivery to Federal authorities. See § 720.7. Unlike delivery under the Act, delivery of custody pursuant to Article 14, UCMJ, interrupts execution of the court-martial sentence.


§ 720.13 Request for delivery of members serving sentence of a State court.

(a) General. Ordinarily, members serving protracted sentences resulting from a State criminal conviction will be processed for administrative discharge by reason of misconduct. It may, however, be in the best interest of the Naval Service to retain a member charged with a serious offense, subject to military jurisdiction, to try the member by court-martial. The Navy may obtain temporary custody of incarcerated members for prosecution with a request to the State under the Interstate Agreement on Detainers Act. 18 U.S.C. app. 9. The Department of the Navy may use the Act in the same manner in which State authorities may request members purusant to § 720.12.


(b) Interstate Agreement on Detainers Act. Military authorities may use the Act to obtain temporary custody of a member incarcerated in a State institution, pursuant to conviction by a State court, to resolve criminal charges against the member before a court-martial.


(1) Detainer. If a command requests temporary custody under the Act, the commanding officer of the cognizant naval legal service office or the Marine Corps staff judge advocate, shall file a detainer with the warden, commissioner of corrections, or other State official having custody of the member. The detainer shall identify the member with particularity, enumerate the military charges pending, and request the command be notified in advance of any intention to release the member from confinement.


(2) Request for delivery. As soon as practical after filing the detainer, the commanding officer of the cognizant naval legal service office or the Marine Corps staff judge advocate, shall prepare a written request for temporary custody of the member addressed to the State official charged with administration of the State penal system. The request shall designate the person(s) to whom the member is to be delivered and shall be transmitted via the military judge to whom the member’s case has been assigned. If the request is properly prepared, the military judge shall approve, record, and transmit the request to the addressee official. The Act provides the State with a 30-day period after receipt of the request before the request is to be honored. Within that period of time, the governor of the State may disapprove the request, either unilaterally or upon the prisoner’s request. If the governor disapproves the request, the command should coordinate any further action with the Judge Advocate General.


(3) Responsibilities. The cognizant command shall ensure that the responsibilities of a receiving jurisdiction, delineated in section 2, Article IV of the Act, are discharged. In particular, the Act requires that the receiving jurisdiction:


(i) Commence the prisoner’s trial within 120 days of the prisoner’s arrival, unless the court, for good cause shown during an Article 39(a), UCMJ, session, grants a continuance necessary or reasonable to promote the ends of justice;


(ii) Hold the prisoner in a suitable jail or other facility regularly used for persons awaiting prosecution, except for periods during which the prisoner attends court or travels to or from any place at which his presence may be required;


(iii) Return the prisoner to the sending jurisdiction at the earliest practical time, but not before the charges that underlie the request have been resolved (prematurely returning the prisoner will result in dismissal of the charges); and


(iv) Pay all costs of transporting, caring for, keeping, and returning the prisoner to the sending jurisdiction, unless the command and the State agree on some other allocation of the costs or responsibilities.


§§ 720.14-720.19 [Reserved]

Subpart B – Service of Process and Subpoenas Upon Personnel


Source:57 FR 5232, Feb. 13, 1992, unless otherwise noted.

§ 720.20 Service of process upon personnel.

(a) General. Commanding officers afloat and ashore may permit service of process of Federal or State courts upon members, civilian employees, dependents, or contractors residing at or located on a naval installation, if located within their commands. Service will not be made within the command without the commanding officer’s consent. The intent of this provision is to protect against interference with mission accomplishment and to preserve good order and discipline, while not unnecessarily impeding the court’s work. Where practical, the commanding officer shall require that the process be served in his presence, or in the presence of a designated officer. In all cases, individuals will be advised to seek legal counsel, either from a legal assistance attorney or from personal counsel for service in personal matters, and from Government counsel for service in official matters. The commanding officer is not required to act as a process server. The action required depends in part on the status of the individual requested and which State issued the process.


(1) In-State process. When a process server from a State or Federal court from the jurisdiction where the naval station is located requests permission to serve process aboard an installation, the command ordinarily should not prevent service of process so long as delivery is made in accordance with reasonable command regulations and is consistent with good order and discipline. Withholding service may be justified only in the rare case when the individual sought is located in an area under exclusive Federal jurisdiction not subject to any reservation by the State of the right to serve process. Questions on the extent of jurisdiction should be referred to the staff judge advocate, command counsel, or local naval legal service office. If service is permitted, an appropriate location should be designated (for example, the command legal office) where the process server and the member or employee can meet privately in order that process may be served away from the workplace. A member may be directed to report to the designated location. A civilian may be invited to the designated location. If the civilian does not cooperate, the process server may be escorted to the location of the civilian in order that process may be served. A civilian may be required to leave a classified area in order that the process server may have access to the civilian. If unusual circumstances require that the command not permit service, see § 720.20(e).


(2) Out-of-State process. In those cases where the process is to be served by authority of a jurisdiction other than that where the command is located, the person named is not required to accept process. Accordingly, the process server from the out-of-State jurisdiction need not be brought face-to-face with the person named in the process. Rather, the process server should report to the designated command location while the person named is contacted, apprised of the situation, and advised that he may accept service, but also may refuse. In the event that the person named refuses service, the process server should be so notified. If service of process is attempted from out-of-State by mail and refused, the refusal should be noted and the documents returned to the sender. Questions should be referred to the staff judge advocate, command counsel, or the local naval legal service office.


(b) Service of process arising from official duties. (1) Whenever a member or civilian employee of the Department of the Navy is served with process because of his official position, the Judge Advocate General or the Associate General Counsel (Litigation), as appropriate, shall be notified by telephone, or by message if telephone is impractical. Notification shall be confirmed by a letter report by the nearest appropriate command. The letter report shall include the detailed facts which give rise to the action.


(2) Any member or civilian employee served with Federal or State court civil or criminal process or pleadings (including traffic tickets) arising from actions performed in the course of official duties shall immediately deliver all such process and pleadings to the commanding officer. The commanding officer shall ascertain the pertinent facts and notify the Judge Advocate General or Associate General Counsel (Litigation), as appropriate, by telephone or by message if telephone is impractical, of the service and immediately forward the pleadings and process to the relevant office. The member or civilian employee will be advised of the right to remove civil or criminal proceedings from State to Federal court under 28 U.S.C. 1442, 1442a, rights under the Federal Employees Liability Reform and Tort Compensation Act (28 U.S.C. 2679b), if applicable, and the right of a Federal employee to request representation by Department of Justice attorneys in Federal (civil) or State (civil or criminal) proceedings and in congressional proceedings in which that person is sued in an individual capacity, as delineated in 28 CFR 50.15. Requests for representation shall be addressed to the Judge Advocate General or Associate General Counsel (Litigation), as appropriate, and shall be endorsed by the commanding officer, who shall provide all necessary data relating to the questions of whether the person was acting within the course of official duty or scope of employment at the time of the incident out of which the suit arose.


(3) If the service of process involves a potential claim against the Government, see 32 CFR 750.12(a), 750.12(b), and 750.24. The right to remove to Federal Court under 28 U.S.C. 1442 and 1442a must be considered where the outcome of the State court action may influence a claim or potential claim against the United States. Questions should be directed to the Judge Advocate General or the Associate General Counsel (Litigation).


(c) Service of process of foreign courts. (1) Usually, the amenability of members, civilian employees, and their dependents stationed in a foreign country, to the service of process from courts of the host country will have been settled by an agreement between the United States and the foreign country concerned (for example, in the countries of the signatory parties, amenability to service of civil process is governed by paragraphs 5(g) and 9 of Article VIII of the NATO Status of Forces Agreement, TIAS 2846). When service of process on a person described above is attempted within the command in a country in which the United States has no agreement on this subject, advice should be sought from the Judge Advocate General or the Associate General Counsel (Litigation), as appropriate. When service of process is upon the United States Government or one of its agencies or instrumentalities as the named defendant, the doctrine of sovereign immunity may allow the service of process to be returned to the court through diplomatic channels. Service of process directed to an official of the United States, on the other hand, must always be processed in accordance with the applicable international agreement or treaty, regardless of whether the suit involves acts performed in the course of official duties. The Judge Advocate General or the Associate General Counsel (Litigation), as appropriate, will arrange through the Department of Justice for defense of the suit against the United States or an official acting within the scope of official duties, or make other arrangements, and will issue instructions.


(2) Usually, the persons described in § 720.20(c)(1) are not required to accept service of process outside the geographic limits of the jurisdiction of the court from which the process issued. In such cases, acceptance of the service is not compulsory, but service may be voluntarily accepted in accordance with § 720.20(b). In exceptional cases when the United States has agreed that service of process will be accepted by such persons when located outside the geographic limits of the jurisdiction of the court from which the process issued, the provisions of the agreement and of § 720.20(a) will govern.


(3) Under the laws of some countries (such as Sweden), service of process is effected by the document, in original or certified copy, being handed to the person for whom the service is intended. Service is considered to have taken place even if the person refuses to accept the legal documents. Therefore, if a commanding officer or other officer in the military service personally hands, or attempts to hand, that person the document, service is considered to have been effected, permitting the court to proceed to judgment. Upon receipt of foreign process with a request that it be served upon a person described in § 720.20(c)(1), a commanding officer shall notify the person of the fact that a particular foreign court is attempting to serve process and also inform that person that the process may be ignored or received. If the person to be served chooses to ignore the service, the commanding officer will return the document to the embassy or consulate of the foreign country with the notation that the commanding officer had the document, that the person chose to ignore it, and that no physical offer of service had been made. The commanding officer will advise the Judge Advocate General or the Associate General Counsel (Litigation), as appropriate, of all requests for service of process from a foreign court and the details thereof.


(d) Leave or liberty to be granted persons served with process. When members or civilian employees are either served with process, or voluntarily accept service of process, in cases where the United States is not a party to the litigation, the commanding officer normally will grant leave or liberty to the person served to permit compliance with the process, unless to do so would have an adverse impact on naval operations. When a member or civilian employee is a witness for a nongovernmental party because of performance of official duties, the commanding officer may issue the person concerned permissive orders authorizing attendance at the trail at no expense to the Government. The provisions of 32 CFR part 725 must also be considered in such cases. Members or civilian employees may accept allowances and mileage tendered; however, any fees tendered for testimony must be paid to the Department of the Navy unless the member or employee is on authorized leave while attending the judicial proceeding. When it would be in the best interests of the United States Government (for example, in State criminal trails), travel funds may be used to provide members and civilian employees as witnesses as provided in the Joint Federal Travel Regulations. Responsibility for the payment of the member’s mileage and allowances will be determined pursuant to the Joint Federal Travel Regulations, Volume 1, paragraph M6300, subsections 1-3.
3




3 See footnote 1 of § 720.5(b).


(e) Report where service not allowed. Where service of process is not permitted, or where the member or civilian employee is not given leave, liberty, or orders to attend a judicial proceeding, a report of such refusal and the reasons therefor shall be made by telephone, or message if telephone is impractical, to the Judge Advocate General or the Associate General Counsel (Litigation), as appropriate.


§ 720.21 Members or civilian employees subpoenaed as witnesses in State courts.

Where members or civilian employees are subpoenaed to appear as witnesses in State courts, and are served as described in §§ 720.20, 720.20(d) applies. If these persons are requested to appear as witnesses in State courts when the interests of the Federal Government are involved (e.g., Medical Care Recovery Act cases), follow the procedures described in § 720.22. If State authorities are attempting to obtain the presence of a member or a civilian employee as a witness in a civil or criminal case, and such person is unavailable because of an overseas assignment, the command should immediately contact the Judge Advocate General, or the Associate General Counsel (Litigation), as appropriate.


§ 720.22 Members or civilian employees subpoenaed as witnesses in Federal courts.

(a) Witnesses on behalf of Federal Government. When members or civilian employees of the Department of the Navy are required to appear as witnesses in a Federal Court to testify on behalf of the Federal Government in cases involving Department of the Navy activities, the Chief of Naval Personnel or the Commandant of the Marine Corps, as appropriate, will issue temporary additional duty orders to that person. The charges for such orders will be borne by the activity to which the required witness is attached. Payment to witnesses will be as provided by the Joint Federal Travel Regulations and U.S. Navy travel instructions. If the required witness is to appear in a case in which the activities of the Department of the Navy are not involved, the Department of the Navy will be reimbursed in accordance with the procedures outlined in the Navy Comptroller Manual, section 046268.


(b) Witnesses on behalf of nongovernmental parties – (1) Criminal actions. When members or civilian employees are served with a subpoena to appear as a witness for a defendant in a criminal action and the fees and mileage required by rule 17(d) of the Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure are tendered, the commanding officer may issue the person subpoenaed permissive orders authorizing attendance at the trial at no expense to the Government, unless the person’s absence would have an adverse impact on naval operations. In such a case, a full report of the circumstances will be made to the Judge Advocate General or, in the case of civilian employees, to the Associate General Counsel (Litigation). In those cases where fees and mileage are not tendered as required by rule 17(d) of the Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure, but the person subpoenaed still desires to attend, the commanding officer also may issue permissive orders at no cost to the Government. Such persons, however, should be advised that an agreement as to reimbursement for any expenses incident to travel, lodging, and subsistence should be effected with the party desiring their attendance and that no reimnbursement should be expected from the Government.


(2) Civil actions. When members or civilian employees are served with a subpoena to appear as a witness on the behalf of a nongovernmental party in a civil action brought in a Federal court, the provisions of § 720.20 apply.


§ 720.23 Naval prisoners as witnesses or parties in civilian courts.

(a) Criminal actions. When Federal or State authorities desire the attendance of a naval prisoner as a witness in a criminal case, they should submit a written request for such person’s attendance to the Judge Advocate General. The civilian authority should include the following averments in its request:


(1) That the evidence to be derived from the prisoner’s testimony is unavailable from any other source:


(2) That the civilian authority will provide adequate security arrangements for the prisoner and assume responsibility for the prisoner while he is in its custody; and


(3) that the civilian authority will assume all costs of transporting the prisoner from the brig, of maintaining that prisoner while in civilian custody, and of returning the prisoner to the brig from which he was removed.


The civilian authority should also include in its request an estimate of the length of time the prisoner’s services will be required, and should specify the mode of transport by which it intends to return the prisoner. Upon receipt of such a request, authority by the Judge Advocate General will be given, in a proper case, for the production of the requested naval prisoner in court without resort to a writ of habeas corpus ad testificandum (a writ which requires the production of a prisoner to testify before a court of competent jurisdiction).

(b) Civil actions. The Department of the Navy will not authorize the attendance of a naval prisoner in a Federal or State court, either as a party or as a witness, in private litigation pending before such a court. The deposition of a naval prisoner may be taken in such a case, subject to reasonable conditions or limitations imposed by the command concerned.


§ 720.24 Interviews and depositions in connection with civil litigation in matters pertaining to official duties.

Requests to interview, depose, or call as witnesses, current or former members or civilian employees of the Department of the Navy, regarding information obtained in the course of their official duties, including expert testimony related thereto, shall be processed in accordance with 32 CFR part 725.


§ 720.25 Repossession of personal property.

Repossession of personal property, located on a Navy or Marine Corps installation, belonging to a member or to any dependent residing at or located on a Department of the Navy installation, may be permitted in the discretion of the commanding officer of the installation where the property is located, subject to the following. The documents purporting to authorize repossession and the procedures for repossessing the property must comply with State law. Prior to permitting physical repossession of any property, the commanding officer shall cause an informal inquiry into the circumstances and then determine whether to allow the repossession. If repossession is to be allowed, the person whose property is to be repossessed should be asked if he wishes to relinquish the property voluntarily. Repossession must be carried out in a manner prescribed by the commanding officer. In the case of property owned by civilian employees of the Department of the Navy or civilian contractors or their employees or dependents, the commanding officer should direct that the disputed property be removed from the installation until the commanding officer is satisfied that the dispute is resolved.


§§ 720.26-720.29 [Reserved]

Subpart C – Production of Official Records

§ 720.30 Production of official records in response to court order.

(a) General. Where unclassified naval records are desired by or on behalf of litigants, the parties will be informed that the records desired, or certified copies thereof, may be obtained by forwarding to the Secretary of the Navy, Navy Department, Washington, DC, or other custodian of the records, a court order calling for the particular records desired or copies thereof. Compliance with such court order will be effected by transmitting certified copies of the records to the clerk of the court out of which the process issues. See the provisions in the Secretary of the Navy Instruction 5211.5 series which set forth the additional requirement that reasonable efforts be made to notify all individuals to whom the record pertains of (1) the disclosure, and (2) the nature of the information provided, when the court order has become a matter of public record and the record is contained in a system of records as defined in the Secretary of the Navy Instruction 5211.5 series. If an original record is produced by a naval custodian, it will not be removed from the custody of the person producing it, but copies may be placed in evidence. Upon written request of one or more parties in interest or their respective attorneys, records which would be produced in response to a court order as set forth above may be furnished without court order when such records are not in a ‘system of records’ as defined by the Privacy Act (5 U.S.C. 552a) except as noted in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section. In determining whether or not a record contained in a “system of records” will be furnished in response to a written request for that record, consideration shall be given to the provisions of the Secretary of the Navy Instruction 5720.42 series. If the record is in a “system of records,” it may be produced upon written request of one or more parties in interest or their respective attorneys in the absence of a court order only if the individuals to whom the record pertains give written consent to the production or if the production is otherwise authorized under the Privacy Act and the Secretary of the Navy Instruction 5211.5 series. Whenever compliance with a court order for production of Department of the Navy records is deemed inappropriate for any reason, such as when they contain privileged or classified information, the records and subpoena may be forwarded to the Secretary of the Navy (Judge Advocate General) for appropriate action, and the parties to the suit so notified. Any release of classified information for civil court proceedings (whether civil or criminal in nature) must also be coordinated within the office of the Chief of Naval Operations (OP-009D) in accordance with the Chief of Naval Operations Instruction 5510.1 series.


(b) Records in the custody of National Personnel Records Center. Court orders, subpoenas duces tecum, and other legal documents demanding information from, or the production of, service or medical records in the custody of the National Personnel Records Center involving former (deceased or discharged) Navy and Marine Corps personnel shall be served upon the General Services Administration, 9700 Page Boulevard; St. Louis, MO 63132, rather than the Department of the Navy. In the following situations, the request shall be forwarded to the Secretary of the Navy (Judge Advocate General).


(1) When the United States (Department of the Navy) is one of the litigants.


(2) When the case involves a person or persons who are or have been senior officers or officials within the Department of the Navy; and


(3) In other cases considered to be of special significance to the Judge Advocate General or the Secretary of the Navy.


(c) Exceptions. Where not in conflict with the foregoing restrictions relative to personal information, the release of which would result in a clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy, the production in Federal, State, territorial, or local courts of evidentiary material from investigations conducted pursuant to this Manual, and the service, employment, pay or medical records (including medical records of dependents) of persons in the naval service is authorized upon receipt of a court order, without procuring specific authority from the Secretary of the Navy. When the request for production involves material related to claims in favor of the Government, notification should be made to the affirmative claims office at the naval legal service office having territorial responsibility in the area. Where travel is involved, it must be without expense to the Government.


(d) Medical and other records of civilian employees. Production of medical certificates or other medical reports concerning civilian employees is controlled by the provisions of Executive Order 10561, 19 FR 5963, as implemented by Federal Personnel Manual, chapter 294, and chapter 339.1-4 (reprinted in MANMED article 23-255(6)). Records of civilian employees other than medical records may be produced upon receipt of a court order without procuring specific authority from the Secretary of the Navy, provided there is not involved any classified or For-Official-Use-Only information, such as loyalty or security records. Records relating to compensation benefits administered by the Bureau of Employees’ Compensation may not be disclosed except upon the written approval of that Bureau (20 CFR 1.21). In case of doubt, the matter should be handled in accordance with the provisions of subsection a above. Where information is furnished hereunder in response to a court order, it is advisable that certified copies rather than originals be furnished and that, where original records are to be produced, the assistance of the U.S. Attorney or U.S. Marshal be requested so that custody of the records may be maintained.


[38 FR 6021, Mar. 6, 1973, as amended at 48 FR 4466, Feb. 1, 1983]


§ 720.31 Production of official records in the absence of court order.

(a) General. Release of official records outside the Department of the Navy in the absence of a court order is governed by the Privacy Act (5 U.S.C. 552a) and the Freedom of Information Act (5 U.S.C. 552). The following sources pertain: SECNAVINST 5211.5 series (Privacy) and SECNAVINST 5720.42 series (Freedom of Information).


(b) Release of JAG Manual Investigations, Court-Martial Records, Articles 69 and 73 Petitions, and Article 138 Complaints of Wrongs. Except as provided in this section, only the Assistant Judge Advocates General (Civil Law) and (Military Law) shall make determinations concerning the release of the records covered herein if less than a release of the complete requested record will result. In all other instances the Deputy Assistant Judge Advocates General, who have cognizance of the record(s) in issue, may release such records. Local record holders are reminded that the authority to release records does not necessarily include denial authority.


(1) JAG Manual Investigations (including enclosures). Any request for release outside the Department of the Navy shall be forwarded to the Assistant Judge Advocate General (Military Law) for determination, except that Privacy Act requests for release shall be forwarded to the Assistant Judge Advocate General (Civil Law) for determination.


(2) Court-martial records and Articles 69 and 73 petitions. These are matters of public record and may be released by any local holder. Court-martial records should be released only following proper authentication.


(3) Article 138 Complaints of Wrongs. Forward as in paragraph (b)(1) of this section.


(c) Affirmative claims files. Affirmative claims files (including Medical Care Recovery Act files), except to the extent that such files contain copies of reports of investigations prepared under the Manual of the Judge Advocate General, or classified or privileged information, may be released by local holders to insurance companies to support claims; to civilian attorneys representing the injured party’s and the Government’s interests; and to other components of the Department of Defense, without the prior approval of the Judge Advocate General, provided that the amount of the claim is within the monetary settlement authority of the releaser. When the request for production involves material related to claims in favor of the Government, notification should be made to the affirmative claims office at the naval legal service office having territorial responsibility for the area.


(d) Accounting for disclosures of records from systems of records. When records located in a “system of records” are released, the official responsible for releasing the records shall consult SECNAVINST 5211.5 series regarding the requirement that accountings of the disclosures be maintained. Appendix A-3-a of the Manual of the Judge Advocate General is recommended for this purpose.


(1 CFR 18.14, and part 21, subpart B)

[45 FR 8599, Feb. 8, 1980, as amended at 48 FR 4466, Feb. 1, 1983]


§ 720.32 Certificates of full faith and credit.

The Judge Advocate General, the Deputy Judge Advocate General, or any Assistant Judge Advocate General is authorized to execute certificates of full faith and credit certifying the signatures and authority of officers of the Department of the Navy.


[38 FR 6021, Mar. 6, 1973]


Subpart D – Compliance With Court Orders by Department of the Navy Members, Employees, and Family Members Outside the United States


Authority:DoD Directive 5525.9, 54 FR 296, 32 CFR part 146.


Source:55 FR 47876, Nov. 16, 1990, unless otherwise noted.

§ 720.40 Purpose.

This instruction:


(a) Implements 32 CFR part 146.


(b) Establishes policy and procedures for requesting the return to the United States of, or other action affecting, Department of the Navy (DON) personnel and employees serving outside the United States, and family members accompanying them, in compliance with court orders.


§ 720.41 Definitions.

Court. Any judicial body in the United States with jurisdiction to impose criminal sanctions on a Department of the Navy member, employee, or family member.


Employee. A civilian employed by the Department of the Navy or a component service, including an individual paid from non-appropriated funds, who is a citizen or national of the United States.


Family member. A spouse, natural or adopted child, or other lawful dependent of a Department of the Navy employee or member accompanying the Department of the Navy member or employee assigned to duty outside the United States.


Felony. A criminal offense that is punishable by incarceration for more than one year, regardless of the sentence that is imposed for commission of that offense.


Member. An individual on active duty in the Navy, Naval Reserve, Marine Corps, or Marine Corps Reserve.


Request for return. Any request or order received from a court, or from federal, state or local authorities concerning a court order, for the return to the United States of members, employees, or family members, for any reason listed in § 720.42.


Respondent. A member, employee, or family member whose return to the United States has been requested, or with respect to whom other assistance has been requested under this instruction.


Responsible official. Officials designated in this instruction to act on a request to return, or take other action affecting, members, employees or family members to the United States under this instruction.


United States. The 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, American Samoa, and the Virgin Islands.


§ 720.42 Policy.

(a) It is Department of the Navy policy to cooperate, as prescribed in this instruction, with courts and federal, state and local officials in enforcing court orders. The Department of the Navy will cooperate with requests when such action is consistent with mission requirements (including operational readiness), the provisions of applicable international agreements, and ongoing Department of Defense (DoD) investigations and courts-martial.


(b) Every reasonable effort will be made to resolve the matter without the respondent returning to the United States, or other action being taken against the respondent under this instruction.


(c) Requests to return members for felonies or for contempt involving unlawful or contemptuous removal of a child from the jurisdiction of a court or the custody of a parent or other person awarded custody by a court order will normally be granted, but only if the member cannot resolve the issue with the court without return to the United States. When the member’s return is inconsistent with mission requirements, applicable international agreements, or ongoing DoD investigations or courts-martial, DoD approval of denial will be requested.


(d) For all other requests involving members, return will be based on the circumstances of the individual case as provided in this instruction.


(e) Members will normally be returned on a temporary additional duty (TAD) basis unless there are compelling reasons the return should be a permanent change of duty station (PCS).


(f) The involuntary return of employees or family members in response to a request for return is not authorized. However, the following action will be taken:


(1) Employees will be strongly urged to comply with court orders. Failure to comply with court orders involving felonies or contempt involving unlawful or contemptuous removal of a child from the jurisdiction of the court or the custody of a parent or other person awarded custody by a court order will normally require processing for adverse action, up to and including removal from federal service. Failure to comply with other court orders may require adverse action, depending on the circumstances of the individual case.


(2) Family members will be strongly encouraged to comply with court orders. Family members who fail to comply with court orders involving felonies or contempt involving unlawful or contemptuous removal of a child from the jurisdiction of the court or the custody of a parent or other person awarded custody by a court order will normally have their command sponsorship removed. Failure to comply with other court orders may also result in removal of command sponsorship, depending on the circumstances of the individual case.


(g) To facilitate prompt resolution of requests for return of members, minimize the burden on operating units, and to provide consistency during initial implementation of this new program, a limited number of responsible officials, designated in § 720.44, will respond to requesting officials.


§ 720.43 Points of contact.

(a) Authorities issuing requests for return or for other action under this instruction may contact the following activities:


(1) Chief of Naval Personnel (Pers-14), Washington, DC 20370-5000 (For Navy members and their family members).


(2) Commandant, U.S. Marine Corps (Code JAR), Washington, DC 20380-0001 (For Marine Corps members and their family members).


(3) Director, Office of Civilian Personnel Management (Code OOL), 800 N. Quincy Street, Arlington, VA 22203-1998 (For civilian personnel, including non-appropriated fund employees and their family members).


(b) Upon receipt of a request for action under this instruction, the Office of Civilian Personnel Management will forward the request to the appropriate responsible official for action in accordance with § 720.44.


§ 720.44 Responsible officials.

The following officials are designated responsible officials for acting on requests to return or to take other action affecting members, employees or family members to the United States.


(a) The Chief of Naval Personnel (CHNAVPERS) for requests involving Navy members and their family members who are not employees. The CHNAVPERS may delegate this authority within his headquarters, not below the 0-6 level for routine matters and not lower than the flag officer level for decisions to deny the request for return.


(b) The Commandant of the Marine Corps (CMC) for requests involving Marine Corps members and their family members who are not employees. The CMC may delegate this authority within his headquarters, not below the 0-6 level for routine matters and no lower that the general officer level for decisions to deny the request for return.


(c) The local commanding officer or officer in charge for requests involving employees and their family members who are not active duty military members.


(d) The Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Manpower and Reserve Affairs) (ASN(M&RA)) for requests not covered by §§ 720.44 (a) through (c).


§ 720.45 Procedures.

(a) If the request pertains to a felony or to contempt involving the unlawful or contemptuous removal of a child from the jurisdiction of a court or the custody of a parent or another person awarded custody by court order, and the matter cannot be resolved with the court without the respondent returning to the United States:


(1) For members: The responsible official shall direct the commanding officer or officer in charge to order the member to return to the United States. Failure to comply will normally be the basis for disciplinary action against the member.


(2) For employees, military and civilian family members: The responsible official shall strongly encourage the respondent to comply. Failure to comply may subject employees to adverse action, to include removal from the Federal service, and subject military and civilian family members to withdrawal of command sponsorship.


(b) For all other requests when the matter cannot be resolved with the court without returning the respondent to the United States, the responsible official shall take the action described in this instruction when deemed appropriate with the facts and circumstances of each particular case, following consultation with legal staff.


(c) When a member’s return is inconsistent with mission requirements, the provisions of applicable international agreements, or ongoing DoD investigations and courts-martial, the Department of the Navy will ask DoD to approve denial of the request for the military members’s return. To initiate this action, there must be an affirmative showing of articulable harm to the unit’s mission or violation of an international agreement.


(d) When a responsible official has determined a request for return is apparently based on an order issued by a court of competent jurisdiction, the responsible official shall complete action on the request for return within 30 days of receipt of the request for return by the responsible official, unless a delay is authorized by the ASN(M&RA).


(e) When a delay to complete the action is warranted, the ASN(M&RA) will grant a 45 day delay, and provide a copy of that approval to the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Force Management & Personnel (ASD(FM&P)) and the General Counsel, DoD. The 45 day period begins upon request by the responsible official of the request for return. Conditions which, when accompanied by full supporting justification, will warrant the granting of the 45 day delay are:


(1) Efforts are in progress to resolve the matter to the satisfaction of the court without the respondent’s return to the United States.


(2) To provide sufficient time for the respondent to provide evidence to show legal efforts to resist the request or to show legitimate cause for noncompliance.


(3) To provide commanding officers an opportunity to detail the specific effect on command mission and operational readiness anticipated from the loss of the member or Department of the Navy employee, and to present facts relating to any international agreement, or ongoing DoD investigation or courts-martial.


(f) A commanding officer or officer in charge who receives a request for the return of, or other action affecting, a member, family member, or employee not of his/her command will forward the request to the appropriate commanding officer or officer in charge, copy to the responsible official, and advise both of them by message that a request for return or other action has been forwarded to them.


(g) A commanding officer or officer in charge who receives a request for the return of, or other action affecting, a member, family member, or employee of his/her command will:


(1) Notify the respondent of the right to provide evidence to show legal efforts to resist the request, or to show legitimate cause for noncompliance for inclusion in the submission to the responsible official.


(2) For members and their family members who are not employees, forward the request immediately to the appropriate responsible official, together with:


(i) Any information the individual desires to provide to show legal efforts to resist the request, or otherwise to show legitimate cause for noncompliance.


(ii) Facts detailing the specific impacts on command missions and readiness anticipated from loss of the member.


(iii) Facts relating to any international agreements or ongoing DoD investigations or courts-martial involving the respondent.


(iv) Information regarding conditions expected to interfere with a member’s return to the command after completion of proceedings. If, in the opinion of the commanding officer, there are compelling reasons for the member to be returned to the United States PCS, provide full justification to support that recommendation to the cognizant officer.


(3) If a delay in processing is warranted under § 720.42 or § 720.45(e), make a recommendation with supporting justification to the responsible official.


(4) Monitor, and update as necessary, information provided to the responsible official.


(h) The responsible official shall:


(1) Determine whether the request is based on an order issued by a court of apparent competent jurisdiction and if so, complete action on the request no later than 30 days after its receipt by the responsible official. If a conflicts of law issue is presented between competing state interests, or between a state and a foreign host-nation, or between two different foreign nations, the matter shall be referred to the ASN(M&RA) on the first issue and to the Judge Advocate General (Code 10) on the second and third issues.


(2) Encourage the respondent to attempt to resolve the matter to the satisfaction of the court or other requesting authority without return of or other action affecting the member, employee, or family member.


(3) When a delay to complete action under this section is warranted, request the delay from ASN(M&RA) with full supporting justification.


(4) Examine all information the respondent desires to provide to show legal efforts to resist the request, or otherwise to show legitimate cause for noncompliance.


(5) Requests for exception from the requirements of this instruction shall be submitted, with supporting justification, to the ASN(M&RA) for submission to the ASD(FM&P).


(6) If a member will be ordered to return to the United States, determine if the member will be ordered TAD or PCS and advise the member’s commanding officer of the determination.


(7) If a member will be ordered to return to an appropriate port of entry to comply with a request, ensure:


(i) The requesting officer has given official notification to the responsible official that the requesting official or other appropriate party will initiate action with the receiving jurisdiction to secure the member’s delivery/extradition, as appropriate, per chapter 6 of the Manual of the Judge Advocate General, and provide for all costs incident thereto, including any escort if desired.


(ii) If applicable, the necessary accounting data are provided to the commanding officer of the member or orders are issued.


(iii) The member has arranged satisfactory foster care for any lawful minor dependents who will be left unaccompanied overseas upon the member’s return to the United States.


(8) Notify the requesting official at least 10 days before the member’s return to the selected port of entry.


(9) In the case of an employee or of a family member, the commanding officer or officer in charge of the activity to which the family member’s sponsor is attached, or by which the employee is employed, will carry out the following steps:


(i) An employee shall be strongly encouraged to comply with the court order or other request for return. Failure to comply may be the basis for adverse action to include removal from Federal service. Adverse action should only be taken after coordination with the cognizant civilian personnel office and legal counsel and in compliance with Civilian Personnel Instruction 752.


(ii) If a family member of either a member or an employee is the subject of a request for return, the family member shall be strongly encouraged to comply with the court order. Failure to respond may be the basis for withdrawal of command sponsorship of the family member.


(10) Report promptly to the ASN(M&RA) any actions taken under § 720.45 (a) or (b).


(i) The ASN(M&RA):


(1) May grant delays of up to 45 days from the date of a request for delay in accordance with § 720.45(e).


(2) Will report promptly all delays of requests for the return of members to the ASD(FM&P) and to the General Counsel of the Department of Defense.


(3) Will request from the ASD(FM&P), when warranted, exception to the policies and procedures of DoD Directive 5525.9 of December 27, 1988.


(4) Consolidate and forward reports of action taken under § 720.45 (a) or (b) to the ASD(FM&P) and the General Counsel, DoD as required by DoD Directive 5525.9 of December 27, 1988.


§ 720.46 Overseas screening programs.

The Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) and the CMC shall incorporate procedures requiring members and employees to certify they have legal custody of all minor dependents accompanying them outside the United States into service overseas screening programs.


§ 720.47 Report.

The report requirement in this instruction is exempt from reports control by SECNAVINST 5214.2B.


PARTS 721-722 [RESERVED]

PART 723 – BOARD FOR CORRECTION OF NAVAL RECORDS


Authority:10 U.S.C. 1034, 1552.


Source:62 FR 8166, Feb. 24, 1997, unless otherwise noted.

§ 723.1 General provisions.

This part sets up procedures for correction of naval and marine records by the Secretary of the Navy acting through the Board for Correction of Naval Records (BCNR or the Board) to remedy error or injustice. It describes how to apply for correction of naval and marine records and how the BCNR considers applications. It defines the Board’s authority to act on applications. It directs collecting and maintaining information subject to the Privacy Act of 1974 authorized by 10 U.S.C. 1034 and 1552.


§ 723.2 Establishment, function and jurisdiction of the Board.

(a) Establishment and composition. Under 10 U.S.C. 1034 and 1552, the Board for Correction of Naval Records is established by the Secretary of the Navy. The Board consists of civilians of the executive part of the Department of the Navy in such number, not less than three, as may be appointed by the Secretary and who shall serve at the pleasure of the Secretary. Three members present shall constitute a quorum of the Board. The Secretary of the Navy will designate one member as Chair. In the absence or incapacity of the Chair, an Acting Chair chosen by the Executive Director shall act as Chair for all purposes.


(b) Function. The Board is not an investigative body. Its function is to consider applications properly before it for the purpose of determining the existence of error or injustice in the naval records of current and former members of the Navy and Marine Corps, to make recommendations to the Secretary or to take corrective action on the Secretary’s behalf when authorized.


(c) Jurisdiction. The Board shall have jurisdiction to review and determine all matters properly brought before it, consistent with existing law.


§ 723.3 Application for correction.

(a) General requirements. (1) The application for correction must be submitted on DD 149 (Application for Correction of Military Record) or exact facsimile thereof, and should be addressed to: Board for Correction of Naval Records, Department of the Navy, 2 Navy Annex, Washington, DC 20370-5100. Forms and other explanatory matter may be obtained from the Board upon request.


(2) Except as provided in paragraph (a)(3) of this section, the application shall be signed by the person requesting corrective action with respect to his/her record and will either be sworn to or will contain a provision to the effect that the statements submitted in the application are made with full knowledge of the penalty provided by law for making a false statement or claim. (18 U.S.C. 287 and 1001)


(3) When the record in question is that of a person who is incapable of making application, or whose whereabouts is unknown, or when such person is deceased, the application may be made by a spouse, parent, heir, or legal representative. Proof of proper interest shall be submitted with the application.


(b) Time limit for filing application. Applications for correction of a record must be filed within 3 years after discovery of the alleged error or injustice. Failure to file within the time prescribed may be excused by the Board if it finds it would be in the interest of justice to do so. If the application is filed more than 3 years after discovery of the error or injustice, the application must set forth the reason why the Board should find it in the interest of justice to excuse the failure to file the application within the time prescribed.


(c) Acceptance of applications. An application will be accepted for consideration unless:


(1) The Board lacks jurisdiction.


(2) The Board lacks authority to grant effective relief.


(3) The applicant has failed to comply with the filing requirements of paragraphs (a)(l), (a)(2), or (a)(3) of this section.


(4) The applicant has failed to exhaust all available administrative remedies.


(5) The applicant has failed to file an application within 3 years after discovery of the alleged error or injustice and has not provided a reason or reasons why the Board should find it in the interest of justice to excuse the failure to file the application within the prescribed 3-year period.


(d) Other proceedings not stayed. Filing an application with the Board shall not operate as a stay of any other proceedings being taken with respect to the person involved.


(e) Consideration of application. (1) Each application accepted for consideration and all pertinent evidence of record will be reviewed by a three member panel sitting in executive session, to determine whether to authorize a hearing, recommend that the records be corrected without a hearing, or to deny the application without a hearing. This determination will be made by majority vote.


(2) The Board may deny an application in executive session if it determines that the evidence of record fails to demonstrate the existence of probable material error or injustice. The Board relies on a presumption of regularity to support the official actions of public officers and, in the absence of substantial evidence to the contrary, will presume that they have properly discharged their official duties. Applicants have the burden of overcoming this presumption but the Board will not deny an application solely because the record was made by or at the direction of the President or the Secretary in connection with proceedings other than proceedings of a board for the correction of military or naval records. Denial of an application on the grounds of insufficient evidence to demonstrate the existence of probable material error or injustice is final subject to the provisions for reconsideration contained in § 723.9.


(3) When an original application or a request for further consideration of a previously denied application is denied without a hearing, the Board’s determination shall be made in writing and include a brief statement of the grounds for denial.


(4) The brief statement of the grounds for denial shall include the reasons for the determination that relief should not be granted, including the applicant’s claims of constitutional, statutory and/or regulatory violations that were rejected, together with all the essential facts upon which the denial is based, including, if applicable, factors required by regulation to be considered for determination of the character of and reason for discharge. Further the Board shall make a determination as to the applicability of the provisions of the Military Whistleblower Protection Act (10 U.S.C. 1034) if it is invoked by the applicant or reasonably raised by the evidence. Attached to the statement shall be any advisory opinion considered by the Board which is not fully set out in the statement. The applicant will also be advised of reconsideration procedures.


(5) The statement of the grounds for denial, together with all attachments, shall be furnished promptly to the applicant and counsel, who shall also be informed that the name and final vote of each Board member will be furnished or made available upon request. Classified or privileged material will not be incorporated or attached to the Board statement; rather, unclassified or nonprivileged summaries of such material will be so used and written explanations for the substitution will be provided to the applicant and counsel.


§ 723.4 Appearance before the board; notice; counsel; witnesses; access to records.

(a) General. In each case in which the Board determines a hearing is warranted, the applicant will be entitled to appear before the Board either in person or by counsel of his/her selection or in person with counsel. Additional provisions apply to cases processed under the Military Whistleblower Protection Act (10 U.S.C. 1034).


(b) Notice. (1) In each case in which a hearing is authorized, the Board’s staff will transmit to the applicant a written notice stating the time and place of hearing. The notice will be mailed to the applicant, at least 30 days prior to the date of hearing, except that an earlier date may be set where the applicant waives his/her right to such notice in writing.


(2) Upon receipt of the notice of hearing, the applicant will notify the Board in writing at least 15 days prior to the date set for hearing as to whether he/she will be present at the hearing and will indicate to the Board the name of counsel, if represented by counsel, and the names of such witnesses as he/she intends to call. Cases in which the applicant notifies the Board that he/she does not desire to be present at the hearing will be considered in accordance with § 723.5(b)(2).


(c) Counsel. As used in this part, the term “counsel” will be construed to include members in good standing of the federal bar or the bar of any state, accredited representatives of veterans’ organizations recognized by the Secretary of Veterans Affairs under 38 U.S.C. 3402, or such other persons who, in the opinion of the Board, are considered to be competent to present equitably and comprehensively the request of the applicant for correction, unless barred by law. Representation by counsel will be at no cost to the government.


(d) Witnesses. The applicant will be permitted to present witnesses in his/her behalf at hearings before the Board. It will be the responsibility of the applicant to notify his/her witnesses and to arrange for their appearance at the time and place set for hearing. Appearance of witnesses will be at no cost to the government.


(e) Access to records. (1) It is the responsibility of the applicant to procure such evidence not contained in the official records of the Department of the Navy as he/she desires to present in support of his/her case.


(2) Classified or privileged information may be released to applicants only by proper authorities in accordance with applicable regulations.


(3) Nothing in this part authorizes the furnishing of copies of official records by the Board. Requests for copies of these records should be submitted in accordance with applicable regulations governing the release of information. The BCNR can provide a requestor with information regarding procedures for requesting copies of these records from the appropriate retention agency.


§ 723.5 Hearing.

(a) Convening of board. The Board will convene, recess and adjourn at the call of the Chair or Acting Chair.


(b) Conduct of hearing. (1) The hearing shall be conducted by the Chair or Acting Chair, and shall be subject to his/her rulings so as to ensure a full and fair hearing. The Board shall not be limited by legal rules of evidence but shall maintain reasonable bounds of competency, relevancy, and materiality.


(2) If the applicant, after being duly notified, indicates to the Board that he/she does not desire to be present or to be represented by counsel at the hearing, the Board will consider the case on the basis of all the material before it, including, but not limited to, the application for correction filed by the applicant, any documentary evidence filed in support of such application, any brief submitted by or in behalf of the applicant, and all available pertinent records.


(3) If the applicant, after being duly notified, indicates to the Board that he/she will be present or be represented by counsel at the hearing, and without good cause and timely notice to the Board, the applicant or representative fails to appear at the time and place set for the hearing or fails to provide the notice required by § 723.4(b)(2), the Board may consider the case in accordance with the provisions of paragraph (b)(2) of this section, or make such other disposition of the case as is appropriate under the circumstances.


(4) All testimony before the Board shall be given under oath or affirmation. The proceedings of the Board and the testimony given before it will be recorded verbatim.


(c) Continuance. The Board may continue a hearing on its own motion. A request for continuance by or in behalf of the applicant may be granted by the Board if a continuance appears necessary to insure a full and fair hearing.


§ 723.6 Action by the Board.

(a) Deliberations, findings, conclusions, and recommendations. (1) Only members of the Board and its staff shall be present during the deliberations of the Board.


(2) Whenever, during the course of its review of an application, it appears to the Board’s satisfaction that the facts have not been fully and fairly disclosed by the records or by the testimony and other evidence before it, the Board may require the applicant or military authorities to provide such further information as it may consider essential to a complete and impartial determination of the facts and issues.


(3) Following a hearing, or where the Board determines to recommend that the record be corrected without a hearing, the Board will make written findings, conclusions and recommendations. If denial of relief is recommended following a hearing, such written findings and conclusions will include a statement of the grounds for denial as described in § 723.3(e)(4). The name and final vote of each Board member will be recorded. A majority vote of the members present on any matter before the Board will constitute the action of the Board and shall be so recorded.


(4) Where the Board deems it necessary to submit comments or recommendations to the Secretary as to matters arising from but not directly related to the issues of any case, such comments and recommendations shall be the subject of separate communication. Additionally, in Military Whistleblower Protection Act cases, any recommendation by the Board to the Secretary that disciplinary or administrative action be taken against any Navy official based on the Board’s determination that the official took reprisal action against the applicant will not be made part of the Board’s record of proceedings or furnished the applicant but will be transmitted to the Secretary as a separate communication.


(b) Minority report. In case of a disagreement between members of the Board a minority report will be submitted, either as to the findings, conclusions or recommendation, including the reasons therefor.


(c) Record of proceedings. Following a hearing, or where the Board determines to recommend that the record be corrected without a hearing, a record of proceedings will be prepared. Such record shall indicate whether or not a quorum was present, and the name and vote of each member present. The record shall include the application for relief, a verbatim transcript of any testimony, affidavits, papers and documents considered by the Board, briefs and written arguments, advisory opinions, if any, minority reports, if any, the findings, conclusions and recommendations of the Board, where appropriate, and all other papers, documents, and reports necessary to reflect a true and complete history of the proceedings.


(d) Withdrawal. The Board may permit an applicant to withdraw his/her application without prejudice at any time before its record of proceedings is forwarded to the Secretary.


(e) Delegation of authority to correct certain naval records. (1) With respect to all petitions for relief properly before it, the Board is authorized to take final corrective action on behalf of the Secretary, unless:


(i) Comments by proper naval authority are inconsistent with the Board’s recommendation;


(ii) The Board’s recommendation is not unanimous; or


(iii) It is in the category of petitions reserved for decision by the Secretary of the Navy.


(2) The following categories of petitions for relief are reserved for decision by the Secretary of the Navy:


(i) Petitions involving records previously reviewed or acted upon by the Secretary wherein the operative facts remained substantially the same;


(ii) Petitions by former commissioned officers or midshipmen to change the character of, and/or the reason for, their discharge; or,


(iii) Such other petitions as, in the determination of Office of the Secretary or the Executive Director, warrant Secretarial review.


(3) The Executive Director after ensuring compliance with this section, will announce final decisions on applications decided under this section.


§ 723.7 Action by the Secretary.

(a) General. The record of proceedings, except in cases finalized by the Board under the authority delegated in § 723.6(e), and those denied by the Board without a hearing, will be forwarded to the Secretary who will direct such action as he or she determines to be appropriate, which may include the return of the record to the Board for further consideration. Those cases returned for further consideration shall be accompanied by a brief statement setting out the reasons for such action along with any specific instructions. If the Secretary’s decision is to deny relief, such decision shall be in writing and, unless he or she expressly adopts in whole or in part the findings, conclusions and recommendations of the Board, or a minority report, shall include a brief statement of the grounds for denial. See § 723.3(e)(4).


(b) Military Whistleblower Protection Act. The Secretary will ensure that decisions in cases involving the Military Whistleblower Protection Act are issued 180 days after receipt of the case and will, unless the full relief requested is granted, inform applicants of their right to request review of the decision by the Secretary of Defense. Applicants will also be informed:


(1) Of the name and address of the official to whom the request for review must be submitted.


(2) That the request for review must be submitted within 90 days after receipt of the decision by the Secretary of the Navy.


(3) That the request for review must be in writing and include:


(i) The applicant’s name, address and telephone number;


(ii) A copy of the application to the Board and the final decision of the Secretary of the Navy; and


(iii) A statement of the specific reasons the applicant is not satisfied with the decision of the Secretary of the Navy.


(4) That the request must be based on the Board record; request for review based on factual allegations or evidence not previously presented to the Board will not be considered under this paragraph but may be the basis for reconsideration by the Board under § 723.9.


§ 723.8 Staff action.

(a) Transmittal of final decisions granting relief. (1) If the final decision of the Secretary is to grant the applicant’s request for relief the record of proceedings shall be returned to the Board for disposition. The Board shall transmit the finalized record of proceedings to proper naval authority for appropriate action. Similarly final decisions of the Board granting the applicant’s request for relief under the authority delegated in § 723.6(e), shall also be forwarded to the proper naval authority for appropriate action.


(2) The Board shall transmit a copy of the record of proceedings to the proper naval authority for filing in the applicant’s service record except where the effect of such action would be to nullify the relief granted. In such cases no reference to the Board’s decision shall be made in the service record or files of the applicant and all copies of the record of proceedings and any related papers shall be forwarded to the Board and retained in a file maintained for this purpose.


(3) The addressees of such decisions shall report compliance therewith to the Executive Director.


(4) Upon receipt of the record of proceedings after final action by the Secretary, or by the Board acting under the authority contained in § 723.6(e), the Board shall communicate the decision to the applicant. The applicant is entitled, upon request, to receive a copy of the Board’s findings, conclusions and recommendations.


(b) Transmittal of final decisions denying relief. If the final decision of the Secretary or the Board is to deny relief, the following materials will be made available to the applicant:


(1) A statement of the findings, conclusions, and recommendations made by the Board and the reasons therefor;


(2) Any advisory opinions considered by the Board;


(3) Any minority reports; and


(4) Any material prepared by the Secretary as required in § 723.7. Moreover, applicant shall also be informed that the name and final vote of each Board member will be furnished or made available upon request and that he/she may submit new and material evidence or other matter for further consideration.


§ 723.9 Reconsideration.

After final adjudication, further consideration will be granted only upon presentation by the applicant of new and material evidence or other matter not previously considered by the Board. New evidence is defined as evidence not previously considered by the Board and not reasonably available to the applicant at the time of the previous application. Evidence is material if it is likely to have a substantial effect on the outcome. All requests for further consideration will be initially screened by the Executive Director of the Board to determine whether new and material evidence or other matter (including, but not limited to, any factual allegations or arguments why the relief should be granted) has been submitted by the applicant. If such evidence or other matter has been submitted, the request shall be forwarded to the Board for a decision. If no such evidence or other matter has been submitted, the applicant will be informed that his/her request was not considered by the Board because it did not contain new and material evidence or other matter.


§ 723.10 Settlement of claims.

(a) Authority. (1) The Department of the Navy is authorized under 10 U.S.C. 1552 to pay claims for amounts due to applicants as a result of corrections to their naval records.


(2) The Department of the Navy is not authorized to pay any claim heretofore compensated by Congress through enactment of a private law, or to pay any amount as compensation for any benefit to which the claimant might subsequently become entitled under the laws and regulations administered by the Secretary of Veterans Affairs.


(b) Application for settlement. (1) Settlement and payment of claims shall be made only upon a claim of the person whose record has been corrected or legal representative, heirs at law, or beneficiaries. Such claim for settlement and payment may be filed as a separate part of the application for correction of the record.


(2) When the person whose record has been corrected is deceased, and where no demand is presented by a duly appointed legal representative of the estate, payments otherwise due shall be made to the surviving spouse, heir or beneficiaries, in the order prescribed by the law applicable to that kind of payment, or if there is no such law covering order of payment, in the order set forth in 10 U.S.C. 2771; or as otherwise prescribed by the law applicable to that kind of payment.


(3) Upon request, the applicant or applicants shall be required to furnish requisite information to determine their status as proper parties to the claim for purposes of payment under applicable provisions of law.


(c) Settlement. (1) Settlement of claims shall be upon the basis of the decision and recommendation of the Board, as approved by the Secretary or his designee. Computation of the amounts due shall be made by the appropriate disbursing activity. In no case will the amount found due exceed the amount which would otherwise have been paid or have become due under applicable laws had no error or injustice occurred. Earnings received from civilian employment, self employment or any income protection plan for such employment during any period for which active duty pay and allowances are payable will be deducted from the settlement. To the extent authorized by law and regulation, amounts found due may be reduced by the amount of any existing indebtedness to the Government arising from military service.


(2) Prior to or at the time of payment, the person or persons to whom payments are to be made shall be advised by the disbursing activity of the nature and amount of the various benefits represented by the total settlement and shall be advised further that acceptance of such settlement shall constitute a complete release by the claimants involved of any claim against the United States on account of the correction of the record.


(d) Report of settlement. In every case where payment is made, the amount of such payment and the names of the payee or payees shall be reported to the Executive Director.


§ 723.11 Miscellaneous provisions.

(a) Expenses. No expenses of any nature whatsoever voluntarily incurred by the applicant, counsel, witnesses, or by any other person in the applicant’s behalf, will be paid by the Government.


(b) Indexing of decisions. (1) Documents sent to each applicant and counsel in accordance with § 723.3(e)(5) and § 723.8(a)(4), together with the record of the votes of Board members and all other statements of findings, conclusions and recommendations made on final determination of an application by the Board or the Secretary will be indexed and promptly made available for public inspection and copying at the Armed Forces Discharge Review/Correction Boards Reading Room located on the Concourse of the Pentagon Building in Room 2E123, Washington, DC.


(2) All documents made available for public inspection and copying shall be indexed in a usable and concise form so as to enable the public to identify those cases similar in issue together with the circumstances under and/or reasons for which the Board and/or Secretary have granted or denied relief. The index shall be published quarterly and shall be available for public inspection and distribution by sale at the Reading Room located on the Concourse of the Pentagon Building in Room 2E123, Washington, DC. Inquiries concerning the index or the Reading Room may be addressed to the Chief, Micromation Branch/Armed Forces Discharge Review/Correction Boards Reading Room, Crystal Mall 4, 1941 Jefferson Davis Highway, Arlington, Virginia 22202.


(3) To the extent necessary to prevent a clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy, identifying details of the applicant and other persons will be deleted from the documents made available for public inspection and copying. Names, addresses, social security numbers and military service numbers must be deleted. Deletions of other information which is privileged or classified may be made only if a written statement of the basis for such deletion is made available for public inspection.


PART 724 – NAVAL DISCHARGE REVIEW BOARD


Authority:5 U.S.C. 301; 10 U.S.C. 1553.


Source:50 FR 10943, Mar. 19, 1985, unless otherwise noted.


Editorial Note:Nomenclature changes to part 724 appear at 65 FR 62616, Oct. 19, 2000.

Subpart A – Definitions

§ 724.101 Naval Service.

The Naval Service is comprised of the uniformed members of the United States Navy and the United States Marine Corps, including active and inactive reserve components.


§ 724.102 Naval Discharge Review Board.

An administrative board, referred to as the “NDRB” established by the Secretary of the Navy pursuant to title 10 U.S.C., section 1553, for the review of discharges of former members of the Naval Service.


§ 724.103 NDRB panel.

An element of the NDRB, consisting of five members, authorized to review discharges. In plenary review session, an NDRB panel acts with the authority delegated by the Secretary of the Navy to the Naval Discharge Review Board.


§ 724.104 NDRB Traveling Panel.

An NDRB Panel that travels for the purpose of conducting personal appearances discharge review hearings at locations outside of the National Capital Region (NCR).


§ 724.105 President of the NDRB.

A senior officer of the Naval Service designated by the Secretary of the Navy who is responsible for the direct supervision of the discharge review function within the Naval Service. (See subpart E).


§ 724.106 Presiding Officer, NDRB Panel.

The senior member of an NDRB Panel shall normally be the Presiding Officer. He/she shall convene, recess and adjourn the NDRB Panel as appropriate.


§ 724.107 Discharge.

In the context of the review function prescribed by 10 U.S.C. 1553, a discharge or dismissal is a complete separation from the Naval Service, other than one pursuant to the sentence of a general court-martial. By reason of usage, the term “discharge” is predominantly applicable to the separation of enlisted personnel for any reason, and the term “dismissal” to the separation of officers as a result of Secretarial or general court-martial action. In the context of the mission of the NDRB, the term “discharge” used here shall, for purpose of ease of expression, include any complete separation from the naval service other than that pursuant to the sentence of general court-martial. The term “discharge” also includes the type of discharge and the reason/basis for that discharge, e.g., Other Than Honorable/Misconduct (Civil Conviction).


§ 724.108 Administrative discharge.

A discharge upon expiration of enlistment or required period of service, or prior thereto, in a manner prescribed by the Commandant of the Marine Corps or the Commander, Naval Personnel Command, but specifically excluding separation by sentence of a general court-martial.


[65 FR 62616, Oct. 19, 2000]


§ 724.109 Types of administrative discharges.

(a) A determination reflecting a member’s military behavior and performance of duty during a specific period of service. The three characterizations are:


(1) Honorable. A separation from the naval service with honor. The issuance of an Honorable Discharge is contingent upon proper military behavior and performance of duty.


(2) Under Honorable Conditions (also termed General Discharge). A separation from the naval service under honorable conditions. The issuance of a discharge under honorable conditions is contingent upon military behavior and performance of duty which is not sufficiently meritorious to warrant an Honorable Discharge.


(3) Under Other Than Honorable Conditions (formerly termed Undesirable Discharge). A separation from the naval service under conditions other than honorable. It is issued to terminate the service of a member of the naval service for one or more of the reasons/basis listed in the Naval Military Personnel Manual, Marine Corps Separation and Retirement Manual and their predecessor publications.


(4) Entry Level Separation. (i) A separation initiated while a member is in entry level status will be described as an Entry Level Separation except in the following circumstances:


(a) When characterization under Other Than Honorable Conditions is authorized and is warranted by the circumstances of the case; or


(b) When characterization of service as Honorable is clearly warranted by the presence of unusual circumstances including personal conduct and performance of naval duty and is approved on a case-by-case basis by the Secretary of the Navy. This characterization will be considered when the member is separated by reason of Selected Changes in Service Obligation, Convenience of the Government, or Disability.


(ii) With respect to administrative matters outside the administrative separation system that require a characterization of service as Honorable or General, an Entry Level Separation shall be treated as the required characterization. An Entry Level Separation for a member of a Reserve component separated from the Delayed Entry Program is under honorable conditions.


(b) [Reserved]


[50 FR 10943, Mar. 19, 1985, as amended at 51 FR 44909, Dec. 15, 1986; 65 FR 62616, Oct. 19, 2000]


§ 724.110 Reason/basis for administrative discharge.

The terms “reason for discharge” and “basis for discharge” have the same meaning. The first is a Navy term and the second is a Marine Corps term. These terms identify why an administrative discharge was issued, e.g., Convenience of the Government, Misconduct. Reasons/basis for discharge are found in the Naval Military Personnel Manual and Marine Corps Separation and Retirement Manual as well as predecessor publications.


§ 724.111 Punitive discharge.

A discharge awarded by sentence of a court-martial. There are two types of punitive discharges:


(a) Bad conduct. A separation from the naval service under conditions other than honorable. It may be effected only as a result of the approved sentence of a general or special court-martial.


(b) Dishonorable. A separation from the naval service under dishonorable conditions. It may be effected only as a result of the approved sentence of a general court-martial.


§ 724.112 Clemency discharge.

(a) The clemency discharge was created by the President on September 16, 1974, in his Proclamation 4313, “Announcing a Program for the Return of Vietnam Era Draft Evaders and Military Deserters.” Upon issuance to individuals who have an undesirable discharge or a punitive discharge, a clemency discharge serves as a written testimonial to the fact that the individual has satisfied the requirements of the President’s program, and has fully earned his/her return to the mainstream of American society in accordance with that program.


(b) The clemency discharge is a neutral discharge, neither honorable nor less than honorable. It does not effect a change in the characterization of the individual’s military service as having been under other than honorable condition, nor does it serves to change, seal, erase or in any way modify the individual’s past military record. Therefore, if the underlying discharge was issued as a result of a general court-martial, the issuance of a Clemency Discharge does not subject the underlying characterization to review under 10 U.S.C. 1553. Clemency discharges are issued by the Commander, Naval Military Personnel Command or the Commandant of the Marine Corps when an individual has met the requirements of the Presidential Proclamation.


§ 724.113 Application.

In the context of this Manual, a written application to the NDRB for the review of a discharge submitted by a former member of the naval service or, where a former member is deceased or incompetent, by spouse, next of kin or legal representative. Department of Defense Form 293 must be used for the application.


§ 724.114 Applicant.

A former member of the naval service who has been discharged administratively in accordance with the directives of the naval service or by sentence of a special court-martial under title 10 U.S.C. 801 et seq. (Uniform Code of Military Justice) and, in accordance with statutory and regulatory provisions:


(a) Whose case is considered by the NDRB at the request of the former member, of, if authorized under § 724.113, the surviving spouse, next-of-kin or legal representative, or


(b) Whose case is considered on the NDRB’s own motion.


§ 724.115 Next of kin.

The person or persons in the highest category of priority as determined by the following list (categories appear in descending order of priority): Surviving legal spouse; children (whether by current or prior marriage) age 18 years or older in descending precedence by age; father or mother, unless by court order custody has been vested in another (adoptive parent takes precedence over natural parent); siblings (whole or half) age 18 years or older in descending precedence by age; grandfather or grandmother; any other relative (precedence to be determined in accordance with the civil law of descent of the deceased former member’s state of domicile at time of death).


§ 724.116 Counsel/Representative.

An individual or agency designated by the applicant who agrees to represent the applicant in a case before the NDRB. It includes, but is not limited to: a lawyer who is a member of the bar of a Federal Court or of the highest court of a State; an accredited representative designated by an organization recognized by the Administrator of Veterans Affairs; a representative from a State agency concerned with veterans affairs; or a representative from private organizations or local Government agencies.


§ 724.117 Discharge review.

A nonadversary administrative reappraisal at the level of the Navy Department of discharges from the naval service. The object of the reappraisal is to determine whether the discharge should be changed, and if so, the nature of the change. This reappraisal includes the type and reason/basis for separation, the procedures followed in accomplishing separation, and the characterization of service. This term includes determinations made under the provisions of 38 U.S.C. 3103(2).


§ 724.118 Documentary discharge review.

A formal session of the NDRB convened for the purpose of reviewing, on the basis of documentary data, an applicant’s discharge. The Documentary data shall include the application together with all information accompanying that application, available service records, and any other information considered relevant by the NDRB.


[50 FR 10943, Mar. 19, 1985, as amended at 75 FR 747, Jan. 6, 2010]


§ 724.119 Personal appearance discharge review.

A formal session of the NDRB convened for the purpose of reviewing an applicant’s discharge on the basis of a personal appearance, as well as documentary data. The personal appearance may be by the applicant or by a representative of the applicant, or both.


§ 724.120 National Capital Region (NCR).

The District of Columbia; Prince Georges and Montgomery Counties in Maryland; Arlington, Fairfax, Loudoun, and Prince William Counties in Virginia; and all cities and towns included within the outer boundaries of the foregoing counties.


§ 724.121 Decisional document.

The written recordation of the applicant’s summary of service, the issue or issues presented together with any evidence offered in support of the application, the NDRB’s response to the issue or issues, the votes of the members of the panel, and any recommendations or responses by the President of the NDRB or the Secretarial Reviewing Authority (SRA). The decisional document is promulgated by the “en bloc letter”.


§ 724.122 Recorder, NDRB Panel.

A panel member responsible for briefing an applicant’s case from the documentary evidence available prior to a discharge review, presenting the brief to the panel considering the application, performing other designated functions during personal appearance discharge hearings, and drafting the decisional document subsequent to the hearing.


§ 724.123 Complainant.

A former member of the Armed Forces (or the former member’s counsel) who submits a complaint under 32 CFR part 70 with respect to the decisional document issued in the former member’s own case; or a former member of the Armed Forces (or the former member’s counsel) who submits a complaint under reference (b) stating that correction of the decisional document will assist the former member in preparing for an administrative or judicial proceeding in which the former member’s own discharge will be at issue.


Subpart B – Authority/Policy for Departmental Discharge Review

§ 724.201 Authority.

The Naval Discharge Review Board, established pursuant to 10 U.S.C. 1553, is a component of the Secretary of the Navy Council of Review Boards. On December 6, 2004, the Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Manpower & Reserve Affairs) approved the change in name from Naval Council of Personnel Boards to Secretary of the Navy Council of Review Boards. By SECNAVINST 5730.7 series, the Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Manpower and Reserve Affairs) is authorized and directed to act for the Secretary of the Navy within his/her assigned area of responsibility and exercises oversight over the Secretary of the Naval Council of Review Boards. SECNAVINST 5420.135 series states the organization, mission, duties and responsibilities of the Secretary of the Naval Council of Review Boards to include the Naval Discharge Review Board. The Chief of Naval Operations established the Office of Naval Disability Evaluation and the Navy Council of Personnel Boards on 1 October 1976 (OPNAVNOTE 5450 Ser 09b26/535376 of 9 Sep 1976 (Canc frp: Apr 77)). The Chief of Naval Operations approved the change in name of the Office of Naval Disability Evaluation and Navy Council of Personnel Boards to Naval Council of Personnel Boards on 1 February 1977 (OPNAVNOTE 5450 Ser 099b26/32648 of 24 Jan 1977 (Canc frp: Jul 77)) with the following mission Statement:



To administer and supervise assigned boards and councils.


[75 FR 747, Jan. 6, 2010]


§ 724.202 Statutory/Directive Authority.

The NDRB, in its conduct of discharge review, shall be guided by the applicable statutes, regulations, and manuals and directives of the Department of the Navy, and other written public expressions of policy by competent authority:


(a) 10 U.S.C. 1553, Review of discharge or dismissal:


(1) “The Secretary concerned shall, after consulting the Administrator of Veterans’ Affairs, establish a board of review, consisting of five members, to review the discharge or dismissal (other than a discharge or dismissal by sentence of a general court-martial) of any former member of an armed force under the jurisdiction of his/her department upon its own motion or upon the request of the former member or, if he/she is dead, his/her surviving spouse, next of kin, or legal representative. A motion or request for review must be made within 15 years after the date of the discharge or dismissal.”


(2) A board established under this section may, subject to review by the Secretary concerned, change a discharge or dismissal, or issue a new discharge, to reflect its findings.


(3) A review by the board established under this section shall be based on the records of the armed forces concerned and such other evidence as may be presented to the board. A witness may present evidence to the board in person or by affidavit. A person who requests a review under this section may appear before the board in person or by counsel or an accredited representative or an organization recognized by the Administrator of Veterans’ Affairs under title 38 U.S.C. 3401 et seq.”.


(b) Pub. L. 95-126. See appendix D.


(c) 32 CFR part 70. This provides for uniform standards and procedures for review of discharges from the military services of the Department of Defense. The provisions of 32 CFR part 70 are incorporated in this Manual.


(d) The Secretary of Defense memoranda dated August 13, 1971 and April 28, 1972 (NOTAL). These directed a review for recharacterization of (1) administrative discharges under other than honorable conditions issued solely on the basis of personal use of drugs or possession of drugs for the purpose of such use, and (2) punitive discharges and dismissals issued solely for conviction of personal use of drugs and possession for the purpose of such use for those discharges executed as a result of a case completed or in process on or before July 7, 1971. (See appendix B).


(e) 32 CFR part 41. This prescribes policy, standards and procedures which govern the administrative separation of enlisted persons from the Armed Forces.


§ 724.203 Broad objectives of naval discharge review.

Naval discharge review shall have as its broad objectives:


(a) The furtherance of good order and discipline.


(b) The correction of injustice or inequity in the discharge issued.


(c) The correction of administrative or clerical errors.


§ 724.204 Eligibility for naval discharge review.

Any former member of the Naval Service, eligible for review under reference (a) or surviving spouse, next of kin or legal representative, shall upon submission of an application be afforded a review of the member’s discharge from the Naval Service as provided in §§ 724.205 and 724.206. Discharge review may also be initiated on the motion of the NDRB (See § 724.220).


§ 724.205 Authority for review of naval discharges; jurisdictional limitations.

(a) The Board shall have no authority to:


(1) Review a discharge or dismissal resulting from a general court-martial;


(2) Alter the judgment of a court-martial, except the discharge or dismissal awarded may be changed for purposes of clemency;


(3) Revoke any discharge or dismissal;


(4) Reinstate a person in the naval service;


(5) Recall a former member to active duty;


(6) Change a reenlistment code;


(7) Make recommendations for reenlistment to permit entry in the naval service or any other branch of the Armed Forces;


(8) Cancel or void enlistment contracts; or


(9) Change the reason for discharge from or to a physical disability


(b) Review of naval discharges shall not be undertaken in instances where the elapsed time between the date of discharge and the date of receipt of application for review exceeds fifteen years.


§ 724.206 Jurisdictional determinations.

The determination as to whether the NDRB has jurisdiction in any case shall be predicated on the policy stated in § 724.205. Decisions shall be made by administrative action without referral to the NDRB. Normally, they shall be made by the Executive Secretary of the NDRB, or they may be referred to the President, NDRB.


§ 724.207 Disposition of applications for discharge review.

One of three dispositions will be made of an application for review of a discharge:


(a) The application may be rejected for reason of:


(1) Absence of jurisdiction;


(2) Previous review on the same evidence; or


(b) The application may be withdrawn by the applicant; or


(c) The application may be accepted and the discharge reviewed by the NDRB, resulting in,


(1) Change to the discharge, or


(2) No change.


§ 724.208 Implementation of NDRB decisions.

The Commandant of the Marine Corps and the Chief of Naval Operations are responsible for implementing Naval Discharge Review Board decisions within their respective services. The Commandant of the Marine Corps shall be notified of decisions in each discharge review case and shall implement the decisions within the Marine Corps. The Commander, Naval Military Personnel Command, acting for the Chief of Naval Operations and Chief of Naval Personnel, shall be notified of decisions in each discharge review case and shall implement the decisions within the Navy.


§ 724.209 Evidence supporting applications.

In the absence of law, evidence or policy to the contrary, naval discharges shall be considered just, equitable and proper as issued. When hearings are scheduled, applicants must be prepared to present their case at the scheduled time. In the absence of any other evidence, naval discharge review shall be undertaken by examination of available service and health records of the applicant. Normally, the responsibility for presenting evidence from outside available service and health records shall rest with the applicant. Applications in which elements of relevant information are obviously omitted will be returned for completion and resubmission.


§ 724.210 Review action in instances of unavailable records.

(a) In the event that Department of the Navy personnel or health records associated with a requested review of discharge are not located at the custodial activity, the following action shall be taken by the NDRB prior to consideration of the request for discharge review.


(1) A certification that the records are unavailable shall be obtained from the custodial activity.


(2) The applicant shall be notified of the situation and requested to provide such information and documents as may be desired in support of the request for discharge review. A period of not less than 60 days shall be allowed for such documents to be submitted. At the expiration of this time period, the review may be conducted with information available to the NDRB.


(3) The presumption of regularity in the conduct of government affairs may be applicable in instances of unavailable records depending on the circumstances of the case. (See § 724.211)


(b) [Reserved]


[50 FR 10943, Mar. 19, 1985, as amended at 65 FR 62616, Oct. 19, 2000]


§ 724.211 Regularity of government affairs.

There is a presumption of regularity in the conduct of governmental affairs. This presumption can be applied in any review unless there is substantial credible evidence to rebut the presumption.


§ 724.212 Availability of records.

(a) Before applying for discharge review, potential applicants or their designated representatives may obtain copies of their military personnel records by submitting a General Services Administration Standard Form 180, “Request Pertaining to Military Records,” to the National Personnel Records Center (NPRC), 9700 Page Boulevard, St. Louis, MO 63132. Once the application for discharge review (DD Form 293) is submitted, an applicant’s military records are forwarded to the NDRB where they cannot be reproduced. Submission of a request for an applicant’s military records, including a request under the Freedom of Information Act (5 U.S.C. 552) or Privacy Act (5 U.S.C. 552a) after the DD Form 293 has been submitted, shall result automatically in the temporary suspension of processing of the application for discharge review until the requested records are sent to an appropriate location for copying, are copied, and are returned to the headquarters of the NDRB. Processing of the application shall then be resumed at whatever stage of the discharge review process is practicable. Applicants are encouraged to submit any request for their military records before applying for discharge review rather than after submitting DD Form 293 to avoid delays in processing of applications and scheduling of reviews. Applicants and their counsel may also examine their military personnel records at the site of their scheduled review before the hearing. The NDRB shall notify applicants of the dates the records are available for examination in their standard scheduling information.


(b) If the NDRB is not authorized to provide copies of documents that are under the cognizance of another government department, office, or activity, applications for such information must be made by the applicant to the cognizant authority. The NDRB shall advise the applicant of the mailing address of the government department, office, or activity to which the request should be submitted.


(c) [Reserved]


(d) The NDRB may take steps to obtain additional evidence that is relevant to the discharge under consideration beyond that found in the official military records or submitted by the applicant, if a review of available evidence suggests that it would be incomplete without the additional information, or when the applicant presents testimony or documents that require additional information to evaluate properly. Such information shall be made available to the applicant, upon request, with appropriate modifications regarding classified material.


(1) In any case heard on request of an applicant, the NDRB shall provide the applicant and counsel or representative, if any, at a reasonable time before initiating the decision process, a notice of the availability of all regulations and documents to be considered in the discharge review, except for documents in the official personnel or medical records and any documents submitted by the applicant. The NDRB shall also notify the applicant or counsel or representative: (a) of the right to examine such documents or to be provided with copies of the documents upon request; (b) of the date by which such requests must be received; and (c) of the opportunity to respond within a reasonable period of time to be set by the NDRB.


(2) When necessary to acquaint the applicant with the substance of a classified document, the classifying authority, on the request of the NDRB, shall prepare a summary of or an extract from the document, deleting all references to sources of information and other matters, the disclosure of which, in the opinion of the classifying authority, would be detrimental to the national security interests of the United States. Should preparation of such summary be deemed impracticable by the classifying authority, information from the classified source shall not be considered by the NDRB in its review of the case.


(e) Regulations of a military department may be obtained at many installations under the jurisdiction of the Military Department concerned or by writing to the following address: DA Military Review Boards Agency, Attention: SFBA (Reading Room), Room 1E520, The Pentagon, Washington, DC 20310.


[50 FR 10943, Mar. 19, 1985, as amended at 65 FR 62616, Oct. 19, 2000]


§ 724.213 Attendance of witnesses.

Arrangement for attendance of witnesses testifying in behalf of the applicant at discharge review hearings is the responsibility of the applicant. The NDRB is not authorized to subpoena or otherwise require their presence.


§ 724.214 Applicant’s expenses.

Unless otherwise specified by law or regulation, expenses incurred by the applicant, witnesses, or counsel/representative will not be paid by the Department of Defense. The NDRB is not authorized to issue orders or other process to enable the applicant to appear in person.


§ 724.215 Military representation.

Military officers, except those acting pursuant to specific detailing by appropriate authorities desiring to act for or on behalf of an applicant in the presentation of a case before an NDRB Panel are advised to consult legal counsel before undertaking such representation. Such representation may be prohibited by 18 U.S.C. 205.


§ 724.216 Failure to appear at a hearing or respond to a scheduling notice.

(a) Except as otherwise authorized by the Secretary concerned, further opportunity for a hearing shall not be made available in the following circumstances to an applicant who has requested a hearing:


(1) When the applicant has been sent a letter containing the month and location of a proposed hearing and fails to make a timely response; or


(2) When the applicant, after being notified by letter of the time and place of the hearing, fails to appear at the appointed time, either in person or by representative, without having made a prior, timely request for a continuation, postponement, or withdrawal.


(b) In such cases, the applicant shall be deemed to have waived the right to a hearing, and the NDRB shall complete its review of the discharge. Further request for a hearing shall not be granted unless the applicant can demonstrate that the failure to appear or respond was due to circumstances beyond the applicant’s control.


§ 724.217 Limitation – Reconsiderations.

A discharge review shall not be subject to reconsideration except:


(a) When the only previous consideration of the case was on the motion of the NDRB;


(b) When the original discharge review did not involve a personal hearing and a hearing is now desired, and the provisions of § 724.216 do not apply;


(c) When changes in discharge policy are announced after an earlier review of an applicant’s discharge, and the new policy is made expressly retroactive;


(d) When the NDRB determines that policies and procedures under which the applicant was discharged differ in material respects from policies and procedures currently applicable on a service-wide basis to discharges of the type under consideration, provided that such changes in policies or procedures represent a substantial enhancement of the rights afforded an applicant in such proceedings;


(e) When an individual is to be represented by counsel or representative, and was not so represented in any previous consideration of the case by the NDRB;


(f) When the case was not previously considered under uniform standards published pursuant to Pub. L. 95-126 and such application is made within 15 years after the date of discharge; or


(g) On the basis of presentation of new, substantial, relevant evidence not available to the applicant at the time of the original review. The decision whether evidence offered by an applicant in support of a request for reconsideration is in fact new, substantial, relevant, and was not available to the applicant at the time of the original review will be based on a comparison of such evidence with the evidence considered in the previous discharge review. If this comparison shows that the evidence submitted would have had a probable effect on matters concerning the propriety or equity of the discharge, the request for reconsideration shall be granted.


§ 724.218 Limitation – Continuance and Postponements.

(a) A continuance of a discharge review hearing may be authorized by the President of the NDRB or presiding officer of the panel concerned, provided that such continuance is of reasonable duration and is essential to achieving a full and fair hearing. When a proposal for continuance is indefinite, the pending application shall be returned to the applicant with the option to resubmit when the case is fully ready for review.


(b) Postponements of scheduled reviews normally shall not be permitted other than for demonstrated good and sufficient reason set forth by the applicant in a timely manner or for the convenience of the government.


§ 724.219 Withdrawal of application.

An applicant shall be permitted to withdraw an application without prejudice at any time before the scheduled review, except that failure to appear for a scheduled hearing shall not be construed or accepted as a withdrawal.


§ 724.220 Review on motion of the NDRB.

Reviews of Naval discharges may be initiated by the NDRB on its own motion (10 U.S.C. 1553) which includes reviews requested by the Veterans Administration under 38 U.S.C. 101, 3103 as amended by Pub. L. 95-126 of October 8, 1977 (See Pub. L. 98-209).


§ 724.221 Scheduling of discharge reviews.

(a) If an applicant requests a personal appearance discharge review, or to be represented in absentia, the NDRB shall provide a hearing in the NCR or at another site within the forty-eight contiguous states.


(b) The NDRB shall subsequently notify the applicant and representative (if any) in writing of the proposed personal appearance hearing time and place. This notice shall normally be mailed thirty to sixty days prior to the date of the hearing. If the applicant elects, this time limit may be waived and an earlier date set.


(c) When an applicant requests a documentary review, the NDRB shall undertake the review as soon as practicable. Normally, documentary reviews shall be conducted in the order in which they are received.


§ 724.222 Personal appearance discharge hearing sites.

(a) The NDRB shall be permanently located, together with its administrative staff, in the NCR. The NDRB shall routinely conduct personal appearance discharge reviews and documentary reviews at this, its permanent office.


(b) In addition, as permitted by available resources, NDRB Panels shall travel to other selected sites within the contiguous 48 states for the purpose of conducting reviews. The selection of sites and frequency of visits shall be predicated on the number of requests pending within a region and the availability of resources.


§ 724.223 NDRB support and augmentation by regular and reserve activities.

(a) When an NDRB Panel travels for the purpose of conducting hearings, it shall normally select Navy or Marine Corps installations in the area visited as review sites.


(b) The NDRB Traveling Board shall normally consist of members from the NCPB and augmentees from regular and reserve Navy and Marine Corps sources, as required.


(c) Navy and Marine Corps activities in the geographical vicinity of selected review sites shall provide administrative support and augmentation to an NDRB Panel during its visit where such assistance can be undertaken without interference with mission accomplishment. The NDRB shall coordinate requests for augmentees and administrative support through Commandant of the Marine Corps or the Chief of Naval Reserve, as appropriate.


(d) The administrative staff of the NDRB shall undertake all arrangements for NDRB Traveling Panel visits and shall process associated review documents.


[50 FR 10943, Mar. 19, 1985, as amended at 75 FR 747, Jan. 6, 2010]


§ 724.224 Court-martial specifications, presumption concerning.

(a) Relevant and material facts stated in a court-martial specification, shall be presumed by the NDRB Panel as established facts. With respect to a discharge or dismissal adjudged by a court-martial case tried under the Uniform Code of Military Justice, the action may extend only to change in the discharge or dismissal for purposes of clemency. This policy only applies to cases filed with the discharge review board after December 6, 1983.


(b) Relevant and material facts stated in a court-martial specification, in the face of which the applicant requested a discharge for the good of the service to avoid trial by court-martial, shall be considered in accordance with the following:


(1) If the applicant/accused was required to admit the facts contained in the charge sheet, or if the discharge authority was required to find that the stated facts were true, then the NDRB can presume the truth of such facts, unless there is a substantial credible evidence to rebut this presumption; or


(2) If the discharge in lieu of court-martial only required a valid preferral, the NDRB may presume that the signer either had personal knowledge of, or had investigated the matters set forth, and that the charges were true in fact to the best of the signer’s knowledge and belief.
1
The weight to be given this presumption in determining whether the facts stated in the charge sheet are true is a matter to be determined by the NDRB. To the extent that the discharge proceeding reflects an official determination that the facts stated in the charge sheet are true; that the applicant/accused admitted the facts stated in the charge sheet; or that the applicant/accused admitted guilt of the offense(s), then the presumption is strengthened. In accordance with paragraph B12f of enclosure (3) to 32 CFR part 70 the presumption may be rebutted by “substantial credible evidence.”




1 Charges may be preferred by any person subject to the Uniform Code of Military Justice. The charges must be signed and sworn to before a commissioned officer authorized to administer oaths, and shall state that the signer has personal knowledge of, or has investigated the matters set forth therein; and that the charges are true in fact to the best of the signer’s knowledge and belief. 10 U.S.C. 830 (1976) (Art. 30 Uniform Code of Military Justice).


Subpart C – Director, Secretary of the Navy Council of Review Boards and President Naval Discharge Review Board; Responsibilities in Support of the Naval Discharge Review Board

§ 724.301 Mission.

To administer and supervise assigned boards and councils within the Department of the Navy.


§ 724.302 Functions: Director, Secretary of the Navy Council of Review Boards.

(a) Make recommendations to the Secretary of the Navy regarding organization, tasking and resources of the NDRB and its associated administrative support.


(b) Submit recommendations to the Secretary of the Navy regarding policy and procedures for discharge review.


(c) Provide administrative and clerical support for NDRB.


(d) Inform the Secretary of the Navy of matters of interest to him.


(e) Maintain a system of records, including as a minimum:


(1) Records specified for the NDRB as stipulated in the procedures prescribed in subpart H of this Manual.


(2) Records required for the administration of military and civilian personnel.


(3) Files of correspondence received and issued.


(f) Establish billet/position assignment criteria for the NDRB.


(g) Propose to the Secretary of the Navy, changes to this instruction.


(h) Issue requisite precepts and remove or add members to the NDRB from personnel detailed to serve on the Secretary of the Navy Council of Review Boards, or from personnel otherwise made available.


[50 FR 10943, Mar. 19, 1985, as amended at 75 FR 747, Jan. 6, 2010]


§ 724.303 Functions: President, Naval Discharge Review Board.

(a) Exercise primary cognizance within the Department of the Navy for matters relating to discharge review.


(b) Supervise and direct the activities of the NDRB.


(c) Maintain appropriate liaison with discharge review activities in other services (use Army Discharge Review Board as focal point for service coordination).


(d) Maintain coordination with the Commandant of the Marine Corps (Code M) and the Commander, Naval Military Personnel Command in matters associated with discharge review.


(e) In conformance with SECNAVINST 5211.5 series, protect the privacy of individuals in connection with discharge review.


(f) Assure that NDRB functions are administered in accordance with the appropriate Secretary of the Navy instructions dealing with privacy and access to information.


(g) Convene the NDRB as authorized by the Secretary of the Navy.


(h) Direct the movement of the NDRB Traveling Panel(s) on the basis of regional hearing requests.


(i) Monitor the performance of the naval discharge review system. Make recommendations for changes and improvements. Take action to avoid delays in processing of individual discharge review actions.


(j) Provide NDRB inputs for the maintenance of a public reading file and maintain associated NDRB indexes updated quarterly.


[50 FR 10943, Mar. 19, 1985, as amended at 75 FR 747, Jan. 6, 2010]


§ 724.304 Responsibility for Department of the Navy support of the Naval Discharge Review Board.

The Commandant of the Marine Corps; Commander, Naval Military Personnel Command; Commander, Naval Reserve Force; Commander, Naval Medical Command; and chiefs of other bureaus and offices of the Department of the Navy shall provide support, as requested, to the Naval discharge review process.


§ 724.305 Functions of the CMC and CNO.

In the case of Navy, CNMPC, under the CNP, shall discharge responsibilities of the CNO.


(a) Provide and facilitate access by the NDRB to service/health records and other data associated with performance of duty of applicants.


(b) Advise the NDRB of developments in personnel management which may have a bearing on discharge review judgments.


(c) Implement the discharge review decisions of the NDRB and those of higher authority within respective areas of cognizance.


(d) Include the record of NDRB proceedings as a permanent part of the service record of the applicant in each case.


(e) Where appropriate, recommend cases for the NDRB to review on its own motion.


(f) Provide qualified personnel as NDRB members, recorders and administrative staff.


(g) Establish administrative procedures to ensure that if a member is separated from the Navy or the Marine Corps under other than fully honorable conditions, the member is advised of:


(1) The right to a review of his or her discharge under provisions of 10 U.S.C. 1553, and


(2) The procedures for applying for such a review.


(h) Provide Navy and Marine Corps units and activities with information on the mission of the Naval Discharge Review Board through entries in appropriate personnel administration directives.


§ 724.306 Functions of the Commander, Naval Medical Command.

Under the CNO the COMNAVMEDCOM shall facilitate, as required, access by the NDRB to health records of applicants.


§ 724.307 Functions of the Commander, Naval Reserve Force.

In the case of Navy, the COMNAVRESFOR shall discharge the responsibilities of the CNO –


(a) Upon request and within available resources, provide qualified inactive duty reservists to serve as members of the NDRB.


(b) Upon request, provide appropriate accommodations to the NDRB Traveling Panels for purposes of conducting reviews at Naval and Marine Corps Reserve Centers and aviation facilities.


Subpart D – Principal Elements of the Navy Department Discharge Review System

§ 724.401 Applicants.

As defined in § 724.114.


§ 724.402 Naval Discharge Review Board.

As defined in § 724.102.


§ 724.403 President, Naval Discharge Review Board.

Supervises the Naval Discharge Review Board. (See subpart C).


§ 724.404 Director, Naval Council of Personnel Boards.

Exercises adminstrative control and oversight of the Naval discharge review process. (See subpart C).


§ 724.405 Commandant of the Marine Corps or the Commander, Naval Military Personnel Command.

Personnel managers of the Marine Corps and the Navy; responsible for providing limited support to the Naval Discharge Review Board and for implementation of departmental discharge review decisions. (See subpart C).


§ 724.406 Commander, Naval Medical Command.

Custodian of Navy and Marine Corps health records. (See subpart C).


§ 724.407 Commander, Naval Reserve Force.

Manages Naval Reserve resources. Responsible for providing limited support to the Naval Discharge Review Board. (See subpart C).


§ 724.408 Secretary of the Navy.

The final authority within the Department of the Navy in discharge review.


Subpart E – Procedural Rights of the Applicant and Administrative Actions Preliminary To Discharge Review

§ 724.501 Procedural rights of the applicant.

Each applicant has the following procedural rights:


(a) Within 15 years after the date of discharge, to make a written request for review of the applicant’s discharge if the discharge was other than the result of a general court-martial. The request may include such other statements, affidavits, or documentation as desired.


(b) To have that review conducted by the NDRB either in the NCR or other designated location, when a personal appearance discharge review is desired.


(c) To appear before the NDRB in person, with or without counsel/representative; with counsel/representative concurrence, to have counsel/representative present the applicant’s case in the absence of the applicant; or to have the review conducted based on records and any additional documentation submitted by the applicant or counsel/representative.


(d) To request copies of any documents or other evidence to be considered by the NDRB in the review of the applicant’s discharge or dismissal other than the documents or evidence contained in the official record or submitted by the applicant prior to the conduct of the formal review and to be afforded an opportunity to examine such other documents or evidence or to be provided with copies of them.


(e) To withdraw the request for discharge review without prejudice at any time prior to the scheduled review, except that failure to appear for a scheduled hearing shall not be construed or accepted as a withdrawal.


(f) To request a continuance of the review when the continuance is of a reasonable duration and essential to achieving a full and fair hearing. The request must indicate the reason why the continuance is required.


(g) To request postponement of the discharge review for good and sufficient reason set forth in a timely manner.


(h) To request reconsideration of the discharge review under the conditions set forth in § 724.217.


(i) To have access to the information to be considered by the NDRB prior to the actual review of the applicant’s case.


(j) To have the applicant’s right to privacy protected in any review conducted by the NDRB.


(k) When appearing personally before the NDRB:


(1) To introduce witnesses, documents, and sworn or unsworn testimony.


(2) To present oral or written arguments personally or through counsel/representative.


(l) To submit documents, affidavits, briefs or arguments in writing. When the counsel/representative appears in person before the NDRB, arguments may be presented orally.


(m) To state clearly and specifically the issue or issues which the applicant desires the NDRB to answer in writing. These must be presented in writing on DD Form 293 by the applicant or counsel/representative.


(n) To have the applicant’s discharge reviewed under the standards of equity and propriety outlined in subpart I.


(o) To be provided with a written decision on the applicant’s review.


(p) If the case is to be forwarded for Secretarial review, to present a timely statement rebutting any findings, conclusions, or reasons of the NDRB or the President, NDRB, which are alleged to be erroneous on the facts, against the substantial weight of the evidence, or contrary to law or governing regulation, prior to that Secretarial review.


[50 FR 10943, Mar. 19, 1985, as amended at 75 FR 747, Jan. 6, 2010]


§ 724.502 Actions to be taken by the applicant preliminary to discharge review.

(a) Application for Review of Discharge or Dismissal from the Armed Forces of the United States, DD Form 293 must be used in requesting a discharge review. DD Form 293 is available at most military installations and regional offices of the Veterans Administration. This form is to be signed personally by the applicant. In the event the discharged individual is deceased or incompetent, the form must be signed by an authorized individual as discussed in § 724.113 of this Manual.


(b) The application is to be accompanied by:


(1) A copy of the certificate of discharge, if available;


(2) A copy of the Armed Forces of the United States Report of Transfer or Discharge (DD-214), if available;


(3) Certification of death, incompetency and evidence of relationship in applicable cases (§ 724.113);


(4) Other statements, affidavits, depositions, documents and information desired by the applicant to be considered by the NDRB.


(c) Correspondence relating to review of naval discharges should be addressed to:



Naval Discharge Review Board, 720 Kennon Ave SE., Suite 309, Washington, DC 20374-5023

(d) NDRB telephone number is (202) 685-6600.


[50 FR 10943, Mar. 19, 1985, as amended at 75 FR 747, Jan. 6, 2010]


§ 724.503 NDRB response to application for discharge review.

(a) The NDRB shall acknowledge receipt of the application.


(b) In the event a documentary review is requested, the applicant shall normally receive no further communication from the NDRB until notified of the decision in the case.


(c) In the event a personal appearance discharge review is requested, the applicant shall be notified of the proposed time and place of this review and shall be advised of the availability of the official documents to be considered by the NDRB.


(d) A copy of NDRB correspondence to an applicant shall be sent to the representative of record, if any.


§ 724.504 NDRB actions preliminary to discharge review.

(a) When each application for discharge review is received by the NDRB, the service record and, if required, health record of the applicant will be requested from the appropriate record custodian.


(b) Upon receipt, each record of service will be reviewed to determine whether or not the applicant appears to have been discharged under circumstances which might act as a bar to Veterans’ Administration benefits under 38 U.S.C. 3103. These circumstances of discharge are:


(1) Discharge or dismissal by reason of the sentence of a general court-martial.


(2) Discharge as a conscientious objector who refused to perform military duty, to wear the uniform or otherwise to comply with lawful orders of competent military authority.


(3) Discharge as a deserter.


(4) Discharge on the basis, or as part of the basis, of an absence without authority from active duty for a continuous period of at least 180 days, if such discharge was under conditions other than honorable. Additionally, such absence is computed without regard to the applicant’s normal or adjusted expiration of term of service.


(5) Discharge or dismissal of an officer based on acceptance of the officer’s resignation for the good of the service.


(6) Discharge, on his/her own application, during a period of hostilities, as an alien.


(c) If it appears that the applicant was discharged under one or more of the circumstances outlined in § 724.504b, a written notification will be sent which informs the applicant that:


(1) An initial service record review reveals that the discharge may have been awarded under circumstances which make the applicant ineligible for receipt of VA benefits regardless of any action taken by the NDRB.


(2) Separate action by the Board for Correction of Naval Records (BCNR) and/or the VA, in case of 180 days consecutive UA disqualification, may confer eligibility for VA benefits. Instructions for making application to the BCNR and for contacting the VA are provided.


[50 FR 10943, Mar. 19, 1985, as amended at 75 FR 747, Jan. 6, 2010]


Subpart F – Naval Discharge Review Board Mission and Functions

§ 724.601 General.

The NDRB is a component of the Secretary of the Navy Council of Review Boards and has its offices located in the NCR. The NDRB conducts documentary reviews and personal appearance reviews in the NCR and, on a traveling basis, at selected sites within the 48 contiguous states. Regional site selection is predicated on the number of pending applications accumulated from a given geographical area and the resources available to support distant personal appearance reviews. The NDRB does not maintain facilities other than at its NCR offices. The primary sites of NCR are: Chicago, IL; Dallas, TX; and San Francisco, CA.


[50 FR 10943, Mar. 19, 1985, as amended at 75 FR 747, Jan. 6, 2010]


§ 724.602 Mission.

To decide, in accordance with standards of naval law and discipline and the standards for discharge review set forth in subpart I, whether a discharge or dismissal from the naval service is proper and equitable, or whether it should be changed.


§ 724.603 Functions.

(a) Meet as frequently as necessary to provide expeditious review of naval discharges.


(b) Meet at locations within the 48 contiguous states as determined appropriate on the basis of the number of discharge review applications received from various geographical areas and of available resources and facilities.


(c) Review applications for review of discharges.


(d) In consonance with directives of higher authority and the policies set forth in this Manual, grant or deny change of discharges.


(e) Promulgate decisions in a timely manner.


(f) Maintain a system of records.


(g) Maintain liaison in discharge review matters with:


(1) General Counsel of the Navy.


(2) Commandant of the Marine Corps.


(3) Chief of Naval Operations.


(i) Commander, Naval Reserve Force.


(ii) Commander, Naval Medical Command.


(iii) Commander, Naval Military Personnel Command, under the Chief of Naval Personnel.


(4) Judge Advocate General of the Navy.


(5) Veterans’ service organizations.


(6) Discharge review boards of the other services, using the Army Discharge Review Board as the focal point for service coordination.


(h) Protect the privacy of individuals whose records are reviewed.


(i) Maintain for public access a reading file and associated index of records of NDRB proceedings in all reviews undertaken subsequent to July 1, 1975.


Subpart G – Organization of the Naval Discharge Review Board

§ 724.701 Composition.

The NDRB acting in plenary review session shall be composed of five members. Normally the members shall be career military officers, assigned to the Secretary of the Navy Council of Review Boards or otherwise made available; inactive duty officers of the Navy and Marine Corps Reserve may serve as members when designated to do so by the President, NDRB.


(a) Presiding officers of the NDRB shall normally be Navy or Marine Corps officers in the grade of Captain/Colonel or above.


(b) The remaining NDRB membership shall normally be not less than the grade of Lieutenant Commander/Major with preference being given to senior grades.


(c) Normally, at least three of the five members of the NDRB shall belong to the service from which the applicant whose case is under review was discharged.


(d) Individual membership in the NDRB may vary within the limitations of the prescribed composition.


(e) Any member of a panel of the NDRB other than the presiding officer may act as recorder for cases assigned. The recorder will participate as a voting member of the panel.


[50 FR 10943, Mar. 19, 1985, as amended at 75 FR 747, Jan. 6, 2010]


§ 724.702 Executive management.

The administrative affairs of the NDRB shall be managed by the Executive Secretary. This responsibility shall include schedules, records, correspondence and issuance of NDRB decisions.


§ 724.703 Legal counsel.

Normally, the NDRB shall function without the immediate attendance of legal counsel. In the event that a legal advisory opinion is deemed appropriate by the NDRB, such opinion shall be obtained routinely by reference to the Counsel assigned to the Office of the Director, Secretary of the Navy Council of Review Boards. In addition, the NDRB may request advisory opinions from staff offices of the Department of the Navy, including, but not limited to the General Counsel and the Judge Advocate General.


[75 FR 747, Jan. 6, 2010]


Subpart H – Procedures of Naval Discharge Review Board

§ 724.801 Matters to be considered in discharge review.

In the process of its review of discharges, the NDRB shall examine available records and pertinent regulations of the Department of the Navy, together with such information as may be presented by the applicant and/or representative, which will normally include:


(a) The application for discharge review;


(b) Statements, affidavits or documentation, if any, accompanying the application or presented during hearings;


(c) Testimony, if any, presented during hearings;


(d) Service and health records;


(e) A brief of pertinent facts extracted from the service and health records, prepared by the NDRB recorder.


§ 724.802 Applicant’s responsibilities.

(a) Request for change of discharge. An applicant may request a change in the character of or reason for discharge (or both).


(1) Character of discharge. Block 7 of DD Form 293 provides an applicant an opportunity to request a specific change in character of discharge (for example, General Discharge to Honorable Discharge; Other than Honorable Discharge to General or Honorable Discharge). A person separated on or after 1 October 1982 while in an entry level status may request a change from Other Than Honorable Discharge to Entry Level Separation. A request for review from an applicant who does not have an Honorable Discharge will be treated as a request for a change to an Honorable Discharge unless the applicant requests a specific change to another character of discharge.


(2) Reason for discharge. Block 7 of DD Form 293 provides an applicant an opportunity to request a specific change in the reason for discharge. If an applicant does not request a specific change in the reason for discharge, the NDRB will presume that the request for review does not involve a request for change in the reason for discharge. Under its responsibility to examine the propriety and equity of an applicant’s discharge, the NDRB will change the reason for discharge if such a change is warranted.


(3) The applicant must ensure that issues submitted to the NDRB are consistent with the request for change in discharge set forth in block 7 of the DD Form 293. If an ambiguity is created by a difference between and applicant’s issue and the request in block 7, the NDRB will respond to the issue in the context of the action requested in block 7. In the case of a personal appearance hearing, the NDRB will attempt to resolve the ambiguity under § 724.802(c).


(b) Request for consideration of specific issues. An applicant may request the Board to consider specific issues which, in the opinion of the applicant, form a basis for changing the character of or reason for discharge, or both. In addition to the guidance set forth in this section, applicants should consult the other sections in this manual before submitting issues for consideration by the Board.


(1) Submission of issues on DD Form 293. Issues must be provided to the NDRB on DD Form 293 (82 Nov) before the NDRB closes the review process for deliberation.


(i) Issues must be clear and specific. An issue must be stated clearly and specifically in order to enable the NDRB to understand the nature of the issue and its relationship to the applicant’s discharge.


(ii) Separate listing of issues. Each issue submitted by an applicant should be listed separately. Submission of a separate statement for each issue provides the best means of ensuring that the full import of the issue is conveyed to the NDRB.


(iii) Use of DD Form 293. DD Form 293 provides applicants with a standard format for submitting issues to the NDRB, and its use:


(A) Provides a means for an applicant to set forth clearly and specifically those matters that, in the option of the applicant, provide a basis for changing the discharge;


(B) Assists the NDRB in focusing on those matters considered to be important by an applicant;


(C) Assists the NDRB in distinguishing between a matter submitted by an applicant in the expectation that it will be treated as a decisional issue, and those matters submitted simply as background or supporting materials;


(D) Provides the applicant with greater rights in the event that the applicant later submits a complaint concerning the decisional document;


(E) Reduces the potential for disagreement as to the content of an applicant’s issue.


(iv) Incorporation by reference. If the applicant makes an additional written submission, such as a brief, in support of the application, the applicant may incorporate by reference specific issues set forth in the written submission in accordance with the guidance on DD Form 293. The reference shall be specific enough for the NDRB to identify clearly the matter being submitted as an issue. At a minimum, it shall identify the page, paragraph, and sentence incorporated. Because it is to the applicant’s benefit to bring such issues to the NDRB’s attention as early as possible in the review, applicants who submit a brief are strongly urged to set forth all such issues as a separate item at the beginning of the brief. If it reasonably appears that the applicant inadvertently failed expressly to incorporate an issue which the applicant clearly identifies as an issue to be addressed by the NDRB, the NDRB shall respond to such an issue. (See §§ 724.805 and 724.806.)


(v) Effective date of the new Form DD 293. With respect to applications pending (before November 1982, the effective date of the new DD Form 293), the NDRB shall consider issues clearly and specifically stated in accordance with the rules in effect at the time of submission. With respect to applications received after November 1982, if the applicant submits an obsolete DD Form 293, the NDRB shall accept the application, but shall provide the applicant with a copy of the new form and advise the applicant that it will only respond to issues submitted on the new form in accordance with this instruction.


(2) Relationship of issues to character of or reason for discharge. If the application applies to both character of and reason for discharge, the applicant is encouraged, but not required, to identify the issue as applying to either the character of or the reason for discharge (or both). Unless the issue is directed at the reason for discharge expressly or by necessary implication, the NDRB will presume that it applies solely to the character of discharge.


(3) Relationship of issues to the standards for discharge review. The NDRB reviews discharges on the basis of issues of propriety and equity. The standards used by the NDRB are set forth in § 724.804. The applicant is encouraged to review those standards before submitting any issue upon which the applicant believes a change in discharge should be based.


(i) Issues concerning the equity of the discharge. An issue of equity is a matter that involves a determination whether a discharge should be changed under the equity standards of this part. This includes any issue, submitted by the applicant in accordance with § 724.802(b)(1), that is addressed to the discretionary authority of the NDRB.


(ii) Issues concerning the propriety of a discharge. An issue of propriety is a matter that involves a determination whether a discharge should be changed under the propriety standards of this part. This includes an applicant’s issue, submitted in accordance with § 724.802(b)(1), in which the applicant’s position is that the discharge must be changed because of an error in the discharge pertaining to a regulation, statute, constitutional provision, or other source of law (including a matter that requires a determination whether, under the circumstances of the case, action by military authorities was arbitrary, capricious, or an abuse of discretion). Although a numerical reference to the regulation or other sources of law alleged to have been violated is not necessarily required, the context of the regulation or a description of the procedures alleged to have been violated normally must be set forth in order to inform the NDRB adequately of the basis for the applicant’s position.


(iii) The applicant’s identification of an issue. The applicant is encouraged, but not required, to specify that each issue pertains to the propriety or the equity of the discharge. This will assist the NDRB in assessing the relationship of the issue to propriety or equity.


(4) Citation of matter from decisions. The primary function of the NDRB involves the exercise of discretion on a case-by-case basis. Applicants are not required to cite prior decisions as the basis for a change in discharge. If the applicant wishes to bring the NDRB’s attention to a prior decision as background or illustrative material, the citation should be placed in a brief or other supporting documents. If, however, it is the applicant’s intention to submit an issue that sets forth specific principles and facts from a specific cited decision, the following requirements with respect to applications received on or after November 27, 1982 apply:


(i) The issue must be set forth or expressly incorporated in the “Applicant’s Issue” portion of DD Form 293.


(ii) If an applicant’s issue cites a prior decision (of the NDRB, another Board, an agency, or a court), the applicant shall describe the specific principles and facts that are contained in the prior decision and explain the relevance of cited matter to the applicant’s case.


(iii) To ensure timely consideration of principles cited from unpublished opinions (including decisions maintained by the Armed Forces Discharge Review Board/Corrective Board Reading Room), applicants must provide the NDRB with copies of such decisions or of the relevant portion of the treatise, manual or similar source in which the principles were discussed. At the applicant’s request, such materials will be returned.


(iv) If the applicant fails to comply with requirements in § 724.802(b)(4), the decisional document shall note the defect, and shall respond to the issue without regard to the citation.


(c) Identification by the NDRB of issues submitted by an applicant. The applicant’s issues shall be identified in accordance with this section after a review of the materials noted under § 924.803, is made.


(1) Issues on DD Form 293. The NDRB shall consider all items submitted as issues by an applicant on DD Form 293 (or incorported therein).


(2) Amendment of issues. The NDRB shall not request or instruct an applicant to amend or withdraw any matter submitted by the applicant. Any amendment or withdrawal of an issue by an applicant shall be confirmed in writing by the applicant. Nothing in this provision:


(i) Limits the NDRB’s authority to question an applicant as to the meaning of such matter;


(ii) Precludes the NDRB from developing decisional issues based upon such questions;


(iii) Prevents the applicant from amending or withdrawing such matter any time before the NDRB closes the review process for deliberation; or


(iv) Prevents the NDRB from presenting an applicant with a list of proposed decisional issues and written information concerning the right of the applicant to add to, amend, or withdraw the applicant’s submission. The written information will state that the applicant’s decision to take such action (or decline to do so) will not be used against the applicant in the consideration of the case.


(3) Additional issues identified during a hearing. The following additional procedure shall be used during a hearing in order to promote the NDRB’s understanding of an applicant’s presentation. If, before closing the case for deliberation, the NDRB believes that an applicant has presented an issue not listed on DD Form 293, the NDRB may so inform the applicant, and the applicant may submit the issue in writing or add additional written issues at that time. This does not preclude the NDRB from developing its own decisional issues.


§ 724.803 The decisional document.

A decisional document shall be prepared for each review. At a minimum, this document shall contain:


(a) The circumstances and character of the applicant’s service as extracted from available service records, including health records, and information provided by other government authorities or the applicant, such as, but not limited to:


(1) Information concerning the discharge under review, including:


(i) Date (YYMMDD) of discharge;


(ii) Character of discharge;


(iii) Reason for discharge;


(iv) The specific regulatory authority under which the discharge was issued;


(v) Date (YYMMDD) of enlistment;


(vi) Period of enlistment;


(vii) Age at enlistment;


(viii) Length of service;


(ix) Periods of unauthorized absence;


(x) Conduct and efficiency ratings (numerical or narrative);


(xi) Highest rank achieved;


(xii) Awards and decorations;


(xiii) Educational level;


(xiv) Aptitude test scores;


(xv) Incidents of punishment pursuant to Article 15, Uniform Code of Military Justice (including nature and date (YYMMDD) of offense or punishment);


(xvi) Convictions by court-martial;


(xvii) Prior military service and type of discharge received.


(2) Any other matters in the applicant’s record which pertains to the discharge or the issues, or provide a clearer picture of the overall quality of the applicant’s service.


(b) A list of the type of documents submitted by or on behalf of the applicant (including written briefs, letters of recommendation, affidavits concerning the circumstances of the discharge, or other documentary evidence), if any.


(c) A statement whether the applicant testified, and a list of the type of witnesses, if any , who testified on behalf of the applicant.


(d) A notation whether the application pertained to the character of discharge, the reason for discharge, or both.


(e) A list of the items submitted as issues on DD Form 293 or expressly incorporated therein and such other items submitted as issues by the applicant that are identified as inadvertently omitted. If the issues are listed verbatim on DD Form 293, a copy of the relevant portion of the form may be attached. Issues that have been withdrawn or modified with the written consent of the applicant need not be listed.


(f) The response to the items submitted as issues by the applicant.


(g) A list of decisional issues and a discussion of such issues.


(h) NDRB’s conclusions on the following:


(1) Whether the character of or reason for discharge should be changed.


(2) The specific changes to be made, if any.


(i) A record of the voting, including:


(1) The number of votes for the NDRB’s decision and the number of votes in the minority, if any.


(2) The NDRB members’ names and votes. The copy provided to the applicant may substitute a statement that the names and votes will be made available to the applicant at the applicant’s request.


(j) Advisory opinions, including those containing factual information, when such opinions have been relied upon for final decision or have been accepted as a basis for rejecting any of the applicant’s issues. Such advisory opinions or relevant portions that are not fully set forth in the discussion of decisional issues or otherwise in response to items submitted as issues by the applicant shall be incorporated by reference. A copy of opinions incorporated by reference shall be appended to the decision and included in the record of proceedings.


(k) The recommendation of the NDRB president when required.


(l) The addendum of the SRA when required.


(m) Index entries for each decisional issue under appropriate categories listed in the index of decisions.


(n) An authentication of the document by an appropriate official.


§ 724.804 Decision process.

(a) The NDRB or the NDRB panel, as appropriate, shall meet in plenary session to review discharges and exercise its discretion on a case-by-case basis in applying the standard set forth in subpart I.


(b) The presiding officer is responsible for the conduct of the discharge review. The presiding officer shall convene, recess, and adjourn the NDRB panel as appropriate and shall maintain an atmosphere of dignity and decorum at all times.


(c) Each NDRB member shall act under oath or affirmation requiring careful, objective consideration of the application. NDRB members are responsible for eliciting all facts necessary for a full and fair review. They shall consider all information presented to them by the applicant. In addition, they shall consider available military service and health records, together with other records that may be in the files of the military department concerned and relevant to the issues before the NDRB, and any other evidence obtained in accordance with this Manual.


(d) The NDRB shall identify and address issues after a review of the following material obtained and presented in accordance with this Manual and any implementing instructions of the NDRB: available official records, documentary evidence submitted by or on behalf of an applicant, presentation of a hearing examination, testimony by or on behalf of an applicant, oral or written arguments presented by or on behalf of an applicant, and any other relevant evidence.


(e) If an applicant who has requested a hearing does not respond to a notification letter or does not appear for a scheduled hearing, the NDRB may complete the review on the basis of material previously submitted and available service records.


(f) Application of standards. (1) When the NDRB determines that an applicant’s discharge was improper, the NDRB will determine which reason for discharge should have been assigned based upon the facts and circumstances before the discharge authority, including the service regulations governing reasons for discharge at the time the applicant was discharged. Unless it is also determined that the discharge was inequitable, the provisions as to the characterization in the regulation under which the applicant should have been discharged will be considered in determining whether further relief is warranted.


(2) When the NDRB determines that an applicant’s discharge was inequitable, any change will be based on the evaluation of the applicant’s overall record of service and relevant regulations of the service of which the applicant was a member.


(g) Voting shall be conducted in closed session, a majority of the votes of the five members constituting the NDRB decision.


(h) Details of closed session deliberations of the NDRB are priviledged information and shall not be divulged.


(i) There is no requirement for a statement of minority views in the event of a split vote.


(j) The NDRB may request advisory opinions from appropriate staff officers of the naval service. These opinions are advisory in nature and are not binding on the NDRB in its decision-making process.


(k) The preliminary determinations required by 38 U.S.C. 3103(e) shall be made upon majority vote of the NDRB concerned on an expedited basis. Such determination shall be based upon the standards set forth in this Manual.


§ 724.805 Response to items submitted as issues by the applicant.

(a) General guidance. (1) If any issue submitted by an applicant contains two or more clearly separate issues, the NDRB should respond to each issue under the guidance of this paragraph as if it had been set forth separately by the applicant.


(2) If an applicant uses a “building block” approach (that is, setting forth a series of conclusions on issues that lead to a single conclusion purportedly warranting a change in the applicant’s discharge), normally there should be a separate response to each issue.


(3) Nothing in this paragraph precludes the NDRB from making a single response to multiple issues when such action would enhance the clarity of the decisional document, but such response must reflect an adequate response to each separate issue.


(b) Decisional issues. An item submitted as an issue by an applicant in accordance with this Manual shall be addressed as a decisional issue in the following circumstances:


(1) When the NDRB decides that a change in discharge should be granted, and the NDRB bases its decision in whole or in part on the applicant’s issue; or


(2) When the NDRB does not provide the applicant with the full change in discharge requested, and the decision is based in whole or in part on the NDRB’s disagreement on the merits with an issue submitted by the applicant.


(c) Response to items not addressed as decisional issues. (1) If the applicant receives the full change in discharge requested (or a more favorable change), that fact shall be noted and the basis shall be addressed as a decisional issue. No further response is required to other issues submitted by the applicant.


(2) If the applicant does not receive the full change in discharge requested with respect to either the character of or reason for discharge (or both), the NDRB shall address the items submitted by the applicant under § 724.806, (Decisional Issues) unless one of the following responses is applicable:


(i) Duplicate issues. The NDRB may state that there is a full response to the issue submitted by the applicant under a specified decisional issue. This response may be used only when one issue clearly duplicates another or the issue clearly requires discussion in conjunction with another issue.


(ii) Citations without principles and facts. The NDRB may state that the applicant’s issue, which consists of a citation to a decision without setting forth any principles and facts from the decision that the applicant states are relevant to the applicant’s case, does not comply with the requirements of § 724.802(b)(4).


(iii) Unclear issues. The NDRB may state that it cannot respond to an item submitted by the applicant as an issue because the meaning of the item is unclear. An issue is unclear if it cannot be understood by a reasonable person familiar with the discharge review process after a review of the materials considered.


(iv) Nonspecific issues. The NDRB may state that it cannot respond to an item submitted by the applicant as an issue because it is not specific. A submission is considered not specific if a reasonable person familiar with the discharge review process after a review of the materials considered cannot determine the relationship between the applicant’s submission and the particular circumstances of the case. This response may be used only if the submission is expressed in such general terms that no other response is applicable. For example, if the NDRB disagrees with the applicant as to the relevance of matters set forth in the submission, the NDRB normally will set forth the nature of the disagreement with respect to decisional issues, or it will reject the applicant’s position. If the applicant’s submission is so general that none of those provisions is applicable, then the NDRB may state that it cannot respond because the item is not specific.


§ 724.806 Decisional issues.

(a) General. Under the guidance in this section, the decisional document shall discuss the issues that provide a basis for the decision whether there should be a change in the character of or reason for discharge. In order to enhance clarity, the NDRB should not address matters other than issues relied upon in the decision or raised by the applicant.


(1) Partial change. When the decision changes a discharge, but does not provide the applicant with the full change in discharge requested, the decisional document shall address both the issues upon which change is granted and the issues upon which the NDRB denies the full change requested.


(2) Relationship of issue of character of or reason for discharge. Generally, the decisional document should specify whether a decisional issue applies to the character of or reason for discharge (or both), but it is not required to do so.


(3) Relationship of an issue to propriety or equity. (i) If an applicant identifies an issue as pertaining to both propriety and equity, the NDRB will consider it under both standards.


(ii) If an applicant identifies an issue as pertaining to the propriety of the discharge (for example, by citing a propriety standard or otherwise claiming that a change in discharge is required as a matter of law), the NDRB shall consider the issue solely as a matter of propriety. Except as provided in § 724.806(a)(3)(d), the NDRB is not required to consider such an issue under the equity standards.


(iii) If the applicant’s issue contends that the NDRB is required as a matter of law to follow a prior decision by setting forth an issue of propriety from the prior decision and describing its relationship to the applicant’s case, the issue shall be considered under the propriety standards and addressed under § 724.806 (a) or (b).


(iv) If the applicant’s issue sets forth principles of equity contained in a prior NDRB decision, describes the relationship to the applicant’s case, and contends that the NDRB is required as a matter of law to follow the prior case, the decisional document shall note that the NDRB is not bound by its discretionary decisions in prior cases. However, the principles cited by the applicant, and the description of the relationship of the principles to the applicant’s case, shall be considered and addressed under the equity standards.


(v) If the applicant’s issue cannot be identified as a matter of propriety or equity, the NDRB shall address it as an issue of equity.


(b) Change of discharge: issues of propriety. If a change in the discharge is warranted under the propriety standards, the decisional document shall state that conclusion and list the errors of expressly retroactive changes in policy or violations of regulations that provide a basis for the conclusion. The decisional document shall cite the facts in the record that demonstrate the relevance of the error or change in policy to the applicant’s case. If the change in discharge does not constitute the full change requested by the applicant, the reasons for not granting the full change shall be set forth.


(c) Denial of the full change requested: issues of propriety. (1) If the decision rejects the applicant’s position on an issue of propriety, of if it is otherwise decided on the basis of an issue of propriety that the full change in discharge requested by the applicant is not warranted, the decisional document shall note that conclusion.


(2) The decisional document shall list reasons for its conclusion on each issue of propriety under the following guidance:


(i) If a reason is based in whole or in part upon a regulation, statute, constitutional provision, judicial determination, or other source of law, the NDRB shall cite the pertinent source of law and the facts in the record that demonstrate the relevance of the source of law to the particular circumstances in the case.


(ii) If a reason is based in whole or in part on a determination as to the occurrence or nonoccurrence of an event or circumstances, including a factor required by applicable service regulations to be considered for determination of the character of and reason for the applicant’s discharge, the NDRB shall make a finding of fact for each such event or circumstance.


(A) For each such finding, the decisional document shall list the specific source of the information relied upon. This may include the presumption of regularity in appropriate cases. If the information is listed in the service record section of the decisional document, a citation is not required.


(B) If a finding of fact is made after consideration of contradictory evidence in the record (including information cited by the applicant or otherwise identified by members of the NDRB), the decisional document shall set forth the conflicting evidence and explain why the information relied upon was more persuasive than the information that was rejected. If the presumption of regularity is cited as the basis for rejecting such information, the decisional document shall explain why the contradictory evidence was insufficient to overcome the presumption. In an appropriate case, the explanation as to why the contradictory evidence was insufficient to overcome the presumption of regularity may consist of a statement that the applicant failed to provide sufficient corroborating evidence, or that the NDRB did not find the applicant’s testimony to be sufficiently credible to overcome the presumption.


(iii) If the NDRB disagrees with the position of the applicant on an issue of propriety, the following guidance applies in addition to the guidance in § 724.806(c)(2) (a) and (b):


(A) The NDRB may reject the applicant’s position by explaining why it disagrees with the principles set forth in the applicant’s issue (including principles derived from cases cited by the applicant in accordance with § 724.802(b)(4).


(B) The NDRB may reject the applicant’s position by explaining why the principles set forth in the applicant’s issue (including principles derived from cases cited by the applicant in accordance with § 724.802(b)(4)) are not relevant to the applicant’s case.


(C) The NDRB may reject an applicant’s position by stating that the applicant’s issue of propriety is not a matter upon which the NDRB grants a change in discharge, and by providing an explanation for this position. When the applicant indicates that the issue is to be considered in conjunction with one or more other specified issues, the explanation will address all such specified issues.


(D) The NDRB may reject the applicant’s position on the grounds that other specified factors in the case preclude granting relief, regardless of whether the NDRB agreed with the applicant’s position.


(E) If the applicant take the position that the discharge must be changed because of an alleged error in a record associated with the discharge, and the record has not been corrected by the organization with primary responsibility for corrective action, the NDRB may respond that it will presume the validity of the record in the absence of such corrective action. If the organization empowered to correct the record is within the Department of Defense, the NDRB should provide the applicant with a brief description of the procedures for requesting correction of the record. If the NDRB on its own motion cites this issue as a decisional issue on the basis of equity, it shall address the issue.


(F) When an applicant’s issue contains a general allegation that a certain course of action violated his or her constitutional rights, the NDRB may respond in appropriate cases by noting that the action was consistent with statutory or regulatory authority, and by citing the presumption of constitutionality that attaches to statutes and regulations. If, on the other hand, the applicant makes a specific challenge to the constitutionality of the action by challenging the application of a statute or regulation in a particular set of circumstances, it is not sufficient to respond solely by citing the presumption of constitutionality of the statute or regulation when the applicant is not challenging the constitutionality of the statute or regulation. Instead, the response must address the specific circumstances of the case.


(d) Denial of the full change in discharge requested when propriety is not at issue. If the applicant has not submitted an issue of propriety and the NDRB has not otherwise relied upon an issue of propriety to change the discharge, the decisional document shall contain a statement to that effect. The NDRB is not required to provide any further discussion as to the propriety of the discharge.


(e) Change of discharge: issues of equity. If the NDRB concludes that a change in the discharge is warranted under the equity standards, the decisional document shall list each issue of equity upon which this conclusion is based. The NDRB shall cite the facts in the record that demonstrate the relevance of the issue to the applicant’s case. If the change in discharge does not constitute the full change requested by the applicant, the reasons for not giving the full change requested shall be discussed.


(f) Denial of the full change in discharge requested: issues of equity. (1) If the NDRB rejects the applicant’s position on an issue of equity, or if the decision otherwise provides less than the full change in discharge requested by the applicant, the decisional document shall note that conclusion.


(2) The NDRB shall list reasons for its conclusion on each issue of equity under the following guidance:


(i) If a reason is based in whole or in part upon a regulation, statute, constitutional provision, judicial determination, or other source of law, the NDRB shall cite the pertinent source of law and the facts in the record that demonstrate the relevance of the source of law to the exercise of discretion on the issue of equity in the applicant’s case.


(ii) If a reason is based in whole or in part on a determination as to the occurrence or nonoccurrence of an event or circumstance, including a factor required by applicable service regulations to be considered for determination of the character of and reason for the applicant’s discharge, the NDRB shall make a finding of fact for each such event or circumstance.


(A) For each such finding, the decisional document shall list the specific source of the information relied upon. This may include the presumption of regularity in appropriate cases. If the information is listed in the service record section of the decisional document, a citation is not required.


(B) If a finding of fact is made after consideration of contradictory evidence in the record (including information cited by the applicant or otherwise indentified by members of the NDRB), the decisional document shall set forth the conflicting evidence and explain why the information relied upon was more persuasive than the information that was rejected. If the presumption of regularity is cited as the basis for rejecting such information, the decisional document shall explain why the contradictory evidence was insufficient to overcome the presumption. In an appropriate case, the explanation as to why the contradictory evidence was insufficient to overcome the presumption of regularity may consist of a statement that the applicant failed to provide sufficient corroborating evidence, or that the NDRB did not find the applicant’s testimony to be sufficiently credible to overcome the presumption.


(iii) If the NDRB disagrees with the postion of the applicant on an issue of equity, the following guidance applies in addition to the guidance in paragraphs above:


(A) The NDRB may reject the applicant’s position by explaining why it disagrees with the principles set forth in the applicant’s issue (including principles derived from cases cited by the applicant).


(B) The NDRB may reject the applicant’s position by explaining why the principles set forth in the applicant’s issue (including principles derived from cases cited by the applicant) are not relevant to the applicant’s case.


(C) The NDRB may reject an applicant’s position by explaining why the applicant’s issue is not a matter upon which the NDRB grants a change in discharge as a matter of equity. When the applicant indicates that the issue is to be considered in conjunction with other specified issues, the explanation will address all such specified issues.


(D) The NDRB may reject the applicant’s position on the grounds that other specified factors in the case preclude granting relief, regardless of whether the NDRB agrees with the applicant’s position.


(E) If the applicant takes the position that the discharge should be changed as a matter of equity because of an alleged error in a record associated with the discharge, and the record has not been corrected by the organization with primary responsibility for corrective action, the NDRB may respond that it will presume the validity of the record in the absence of such corrective action. However, the NDRB will consider whether it should exercise its equitable powers to change the discharge on the basis of the alleged error. If it declines to do so, it shall explain why the applicant’s position did not provide a sufficient basis for the change in the discharge requested by the applicant.


(iv) When NDRB concludes that aggravating factors outweigh mitigating factors, the NDRB must set forth reasons such as the seriousness of the offense, specific circumstances surrounding the offense, number of offenses, lack of mitigating circumstances, or similar factors. The NDRB is not required however, to explain why it relied on any such factors unless the applicability or weight of such a factor is expressly raised as an issue by the applicant.


(v) If the applicant has not submitted any issues and the NDRB has not otherwise relied upon an issue of equity for a change in discharge, the decisional document shall contain a statement to that effect, and shall note that the major factors upon which the discharge was based are set forth in the service record portion of the decisional document.


§ 724.807 Record of NDRB proceedings.

(a) When the proceedings in any review have been concluded, a record thereof will be prepared. Records may include written records, electromagnetic records, audio and/or videotape recordings, or a combination.


(b) At a minimum, the record will include the following:


(1) The application for review;


(2) A record of the testimony in either verbatim, summarized, or recorded form at the option of the NDRB;


(3) Documentary evidence or copies, other than the military service record considered by the NDRB;


(4) Briefs and arguments submitted by or on behalf of the applicant;


(5) Advisory opinions considered by the NDRB, if any:


(6) The findings, conclusions, and reasons developed by the NDRB;


(7) Notification of the NDRB’s decision to the cognizant custodian of the applicant’s records, or reference to the notification document;


(8) A copy of the decisional document.


§ 724.808 Issuance of decisions following discharge review.

The applicant and counsel or representative, if any, shall be provided with a copy of the decisional document and of any further action in review. Final notification of decisions shall be issued to the applicant with a copy to the counsel or representative, if any, and to the service manager concerned.


(a) Notification to applicants, with copies to counsel or representatives, shall normally be made through the U.S. Postal Service. Such notification shall consist of a notification of decision, together with a copy of the decisional document.


(b) Notification to the service manager shall be for the purpose of appropriate action and inclusion of review matter in personnel records. Such notification shall bear appropriate certification of completeness and accuracy.


(c) Actions on review by superior authority, when occurring, shall be provided to the applicant and counsel or representative in the same manner as to the notification of the review decision.


§ 724.809 Final disposition of the record of proceedings.

The original decisional document and all appendices thereto, shall in all cases be incorporated in the military service record of the applicant and the service record shall be returned to the custody of the appropriate record holding facility. If a portion of the original record of proceedings cannot be stored with the service record, the service record shall contain a notation as to the place where the record is stored. Other copies including any electromagnetic records, audio and/or videotape recordings or any combination thereof shall be filed in the NDRB case folder and disposed of in accordance with appropriate naval regulations.


§ 724.810 Availability of Naval Discharge Review Board documents for public inspection and copying.

(a) A copy of the decisional document prepared in accordance with subpart H of this enclosure shall be made available for public inspection and copying promptly after a notice of final decision is sent to the applicant.


(b) To prevent a clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy, identifying details of the applicant and other persons will be deleted from documents made available for public inspection and copying.


(1) Names, addresses, social security numbers, and military service numbers must be deleted. Written justification shall be made for all other deletions and shall be available for public inspection.


(2) The NDRB shall ensure that there is a means for relating a decisional document number to the name of the applicant to permit retrieval of the applicant’s records when required in processing a complaint.


(c) Any other privileged or classified material contained in or appended to any documents required by this Manual to be furnished the applicant and counsel or representative or made available for public inspection and copying may be deleted only if a written statement on the basis for the deletions is provided the applicant and counsel or representative and made available for public inspection. It is not intended that the statement be so detailed as to reveal the nature of the withheld material.


(d) NDRB documents made available for public inspection and copying shall be located in the Armed Forces Discharge Review/Correction Board Reading Room. The documents shall be indexed in a usable and concise form so as to enable the public, and those who represent applicants before the NDRB, to isolate from all these decisions that are indexed, those cases that may be similar to an applicant’s case and that indicate the circumstances under or reasons for (or both) which the NDRB or the Secretary concerned granted or denied relief.


(1) The reading file index shall include, in addition to any other item determined by the NDRB, the case number, the date, character of, reason and authority for the discharge. It shall also include the decisions of the NDRB and reviewing authority, if any, and the issues addressed in the statement of findings, conclusions, and reasons.


(2) The index shall be maintained at selected permanent locations throughout the United States. This ensures reasonable availability to applicants at least 30 days before a traveling panel review. A list of these locations shall be published in the Federal Register by the Department of the Army. The index shall also be made available at sites selected for traveling panels or hearing examinations for such periods as the NDRB is present and in operation. An applicant who has requested a traveling panel review shall be advised, in the notice of such review, of the permanent index locations.


(3) The Armed Forces Discharge Review/Corrections Board Reading Room shall publish indexes quarterly for all DRBs. The NDRB shall be responsible for timely submission to the Reading Room of individual case information required for update of the indexes. In addition, the NDRB shall be responsible for submission of new index categories based upon published changes in policy, procedures, or standards. These indexes shall be available for public inspection or purchase (or both) at the Reading Room. When the NDRB has accepted an application, information concerning the availability of the index shall be provided in the NDRB’s response to the application.


§ 724.811 Privacy Act information.

Information protected under the Privacy Act is involved in the discharge review functions. The provisions of SECNAVINST 5211.5C shall be observed throughout the processing of a request for review of discharge or dismissal.


§ 724.812 Responsibilities of the Reading Room.

(a) Copies of decisional documents will be provided to individuals or organizations outside the NCR in response to written requests for such documents. Although the Reading Room shall try to make timely responses to such requests, certain factors such as the length of a request, the volume of other pending requests, and the impact of other responsibilities of the staff assigned to such duties may cause some delays. A fee may be charged for such documents under appropriate DOD and Department of the Army directives and regulations. The manual that accompanies the index of decisions shall notify the public that if an applicant indicates that a review is scheduled for a specific date, an effort will be made to provide requested decisional documents before that date. The individual or organization will be advised if that cannot be accomplished.


(b) Correspondence relating to matters under the cognizance of the Reading Room (including requests for purchase of indexes) shall be addressed to:



DA Military Review Board Agency, Attention: SFBA (Reading Room), Room 1E520, The Pentagon, Washington, DC 20310.

§ 724.813 The recommendation of the NDRB president.

(a) General. The president of the NDRB may forward cases for consideration by the Secretarial Review Authority (SRA). There is no requirement that the president submit a recommendation when a case is forwarded to the SRA. If the president makes a recommendation with respect to the character of or reason for discharge, however, the recommendation shall be prepared under the guidance in § 724.813b.


(b) Format for recommendation. If a recommendation is provided, it shall contain the president’s view whether there should be a change in the character of or reason for discharge (or both). If the president recommends such a change, the particular change to be made shall be specified. The recommendation shall set forth the president’s position on decisional issues and issues submitted by the applicant under the following guidance:


(1) Adoption of the NDRB’s decisional document. The recommendation may state that the president has adopted the decisional document prepared by the majority. The president shall ensure that the decisional document meets the requirements of this enclosure.


(2) Adoption of the specific statements from the majority. If the President adopts the views of the majority only in part, the recommendation shall cite the specific matter adopted from the majority. If the president modifies a statement submitted by the majority, the recommendation shall set forth the modification.


(3) Response to issues not included in matter adopted from the majority. The recommendation shall set forth the following if not adopted in whole or in part from the majority:


(i) The issues on which the president’s recommendation is based. Each such decisional issue shall be addressed by the president.


(ii) The president’s response to items submitted as issues by the applicant.


(iii) Reasons for rejecting the conclusion of the majority with respect to the decisional document which, if resolved in the applicant’s favor, would have resulted in greater relief for the applicant than that afforded by the president’s recommendation. Such issues shall be addressed under the principles in § 724.806.


§ 724.814 Secretarial Review Authority (SRA).

(a) Review by the SRA. The Secretarial Review Authority (SRA) is the Secretary concerned or the official to whom Secretary’s discharge review authority has been delegated.


(1) The SRA may review the following types of cases before issuance of the final notification of a decision:


(i) Any specific case in which the SRA has an interest.


(ii) Any specific case that the president of the NDRB believes is of significant interest to the SRA.


(2) Cases reviewed by the SRA shall be considered under the standards set forth in this part.


(b) Processing the decisional document. (1) The decisional document shall be transmitted by the NDRB president under § 724.813.


(2) The following guidance applies to cases that have been forwarded to the SRA except for cases reviewed on the NDRB’s own motion, without the participation of the applicant or the applicant’s counsel:


(i) The applicant and counsel or representative, if any, shall be provided with a copy of the proposed decisional document, including the NDRB president’s recommendation to the SRA, if any. Classified information shall be summarized.


(ii) The applicant shall be provided with a reasonable period of time, but not less than 25 days, to submit a rebuttal to the SRA. Any issue in rebuttal consists of a clear and specific statement by the applicant in support of or in opposition to the statements of the NDRB or NDRB president on decisional issues and other clear and specific issues that were submitted by the applicant. The rebuttal shall be based solely on matters in the record before the NDRB closed the case for deliberation or in the president’s recommendation.


(c) Review of the decisional document. If corrections in the decisional document are required, the decisional document shall be returned to the NDRB for corrective action. The corrected decisional document shall be sent to the applicant (and counsel, if any), but a further opportunity for rebuttal is not required unless the correction produces a different result or includes a substantial change in the decision by the NDRB (or NDRB president) of the issues raised by the majority or the applicant.


(d) The addendum of the SRA. The decision of the SRA shall be in writing and shall be appended as an addendum to the decisional document under the guidance in this subsection.


(1) The SRA’s decision. The addendum shall set forth the SRA’s decision whether there will be a change in the character of or reason for discharge (or both); if the SRA concludes that a change is warranted, the particular change to be made shall be specified. If the SRA adopts the decision recommended by the NDRB or the NDRB president, the decisional document shall contain a reference to the matter adopted.


(2) Discussion of issues. In support of the SRA’s decision, the addendum shall set forth the SRA’s position on decisional issues, items submitted as issues by an applicant and issues raised by the NDRB and the NDRB president in accordance with the following guidance:


(i) Adoption of the NDRB president’s recommendation. The addendum may state that the SRA has adopted the NDRB president’s recommendation.


(ii) Adoption of the NDRB’s proposed decisional document. The addendum may state that the SRA has adopted the proposed decisional document prepared by the NDRB.


(iii) Adoption of specific statements from the majority or the NDRB president. If the SRA adopts the views of the NDRB or the NDRB president only in part, the addendum shall cite the specific statements adopted. If the SRA modifies a statement submitted by the NDRB or the NDRB president, the addendum shall set forth the modification.


(iv) Response to issues not included in matter adopted from the NDRB or the NDRB president. The addendum shall set forth the following if not adopted in whole or in part from the NDRB or the NDRB president:


(A) A list of the issues on which the SRA’s decision is based. Each such decisional document issue shall be addressed by the SRA. This includes reasons for rejecting the conclusion of the NDRB or the NDRB president with respect to decisional issues which, if resolved in the applicant’s favor, would have resulted in a change to the discharge more favorable to the applicant than that afforded by the SRA’s decision. Such issues shall be addressed under the principles in § 724.806(f).


(B) The SRA’s response to items submitted as issues by the applicant.


(3) Response to the rebuttal. (i) If the SRA grants the full change in discharge requested by the applicant (or a more favorable change), that fact shall be noted, the decisional issues shall be addressed and no further response to the rebuttal is required.


(ii) If the SRA does not grant the full change in discharge requested by the applicant (or a more favorable change), the addendum shall list each issue in rebuttal submitted by an applicant in accordance with this section, and shall set forth the response of the SRA under the following guidance:


(A) If the SRA rejects an issue in rebuttal, the SRA may respond in accordance with the principals in § 724.806.


(B) If the matter adopted by the SRA provides a basis for the SRA’s rejection of the rebuttal material, the SRA may note that fact and cite the specific matter adopted that responds to the issue in rebuttal.


(C) If the matter submitted by the applicant does not meet the requirements for rebuttal material, that fact shall be noted.


(4) Index entries. Appropriate index entries shall be prepared for the SRA’s actions for matters that are not adopted from the NDRB’s proposed decisional document.


§ 724.815 Complaints.

A complaint is any correspondence in which it is alleged that a decisional document issued by the NDRB or the SRA contains a specifically indentified violation of 32 CFR part 70 or any references thereto. Complaints will be reviewed pursuant to 32 CFR part 70.


Subpart I – Standards for Discharge Review

§ 724.901 Objective of discharge review.

The objective of a discharge review is ot examine the propriety and equity of the applicant’s discharge and to effect changes, if necessary. The standards of the review and the underlying factors which aid in determining whether the standards are met shall be consistent with historical criteria for determining honorable service. No factors shall be established that require automatic change or denial of a change in a discharge. Neither the NDRB nor the Secretary of the Navy shall be bound by any methodology of weighting of the factors in reaching a determination. In each case, the NDRB shall give full, fair, and impartial consideration to all applicable factors before reaching a decision. An applicant may not receive a less favorable discharge than that issued at the time of separation. This does not preclude correction of clerical errors.


§ 724.902 Propriety of the discharge.

(a) A discharge shall be deemed to be proper unless, in the course of discharge review, it is determined that:


(1) There exists an error of fact, law, procedure, or discretion associated with the discharge at the time of issuance; and that the rights of the applicant were prejudiced thereby (such error shall constitute prejudicial error if there is substantial doubt that the discharge would have remained the same if the error had not been made); or


(2) A change in policy by the military service of which the applicant was a member, made expressly retroactive to the type of discharge under consideration, requires a change in the discharge.


(b) When a record associated with the discharge at the time of issuance involves a matter in which the primary responsibility for corrective action rests with another organization (for example, another Board, agency, or court) the NDRB will recognize an error only to the extent that the error has been corrected by the organization with primary responsibility for correcting the record.


(c) The primary function of the NDRB is to exercise its discretion on issues of equity by reviewing the individual merits of each application on a case-by-case basis. Prior decisions in which the NDRB exercised its discretion to change a discharge based on issues of equity (including the factors cited in such decisions or the weight given to factors in such decisions) do not bind the NDRB in its review of subsequent cases because no two cases present the same issues of equity.


(d) The following applies to applicants who received less than fully honorable administrative discharges because of their civilian misconduct while in an inactive duty status in a reserve component and who were discharged or had their discharge reviewed on or after April 20, 1971: the NDRB shall either recharacterize the discharge to Honorable without any additional proceedings or additional proceedings shall be conducted in accordance with the Court’s Order of December 3, 1981, in Wood v. Secretary of Defense to determine whether proper grounds exist for the issuance of a less than honorable discharge, taking into account that:


(1) An other than honorable (formerly undesirable) discharge for an inactive duty reservist can only be based upon civilian misconduct found to have affected directly the performance of military duties;


(2) A general discharge for an inactive duty reservist can only be based upon civilian misconduct found to have had an adverse impact on the overall effectiveness of the military, including military morale and efficiency.


§ 724.903 Equity of the discharge.

A discharge shall be deemed to be equitable unless:


(a) In the course of a discharge review, it is determined that the policies and procedures under which the applicant was discharged differ in material respects from policies and procedures currently applicable on a service-wide basis to discharges of the type under consideration, provided that:


(1) Current policies or procedures represent a substantial enhancement of the rights afforded a respondent in such proceedings; and


(2) There is substantial doubt that the applicant would have received the same discharge, if relevant current policies and procedures had been available to the applicant at the time of the discharge proceedings under consideration.


(b) At the time of issuance, the discharge was inconsistent with standards of discipline in the military service of which the applicant was a member.


(c) In the course of a discharge review, it is determined that relief is warranted based upon consideration of the applicant’s service record and other evidence presented to the NDRB viewed in conjunction with the factors listed in this paragraph and the regulations under which the applicant was discharged, even though the discharge was determined to have been otherwise equitable and proper at the time of issuance. Areas of consideration include, but are not limited to:


(1) Quality of service, as evidenced by factors such as:


(i) Service history, including date of enlistment, period of enlistment, highest rank achieved, conduct and proficiency ratings (numerical and narrative);


(ii) Awards and decorations;


(iii) Letters of commendation or reprimand;


(iv) Combat service;


(v) Wounds received in action;


(vi) Records of promotions and demotions;


(vii) Level of responsibility at which the applicant served;


(viii) Other acts of merit that may not have resulted in formal recognition through an award or commendation;


(ix) Length of service during the service period which is the subject of the discharge review;


(x) Prior military service and type of discharge received or outstanding post service conduct to the extent that such matters provide a basis for a more thorough understanding of the performance of the applicant during the period of service which is the subject of the discharge review;


(xi) Convictions by court-martial;


(xii) Records of nonjudicial punishment;


(xiii) Convictions by civil authorities while a member of the service, reflected in the discharge proceedings or otherwise noted in the service records;


(xiv) Records of periods of unauthorized absence;


(xv) Records relating to a discharge in lieu of court-martial.


(2) Capability to serve, as evidenced by factors such as:


(i) Total capabilities. This includes an evaluation of matters such as age, educational level, and aptitude scores. Consideration may also be given as to whether the individual met normal military standards of acceptability for military service and similar indicators of an individual’s ability to serve satisfactorily, as well as ability to adjust to military service.


(ii) Family and personal problems. This includes matters in extenuation or mitigation of the reason for discharge that may have affected the applicant’s ability to serve satisfactorily.


(iii) Arbitrary or capricious actions. This includes actions by individuals in authority which constiute a clear abuse of such authority and that, although not amounting to prejudicial error, may have contributed to the decision to discharge the individual or unduly influence the characterization of service.


(iv) Discrimination. This includes unauthorized acts as documented by records or other evidence.


Appendix A to Part 724 – Policy Statement by the Secretary of Defense – Addressing Certain Categories of Discharges

Secretary of Defense memorandum of August 13, 1971, to the Secretaries of the Military Departments, The Chairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff; Subject: Review of Discharges Under Other Than Honorable Conditions Issued to Drug Users:


“Consistent with Department of Defense Directive 1300.11, October 23, 1970, and my memorandum of July 7, 1971, concerning rehabilitation and treatment of drug users, administrative discharges under other than honorable conditions issued solely on the basis of personal use of drugs or possession of drugs for the purpose of such use will be reviewed for recharacterization.


“Accordingly, each Secretary of a Military Department, acting through his/her Discharge Review Board, will consider applications for such review from former service members. Each Secretary is authorized to issue a discharge under honorable conditions upon establishment of facts consistent with this policy. Former service members will be notified of the results of the review. The Veterans’ Administration will also be notified of the names of former service members whose discharges are recharacterized.


“The statute of limitations for review of discharges within the scope of this policy will be in accordance with 10 United States Code 1553.


“This policy shall apply to those service members whose cases are finalized or in process on or before July 7, 1971”.


Secretary of Defense memorandum of April 28, 1972, to Secretaries of the Military Departments, Chairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff; Subject: Review of Punitive Discharges Issued to Drug Users:


“Reference is made to Secretary Packard’s memorandum of July 7, 1971, concerning rehabilitation and treatment of drug users, and my memorandum of August 13, 1971, subject: ‘Review of Discharges Under Other Than Honorable Conditions Issued to Drug Users.’


“My August 13, 1971 memorandum established the current Departmental policy that administrative discharges under other than honorable conditions issued solely on the basis of personal use of drugs or possession of drugs for the purpose of such use will be reviewed for recharacterization to under honorable conditions.


“It is my desire that this policy be expanded to include punitive discharges and dismissals resulting from approved sentences of courts-martial issed solely for conviction of personal use of drugs or possession of drugs for the purpose of such use.


“Review and recharacterization are to be effected, upon the application of former service members, utilizing the procedures and authority set forth in Title 10, United States Code, sections 874(b), 1552 and 1553.


“This policy is applicable only to discharges which have been executed on or before July 7, 1971, or issued as a result of a case in process on or before July 7, 1971.


“Former service members requesting a review will be notified of the results of the review. The Veterans’ Administration will also be notified of the names of former service members whose discharges are recharacterized.”


Appendix B to Part 724 – Oath or Affirmation To Be Administered To Discharge Review Board Members

Prior to undertaking duties as a Board member, each person assigned to such duties in the precept of the Board shall execute the following oath or affirmation which shall continue in effect throughout service with the Board.


Oath/Affirmation

I, ______, do swear or affirm that I will faithfully and impartially perform all the duties incumbent upon me as a member of the Naval Discharge Review Board; that I will fully and objectively inquire into and examine all cases coming before me; that I will, without regard to the status of the individual in any case, render my individual judgment according to the facts, my conscience and the law and regulations applicable to review of naval discharges, so help me God.


Appendix C to Part 724 – Samples of Formats Employed by the Naval Discharge Review Board

Attachment
Form
Title
1LetterEn Block Notification of Decision to Commander, Naval Military Personnel Command (No Change).
2……doEn Block Notification of Decision to Commander, Naval Military Personnel Command (Change).
3……doEn Block Notification of Decision to Commandant, Marine Corps (No Change).
4……doEn Block Notification of Decision to Commandant, Marine Corps (Change).


Note:

The Forms appearing in appendix C are not carried in the Code of Federal Regulations.


Appendix D to Part 724 – Veterans’ Benefits

91 Stat. 1106

Pub. L. 95-126, Oct. 8, 1977

95th Congress

An Act

To deny entitlement to veterans’ benefits to certain persons who would otherwise become so entitled solely by virtue of the administrative upgrading under temporarily revised standards of other than honorable discharges from service during the Vietnam era; to require case-by-case review under uniform, historically consistent, generally appli cable standards and procedures prior to the award of veterans’ benefits to persons administratively discharged under other than honorable conditions from active military, naval, or air service; and for other purposes.


Be it enacted by the Senate and the House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That (a) section 3103 of Title 38, United States Code, is amended by –


(1) Inserting “or on the basis of an absence without authority from active duty for a continuous period of at least one hundred and eighty days if such person was discharged under conditions other than honorable unless such person demonstrates to the satisfaction of the Administrator that there are compelling circumstances to warrant such prolonged unauthorized absence.” after “deserter,” in subsection (a), and by inserting a coma and “notwithstanding any action subsequent to the date of such discharge by a board established pursuant to section 1553 of title 10” before the period at the end of such subsection; and


(2) Adding at the end of such section the following new subsection:


“(e)(1) Notwithstanding any other provision of law, (A) no benefits under laws administered by the Veterans’ Administration shall be provided, as a result of a change in or new issuance of a discharge under section 1553 of title 10, except upon a case-by-case review by the board of review concerned, subject to review by the Secretary concerned, under such section, of all the evidence and factors in each case under published uniform standard (which shall be historically consistent with criteria for determining honorable service and shall not include any criterion for automatically granting or denying such change or issuance) and procedures generally applicable to all persons administratively discharged or released from active military, naval, or air service under other than honorable conditions: and (B) any such person shall be afforded an opportunity to apply for such review under such section 1553 for a period of time terminating not less than one year after the date on which such uniform standards and procedures are promulgated and published.


“(2) Notwithstanding any other provision of law –


“(A) No person discharged or released from active military, naval, or air service under other than honorable conditions who has been awarded a general or honorable discharge under revised standards for the review of discharges, (i) as implemented by the President’s directive of January 19, 1977, initiating further action with respect to the President’s Proclamation 4313 of September 16, 1974, (ii) as implemented on or after April 5, 1977, under the Department of Defense’s special discharge review program, or (iii) as implemented subsequent to April 5, 1977, and not made applicable to all persons administratively discharged or released from active military, naval, or air service under other than honorable conditions, shall be entitled to benefits under laws administered by the Veterans’ Administration except upon a determination, based on a case-by-case review, under standards (meeting the requirements of paragraph (1) of this subsection) applied by the board of review concerned under section 1553 of title 10, subject to review by the Secretary concerned, that such person would be awarded an upgraded discharged under such standards;


“(B) Such determination shall be made by such board, (i) on an expedited basis after notification by the Veterans’ Administration to the Secretary concerned that such person has received, is in receipt of, or has applied for such benefits or after a written request is made by such person or such determination, (ii) on its own initiative within one year after the date of enactment of this paragraph in any case where a general or honorable discharge has been awarded on or prior to the date of enactment of this paragraph under revised standards referred to in clause (A) (i), (ii), or (iii) of this paragraph, or (iii) on its own initiative at the time a general or honorable discharge is so awarded in any case where a general or honorable discharge is awarded after such enactment date.


“If such board makes a preliminary determination that such person would not have been awarded an upgraded discharge under standards meeting the requirements of paragraph (1) of this subsection, such personal shall be entitled to an appearance before the board, as provided for in section 1553(c) of title 10, prior to a final determination on such question and shall be given written notice by the board of such preliminary determination and of his or her right to such appearance. The Administrator shall, as soon as administratively feasible, notify the appropriate board of review of the receipt of benefits under laws administered by the Veterans’ Administration, or the application for such benefits, by any person awarded an upgraded discharge under revised standards referred to in clause (A) (i), (ii), or (iii) of this paragraph with respect to whom a favorable determination has not been made under this paragraph.”.


(b)(1) The Secretary of Defense shall fully inform each person awarded a general or honorable discharge under revised standards for the review of discharges referred to in section 3103(e)(2)(A) (i), (ii), or (iii) of title 38, United States Code, as added by subsection (a)(2) of this section of his or her right to obtain an expedited determination under section 3103(e)(2)(B)(i) of such title and of the implications of the provisions of this Act for each such person.


(2) Notwithstanding any other provision of law, the Secretary of Defense shall inform each person who applies to a board of review under section 1553 of title 10, United States Code, and who appears to have been discharged under circumstances which might constitute a bar to benefits under section 3103(a), of title 38, United States Code, (A) that such person might possibly be administratively found to be entitled to benefits under laws administered by the Veterans’ Administration only through the action of a board for the correction of military records under section 1552 of such title 10 or the action of the Administrator of Veterans’ Affairs under section 3103 of such title 38, and (B) of the procedures for making application to such section 1552 board for such purpose and to the Administrator of Veterans’ Affairs for such purpose (including the right to proceed concurrently under such sections 3103, 1552 and 1553).


Section 2. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, the Administrator of Veterans’ Affairs shall provide the type of health care and related benefits authorized to be provided under chapter 17 of title 38, United States Code, for any disability incurred or aggravated during active military, naval, or air service in line of duty by a person other than a person barred from receiving benefits by section 3103(a) of such title, but shall not provide such health care and related benefits pursuant to this section for any disability incurred or aggravated during a period of service from which such person was discharged by reason of a bad conduct discharge.


Section 3. Paragraph (18) of section 101 of Title 38, United States Code, is amended to read as follows:


“(18) The term ‘discharge or release’ includes, (A) retirement from the active military, naval, or air service, and (B) the satisfactory completion of the period of active military, naval, or air service for which a person was obligated at the time of entry into such service in the case of a person who, due to enlistment or reenlistment, was not awarded a discharge or release from such period of service at the time of such completion thereof and who, at such time, would otherwise have been eligible for the award of a discharge or release under conditions other than dishonorable.”


Section 4. In promulgating, or making any revisions of or amendments to, regulations governing the standards and procedures by which the Veterans’ Administration determines whether a person was discharged or released from active military, naval, or air service under conditions other than dishonorable, the Administrator of Veterans’ Affairs shall, in keeping with the spirit and intent of this Act, not promulgate any such regulations or revise or amend any such regulations for the purpose of, or having the effect of, (1) providing any unique or special advantage to veterans awarded general or honorable discharges under revised standards for the review of discharges described in section 3103(e)(2)(A) (i), (ii), or (iii) of title 38, United States Code, as added by section 1(a)(2) of this Act, or (2) otherwise making any special distinction between such veterans and other veterans.


Section 5. This Act shall become effective on the date of its enactment, except that –


(1) Section 2 shall become effective on October 1, 1977, or on such enactment date, whichever is later; and


(2) The amendments made by section 1(a) shall apply retroactively to deny benefits under laws administered by the Veterans’ Administration, except that, notwithstanding any other provision of law.


(A) With respect to any person who, on such enactment date is receiving benefits under laws administered by the Veterans’ Administration, (i) such benefits shall not be terminated under paragraph (2) of section 3103(e) of title 38, United States Code, as added by section 1(a)(2) of this Act, until, (I) the day on which a final determination not favorable to the person concerned is made on an expedited basis under paragraph (2) of such section 3103(e), (II) the day following the expiration of ninety days after a preliminary determination not favorable to such person is made under such paragraph, or (III) the day following the expiration of one hundred and eighty days after such enactment date, whichever day is the earliest, and (ii) the United States shall not make any claim to recover the value of any benefits provided to such person prior to such earliest day;


(B) With respect to any person awarded a general or honorable discharge under revised standards for the review of discharges referred to in clause (A) (i), (ii), or (iii) of such paragraph who has been provided any such benefits prior to such enactment date, the United States shall not make any claim to recover the value of any benefits so provided; and


(C) The amendments made by clause (1) of section 1(a) shall apply, (i) retroactively only to persons awarded general or honorable discharges under such revised standards and to persons who, prior to the date of enactment of this Act, had not attained general eligibility to such benefits by virtue of (I) a change in or new issuance of a discharge under section 1553 of title 10, United States Code, or (II) any other provision of law, and (ii) prospectively (on and after such enactment date) to all other persons.


PART 725 – RELEASE OF OFFICIAL INFORMATION FOR LITIGATION PURPOSES AND TESTIMONY BY DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL


Authority:5 U.S.C. 301; 10 U.S.C. 113, 5013; 31 U.S.C. 9701 and 32 CFR part 97.


Source:57 FR 2463, Jan. 22, 1992, unless otherwise noted.

§ 725.1 Purpose.

This instruction implements 32 CFR part 97 regarding the release of official Department of the Navy (DON) information and provision of testimony by DON personnel for litigation purposes, and prescribes conduct of DON personnel in response to a litigation request or demand. It restates the information contained in Secretary of the Navy Instruction 5820.8A of 27 August 1991
1
, and is intended to conform in all respects with the requirements of that instruction.




1 Copies may be obtained, if needed, from the Naval Publications and Forms Directorate, Attn: Code 301, 5801 Tabor Avenue, Philadelphia, PA 19120-5099.


§ 725.2 Policy.

(a) It is DON policy that official factual information, both testimonial and documentary, should be made reasonably available for use in Federal courts, state courts, foreign courts, and other governmental proceedings unless that information is classified, privileged, or otherwise protected from public disclosure.


(b) DON personnel, as defined in § 725.4(b), however, shall not provide such official information, testimony, or documents, submit to interview, or permit a view or visit, without the authorization required by this part.


(c) DON personnel shall not provide, with or without compensation, opinion or expert testimony concerning official DON or Department of Defense (DOD) information, subjects, personnel, or activities, except on behalf of the United States or a party represented by the Department of Justice, or with the written special authorization required by this part.


(d) Section 725.2(b) and (c) constitute a regulatory general order, applicable to all DON personnel individually, and need no further implementation. A violation of those provisions is punishable under the Uniform Code of Military Justice for military personnel and is the basis for appropriate administrative procedures with respect to civilian employees. Moreover, violations of this instruction by DON personnel may, under certain circumstances, be actionable under 18 U.S.C. 207.


(e) Upon a showing by a requester of exceptional need or unique circumstances, and that the anticipated testimony will not be adverse to the interests of the DON, DOD, or the United States, the General Counsel of the Navy, the Judge Advocate General of the Navy, or their respective delegates may, in their sole discretion, and pursuant to the guidance contained in this instruction, grant such written special authorization for DON personnel to appear and testify as expert or opinion witnesses at no expense to the United States.


§ 725.3 Authority to act.

(a) The General Counsel of the Navy, the Judge Advocate General of the Navy, and their respective delegates [hereafter “determining authorities” described in § 725.4(a), shall respond to litigation requests or demands for official DOD information or testimony by DON personnel as witnesses.


(b) If required by the scope of their respective delegations, determining authorities’ responses may include: consultation and coordination with the Department of Justice or the appropriate United States Attorney as required; referral of matters proprietary to another DOD component to that component; determination whether official information originated by the Navy may be released in litigation; and determination whether DOD personnel assigned to or affiliated with the Navy may be interviewed, contacted, or used as witnesses concerning official DOD information or as expert or opinion witnesses. Following coordination with the appropriate commander, a response may further include whether installations, facilities, ships, or aircraft may be visited or inspected; what, if any, conditions will be imposed upon any release, interview, contact, testimony, visit, or inspection; what, if any, fees shall be charged or waived for access under the fee assessment considerations set forth in § 725.11; and what, if any, claims of privilege, pursuant to this instruction, may be invoked before any tribunal.


§ 725.4 Definitions.

(a) Determining authority. The cognizant DON or DOD official designated to grant or deny a litigation request. In all cases in which the United States is, or might reasonably become, a party, or in which expert testimony is requested, the Judge Advocate General or the General Counsel of the Navy, depending on the subject matter of the request, will act as determining authority. In all other cases, the responsibility to act as determining authority has been delegated to all officers exercising general court-martial convening authority, or to their subordinate commands, and to other commands and activities indicated in § 725.6.


(b) DON personnel. Active duty and former military personnel of the naval service including retirees; personnel of other DOD components serving with a DON component; Naval Academy midshipmen; present and former civilian employees of the DON including non-appropriated fund activity employees; non-U.S. nationals performing services overseas for the DON under provisions of status of forces agreements; and other specific individuals or entities hired through contractual agreements by or on behalf of DON, or performing services under such agreements for DON (e.g., consultants, contractors and their employees and personnel).


(c) Factual and expert or opinion testimony. DON policy favors disclosure of factual information if disclosure does not violate the criteria stated in § 725.8. The distinction between factual matters, and expert or opinion matters (where DON policy favors non-disclosure), is not always clear. The considerations set forth below pertain.


(1) Naval personnel may merely be percipient witnesses to an incident, in which event their testimony would be purely factual. On the other hand, they may be involved with the matter only through an after-the-event investigation (e.g., JAGMAN investigation). Describing the manner in which they conducted their investigation and asking them to identify factual conclusions in their report would likewise constitute factual matters to which they might testify. In contrast, asking them to adopt or reaffirm their findings of fact, opinions, and recommendations, or asking them to form or express any other opinion – particularly one based upon matters submitted by counsel or going to the ultimate issue of causation or liability – would clearly constitute precluded testimony under the above policy.


(2) Naval personnel, by virtue of their training, often form opinions because they are required to do so in the course of their duties. If their opinions are formed prior to, or contemporaneously with, the matter in issue, and are routinely required of them in the course of the proper performance of their professional duties, they constitute essentially factual matters (i.e., the opinion they previously held). Opinions formed after the event in question, including responses to hypothetical questions, generally constitute the sort of opinion or expert testimony which this instruction is intended to severely restrict.


(3) Characterization of expected testimony by a requester as fact, opinion, or expert is not binding on the determining authority. When there is doubt as to whether or not expert or opinion (as opposed to factual) testimony is being sought, advice may be obtained informally from, or the request forwarded, to the Deputy Assistant Judge Advocate General (General Litigation) or the Associate General Counsel (Litigation) for resolution.


(d) Litigation. All pretrial, trial, and post-trial stages of all existing or reasonably anticipated judicial or administrative actions, hearings, investigations, or similar proceedings before civilian courts, commissions, boards (including the Armed Services Board of Contract Appeals), or other tribunals, foreign and domestic. This term includes responses to discovery requests, depositions, and other pretrial proceedings, as well as responses to formal or informal requests by attorneys or others in situations involving, or reasonably anticipated to involve, civil or criminal litigation.


(e) Official information. All information of any kind, however stored, in the custody and control of the DOD and its components including the DON; relating to information in the custody and control of DOD or its components; or acquired by DOD personnel or its component personnel as part of their official duties or because of their official status within DOD or its components, while such personnel were employed by or on behalf of the DOD or on active duty with the United States Armed Forces (determining whether “official information” is sought, as opposed to non-DOD information, rests with the determining authority identified in § 725.6, rather than the requester).


(f) Request or demand (legal process). Subpoena, order, or other request by a federal, state, or foreign court of competent jurisdiction, by any administrative agency thereof, or by any party or other person (subject to the exceptions stated in § 725.5) for production, disclosure, or release of official DOD information or for appearance, deposition, or testimony of DON personnel as witnesses.


§ 725.5 Applicability.

(a) This instruction applies to all present and former civilian and military personnel of the DON whether employed by, or assigned to, DON temporarily or permanently. Affected personnel are defined more fully in § 725.4(b).


(b) This instruction applies only to situations involving existing or reasonably anticipated litigation, as defined in § 725.4(d), when DOD information or witnesses are sought, whether or not the United States, the DOD, or its components are parties thereto. It does not apply to formal or informal requests for information in other situations.


(c) This instruction provides guidance only for DON operation and activities of its present and former personnel in responding to litigation requests. It is not intended to, does not, and may not be relied upon to, create any right or benefit, substantive or procedural, enforceable at law or equity against the United States, DOD, or DON.


(d) This instruction is not intended to infringe upon or displace the responsibilities committed to the Department of Justice in conducting litigation on behalf of the United States.


(e) This instruction does not supersede or modify existing laws, DOD or DON regulations, directives, or instructions governing testimony of DON personnel or release of official DOD or DON information during grand jury proceedings.


(f) This instruction does not control release of official information in response to requests unrelated to litigation or under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), 5 U.S.C. 552, or the Privacy Act, 5 U.S.C. 552a. This instruction does not preclude treating any written request for DON records as a request under the FOIA or Privacy Acts. Activities are encouraged to treat such requests for documents under the FOIA or the Privacy Act if they are invoked by the requestor either explicitly or by fair implication. See 32 CFR 701.3(a), 701.10(a). Activities are reminded that such treatment does not absolve them of the responsibility to respond in a timely fashion to legal process. In any event, if the official information requested pertains to a litigation matter which the United States is a present or potential party, the release authority should notify the delegate of the General Counsel or the Judge Advocate General, under § 725.6.


(g) This part does not apply to release of official information or testimony by DON personnel in the following situations:


(1) Before courts-martial convened by any DOD component, or in administrative proceedings conducted by, or on behalf of, such component;


(2) Under administrative proceedings conducted by, or on behalf of, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) or the Merit Systems Protection Board (MSPB), the Federal Labor Relations Authority, the Federal Services Impasse Panel, or under a negotiated grievance procedure under a collective bargaining agreement to which the Government is a party;


(3) In response to requests by Federal Government counsel, or counsel representing the interests of the Federal Government, in litigation conducted, in whole or in part, on behalf of the United States (e.g., Medical Care Recovery Act claims, affirmative claims, or subpoenas issued by, or concurred in by, Government counsel when the United States is a party), but the regulation does apply to an action brought under the qui tam provisions of the False Claims Act in which a private party brings an action in the name of the United States but in which the Department of Justice either has not yet determined to intervene in the litigation or has declined to intervene;


(4) As part of the assistance required by the Defense Industrial Personnel Security Clearance Review Program under DOD Directive 5220.6
2
;




2 See footnote 1 to § 725.1.


(5) Release of copies of Manual of the Judge Advocate General (JAGMAN) investigations, to the next of kin (or their representatives) of deceased or incompetent naval personnel;


(6) Release of information by DON personnel to counsel retained on their behalf for purposes of litigation, unless that information is classified, privileged, or otherwise protected from disclosure (in the latter event, compliance with 32 CFR part 97 and this part is required);


(7) Cases involving garnishment orders for child support and/or alimony. The release of official information in these cases is governed by 5 CFR 581 and SECNAVINST 7200.16
3
, or;




3 See footnote 1 to § 725.1.


(8) Release of information to Federal, state, and local prosecuting and law enforcement authorities, in conjunction with an investigation conducted by a DOD component or DON criminal investigative organization.


(h) This part does not preclude official comment on matters in litigation in appropriate cases.


(i) The DOD General Counsel may notify DOD components that DOD will assume primary responsibility for coordinating all litigation requests for demands for official DOD information or testimony of DOD personnel in litigation involving terrorism, espionage, nuclear weapons, and intelligence sources or means. Accordingly, determining officials who receive requests pertaining to such litigation shall notify the Associate General Counsel (Litigation) or the Deputy Assistant Judge Advocate General (International Law or General Litigation) who shall consult and coordinate with DOD General Counsel prior to any response to such requests.


(j) Relationship with Federal Rules of Procedure. The requirements imposed by this instruction are intended, among other things, to provide adequate notice to DON regarding the scope of proposed discovery. This will assure that certain DON information, which properly should be withheld, is not inadvertently released in response to a litigation request or demand, including a subpoena or other request for discovery issued under Federal rules of procedure. When the United States is a party to Federal litigation and the party opponent uses discovery methods (e.g., request for interrogatories and admissions, depositions) set forth in Federal rules of procedure, the Judge Advocate General or General Counsel, in consultation with representatives of the Department of Justice or the cognizant United States Attorney, may determine whether the requirement for a separate written request in accordance with § 725.7 should be waived. Even if this requirement is waived, however, DON personnel who are subpoenaed to testify still will be required to obtain the written permission described in § 725.2.


§ 725.6 Authority to determine and respond.

(a) Matters proprietary to DON. If a litigation request or demand is made of DON personnel for official DON or DOD information or for testimony concerning such information, the individual to whom the request or demand is made will immediately notify the cognizant DON official designated in § 725.6(c) and (d), who will determine availability and respond to the request or demand.


(b) Matters proprietary to another DOD component. If a DON activity receives a litigation request or demand for official information originated by another DOD component or for non-DON personnel presently or formerly assigned to another DOD component, the DON activity will forward appropriate portions of the request or demand to the DOD component originating the information, to the components where the personnel are assigned, or to the components where the personnel were formerly assigned, for action under 32 CFR part 97. The forwarding DON activity will also notify the requester and court (if appropriate) or other authority of its transfer of the request or demand.


(c) Litigation matters to which the United States is, or might reasonably become, a party. Examples of such instances include suits under the Federal Tort Claims Act, Freedom of Information Act, Medical Care Recovery Act, Tucker Act, and suits against Government contractors where the contractor may interplead the United States or seek indemnification from the United States for any judgment paid, e.g., aviation contractors or asbestos matters. Generally, a suit in which the plaintiff is representing the interests of the United States under the Medical Care Recovery Act is not a litigation matter to which the United States is, or might reasonably become, a party. Determining authorities, if in doubt whether the United States is likely to become a party to the litigation, should seek guidance from representatives of the Offices of the Judge Advocate General or General Counsel. The Judge Advocate General and the General Counsel have the authority to determine whether a litigation request should be forwarded to them, or retained by a determining authority, for resolution.


(1) Litigation requests regarding matters assigned to the Judge Advocate General of the Navy under Navy Regulations, article 0331 (1990), shall be referred to the Deputy Assistant Judge Advocate General for General Litigation, Office of the Navy Judge Advocate General (Washington Navy Yard), 1322 Patterson Avenue, SE., Suite 3000, Washington, DC, 20374-5066, who will respond for the Judge Advocate General or transmit the request to the appropriate Deputy Assistant Judge Advocate General for response.


(2) Litigation requests regarding matters assigned to the General Counsel of the Navy under Navy Regs., art. 0327 (1990)
5
, shall be referred to the cognizant Command Counsel under, and subject to, limitations set forth in § 725.6(d)(2). That Command Counsel may either respond or refer the matter for action to another office. Requests involving asbestos litigation shall be referred to the Office of Counsel, Naval Sea Systems Command Headquarters, Personnel and Labor Law Section (Code 00LD), Washington, DC 20362-5101. Matters not clearly within the purview of a particular command counsel shall be referred to Associate General Counsel (Litigation), who may either respond or refer the matter for action to another office.




5 See footnote 1 to § 725.1.


(3) Matters involving the Armed Services Board of Contract Appeals shall be forwarded to these respective counsel except where the determination may involve the assertion of the deliberative process privilege before that Board. In such an event, the matter shall be forwarded for determination to the Associate General Counsel (Litigation).


(d) Litigation matters in which the United States is not, and is reasonably not expected to become, a party – (1) Matters within the cognizance of the Judge Advocate General – (i) Fact witnesses. Requests to interview, depose, or obtain testimony of any present or former DON personnel as defined in § 725.4(b) about purely factual matters shall be forwarded to the Navy or Marine Corps officer exercising general court-martial jurisdiction (OEGCMJ) in whose chain of command the prospective witness or requested documents lie. That determining authority will respond for the Judge Advocate General under criteria set forth in § 725.8.


(A) If the request pertains to personnel assigned to the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations, the Office of the Vice Chief of Naval Operations, or an Echelon 2 command located in the Washington, DC, area, it shall be forwarded to that office which will likewise respond for the Judge Advocate General under the criteria set forth in § 725.8.


(B) If a request pertains to Marine Corps personnel assigned to Headquarters Battalion, Headquarters Marine Corps, or to other Marine Corps commands located in the Washington, DC, area, it shall be forwarded to the Commandant of the Marine Corps (JAR), Headquarters, U.S. Marine Corps, Washington, DC 20380-0001, which will respond for the Judge Advocate General under criteria set forth in § 725.8.


(C) Nothing here shall prevent a determining authority from referring requests or demands to another determining authority better suited under the circumstances to determine the matter and respond, but the requester shall be notified of the referral. Further, each determining authority specified in this paragraph may further delegate his or her decisional authority to a principal staff member, staff judge advocate, or legal advisor.


(D) In the alternative, the requester may forward the request to the Deputy Assistant Judge Advocate General (General Litigation), who may refer the matter to another determining authority for response, and so notify the requester.


(ii) Visits and views. A request to visit a DON activity, ship, or unit, or to inspect material or spaces located there will be forwarded to one of the authorities stated in § 725.6(d)(1)(i), who will respond on behalf of the Judge Advocate General. Action taken by that authority will be coordinated with the commanding officer of the activity, ship, or unit at issue, or with his or her staff judge advocate (if applicable). The military mission of the unit shall normally take precedence over any visit or view. The commanding officer may independently prescribe reasonable conditions as to time, place, and circumstances to protect against compromise of classified or privileged material, intrusion into restricted spaces, and unauthorized photography.


(iii) Documents. 10 U.S.C. 7861 provides that the Secretary of the Navy has custody and charge of all DON books, records, and property. Under DOD Directive 5530.1,
6
the Secretary of the Navy’s sole delegate for service of process is the General Counsel of the Navy. See CFR 257.5(c). All process for such documents shall be served upon the General Counsel at the Department of the Navy, Office of the General Counsel, Navy Litigation Office, 720 Kennon Street SE, Bldg 36 Room 233, Washington Navy Yard, DC 20374-5013, 202-685-7039, who will refer the matter to the proper delegate for action.




6 See footnote 1 to § 725.1.


(iv) Expert or opinion requests. Any request for expert or opinion consultations, interviews, depositions, or testimony will be referred to the Deputy Assistant Judge Advocate General (General Litigation) who will respond for the Judge Advocate General, or transmit the request to the appropriate DAJAG for response. Matters not clearly within the purview of a particular Deputy Assistant Judge Advocate General will be retained by the Deputy Assistant Judge Advocate General (General Litigation), who may either respond or refer the matter to another determining authority for response.


(2) Matters within the cognizance of the General Counsel of the Navy – (i) Matters not involving issues of Navy policy. Such matters shall be forwarded for determination to the respective counsel for Naval Sea Systems Command, Naval Air Systems Command, Naval Supply Systems Command, Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Space and Naval Warfare Command, Office of the Navy Comptroller, Commandant of the Marine Corps, Office of the Chief of Naval Research, Military Sealift Command, Office of Civilian Personnel Policy, or to the Assistant General Counsel (Acquisition), depending upon who has cognizance over the information or personnel at issue.


(ii) Matters involving issues of Navy policy. Such matters shall be forwarded for determination to the General Counsel of the Navy via the Associate General Counsel (Litigation).


(iii) Matters involving asbestos litigation. Such matters shall be forwarded to the Office of Counsel, Naval Sea Systems Command Headquarters, Personnel and Labor Law Section (Code 00LD), Washington, DC 20362-5101.


(3) Matters not clearly within the cognizance of either the Judge Advocate General or the General Counsel. Such matters may be sent to the Deputy Assistant Judge Advocate General (General Litigation) or the Associate General Counsel (Litigation), who will, in consultation with the other, determine the appropriate authority to respond to the request.


[57 FR 2463, Jan. 22, 1992, as amended at 69 FR 20541, Apr. 16, 2004; 70 FR 12966, Mar. 17, 2005]


§ 725.7 Contents of a proper request or demand.

(a) Routine requests. If official information is sought, through testimony or otherwise, a detailed written request must be submitted to the appropriate determining authority far enough in advance to assure an informed and timely evaluation of the request, and prevention of adverse effects on the mission of the command or activity that must respond. The determining authority shall decide whether sufficient information has been provided by the requester. Absent independent information, the following data is necessary to assess a request.


(1) Identification of parties, their counsel and the nature of the litigation. (i) Caption of case, docket number, court.


(ii) Name, address, and telephone number of all counsel.


(iii) The date and time on which the documents, information, or testimony sought must be produced; the requested location for production; and, if applicable, the estimated length of time that attendance of the DON personnel will be required.


(2) Identification of information or documents requested. (i) A description, in as much detail as possible, of the documents, information, or testimony sought, including the current military service, status (active, separated, retired), social security number, if known, of the subject of the requested pay, medical, or service records;


(ii) The location of the records, including the name, address, and telephone number, if known, of the person from whom the documents, information, or testimony is sought; and


(iii) A statement of whether factual, opinion, or expert testimony is requested (see §§ 725.4(c) and 725.8(b)(3)(ii)).


(3) Description of why the information is needed. (i) A brief summary of the facts of the case and the present posture of the case.


(ii) A statement of the relevance of the matters sought to the proceedings at issue.


(iii) If expert or opinion testimony is sought, an explanation of why exceptional need or unique circumstances exist justifying such testimony, including why it is not reasonably available from any other source.


(b) Additional considerations. The circumstances surrounding the underlying litigation, including whether the United States is a party, and the nature and expense of the requests made by a party may require additional information before a determination can be made. Providing the following information or stipulations in the original request may expedite review and eliminate the need for additional correspondence with the determining authority.


(1) A statement of the requester’s willingness to pay in advance all reasonable expenses and costs of searching for and producing documents, information, or personnel, including travel expenses and accommodations (if applicable);


(2) In cases in which deposition testimony is sought, a statement of whether attendance at trial or later deposition testimony is anticipated and requested. A single deposition normally should suffice;


(3) An agreement to notify the determining authority at least 10 working days in advance of all interviews, depositions, or testimony. Additional time for notification may be required where the witness is a DON health care provider or where the witness is located overseas;


(4) An agreement to conduct the deposition at the location of the witness, unless the witness and his or her commanding officer or cognizant superior, as applicable, stipulate otherwise;


(5) In the case of former DON personnel, a brief description of the length and nature of their duties while in DON employment, and a statement of whether such duties involved, directly or indirectly, the information or matters as to which the person will testify;


(6) An agreement to provide free of charge to any witness a signed copy of any written statement he or she may make, or, in the case of an oral deposition, a copy of that deposition transcript, if taken by a stenographer, or a video tape copy, if taken solely by video tape, if not prohibited by applicable rules of court;


(7) An agreement that if the local rules of procedure controlling the litigation so provide, the witness will be given an opportunity to read, sign, and correct the deposition at no cost to the witness or the Government;


(8) A statement of understanding that the United States reserves the right to have a representative present at any interview or deposition; and


(9) A statement that counsel for other parties to the case will be provided with a copy of all correspondence originated by the determining authority so they may have the opportunity to submit any related litigation requests and participate in any discovery.


(c) Response to deficient requests. A letter request that is deficient in providing necessary information may be returned to the requester by the determining authority with an explanation of the deficiencies and a statement that no further action will be taken until they are corrected. If a subpoena has been received for official information, counsel should promptly determine the appropriate action to take in response to the subpoena. See § 725.9(g).


(d) Emergency requests. Written requests are generally required by 32 CFR part 97.


(1) The determining authority, identified in § 725.6, has discretion to waive that requirement in the event of a bona fide emergency, under conditions set forth here, which were not anticipated in the course of proper pretrial planning and discovery. Oral requests and subsequent determinations should be reserved for instances where factual matters are sought, and compliance with the requirements of a proper written request would result in the effective denial of the request and cause an injustice in the outcome of the litigation for which the information is sought. No requester has a right to make an oral request and receive a determination. Whether to permit such an exceptional procedure is a decision within the sole discretion of the determining authority, unless overruled by the General Counsel or the Judge Advocate General, as appropriate.


(2) If the determining authority concludes that the request, or any portion of it, meets the emergency test, he or she will require the requester to agree to the conditions set forth in § 725.7(a). The determining authority will then orally advise the requester of the determination, and seek a written confirmation of the oral request. Thereafter, the determining authority will make a written record of the disposition of the oral request including the grant or denial, circumstances requiring the procedure, and conditions to which the requester agreed.


(3) The emergency procedure should not be utilized where the requester refuses to agree to the appropriate conditions set forth in § 725.7(a) or indicates unwillingness to abide by the limits of the oral grant, partial grant, or denial.


§ 725.8 Considerations in determining to grant or deny a request.

(a) General considerations. In deciding whether to authorize release of official information, or the testimony of DON personnel concerning official information (hereafter referred to as “the disclosure” under a request conforming with the requirements of § 725.7, the determining authority shall consider the following factors:


(1) The DON policy regarding disclosure in § 725.2;


(2) Whether the request or demand is unduly burdensome or otherwise inappropriate under applicable court rules;


(3) Whether disclosure, including release in camera (i.e., to the judge or court alone), is appropriate under procedural rules governing the case or matter in which the request or demand arose;


(4) Whether disclosure would violate or conflict with a statute, executive order, regulation, directive, instruction, or notice;


(5) Whether disclosure, in the absence of a court order or written consent, would violate 5 U.S.C. 552, 552a;


(6) Whether disclosure, including release in camera, is appropriate or necessary under the relevant substantive law concerning privilege (e.g., attorney-client, attorney work-product, or physician-patient in the case of civilian personnel);


(7) Whether disclosure, except when in camera (i.e., before the judge alone) and necessary to assert a claim of privilege, would reveal information properly classified under the DOD Information Security Program under DOD 5200.1-R
7
, withholding of unclassified technical data from public disclosure following OPNAVINST 5510.161; privileged Naval Aviation Safety Program information (OPNAVINST 3750.6Q (NOTAL))
8
, or other matters exempt from unrestricted disclosure under 5 U.S.C. 552, 552a;




7 See footnote 1 to § 725.1.




8 See footnote 1 to § 725.1.


(8) Whether disclosure would unduly interfere with ongoing law enforcement proceedings, violate constitutional rights, reveal the identity of an intelligence source or source of confidential information, conflict with U.S. obligations under international agreement, or be otherwise inappropriate under the circumstances;


(9) Whether attendance of the requested witness at deposition or trial will unduly interfere with the military mission of the command; and


(10) Whether, in a criminal case, requiring disclosure by a defendant of detailed information about the relevance of documents or testimony as a condition for release would conflict with the defendant’s constitutional rights.


(b) Specific considerations – (1) Documents, interviews, depositions, testimony, and views (where the United States is, or may become, a party). All requests pertaining to such matters shall be forwarded to the Judge Advocate General or the General Counsel, as appropriate under § 725.6(c).


(2) Documents (where the United States is not, and is reasonably not expected to become a party) – (i) Unclassified Navy and Marine Corps records. Where parties or potential parties desire unclassified naval records in connection with a litigation matter, the subpoena duces tecum or court order will be served, under 32 CFR 257.5(c), upon the General Counsel of the Navy, along with a written request complying with § 725.7.


(A) If the determining authority to whom the matter is referred determines to comply with the order or subpoena, compliance will be effected by transmitting certified copies of records to the clerk of the court from which process issued. If, because of an unusual circumstance, an original record must be produced by a naval custodian, it will not be removed from the custody of the person producing it, but copies may be placed in evidence.


(B) Upon written request of one or more parties in interest or their respective attorneys, records which would be produced in response to a court order signed by a judge as set forth above may be furnished without a court order, but only upon a request complying with § 725.7 and only when such records are not in a “system of records” as defined by the Privacy Act (5 U.S.C. 552a). In determining whether a record not contained in a “system of records” will be furnished in response to a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request, SECNAVINST 5720.42E
9
controls.




9 See footnote 1 to § 725.1.


(C) Generally, a record in a Privacy Act “system of records” may not be released under a litigation request except with the written consent of the person to whom the record pertains or in response to a court order signed by a judge. See SECNAVINST 5211.5C
10
and 5 U.S.C. 552, 552a for further guidance.




10 See footnote 1 to § 725.1.


(D) Whenever compliance with a court order or subpoena duces tecum for production of DON records is denied for any reason, the subpoena or court order and complete copies of the requested records will be forwarded to the appropriate Deputy Assistant Judge Advocate General (General Litigation) or the Associate General Counsel (Litigation) for action, and the parties to the suit notified in accordance with this part.


(ii) Classified Navy and Marine Corps records. Any consideration of release of classified information for litigation purposes, within the scope of this instruction, must be coordinated within the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations (OP-09N) per OPNAVINST 5510.1H.
11




11 See footnote 1 to § 725.1.


(iii) Records in the custody of the National Personnel Records Center. Court orders or subpoenas duces tecum demanding information from, or production of, service or medical records of former Navy and Marine Corps personnel in the custody of the National Personnel Records Center will be served upon the Director, National Personnel Records Center, 9700 Page Boulevard, St. Louis, MO 63132. If records responsive to the request are identified and maintained at the National Personnel Records Center, that Center shall make appropriate certified (authenticated) copies of the information requested. These copies will then be forwarded, along with the request, in the case of Navy personnel, to Chief, Bureau of Naval Personnel (Pers-06), Washington, DC 20370-5000, or his delegate, who will respond. In the case of Marine Corps personnel, the copies and request will be sent to the Commandant of the Marine Corps (MMRB-10), Quantico, VA 22134-0001, who will respond. Those requests that do not constitute legal demands will be refused by the Director, National Personnel Records Center, and written guidance provided to the requester.


(iv) Medical and other records of civilian employees. Production of medical certificates or other medical reports concerning civilian employees is controlled by Federal Personnel Manual, chapter 294 and chapter 339.1-4.
12
Records of civilian employees, other than medical records, may be produced upon receipt of a court order and a request complying with § 725.7, provided no classified or for official use only information, such as loyalty or security records, are involved. Disclosure of records relating to compensation benefits administered by the Office of Workers’ Compensation Programs of the Department of Labor are governed by Secretary of the Navy Instruction 5211.5C (Privacy Act implementation) and Secretary of the Navy Instruction 5720.42E (Freedom of Information Act implementation), as appropriate. Where information is furnished per this subparagraph in response to a court order and proper request, certified copies rather than originals should be furnished. Where original records must be produced because of unusual circumstances, they may not be removed from the custody of the official producing them, but copies may be placed on the record.




12 See footnote 1 to § 725.1.


(v) JAGMAN investigations (other than to next of kin). The Deputy Assistant Judge Advocate General having cognizance over the records at issue for litigation or prospective litigation purposes may release the records if a complete release will result. The Assistant Judge Advocate General (Civil Law) will make determinations concerning the release of the records specified in this subparagraph if a release of less than the complete requested record will result. A release to next of kin of incompetent or deceased DON personnel or their representatives is exempt from these requirements and this part.


(vi) Affirmative claims files. Affirmative claims files (including Medical Care Recovery Act files), except to the extent they contain copies of JAGMAN investigations prepared under the Manual of the Judge Advocate General, or classified or privileged information, may be released by the commanding officer of the Naval Legal Service Office having cognizance over the claim at issue, without compliance with this instruction, to: insurance companies to support claims; to civilian attorneys representing injured service persons, their dependents, and the Government’s interests; and to other DOD components. When a request for production involves material related to claims in favor of the Government, either the cognizant Command Counsel or the Naval Legal Service Office having territorial responsibility for the area should be notified.


(vii) Accounting for disclosures from “systems of records.” When compliance with a litigation request or demand for production of records is appropriate, or when release of records is otherwise authorized, and records contained in a “system of records,” are released, the releasing official will consult Secretary of the Navy Instruction 5211.5C regarding disclosure accounting requirements.


(viii) Pay records. Official pay records of active-duty, reserve, retired, or former Navy members should be requested from Director, Defense Finance and Accounting Service (DFAS), Cleveland Center, Anthony J. Celebrezze Federal Building, Cleveland, OH 44199-2055. Official pay records of active-duty, reserve, retired, or former Marines should be requested from Director, Defense Finance and Accounting Service, Kansas City Center (Code G), Kansas City, MO 64197-0001.


(3) Interviews, depositions, and testimony (where the United States is not, and is reasonably not expected to become, a party) – (i) Factual matters. DON policy favors disclosure of factual matters when disclosure does not violate the criteria stated in this section. Distinguishing between factual matters and expert or opinion matters (where DON policy favors non-disclosure) requires careful analysis. Opinion matters are defined at § 725.4(c).


(ii) Expert, opinion, or policy matters. Such matters are to be determined, under the delegation in § 725.6, by the cognizant Deputy Assistant Judge Advocate General or by General Counsel. General considerations to identify expert or opinion testimony are in § 725.4(c). DON personnel shall not provide, with or without compensation, opinion or expert testimony concerning official information, subjects, or activities, except on behalf of the United States or a party represented by the Department of Justice. Upon a showing by the requester of exceptional need or unique circumstances, and that the anticipated testimony will not be adverse to the interests of the DOD or the United States, the appropriate DON official designated in § 725.6, may grant, in writing, special authorization for DON personnel to appear and testify at no expense to the United States. In determining whether exceptional need or unique circumstances exist, the determining official should consider whether such expert or opinion testimony is available to the requester from any other source. The burden of demonstrating such unavailability, if any, is solely upon the requester.


(iii) Visits and views (where the United States is not, and is reasonably not expected to become, a party). Such disclosures are normally factual in nature and should not be accompanied by interviews of personnel unless separately requested and granted. The authority of the commanding officer of the activity, ship, or unit at issue is not limited by this part. Accordingly, he or she may prescribe appropriate conditions as to time, place, and circumstances (including proper restrictions on photography).


(iv) Non-DOD information. A request for disclosure under this part, particularly through the testimony of a witness, may involve both official information and non-DOD information (e.g., in the case of a person who has acquired additional and separate knowledge or expertise wholly apart from Government employment). Determining whether or not official information is at issue is within the purview of the determining authority, not the requester. A requester’s contention that only non-DOD information is at issue is not dispositive. The requester must still comply with this instruction to support that contention. If non-DOD information is at issue in whole or in part, the determining authority shall so state in the written determination described in § 725.9. He or she shall make no other determination regarding that non-DOD information.


§ 725.9 Action to grant or deny a request.

(a) The process of determining whether to grant or deny a request is not an adversary proceeding. This part provides guidance for the operation of DON only and is not intended to, does not, and may not be relied upon to, create any right or benefit, substantive or procedural, enforceable at law against the United States, DOD, or DON.


(b) 32 CFR part 97 and this part apply to testimony by former naval personnel and former civilian employees of DON. A proper request must be made, under § 725.7, to obtain testimony by former personnel regarding official DOD information. However, this part is not intended to place unreasonable restraints upon the post-employment conduct of such personnel. Accordingly, requests for expert or opinion testimony by such personnel will normally be granted unless that testimony would constitute a violation of the U.S. Code (e.g., 18 U.S.C. 201 et seq.), conflict with pertinent regulations (e.g., Secretary of the Navy Instruction 5370.2H), or disclose properly classified or privileged information.


(c) A determination to grant or deny should be made as expeditiously as possible to provide the requester and the court with the matter at issue or with a statement of the reasons for denial. The decisional period should not exceed 10 working days from receipt of a complete request complying with the requirements of § 725.7, absent exceptional or particularly difficult circumstances. The requester should also be informed promptly of the referral of any portion of the request to another authority for determination.


(d) Except as provided in § 725.7(d), a determination to grant or deny shall be in writing.


(e) The determination letter should respond solely to the specific disclosures requested, stating a specific determination on each particular request. When a request is denied in whole or in part, a statement of the reasons for denial should be provided to fully inform a court of the reasons underlying the determination if it is challenged.


(f) A copy of any denial, in whole or in part, of a request, should be forwarded to the cognizant Deputy Assistant Judge Advocate General or the Associate General Counsel (Litigation), as appropriate. Such notification is likewise appropriate when the litigation request has been treated under 5 U.S.C. 552, 552a and § 725.5(f). Telephonic notification is particularly appropriate where a judicial challenge or contempt action is anticipated.


(g) In cases in which a subpoena has been received and the requester refuses to pay fees or otherwise comply with the guidance and requirements imposed by this part, or if the determining authority declines to make some or all of the subpoenaed information available, or if the determining authority has had insufficient time to complete its determination as to how to respond to the request, the determining authority must promptly notify the General Litigation Division of the Office of the Judge Advocate General or the Navy Litigation Office of the Office of the General Counsel, which offices will determine, in consultation with the Department of Justice, the appropriate response to be made to the tribunal which issued the subpoena. Because the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure require that some objections to subpoenas must be made either within 10 days of service of the subpoena or on or before the time for compliance, whichever first occurs, and because this will require consultation with the Department of Justice, timely notice is essential.


§ 725.10 Response to requests or demands in conflict with this instruction.

(a) Except as otherwise provided in this paragraph, DON personnel, including former military personnel and civilian employees, shall not produce, disclose, release, comment upon, or testify concerning any official DOD information in response to a litigation request or demand without prior written approval of the appropriate DON official designated in § 725.6. If a request has been made, and granted, in whole or in part, per 32 CFR part 97 and this part, DON personnel may only produce, disclose, release, comment upon, or testify concerning those matters specified in the request and properly approved by the determining authority designated in § 725.6. See United States ex rel. Touhy v. Ragen, 340 U.S. 462 (1951).


(b) If, after DON personnel have received a litigation request or demand and have in turn notified the appropriate determining authority described in § 725.6, a response to the request or demand is required before instructions from the responsible official have been received, the responsible authority designated in § 725.6 shall notify the Deputy Assistant Judge Advocate General or Associate General Counsel (Litigation) who has cognizance over the matter. That official will furnish the requester, the court, or other authority that the request or demand is being reviewed in accordance with this part and seek a stay of the request or demand pending a final determination.


(c) If a court of competent jurisdiction or other appropriate authority declines to stay the effect of the request or demand in response to action taken under § 725.10(b), or if such court or other authority orders that the request or demand must be complied with, notwithstanding the final decision of the appropriate DON official, the DON personnel upon whom the request or demand was made will, if time permits, notify the determining authority of such ruling or order. That authority will notify the Deputy Assistant Judge Advocate General or the Associate General Counsel (Litigation) having cognizance over the matter. After due consultation and coordination with the Department of Justice, as required by the Manual of the Judge Advocate General, that official will determine whether the individual is required to comply with the request or demand and will notify the requester, the court, or other authority accordingly. The witness shall, if directed by the appropriate DON official, respectfully decline to comply with the demand. Legal counsel for the command concerned should accompany and advise DON personnel during any court proceedings involving the foregoing circumstances.


(d) It is expected that all DON actions in the foregoing paragraphs will be taken only after active consultation with the appropriate component of the Department of Justice. Generally, DON personnel will be instructed to decline to comply with a court order only if the Department of Justice commits to represent the DON personnel in question.


§ 725.11 Fees.

(a) Generally. Except as provided below, determining authorities shall charge reasonable fees and expenses to parties seeking official DON information or testimony under this instruction. Pursuant to 32 CFR 288.4, 288.10, these fees should include all costs of processing a request for information, including time and material expended. Travel for active duty members summoned as witnesses is governed by Joint Travel Regulations, Vol. I, Chap. 7, pt. E. and Navy Travel Instructions, Chap. 6, pt. E.
13
Travel for civilian personnel summoned as witnesses is governed by the Joint Travel Regulations, Vol. II, Chap. 4, pt. E.
14




13 See footnote 1 to § 725.1.




14 See footnote 1 to § 725.1.


(1) When DON is a party. No fees normally shall be charged when the DON is a party to the proceedings, and the activity holding the requested information or employing the witness shall bear the expense of complying with the request.


(2) When another federal agency is a party. No fees shall be charged to the requesting agency. Travel and per diem expenses may be paid by the requesting agency, or by the Navy activity to which the requested witness is assigned, subject to reimbursement from the requesting agency.


(3) When neither DON nor another federal agency is a party. Fees shall be charged to the requester for time taken from official duties by DON personnel who are authorized to be interviewed, give testimony, or escort persons on views and visits of installations. At the discretion of the cognizant command, DON personnel need not be made available during duty hours unless directed by subpoena. Time which DON personnel spend in court testifying, or waiting to testify on factual matters shall not be charged. Fees should be charged, however, for expert or opinion testimony based upon the witness’s education, training, or experience. Testimony by a treating physician called to testify about his personal knowledge of a specific case is considered fact not expert testimony. Fees are payable to the Treasurer of the United States for deposit in the Treasury’s miscellaneous receipts. Rates for uniformed personnel are published in NAVCOMPT Notice 7041 series.
15
Pursuant to 32 CFR 288.4, charges for civilian personnel should include the employee’s hourly rate of pay, as well as allowances and benefits. Except as provided in § 725.11(b)(4), no funds may be expended for travel or per diem of active duty members when an agency of the Federal Government is not a party. The requesting party is responsible for travel arrangements and funding. Government funding of travel and per diem for civilian employees is authorized.




15 See footnote 1 to § 725.1.


(b) Special circumstances – (1) Refusal to pay fees. In cases in which a subpoena has been received and the requester refuses to pay appropriate fees, it may become necessary to request the Department of Justice to take appropriate legal action before the court issuing the subpoena. Determining authorities should consult promptly with the OJAG General Litigation Division or the Navy Litigation Office of the General Counsel if this course of action appears necessary, because some objections to subpoenas must be made either within ten days of service of the subpoena or on or before the time for compliance, whichever first occurs, and because this will require timely consultation with the Department of Justice. If no subpoena has been issued, the determining authority must decide whether to deny the request or, if appropriate, waive the fees.


(2) Waiver or reduction of fees. The determining authority may waive or reduce fees pursuant to 32 CFR 288.4, 288.9, provided such waiver or reduction is in the best interest of the DON and the United States. Fee waivers and reductions shall not be routinely granted, or granted under circumstances which might create the appearance that DON favors one party over another.


(3) Witness fees required by the court. Witness fees required by the rules of the applicable court shall be paid directly to the witness by the requester. Such amounts are to defray the cost of travel and per diem. In a case where the Government has paid the cost of travel and per diem, the witness shall turn over to his or her supervisor any payment received from a private party to defray the cost of travel that, when added to amounts paid by the Government, exceed the actual cost of travel. The supervisor shall forward the amount turned over by the witness to the Office of the Comptroller of the Navy for appropriate action.


(4) Exceptional cases. If neither the DON, nor an agency of the Federal Government is a party, appropriated funds may be used to pay, without reimbursement, travel and per diem of DON personnel who are witnesses in criminal or civil proceedings, provided, the case is directly related to the Armed Services, or its members, and the Armed Services have a genuine and compelling interest in the outcome.


PART 735 – REPORTING BIRTHS AND DEATHS IN COOPERATION WITH OTHER AGENCIES


Authority:70A Stat. 278; 80 Stat. 379, 383; 5 U.S.C. 301, 552; and 10 U.S.C. 5031.


Source:51 FR 15321, Apr. 23, 1986, unless otherwise noted.

§ 735.1 Purpose.

To promulgate latest guidance on reporting births and deaths, including births to which part 138 of this title is applicable.


§ 735.2 Background.

For Armed Forces members and their dependents on duty overseas, registration of vital statistics with an appropriate foreign government may be a distinct advantage should documentary evidence, acceptable in all courts, be required at any future time. Department of Defense (DOD) policy is that military services will require their members to make official record of births, deaths, marriages, etc., with local civil authorities in whose jurisdiction such events occur.


§ 735.3 Action.

When a medical officer has knowledge of a birth or death occurring under the following conditions, he or she shall refer the matter to the commanding officer for assurance of compliance with DOD policy.


(a) Births. (1) In accordance with local health laws and regulations, the commanding officer of a naval hospital in the United States (U.S.) shall report to proper civil authorities all births, including stillbirths, occurring at the hospital. Medical officers on ships and aircraft operating within U.S. political boundaries, or at stations other than naval hospitals in the U.S., shall report all births occurring within their professional cognizance. It shall be the duty of the medical officer to determine the requirements of local civil authorities for these reports.


(2) When births occur on aircraft or ships operating beyond U.S. political boundaries, the medical officer responsible for delivery shall make a report to the commanding officer, master of the ship, or to the officer in command of any aircraft, in every case to be recorded in the ship or aircraft log. A report shall also be made to local civil authorities in the first port of entry if required by law and regulation of such authorities when births occur on a course inbound to the U.S. Additionally, the medical officer shall:


(i) Furnish the parents with appropriate certificates and shall, if the report is not accepted by the local registrar of vital statistics or other civil authority, or in any case in which local authority has indicated in writing that such a report will not be accepted,


(ii) Advise the parents to seek the advice of the nearest office of the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service (USINS), at the earliest practicable time. USINS offices are located in ports of entry and in major cities of the United States.


(iii) For births occurring on courses out-bound and beyond the continental limits of the U.S., report to the U.S. consular representative at the next appropriate foreign port. When the aircraft or ship does not enter a foreign port, procedures described in § 735.3(a)(2)(ii) shall be followed.


(3) Attention is invited to the fact that reports of birth may be forwarded to the Bureau of Health Statistics, Department of Health, Honolulu, Hawaii for any births occurring on courses destined for islands in the Pacific Ocean over which the United States has jurisdiction as well as for those births which are otherwise accepted by civil authorities for Hawaii.


(4) Part 138 of this title prescribes policy, responsibilities, and procedures on birth registration of infants born to U.S. citizens, in military medical facilities outside the United States and its possessions.


(b) Deaths. When a death occurs at a naval activity in any State, Territory, or insular possession of the United States, the commanding officer or designated representative shall report the death promptly to proper civil authorities in accordance with Naval Medical Command directives. If requested by these civil authorities, the civil death certificate may be prepared and signed by the cognizant naval medical officer. Local agreements concerning reporting and preparation of death certificates should be made between the naval facility and local civil authorities.


SUBCHAPTER D – PROCUREMENT, PROPERTY, PATENTS, AND CONTRACTS


Cross Reference:

For joint procurement regulations of the Armed Forces, see chapter I of this title.

PART 746 – LICENSING OF GOVERNMENT INVENTIONS IN THE CUSTODY OF THE DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY


Authority:5 U.S.C. 301; 10 U.S.C. 5031; 40 U.S.C. 486(c); and 41 CFR 101-4.1.


Source:41 FR 55712, Dec. 22, 1976, unless otherwise noted.

§ 746.1 Purpose.

This part implements Department of Defense Directive 5535.3 of November 2, 1973 and 41 CFR subpart 101-4.1, and sets forth the policy, terms, conditions, and procedures for the licensing of rights in domestic patents and patent applications vested in the United States of America and in the custody of the Department of the Navy.


§ 746.2 Policy.

(a) A major premise of the Presidential Statement fo Government Patent Policy, August 23, 1971 (36 FR 16887, August 26, 1971), is that government inventions normally will best serve the public interest when they are developed to the point of practical application and made available to the public in the shortest possible time. The granting of express nonexclusive or exclusive licenses for the practice of these inventions may assist in the accomplishment of the national objective to achieve a dynamic and efficient economy.


(b) The granting of nonexclusive licenses generally is preferable, since the invention is thereby laid open to all interested parties and serves to promote competition in industry, if the invention is in fact promoted commercially. However, to obtain commercial utilization of the invention, it may be necessary to grant an exclusive license for a limited period of time as an incentive for the investment of risk capital to achieve practical application of an invention.


(c) Whenever the grant of an exclusive license is deemed appropriate, it shall be negotiated on terms and conditions most favorable to the public interest. In selecting an exclusive licensee, consideration shall be given to the capabilities of the prospective licensee to further the technical and market development of the invention, his plan to undertake the development, the projected impact on competition, and the benefit to the Government and the public. Consideration shall be given also to assisting small business and minority business enterprises, as well as economically depressed, low income, and labor surplus areas, and whether each or any applicant is a United States citizen or corporation. Where there is more than one applicant for an exclusive license, that applicant shall be selected who is determined to be most capable of satisfying the criteria and achieving the goals set forth in this part.


(d) Subject to the following: (1) Any existing or future treaty or agreement between the United States and any foreign government or inter-governmental organization, or


(2) Licenses under or other rights to inventions made or conceived in the course of or under Department of the Navy research and development contracts where such licenses or other rights to such inventions are provided for in the contract and retained by the party contracting with the Department of the Navy, no license shall be granted or implied in a government invention, except as provided for in this part.


(e) No grant of a license under this part shall be construed to confer upon any licensee any immunity from the antitrust laws or from a charge of patent misuse, and the acquisition and use of rights pursuant to this part shall not be immunized from the operation of state or federal law by reason of the source of the grant.


§ 746.3 Delegation of authority.

The Chief of Naval Research is delegated the authority to administer the patent licensing program, with the authority to redelegate such authority.


§ 746.4 Definitions.

(a) Government invention means an invention covered by a domestic patent or patent application that is vested in the United States and in the custody of the Department of the Navy, and is designated by the Chief of Naval Research as appropriate for the grant of an express non-exclusive or exclusive license.


(b) To the point of practical application means to manufacture in the case of a composition or product, to practice in the case of a process, or to operate in the case of a machine, under such conditions as to establish that the invention is being worked and that its benefits are reasonably accessible to the public.


§ 746.5 Government inventions available for licensing.

Government inventions normally will be made available for the granting of express nonexclusive or limited exclusive licenses to responsible applicants according to the factors and conditions set forth in §§ 746.6 and 746.7, subject to the applicable procedures of § 746.11. The Chief of Naval Research may remove a prior designation of availability for licensing of any patent(s) or patent application(s), provided that no outstanding licenses to that invention are in effect.


§ 746.6 Nonexclusive license.

(a) Availability of licenses. Each government invention normally shall be made available for the granting of nonexclusive revocable licenses, subject to the provisions of any other licenses, including those under § 746.8.


(b) Terms of grant. (1) The duration of the license shall be for a period as specified in the license agreement, provided that the licensee complies with all the terms of the license.


(2) The license shall require the licensees to bring the invention to the point of practical application within a period specified in the license, or such extended period as may be agreed upon, and to contine to make the benefits of the invention reasonably accessible to the public.


(3) The license may be granted for all or less than all fields of use of the invention, and throughout the United States of America, its territories and possessions, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, and the District of Columbia, or in any lesser geographic portion thereof.


(4) After termination of a period specified in the license agreement, the Chief of Naval Research may restrict the license to the fields of use and/or geographic areas in which the licensee has brought the invention to the point of practical application and continues to make the benefits of the invention reasonably accessible to the public.


(5) The license may extend to subsidiaries and affiliates of the licensee but shall be nonassignable without approval of the Chief of Naval Research, except to the successor of that part of the licensee’s business to which the invention pertains.


(6) The Government shall make no representation or warranty as to the validity of any licensed application(s) or patent(s), or of the scope of any of the claims contained therein, or that the exercise of the license will not result in the infringement of any other patent(s), nor shall the Government assume any liability whatsoever resulting from the exercise of the license.


§ 746.7 Limited exclusive license.

(a) Availability of licenses. Each government invention may be made available for the granting of a limited exclusive license, provided that:


(1) The invention has been published as available for licensing pursuant to paragraph (a) of § 746.11 for a period of at least six months;


(2) The Chief of Naval Research has determined that:


(i) The invention may be brought to the point of practical application in certain fields of use and/or in certain geographical locations by exclusive licensing;


(ii) The desired practical application has not been achieved under any nonexclusive license granted on the invention; and


(iii) The desired practical application is not likely to be achieved expeditiously in the public interest under a nonexclusive license or as a result of further government-funded research or development;


(3) The notice of the prospective licensee has been published, pursuant to paragraph (d) of § 746.11 for at least 60 days; and


(4) After termination of the period set forth in paragraph (a)(3) of § 746.7 the Chief of Naval Research has determined that no applicant for a nonexclusive license has brought or will bring, within a reasonable period, the invention to the point of practical application, as specified in the exclusive license, and that to grant the exclusive license would be in the public interest.


(b) Selection of exclusive licensee. An exclusive licensee will be selected on bases consistent with the policy set forth in § 746.2 and in accordance with the procedures set forth in § 746.11.


(c) Terms of grant. (1) The license may be granted for all or less than all fields of use of the government invention, and throughout the United States of America, its territories and possessions, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, and the District of Columbia, or in any lesser geographic portion thereof.


(2) Subject to the rights reserved to the Government in paragraphs (c)(6) and (c)(7) of § 746.7, the licensee shall be granted the exclusive right to practice the invention in accordance with the terms and conditions specified in the license.


(3) The duration of the license shall be negotiated but shall be for a period less than the terminal portion of the patent, the period remaining being sufficient to make the invention reasonably available for the grant of a nonexclusive license; and such period of exclusivity shall not exceed 5 years unless the Chief of Naval Research determines, on the basis of a written submission supported by a factual showing, that a longer period is reasonably necessary to permit the licensee to enter the market and recoup his reasonable costs in so doing.


(4) The license shall require the licensee to bring the invention to the point of practical application within a period specified in the license, or within a longer period as approved by the Chief of Naval Research, and to continue to make the benefits of the invention reasonably accessible to the public.


(5) The license shall require the licensee to expend a specified minimum amount of money and/or take other specified actions, within a specified period of time after the effective date of the license, in an effort to bring the invention to the point of practical application.


(6) The license shall be subject to the irrevocable, royalty-free right of the Government of the United States to practice and have practiced the invention throughout the world, by or on behalf of the Government of the United States, and by or on behalf of any foreign government or intergovernmental organization pursuant to any existing or future treaty or agreement with the United states. If the Chief of Naval Research finds it to be in the public interest, this license may also be expressly subject to this same royalty-free right by or on behalf of state and municipal governments.


(7) The license shall reserve to the Chief of Naval Research the right to require the licensee to grant sublicenses to responsible applicants on terms that are reasonable in the circumstances:


(i) The extent that the invention is required for public use by government regulations, or


(ii) As may be necessary to fulfill health or safety needs, or


(iii) For other public purposes stipulated in the license.


(8) The license may extend to subsidiaries and affiliates of the licensee but shall be nonassignable without approval of the Chief of Naval Research, except to successors of that part of the licensee’s business to which the invention pertains.


(9) An exclusive licensee may grant sublicenses under his license, subject to the approval of the Chief of Naval Research. Each sublicense granted by an exclusive licensee shall make reference to the exclusive license, including the rights retained by the Government under the exclusive license, and a copy of such sublicense shall be furnished to the Chief of Naval Research.


(10) The license may be subject to such other terms as may be in the public interest.


(11) The Government shall make no representation or warranty as to validity of any licensed application(s) or patent(s), or of the scope of any of the claims contained therein, or that the exercise of the license will not result in the infringement of any other patent(s), nor shall the Government assume any liability whatsoever resulting from the exercise of the license.


§ 746.8 Additional licenses.

Subject to any outstanding licenses, nothing in this part shall preclude the Chief of Naval Research from granting additional nonexclusive or limited exclusive licenses for government inventions when he determines that to do so would provide for an equitable exchange of patent rights. The following exemplify circumstances wherein such licenses may be granted:


(a) In consideration of the settlement of an interference;


(b) In consideration of a release of a claim of infringement; or


(c) In exchange for, or as part of, the consideration for a license under adversely held patents.


§ 746.9 Royalties.

(a) Nonexclusive license. Normally, royalties shall not be changed under nonexclusive licenses granted to United States citizens and United States corporations on government inventions; however, the Chief of Naval Research may require other consideration.


(b) Limited exclusive license. A limited exclusive license on a government invention shall contain a royalty provision and/or other consideration flowing to the Government.


§ 746.10 Reports.

A license shall require the licensee to submit periodic reports on his efforts to achieve practical application of the invention. The reports shall contain information within his knowledge, or which he may acquire under normal business practices, pertaining to the commercial use being made of the invention, and other information which the Chief of Naval Research may determine is pertinent to its licensing activities and is specified in the license.


§ 746.11 Procedures.

(a) Publication requirements. The Chief of Naval Research shall cause to be published in the Federal Register, the Official Gazette of the United States Patent and Trademark Office, and at least one other publication that the Chief of Naval Research deems would best serve the public interest, a list of the government inventions available for licensing under the conditions specified in this part. The list shall be revised periodically to include directly, or by reference to a previously published list, all inventions currently available for licensing. Other publications on inventions available for licensing are encouraged, and may include abstracts, when appropriate, as well as information on the design, construction, use, and potential market for the inventions.


(b) Contents of a nonexclusive license application. An application for a nonexclusive license under a government invention should be addressed to the Chief of Naval Research (Code 300), Arlington, VA 22217, and shall include:


(1) Identification of the invention for which the license is desired, including the patent application serial number or patent number, title, and date, if known, and any other identification of the invention;


(2) Name and address of the person, company, or organization applying for the license, and whether the applicant is a United States citizen or a United States corporation;


(3) Name and address of the representative of applicant to whom correspondence should be sent;


(4) Nature and type of applicant’s business;


(5) Source of information concerning the availability of a license on this invention;


(6) Purpose for which the license is desired and a brief description of applicant’s plan to achieve that purpose;


(7) A statement of the fields of use for which applicant intends to practice the invention; and


(8) A statement as to the geographic areas in which the applicant would practice the invention.


(c) Contents of an exclusive license application. An application for an exclusive license should be addressed to the Chief of Naval Research (Code 300), Arlington, VA 22217, and, in addition to the information indicated in paragraph (b) of § 746.11, an application for an exclusive license shall include:


(1) Applicant’s status, if any, in any one or more of the following categor- ies:


(i) Small business firm;


(ii) Minority business enterprise;


(iii) Location in a surplus labor area;


(iv) Location in a low-income area; and


(v) Location in an economically depressed area;


(2) A statement of applicant’s capability to undertake the development and marketing required to achieve the practical application of the invention;


(3) A statement describing the time, expenditure, and other acts which the applicant considers necessary to achieve practical application of the invention and the applicant’s offer to invest that sum to perform such acts if the license is granted;


(4) A statement that contains the applicant’s best knowledge of the extent to which the government invention is being practiced by private industry and the Government;


(5) Identification of other exclusive licenses granted to applicant under inventions in the custody of other government agencies; and


(6) Any other facts which the applicant believes are evidence that it is in the public interest for the Chief of Naval Research to grant an exclusive license rather than a nonexclusive license, and that such exclusive license should be granted to the applicant.


(d) Published notices. (1) A notice that a prospective exclusive licensee has been selected shall be published in the Federal Register, and a copy of the notice shall be sent to the Attorney General. The notice shall include:


(i) Identification of the invention;


(ii) Identification of the selected licensee;


(iii) Duration and scope of the contemplated license; and


(iv) A statement to the effect that the license will be granted unless:


(A) An application for a nonexclusive license, submitted by a responsible applicant pursuant to paragraph (b) of § 746.11, is received by the Chief of Naval Research within 60 days from the publication of the notice in the Federal Register, and the Chief of Naval Research determines in accordance with his prescribed procedures, under which procedures the Chief of Naval Research shall record and make available for public inspection all decisions made pursuant thereto and the basis therefore, that the applicant has established that he has already achieved or is likely to bring the invention to the point of practical application withing a reasonable period under a nonexclusive license; or


(B) The Chief of Naval Research determines that third party has presented evidence and argument which has established that it would not be in the public interest to grant the exclusive license.


(2) If an exclusive license has been granted pursuant to this part, notice thereof shall be published in the Federal Register. Such notice shall include:


(i) Identification of the invention;


(ii) Identification of the licensee; and


(iii) Duration and scope of the license.


(3) If an exclusive license has been modified or revoked pursuant to paragraph (e) § 746.11, notice thereof shall be published in the Federal Register. Such notice shall include:


(i) Identification of the invention;


(ii) Identification of the licensee; and


(iii) Effective date of the modification or revocation.


(e) Modification or revocation. (1) Any license granted pursuant to this part may be modified or revoked by the Chief of Naval Research if the licensee at any time defaults in making any report required by the license or commits any breach of covenant or agreement therein contained.


(2) A license may also be revoked by the Chief of Naval Research if the licensee willfully makes a false statement of material fact or willfully omits a material fact in the license application or any report required in the license agreement.


(3) Before modifying or revoking any license granted pursuant to this part for any cause, the Chief of Naval Research shall furnish the licensee and any sublicensee of record a written notice of intention to modify or revoke the license, and the licensee and any sublicensee shall be allowed 30 days after such notice to remedy any breach of any covenant or agreement as referred to in paragraph (e)(1) of § 746.11, or to show cause why the license should not be modified or revoked.


(f) Appeals. An applicant for a license, a licensee, or such other third party who has participated under paragraph (d)(1)(iv)(B) of § 746.11 shall have the right to appeal, in accordance with procedures prescribed by the Chief of Naval Research, any decision concerning the granting, denial, interpretation, modification, or revocation of a license.


§ 746.12 Litigation.

The property interest in a patent is the right to exclude. It is not the intent of the Government to transfer the property right in a patent when a license is issued pursuant to this part. Accordingly, the right to sue for infringement shall be retained with respect to all licenses so issued by the Government.


§ 746.13 Transfer of custody of Government inventions.

The Chief of Naval Research may enter into an agreement to transfer custody of a Government invention to another government agency for purposes of administration, including the granting of licenses pursuant to this part.


SUBCHAPTER E – CLAIMS

PART 750 – GENERAL CLAIMS REGULATIONS


Authority:5 U.S.C. 301, 5 U.S.C. 552, 10 U.S.C. 5013, and 5148.


Source:57 FR 4722, Feb. 7, 1992, unless otherwise noted.

Subpart A – General Provisions for Claims

§ 750.1 Scope of subpart A.

(a) General. (1) The Judge Advocate General is responsible for the administration and supervision of the resolution of claims arising under the Federal Tort Claims Act (subpart B of this part), the Military Claims Act (subpart C of this chapter), the Nonscope Claims Act (subpart D of this part), the Personnel Claims Act (part 751 of this chapter), the Foreign Claims Act, the International Agreements Claims Act pertaining to cost sharing of claims pursuant to international agreements, the Federal Claims Collection Act (subpart A of part 757 of this chapter), the Medical Care Recovery Act and Health Care Services Incurred on Behalf of Covered Beneficiaries: Collection from Third-party Payers (subpart B of part 757 of this chapter), and postal claims.


(2) The Deputy Assistant Judge Advocate General (Claims and Tort Litigation) (Code 15) is the manager of the Navy claims system established to evaluate, adjudicate, and provide litigation support for claims arising under the acts listed above and is responsible to the Judge Advocate General for the management of that system. The claims system consists of the Claims and Tort Litigation Division of the Office of the Judge Advocate General (Code 15), and the attorneys and support personnel assigned to the Tort Claims Unit at Naval Station, Norfolk, Virginia. For economy of language, Naval Legal Service Offices and Naval Legal Service Office Detachments are referred to as Naval Legal Service Command Activities.


(3) Commanding officers of commands receiving claims are responsible for complying with the guidance on investigations in Sec. 750.2 and Sec. 750.3, the guidance on handling and forwarding claims found in Sec. 750.5, and the guidance provided in the JAG Instruction 5800.7E (JAGMAN)
1
of 20 June 2007.




1 JAG Instruction 5800.7E (JAGMAN) may be retrieved at the official Web site of the United States Navy Judge Advocate General’s Corps at http://www.jag.navy.mil.


(b) This subpart A delineates general investigative and claims-processing requirements to be followed in the handling of all incidents and claims within the provisions of this part. Where the general provisions of this subpart A conflict with the specific provisions of any subsequent subpart of this part, the specific provisions govern.


[57 FR 4722, Feb. 7, 1992, as amended at 72 FR 53417, Sept. 19, 2007]


§ 750.2 Investigations: In general.

(a) Conducting the investigation. The command where the incident giving rise to the claim is alleged to have happened is responsible for conducting an investigation in accordance with this part.


(b) Thorough investigation. Every incident that may result in a claim against or in favor of the United States shall be promptly and thoroughly investigated under this part. Investigations convened for claims purposes are sufficiently complex that they should be performed with the assistance and under the supervision of a judge advocate or other attorney. Where the command has an attorney assigned, he shall be involved in every aspect of the proceedings. When an attorney is not assigned to the investigating command, consultation shall be sought from the appropriate Naval Legal Service Command activity.


(c) Recovery barred. Even when recovery must be barred by statute or case law, all deaths, serious injuries, and substantial losses to property that are likely to give rise to claims must be investigated while the evidence is available. Claims against persons in the naval service arising from the performance of their official duties shall be investigated as though they were claims against the United States. When an incident involves an actual or potential claim against the United States for property damage only and the total amount likely to be paid does not exceed $5,000.00, an abbreviated investigative report may be submitted. Where this monetary figure may be exceeded, but the circumstances indicate an abbreviated report may be adequate to preserve the facts and protect the Government’s claims interests, approval to submit a limited investigative report may be sought from the Office of the Judge Advocate General (Claims and Tort Litigation Division) (Code 15), the Tort Claims Unit Norfolk, or the nearest Naval Legal Service Command activity.


(d) Developing the facts. Any investigation convened for claims purposes must focus on developing the facts of the incident, i.e., the who, what, where, when, why, and how of the matter. Opinions on the possible liability of the United States under any of the claims statutes listed above shall not be expressed. Early and continuous consultation with claims attorneys at Naval Legal Service Command activities is essential to ensure the timely development of all necessary facts, the identification and preservation of relevant evidence, and to void the need for supplemental inquiries.


(e) Attorney work product. (1) The convening order and the preliminary statement of an investigative report prepared to inquire into the facts of an incident giving or likely to give rise to a claim against the United States shall include the following:



This investigation has been convened and conducted, and this report prepared, in contemplation of claims adjudication and litigation and for the express purpose of assisting attorneys representing the interests of the United States.


(2) When an investigation is prepared by or at the direction of an attorney representing the Department of the Navy and is prepared in reasonable anticipation of litigation, it is exempt from mandatory disclosure under the Freedom of Information Act exemption (b)(5) and is normally privileged from discovery in litigation under the attorney work product privilege. 5 U.S.C. 552(b)(5). Unless an attorney prepares the report or personally directs its preparation, the investigation may not be privileged, even if it was prepared in reasonable anticipation of litigation.


(f) Advance copy. An advance copy of an investigation conducted because a claim has been, or is likely to be, submitted shall be forwarded to the Tort Claims Unit Norfolk.


[57 FR 4722, Feb. 7, 1992, as amended at 72 FR 53418, Sept. 19, 2007]


§ 750.3 Investigations: The report.

(a) Purpose. The purpose of investigations into claims incidents is to gather all relevant information about the incident so adjudicating officers can either pay or deny the claim. The essential task of the investigating officer is to answer the questions of who, what, where, when, why and how? The Navy’s best interests are served when the investigation is thorough and is performed in a timely manner so the claimant can be advised promptly of the action on the claim.


(b) Duties of the investigating officer. It is the investigating officer’s responsibility:


(1) To interview all witnesses to the incident and prepare summaries of their comments. Obtaining signed statements of Government witnesses is not necessary. Summaries of the witnesses’ remarks prepared by the investigating officer are quite sufficient and generally expedite the gathering of information. On the other hand, written signed statements should be obtained from the claimant, wherever possible;


(2) To inspect the property alleged to have been damaged by the action of Government personnel;


(3) To determine the nature, extent, and amount of any damage, and to obtain pertinent repair bills or estimates and medical, hospital, and associated bills necessary to permit an evaluation of the claimant’s loss;


(4) To obtain maintenance records of the Navy motor vehicle, plane, or other piece of equipment involved in the claim;


(5) To reduce to writing and incorporate into an appropriate investigative report all pertinent statements, summaries, exhibits, and other evidence considered by the investigator in arriving at his conclusions; and,


(6) To furnish claim forms to any person expressing an interest in filing a claim and to refer such personnel to the Office of the Judge Advocate General, Tort Claims Unit Norfolk, 9620 Maryland Avenue, Suite 100, Norfolk, Virginia 23511-2989.


(c) Content of the report. The written report of investigation shall contain information answering the questions mentioned in § 750.3(a) and, depending on the nature of the incident, will include the following:


(1) Date, time, and exact place the accident or incident occurred, specifying the highway, street, or road;


(2) A concise but complete statement of the incident with reference to physical facts observed and any statements by the personnel involved;


(3) Names, grades, organizations, and addresses of military personnel and civilian witnesses;


(4) Opinions as to whether military or civilian employees involved in the incident were acting within the scope of their duties at the time;


(5) Description of the Government property involved in the incident and the nature of any damage it sustained; and,


(6) Descriptions of all private property involved.


(d) Immediate report of certain events. The Navy or Marine Corps activity most directly involved in the incident shall notify the Judge Advocate General immediately by message, electronic mail, or telephone in any of the following circumstances:


(1) Claims or possible claims arising out of a major disaster or out of an incident giving rise to five or more possible death or serious injury claims.


(2) Upon filing of a claim that could result in litigation that would involve a new precedent or point of law.


(3) Claims or possible claims that involve or are likely to involve an agency other than the Department of the Navy.


(e) Request for assistance. When an incident occurs at a place where the naval service does not have an installation or a unit conveniently located for conducting an investigation, the commanding officer or officer in charge with responsibility for performing the investigation may request assistance from the commanding officer or officer in charge of any other organization of the Department of Defense. Likewise, if a commanding officer or officer in charge of any other organization of the Department of Defense requests such assistance from a naval commanding officer or officer in charge, the latter should normally comply. If a complete investigation is requested it will be performed in compliance with the regulations of the requested service. These investigations are normally conducted without reimbursement for per diem, mileage, or other expenses incurred by the investigating unit or installation.


(f) Report of Motor Vehicle Accident, Standard Form 91. RCS OPNAV 5100-6. The operator of any Government motor vehicle involved in an accident of any sort shall be responsible for making an immediate report on the Operator’s Report of Motor Vehicle Accident, Standard Form 91. This operator’s report shall be made even though the operator of the other vehicle, or any other person involved, states that no claim will be filed, or the only vehicles involved are Government owned. An accident shall be reported by the operator regardless of who was injured, what property was damaged, or who was responsible. The operator’s report shall be referred to the investigating officer, who shall be responsible for examining it for completeness and accuracy and who shall file it for future reference or for attachment to any subsequent investigative report of the accident.


(g) Priority of the investigation. To ensure prompt investigation of every incident while witnesses are available and before damage has been repaired, the duties of an investigating officer shall ordinarily have priority over any other assignments he may have.


(h) Contents of the report of investigation. The report should include the following items in addition to the requirements in § 750.3(c):


(1) If pertinent to the investigation, the investigating officer should obtain a statement from claimant’s employer showing claimant’s occupation, wage or salary, and time lost from work as a result of the incident. In case of personal injury, the investigating officer should ask claimant to submit a written statement from the attending physician setting forth the nature and extent of injury and treatment, the duration and extent of any disability, the prognosis, and the period of hospitalization or incapacity.


(2) A Privacy Act statement for each person who was asked to furnish personal information shall be provided. Social Security numbers of military personnel and civilian employees of the U.S. Government should be included in the report but should be obtained from available records, not from the individual.


(3) Names, addresses, and ages of all civilians or military personnel injured or killed; names of insurance companies; information on the nature and extent of injuries, degree of permanent disability, prognosis, period of hospitalization, name and address of attending physician and hospital, and amount of medical, hospital, and burial expenses actually incurred; occupation and wage or salary of civilians injured or killed; and names, addresses, ages, relationship, and extent of dependency of survivors of any such person fatally injured should be included.


(4) If straying animals are involved, a statement as to whether the jurisdiction has an “open range law” and, if so, reference to such statute.


(5) A statement as to whether any person involved violated any State or Federal statute, local ordinance, or installation regulation and, if so, in what respect. The statute, ordinance, or regulation should be set out in full.


(6) A statement on whether a police investigation was made. A copy of the police report of investigation should be included if available.


(7) A statement on whether arrests were made or charges preferred, and the result of any trial or hearing in civil or military courts.


(i) Expert opinions. In appropriate cases the opinion of an expert may be required to evaluate the extent of damage to a potential claimant’s property. In such cases the investigating officer should consult Navy-employed experts, experts employed by other departments of the U.S. Government, or civilian experts to obtain a competent assessment of claimant’s damages or otherwise to protect the Government’s interest. Any cost involved with obtaining the opinion of an expert not employed by the Navy shall be borne by the command conducting the investigation. Any cost involved in obtaining the opinion of a Navy-employed expert shall be borne by the command to which the expert is attached. Medical experts shall be employed only after consultation with the Chief, Bureau of Medicine and Surgery.


(j) Action by command initiating the investigation and subsequent reviewing authorities. (1) The command initiating the investigation in accordance with § 750.3 or § 750.5 shall review the report of investigation. If additional investigation is required or omissions or other deficiencies are noted, the investigation should be promptly returned with an endorsement indicating that a supplemental investigative report will be submitted. If the original or supplemental report is in order, it shall be forwarded by endorsement, with any pertinent comments and recommendations. An advance copy of the investigation shall be forwarded to the Tort Claims Unit Norfolk.


(2) A reviewing authority may direct that additional investigation be conducted, if considered necessary. The initial investigation should not be returned for such additional investigation, but should be forwarded by an endorsement indicating that the supplemental material will be submitted. The report shall be endorsed and forwarded to the next-level authority with appropriate recommendations including an assessment of the responsibility for the incident and a recommendation as to the disposition of any claim that may subsequently be filed. If a reviewing authority may be an adjudicating authority for a claim subsequently filed, one copy of the report shall be retained by such authority for at least 2 years after the incident.


(3) It is essential that each investigative report reflect that a good faith effort was made to comply with the Privacy Act of 1974 (5 U.S.C. 552a) as implemented by 32 CFR 701, subpart F. Any indication of noncompliance shall be explained either in the preliminary statement of the forwarding endorsements and, when required, corrected.


[57 FR 4722, Feb. 7, 1992, as amended at 72 FR 53418, Sept. 19, 2007]


§ 750.4 Claims: In general.

(a) Claims against the United States. Claims against the United States shall receive prompt and professional disposition. Every effort will be made to ensure an investigation is thoroughly and accurately completed, the claimant’s allegations evaluated promptly, and where liability is established, a check issued as quickly as possible to prevent further harm to a meritorious claimant. Similarly, claims not payble will be processed promptly and the claimant advised of the reasons for the denial.


(b) Claims in favor of the United States. Potential claims in favor of the United States will be critically evaluated and, where appropriate, promptly asserted and aggressively pursued.


(c) Assistance to claimants. Claimants or potential claimants who inquire about their rights or the procedures to be followed in the resolution of their claims should be referred to the Tort Claims Unit Norfolk. The Tort Claims Unit Norfolk will provide claims forms, advise where the forms should be filed, and inform the requester of the type of substantiating information required. Claims officers may provide advice on the claims process but shall not provide advice or opinions about the merits or the wisdom of filing a particular claim. While claims officers have a responsibility to provide general information about claims, they must consider 18 U.S.C. 205, which makes it a crime for an officer or employee of the United States to act as an agent or an attorney in the prosecution of any claim against the United States.


[57 FR 4722, Feb. 7, 1992, as amended at 72 FR 53418, Sept. 19, 2007]


§ 750.5 Claims: Proper claimants.

(a) Damage to property cases. A claim for damage to, or destruction or loss of, property shall be presented by the owner of the property or a duly authorized agent or legal representative. “Owner” includes a bailee, lessee, or mortgagor, but does not include a mortgagee, conditional vendor, or other person having title for security purposes only.


(b) Personal injury and death cases. A claim for personal injury shall be presented by the person injured or a duly authorized agent or legal representative, or, in the case of death, by the properly appointed legal representative of the deceased’s estate or survivor where authorized by State law.


(c) Subrogation. A subrogor and a subrogee may file claims jointly or separately. When separate claims are filed and each claim individually is within the Tort Claims Unit Norfolk’s adjudicating authority limits, they may be processed by the Tort Claims Unit, even if the aggregate of such claims exceeds the Tort Claims Unit’s monetary authority. However, if the aggregate of the claims exceeds the sum for which approval of the Department of Justice (DoJ) is required, currently $200,000.00 under the Federal Tort Claims Act, then the Tort Claims Unit Norfolk must obtain DoJ approval via the Office of the Judge Advocate General, Claims and Tort Litigation Division, before the claims may be settled.


(d) Limitation on transfers and assignment. All transfers and assignments made of any claim upon the United States, and all powers of attorney, orders, or other authorities for receiving payment of any such claim, are absolutely null and void unless they are made after the allowance of such a claim, the ascertainment of the amount due, and the issuing of a warrant for the payment thereof. 31 U.S.C. 203. This statutory provision does not apply to the assignment of a claim by operation of law, as in the case of a receiver or trustee in bankruptcy appointed for an individual, firm, or corporation, or the case of an administrator or executor of the estate of a person deceased, or an insurer subrogated to the rights of the insured.


[57 FR 4722, Feb. 7, 1992, as amended at 72 FR 53418, Sept. 19, 2007]


§ 750.6 Claims: Presentment.

(a) Written demand and Standard Form 95. A claim shall be submitted by presenting a written statement with the amount of the claim expressed in a sum certain, and, as far as possible, describing the detailed facts and circumstances surrounding the incident from which the claim arose. The Claim for Damage or Injury, Standard Form 95, shall be used whenever practical for claims under the Federal Tort and Military Claims Acts. Claims under the Personnel Claims Act shall be submitted on DD Form 1842.
2
The claim and all other papers requiring the signature of the claimant shall be signed by the claimant personally or by a duly authorized agent. If signed by an agent or legal representative, the claim shall indicate the title or capacity of the person signing and be accompanied by evidence of appointment. When more than one person has a claim arising from the same incident, each person shall file a claim separately.




2 The Claim for Damage or Injury, Standard Form 95 and the DD Form 1842 are available at the Web site of the United States Navy Judge Advocate General’s Corps at http://www.jag.navy.mil.


(b) To whom submitted. Claims under the Federal Tort and Military Claims Acts should be submitted to the Tort Claims Unit Norfolk at the address provided in Sec. 750.3 above, or the Office of the Judge Advocate General, Claims and Tort Litigation Division, 1322 Patterson Avenue, SE., Suite 3000, Washington Navy Yard, Washington, DC 20374-5066. Claims may also be submitted to the commanding officer of the Navy or Marine Corps activity involved if known, the commanding officer of any Navy or Marine activity, preferably the one nearest to where the accident occurred, or the local Naval Legal Service Command activity. The claim should be immediately forwarded to the Tort Claims Unit Norfolk.


[72 FR 53418, Sept. 19, 2007]


§ 750.7 Claims: Action by receiving command.

(a) Record date of receipt. The first command receiving a claim shall stamp or mark the date of receipt on the letter or claim form. The envelope in which the claim was received shall be preserved.


(b) Determine the military activity involved. The receiving command shall determine the Navy or Marine Corps activity most directly involved with the claim – usually the command where the incident is alleged to have occurred – and forward a copy of the claim to that activity. The original claim (and the transmittal letter, if a copy is forwarded to a more appropriate activity) should immediately be sent to the Tort Claims Unit Norfolk.


(c) Initiate an investigation. A JAGMAN Litigation Report Investigation shall be commenced immediately by the command most directly involved with the claim. Once the investigation has been completed, an advance copy shall be forwarded by the convening authority to the Tort Claims Unit Norfolk. Waiting until endorsements have been obtained before providing a copy of the investigation to the Tort Claims Unit Norfolk is neither required nor desirable. The facts of the incident must be made known to cognizant claims personnel as soon as possible.


[57 FR 4722, Feb. 7, 1992, as amended at 72 FR 53419, Sept. 19, 2007]


§ 750.8 Claims: Responsibility of the Tort Claims Unit Norfolk.

(a) Reviewing prior actions. The adjudicating authority (Tort Claims Unit Norfolk) determines whether an adequate investigation has been conducted, whether the initial receipt date is recorded on the face of the claim, and whether all holders of the investigation, if completed, are advised of the receipt of the claim.


(b) Determining the sufficiency of the claim. The claim should be reviewed and a determination of its sufficiency made. If the claim is not sufficient as received, it shall be immediately returned to the party who submitted it along with an explanation of the insufficiency. This does not constitute denial of the claim. The claim shall not be considered “presented” until it is received in proper form.


(c) Adjudicating the claim. (1) The Tort Claims Unit Norfolk shall evaluate and either approve or disapprove all claims within its authority, except where the payment of multiple Federal Torts Claims Act claims arising from the same incident will exceed $200,000.00 in the aggregate and thereby require approval of DoJ. In this latter instance, the Torts Claims Unit Norfolk shall contact the Office of the Judge Advocate General, Claims and Tort Litigation Division (OJAG Code 15).


(2) The Tort Claims Unit Norfolk shall evaluate and, where liability is established, attempt to settle claims for amounts within its adjudicating authority. Negotiation at settlement figures above the Tort Claims Unit Norfolk’s payment limits may be attempted if the claimant is informed that the final decision on the claim will be made at a higher level.


(3) If a substantiated claim cannot be approved, settled, or compromised within the settlement authority limits of the Tort Claims Unit Norfolk, the Tort Claims Unit Norfolk shall contact OJAG Code 15 to seek additional settlement authority. To obtain the additional settlement authority, the following materials shall be forwarded to OJAG Code 15:


(i) A letter of transmittal containing a recommendation on resolution of the claim.


(ii) A memorandum of law containing a review of applicable law, an evaluation of liability, and a recommendation on the settlement value of the case. This memorandum should concentrate on the unusual aspects of applicable law, chronicle the attempts to resolve the case, provide information about the availability of witnesses, and outline any other information material to a resolution of the claim, i.e., prior dealings with the claimant’s attorney, local procedural rules, or peculiarities that may make trial difficult. The memorandum should be tailored to the complexity of the issues presented and provide any expert opinions that have been obtained in the case by the Navy or the claimant.


(d) Preparing litigation reports. The Tort Claims Unit Norfolk will prepare a litigation report when a lawsuit is filed and the complaint is received. The report is sent directly to the DoJ official or the U.S. Attorney having cognizance of the matter. The report is a narrative summary of the facts upon which the suit is based and has as enclosures the claims file and a memorandum of law on the issues presented. A copy of the report and all enclosures should be sent to the Judge Advocate General (OJAG Code 15).


[72 FR 53419, Sept. 19, 2007]


§ 750.9 Claims: Payments.

Claims approved for payment shall be expeditiously forwarded to the disbursing office or the General Accounting Office depending on the claims act involved and the amount of the requested payment. Generally, payment of a Federal tort claim above $2,500.00 requires submission of the payment voucher to the General Accounting Office. All other field authorized payment vouchers are submitted directly to the servicing disbursing office for payment.


§ 750.10 Claims: Settlement and release.

(a) Fully and partially approved claims. When a claim is approved for payment in the amount claimed, settlement agreement may not be necessary. When a federal tort, military, or non-scope claim is approved for payment in a lesser amount than that claimed, the claimant must indicate in writing a willingness to accept the offered amount in full settlement and final satisfaction of the claim. In the latter instance, no payment will be made until a signed settlement agreement has been received.


(b) Release. (1) Acceptance by the claimant of an award or settlement made by the Secretary of the Navy or designees, or the Attorney General or designees, is final upon acceptance by the claimant. Acceptance is a complete release by claimant of any claim against the United States by reason of the same subject manner. Claimant’s acceptance of an advance payment does not have the same effect.


(2) The claimant’s acceptance of an award or settlement made under the provisions governing the administrative settlement of Federal tort claims or the civil action provisions of 28 U.S.C. 1346(b) also constitutes a complete release of any claim against any employee of the Government whose act or omission gave rise to the claim.


[57 FR 4722, Feb. 7, 1992, as amended at 72 FR 53419, Sept. 19, 2007]


§ 750.11 Claims: Denial.

A final denial of any claim within this chapter shall be in writing and sent to the claimant, his attorney, or legal representative by certified or registered mail with return receipt requested. The denial notification shall include a statement of the reason or reasons for the denial. The notification shall include a statement that the claimant may:


(a) If the claim is cognizable under the Federal Tort Claims Act, file suit in the appropriate United States District Court within 6 months of the date of the denial notification.


(b) If the claim is cognizable under the Military Claims Act, appeal in writing to the Office of the Judge Advocate General, Claims and Tort Litigation Division within 30 days of the receipt of the denial notification. The notice of denial shall inform the claimant or his representative that is suit is not possible under the act.


[57 FR 4722, Feb. 7, 1992, as amended at 72 FR 53419, Sept. 19, 2007]


§ 750.12 Claims: Action when suit filed.

(a) Action required of any Navy official receiving notice of suit. The commencement, under the civil action provisions of the Federal Tort Claims Act (28 U.S.C. 1346(b)), of any action against the United States and involving the Navy, that comes to the attention of any official in connection with his official duties, shall be reported immediately to the Tort Claims Unit Norfolk to take any necessary action and provide prompt notification to the Judge Advocate General. The commencement of a civil action against an employee of the Navy for actions arising from the performance of official duties shall be reported in the same manner.


(b) Steps upon commencement of civil action. Upon receipt by the Judge Advocate General or Tort Claims Unit Norfolk of notice from the DoJ or other source that a civil action involving the Navy has been initiated under the civil action provisions of the Federal Tort Claims Act, and there being no investigative report available at the headquarters, a request shall be made to the commanding officer of the appropriate Naval Legal Service Command activity for an investigative report into the incident. If there is not a completed investigation, the request shall be forwarded to the appropriate naval activity to convene and complete such a report. The commanding officer of the Naval Legal Service Command activity shall contact the Tort Claims Unit Norfolk to determine whether an administrative claim had been filed and, if available information indicates none had, the Tort Claims Unit Norfolk shall advise the Office of the Judge Advocate General (Claims and Tort Litigation Division) immediately.


[57 FR 4722, Feb. 7, 1992, as amended at 72 FR 53419, Sept. 19, 2007]


§ 750.13 Claims: Single service responsibility.

(a) The Department of Defense has assigned single-service responsibility for processing claims in foreign countries under the following acts. The service and country assignments are in DODDIR 5515.8 of 9 June 1990.


(1) Foreign Claims Act (10 U.S.C. 2734);


(2) Military Claims Act (10 U.S.C. 2733);


(3) International Agreements Claims Act (10 U.S.C. 2734a and b), on the pro-rata cost sharing of claims pursuant to international agreement;


(4) NATO Status of Forces Agreement (4 UST 1792, TIAS 2846) and other similar agreements;


(5) Medical Care Recovery Act (42 U.S.C. 2651-2653) claims for reimbursement for medical care furnished by the United States;


(6) Nonscope Claims Act (10 U.S.C. 2737), claims not cognizable under any other provision of law;


(7) Federal Claims Collection Act (31 U.S.C. Sections 3701, 3702, and 3711), claims and demands by the United States Government; and


(8) Public Law 87-212 (10 U.S.C. 2736), advance or emergency payments.


(b) Single service assignments for processing claims mentioned above are as follows:


(1) Department of the Army: Austria, Belgium, El Salvador, the Federal Republic of Germany, Grenada, Honduras, Hungary, Korea, Iraq, Kuwait, Latvia, Lithuania, the Marshall Islands, the Netherlands, Poland, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia and Switzerland, and as the Receiving State Office in the United States under 10 U.S.C. Sections 2734a – 2734b and the NATO Status of Forces Agreement, and other Status of Forces Agreements with countries not covered by the NATO agreement. Claims arising from Operation Joint Endeavor, including the former Yugoslavia, Hungary, Slovakia and the Czech Republic, as well as the Rwanda Refugee Crisis Area are also assigned to the Army.


(2) Department of the Navy: Bahrain, Greece, Iceland, Israel, Italy, Spain and the United Arab Emirates.


(3) Department of the Air Force: Australia, Azores, Canada, Cyprus, Denmark, India, Japan, Luxembourg, Morocco, Nepal, Norway, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, Tunisia, Turkey, the United Kingdom, Egypt, Oman, and claims involving, or generated by, the United States Central Command (CENTCOM) and the United States Special Operations Command (SOCOM), that arise in countries not specifically assigned to the Departments of the Army and the Navy.


(c) U.S. forces afloat cases under $2,500.00. Notwithstanding the single service assignments above, the Navy may settle claims under $2,500.00 caused by personnel not acting within the scope of employment and arising in foreign ports visited by U.S. forces afloat and may, subject to the concurrence of the authorities of the receiving state concerned, process such claims.


[57 FR 4722, Feb. 7, 1992, as amended at 72 FR 53420, Sept. 19, 2007]


§§ 750.14-750.20 [Reserved]

Subpart B – Federal Tort Claims Act

§ 750.21 Scope of subpart B.

This subpart provides information regarding the administrative processing and consideration of claims against the United States under the FTCA. The FTCA is a limited waiver of sovereign immunity. Under the FTCA, an individual can seek money damages for personal injury, death, or property damage caused by the negligent or wrongful act or omission of a Federal employee acting within the scope of employment. The FTCA also provides for compensation for injuries caused by certain intentional, wrongful conduct. The liability of the United States is determined in accordance with the law of the State where the act or omission occured.


§ 750.22 Exclusiveness of remedy.

(a) The Federal Employees Liability Reform and Tort Compensation Act of 1988, Public Law 100-694 (amending 28 U.S.C. 2679(b) and 2679(d)), provides that the exclusive remedy for damage or loss of property, or personal injury or death arising from the negligent or wrongful acts or omissions of all Federal employees, acting within the scope of their employment, will be against the United States. This immunity from personal liability does not extend to allegations of constitutional torts, nor to allegations of violations of statutes specifically authorizing suits against individuals.


(b) Other statutory provisions create immunity from personal liability for specific categories of Federal employees whose conduct, within the scope of their employment, gives rise to claims against the Government. Department of Defense health care providers are specifically protected by 10 U.S.C. 1089, the Gonzalez Act. DOD attorneys are specifically protected by 10 U.S.C. 1054.


§ 750.23 Definitions.

(a) Negligent conduct. Generally, negligence is the failure to exercise that degree of care, skill, or diligence a reasonable person would exercise under similar circumstances. Negligent conduct can result from either an act or a failure to act. The law of the place where the conduct occurred will determine whether a cause of action lies against the Government. 28 U.S.C. 1346(b) and 2674.


(b) Intentional torts. Although any employee who commits an intentional tort is normally considered to be acting outside the scope of employment, the FTCA does allow claimants to seek compensation for injuries arising out of the intentional torts of assault, battery, false imprisonment, false arrest, abuse of process, and malicious prosecution, if committed by a Federal investigative or law enforcement officer. An “investigative or law enforcement officer” is any officer of the United States empowered by law to execute searches, to seize evidence, or to make arrests for violations of Federal law. 28 U.S.C. 2680(h).


(c) Government employees – (1) General. “Employee of the Government,” defined at 28 U.S.C. 2671, includes officers or employees of any Federal agency, members of the U.S. military or naval forces, and persons acting on behalf of a Federal agency in an official capacity.


(2) Government contractors. Government (also referred to as independent) contractors, are those individuals or businesses who enter into contracts with the United States to provide goods or services. Because the definition of “Federal agency,” found at 28 U.S.C. 2671, specifically excludes “any contractor with the United States,” the United States is generally not liable for the negligence of Government contractors. There are, however, three limited exceptions to the general rule, under which a cause of action against the United States has been found to exist in some jurisdictions. They are:


(i) Where the thing or service contracted for is deemed to be an “inherently dangerous activity”;


(ii) where a nondelegable duty in the employer has been created by law; or,


(iii) where the employer retains control over certain aspects of the contract and fails to discharge that control in a reasonable manner.


(3) Employees of nonappropriated-fund activities. Nonappropriated-fund activities are entities established and operated for the benefit of military members and their dependents, and have been judicially determined to be “arms” of the Federal government. These entities operate from self-generated funds, rather than from funds appropriated by Congress. Examples include Navy and Marine Corps Exchanges, officer or enlisted clubs, and recreational services activities. A claim arising out of the act or omission of an employee of a nonappropriated-fund activity not located in a foreign country, acting within the scope of employment, is an act or omission committed by a Federal employee and will be handled in accordance with the FTCA.


(d) Scope of employment. “Scope of employment” is defined by the law of respondeat superior (master and servant) of the place where the act or omission occurred. Although 28 U.S.C. 2671 states that acting within the scope of employment means acting in the line of duty, the converse is not always true. For administrative purposes, a Government employee may be found “in the line of duty,” yet not meet the criteria for a finding of “within the scope of employment” under the law of the place where the act or omission occurred.


§ 750.24 Statutory/regulatory authority.

The statutory provisions of the Federal Tort Claims Act (FTCA) are at 28 U.S.C. 1346(b), 2671-2672, and 2674-2680. The Attorney General of the United States has issued regulations on administrative claims filed under the FTCA at 28 CFR part 14. If the provisions of this section and the Attorney General’s regulations conflict, the Attorney General’s regulations prevail.


§ 750.25 Scope of liability.

(a) Territorial limitations. The FTCA does not apply to any claim arising in a foreign country. 28 U.S.C. 2680(k) and Beattie v. United States, 756 F.2d 91 (D.C. Cir. 1984).


(b) Exclusions from liability. Statutes and case law have established categories of exclusions from FTCA liability.


(1) Statutory exclusions. Section 2680 of Title 28 lists claims not cognizable under the FTCA. They include:


(i) Claims based on the exercise or performance of, or the failure to exercise or perform, a discretionary Government function;


(ii) Admiralty claims under 46 U.S.C. 741-752 or 781-790. Claims under the Death on the High Seas Act (46 U.S.C. 761), however, are cognizable under the FTCA. All admiralty claims will be referred to the Judge Advocate General for adjudication. Admiralty claims against the Navy shall be processed under part 752 of this Chapter;


(iii) Claims arising from intentional torts, except those referred to in § 750.23(b);


(iv) Claims arising from the combat activities of the military or naval forces, or the Coast Guard, during time of war.


(2) Additional claims not payable. Although not expressly statutorily excepted, the following types of claims shall not be paid under the FTCA:


(i) A claim for personal injury or death of a member of the armed forces of the United States incurred incident to military service or duty. Compare United States v. Johnson, 481 U.S. 681 (1987); Feres v. United States, 340 U.S. 135 (1950) with Brooks v. United States, 337 U.S. 49 (1949);


(ii) Any claim by military personnel or civilian employees of the Navy, paid from appropriated funds, for personal property damage occurring incident to service or Federal employment, cognizable under 31 U.S.C. 3721 and the applicable Personnel Claims Regulations, 32 CFR part 751;


(iii) Any claim by employees of nonappropriated-fund activities for personal property damage occurring incident to Federal employment. These claims will be processed as indicated in 32 CFR part 756;


(iv) Any claim for personal injury or death covered by the Federal Employees’ Compensation Act (5 U.S.C. 8116c);


(v) Any claim for personal injury or death covered by the Longshore and Harbor Workers’ Compensation Act (33 U.S.C. 905 and 5 U.S.C. 8171);


(vi) That portion of any claim for personal injury or property damage, caused by the negligence or fault of a Government contractor, to the extent such contractor may have assumed liability under the terms of the contract (see United States v. Seckinger, 397 U.S. 203 (1969) and § 750.23(c)(2);


(vii) Any claim against the Department of the Navy by another Federal agency. Property belonging to the Government is not owned by any one department of the Government. The Government does not reimburse itself for the loss of its own property except where specifically provided for by law; and


(viii) Any claim for damage to a vehicle rented pursuant to travel orders.


§ 750.26 The administrative claim.

(a) Proper claimant. See § 750.5 of this part.


(b) Claim presented by agent or legal representative. A claim filed by an agent or legal representative will be filed in the name of the claimant; be signed by the agent or legal representative; show the title or legal capacity of the person signing; and be accompanied by evidence of the individual’s authority to file a claim on behalf of the claimant.


(c) Proper claim. A claim is a notice in writing to the appropriate Federal agency of an incident giving rise to Government liability under the FTCA. It must include a demand for money damages in a definite sum for property damage, personal injury, or death alleged to have occurred by reason of the incident. The Attorney General’s regulations specify that the claim be filed on a Standard Form 95 or other written notification of the incident. If a letter or other written notification is used, it is essential that it set forth the same basic information required by Standard Form 95. Failure to do so may result in a determination that the administrative claim is incomplete. A suit may be dismissed on the ground of lack of subject matter jurisdiction based on claimant’s failure to present a proper claim as required by 28 U.S.C. 2675(a).


(d) Presentment. A claim is deemed presented when received by the Navy in proper form. A claim against another agency, mistakenly addressed to or filed with the Navy shall be transferred to the appropriate agency, if ascertainable, or returned to the claimant. A claimant presenting identical claims with more than one agency should identify every agency to which the claim is submitted on every claim form presented. Claims officers shall coordinate with all other affected agencies and ensure a lead agency is designated. 28 CFR 14.2.


§ 750.27 Information and supporting documentation.

(a) Proper documentation. Depending on the type of claim, claimants may be required to submit information, as follows:


(1) Death. (i) An authenticated death certificate or other competent evidence showing cause of death, date of death, and age of the decedent;


(ii) Decedent’s employment or occupation at time of death, including monthly or yearly earnings and the duration of last employment;


(iii) Full names, addresses, birth dates, relationship, and marital status of the decedent’s survivors, including identification of survivors dependent for support upon decedent at the time of death;


(iv) Degree of support provided by decedent to each survivor at time of death;


(v) Decedent’s general physical and mental condition before death;


(vi) Itemized bills for medical and burial expenses;


(vii) If damages for pain and suffering are claimed, a physician’s detailed statement specifying the injuries suffered, duration of pain and suffering, any drugs administered for pain, and the decedent’s physical condition during the interval between injury and death; and,


(viii) Any other evidence or information which may affect the liability of the United States.


(2) Personal injury. (i) A written report by attending physician or dentist on the nature and extent of the injury, nature and extent of treatment, any degree of temporary or permanent disability, the prognosis, period of hospitalization, any diminished earning capacity. In addition, the claimant may be required to submit to a physical or mental examination by a physician employed by any Federal agency. Upon written request, a copy of the report of the examining physician shall be provided;


(ii) Itemized bills for medical, dental, and hospital expenses incurred, or itemized receipts of payments of such expenses;


(iii) A statement of expected expenses for future treatment;


(iv) If a claim is made for lost wages, a written statement from the employer itemizing actual time and wages lost;


(v) If a claim is made for lost self-employed income, documentary evidence showing the amount of earnings actually lost; and


(vi) Any other evidence or information which may affect the liability of the United States for the personal injury or the damages claimed.


(3) Property damage. (i) Proof of ownership;


(ii) A detailed statement of the amount claimed for each item of property;


(iii) An itemized receipt of payment for necessary repairs or itemized written estimates of the cost of repairs;


(iv) A statement listing date of purchase, purchase price, and salvage value where repair is not economical; and


(v) Any other evidence or information which may affect the liability of the United States for the property damage claimed.


(b) Failure to submit necessary documentation. If claimant fails to provide sufficient supporting documentation, claimant should be notified of the deficiency. If after notice of the deficiency, including reference to 28 CFR 14.4, the information is still not supplied, two follow-up requests should be sent by certified mail, return receipt requested. If after a reasonable period of time the information is still not provided, the appropriate adjudicating authority should deny the claim.


[57 FR 4722, Feb. 7, 1992, as amended at 72 FR 53420, Sept. 19, 2007]


§ 750.28 Amendment of the claim.

A proper claim may be amended at any time prior to settlement, denial, or the filing of suit. An amendment must be submitted in writing and must be signed by the claimant or duly authorized agent or legal representative. No finally denied claim for which reconsideration has not been requested under § 750.31 may be amended.


§ 750.29 Investigation and examination.

Subpart A of this part requires an investigation for every incident that may result in a claim against or in favor of the United States. Where a previously unanticipated claim is filed against the Government and an investigation has not already been conducted, the appropriate claims officer shall immediately request an investigation. See subpart A of this part for specific action required by an adjudicating authority.


§ 750.30 Denial of the claim.

Final denial of an administrative claim shall be in writing and shall be sent to the claimant, his duly authorized agent or legal representative by certified or registered mail, with return receipt requested. The notification of final denial shall include the reasons for the denial. The notification shall include a statement informing the claimant of his right to file suit in the appropriate Federal district court not later than 6 months after the date of the mailing of the notification. 28 CFR 14.9(a).


§ 750.31 Reconsideration.

(a) Request. Prior to the commencement of suit and prior to the expiration of the 6-month period for filing suit, a claimant or his duly authorized agent or legal representative may present a request for reconsideration to the authority who denied the claim. The request shall be in writing and shall state the reasons for the requested reconsideration. A request for reconsideration is presented on the date it is received by the DON. 28 CFR 14.9(b).


(b) Proper basis. A request for reconsideration shall set forth claimant’s reasons for the request, and shall include any supplemental supporting evidence or information. Any writing communicating a desire for reconsideration that reasonably appears to have been presented solely for the purpose of extending the statutory period for filing suit, shall not be treated as a request for reconsideration. Claimant or claimant’s authorized representative shall be notified promptly that the writing is not considered a proper request for reconsideration.


(c) Effect of presentment of request. The presentment of a proper request for reconsideration starts a new 6-month period for the DON to act on the request to reconsider. The claimant may not file suit until the expiration of the new 6-month period, or until after the date of mailing of the final denial of the request. Final denial of a request for reconsideration shall be accomplished in the manner prescribed in § 750.30. 28 CFR 14.9(b).


§ 750.32 Suits under the Federal Tort Claims Act (FTCA).

(a) Venue. Venue is proper only in the judicial district where the plaintiff resides or where the act or omission complained of occurred. 28 U.S.C. 1402.


(b) Jury trial. There is no right to trial by jury in suits brought under the FTCA. 28 U.S.C. 2402.


(c) Settlement. The Attorney General of the United States, or designee, may arbitrate, compromise, or settle any action filed under the FTCA. 28 U.S.C. 2677.


(d) Litigation support – (1) Who provides. The adjudicating authority holding a claim at the time suit is filed shall be responsible for providing necessary assistance to the Department of Justice official or U.S. Attorney responsible for defending the Government’s interests.


(2) Litigation report. A litigation report, including a legal memorandum emphasizing anticipated issues during litigation, shall be furnished to the appropriate Department of Justice official or U.S. Attorney.


(3) Pretrial discovery. Complete and timely responses to discovery requests are vital to the effective defense of tort litigation. Subject to existing personnel and resources available, appropriate assistance shall be provided. The Judge Advocate General should be notified promptly when special problems are encountered in providing the requested assistance.


(4) Preservation of evidence. Tort litigation is often accomplished over an extended period of time. Every effort shall be made to preserve files, documents, and other tangible evidence that may bear on litigation. Destruction of such evidence, even in accordance with routine operating procedures, undermines defense of a case.


§ 750.33 Damages.

(a) Generally. The measure of damages is determined by the law of the place where the act or omission occurred. When there is a conflict between local and applicable Federal law, the latter governs. 28 U.S.C. 1346(b).


(b) Limitations on liability. The United States is not liable for interest prior to judgment or for punitive damages. In a death case, if the place where the act or omission complained of occurred provides for only punitive damages, the United States will be liable in lieu thereof, for actual or compensatory damages. 28 U.S.C. 2674.


(c) Setoff. The United States is not obligated to pay twice for the same injury. Claimants under the FTCA may have received Government benefits or services as the result of the alleged tort. The cost of these services or benefits shall be considered in arriving at any award of damages. For example, the cost of medical or hospital services furnished at Government expense, including TRICARE payments, shall be considered. Additionally, benefits or services received under the Veterans Act (38 U.S.C. 101-800) must be considered. Brooks v. United States, 337 U.S. 49 (1949).


(d) Suit. Any damage award in a suit brought under the FTCA is limited to the amount claimed administratively unless based on newly discovered evidence. 28 U.S.C. 2675(b). Plaintiff must prove the increased demand is based on facts not reasonably discoverable at the time of the presentment of the claim or on intervening facts relating to the amount of the claim.


[57 FR 4722, Feb. 7, 1992, as amended at 72 FR 53420, Sept. 19, 2007]


§ 750.34 Settlement and payment.

(a) Settlement agreement – (1) When required. A settlement agreement, signed by the claimant, must be received prior to payment in every case in which the claim is either:


(i) Settled for less than the full amount claimed, or


(ii) The claim was not presented on a Standard Form 95.


(2) Contents. Every settlement agreement must contain language indicating payment is in full and final settlement of the applicable claim. Each settlement agreement shall contain language indicating acceptance of the settlement amount by the claimant, or his agent or legal representative, shall be final and conclusive on the claimant, or his agent or legal representative, and any other person on whose behalf or for whose benefit the claim has been presented, and shall constitute a complete release of any claim against the United States and against any employee of the Government whose conduct gave rise to the claim, by reason of the same subject matter. 28 CFR 14.10(b). In cases where partial payment will benefit both claimant and the Government, such as payment for property damage to an automobile, the settlement agreement shall be tailored to reflect the terms of the partial settlement. All settlement agreements shall contain a recitation of the applicable statutory limitation of attorneys fees. 28 U.S.C. 2678.


(b) DON role in settlement negotiations involving the U.S. Attorney or DOJ. Agency concurrence is generally sought by the Department of Justice or U.S. Attorney’s office prior to settlement of suits involving the DON. Requests for concurrence in settlement proposals shall be referred to the appropriate DON adjudicating authority with primary responsibility for monitoring the claim. Adjudicating authorities shall consult with the Judge Advocate General concerning proposed settlements beyond their adjudicating authority.


(c) Payment of the claim – (1) Statutory authority. Pursuant to 28 U.S.C. 2672 and in accordance with 28 CFR 14.6(a), the Secretary of the Navy or designee, acting on behalf of the United States may compromise or settle any claim filed against the Navy under the FTCA, provided any award, compromise, or settlement by the Navy in excess of $200,000.00 may be effected only with the prior written approval of the Attorney General or designee. Title 28 CFR 14.6 requires consultation with the Department of Justice prior to compromise or settlement of a claim in any amount when:


(i) A new precedent or a new point of law is involved;


(ii) A question of policy is or may be involved;


(iii) The United States is or may be entitled to indemnity or contribution from a third party and the agency is unable to adjust the third party claim;


(iv) The compromise of a particular claim, as a practical matter, will or may control the disposition of a related claim in which the amount to be paid may exceed $100,000.00; or


(v) The DON is informed or is otherwise aware that the United States or an employee, agent, or cost-plus contractor of the United States is involved in litigation based on a claim arising out of the same incident or transaction.


(2) Specific delegation and designation – (i) Payment authority.


Delegated and Designated Authority Federal Tort Claims Act

Judge Advocate General – $200,000.00

Deputy Judge Advocate General – $200,000.00

Assistant Judge Advocate General (General Law) – $200,000.00

Deputy Assistant Judge Advocate General (Claims and Tort Litigation) and Deputy Division Director – $200,000.00

Head, Tort Claims Branch (Claims and Tort Litigation) – $200,000.00

Any payment of over $200,000.00 must be approved by DoJ. The Judge Advocate General, the Deputy Judge Advocate General, the Assistant Judge Advocate General (General Law), Deputy Assistant Judge Advocate General (Claims and Tort Litigation), and the Head, Tort Claims Branch (Claims and Tort Litigation) may deny Federal Tort Claims in any amount.

(ii) Adjudicating authority. The Department of the Navy’s tort claims adjudication function is consolidated as the Tort Claims Unit Norfolk (TCU) located at Naval Station, Norfolk, VA. The address is as follows: Department of the Navy, Office of the Judge Advocate General, Tort Claims Unit Norfolk, 9620 Maryland Avenue Suite 100, Norfolk, VA 23511-2989.


(3) Funding. Claims approved for $2,500.00 or less are paid from DON appropriations. Claims approved in excess of $2,500.00 are paid from the judgment fund and must be forwarded to the United States General Accounting Office (GAO) for payment. 28 CFR 14.10(a). Claims arising out of the operation of nonappropriated-fund activities and approved for payment shall be forwarded to the appropriate nonappropriated-fund activity for payment.


[57 FR 4722, Feb. 7, 1992, as amended at 72 FR 53420, Sept. 19, 2007]


§ 750.35 Attorney’s fees.

Attorney’s fees are limited to 20 percent of any compromise or settlement of an administrative claim, and are limited to 25 percent of any judgment rendered in favor of a plaintiff, or of any settlement accomplished after suit is filed. These amounts are to be paid out of the amount awarded and not in addition to the award. 28 U.S.C. 2678.


§ 750.36 Time limitations.

(a) Administrative claim. Every claim filed against the United States under the FTCA must be presented in writing within 2 years after the claim accrues. 28 U.S.C. 2401(b). Federal law determines the date of accrual. A claim accrues when the claimant discovers or reasonably should have discovered the existence of the act giving rise to the claim. In computing the statutory time period, the day of the incident is excluded and the day the claim was presented included.


(b) Amendments. Upon timely filing of an amendment to a pending claim, the DON shall have 6 months to make a final disposition of the claim as amended, and the claimant’s option to file suit under 28 U.S.C. 2675(a) shall not accrue until 6 months after the presentment of an amendment. 28 CFR 14.2(c).


(c) Suits. A civil action is barred unless suit is filed against the United States not later than 6 months after the date of mailing of notice of final denial of the claim. 28 U.S.C. 2401(b). The failure of the DON to make final disposition of a claim within 6 months after it is presented shall, at the option of the claimant any time thereafter, be deemed a final denial of the claim. 28 U.S.C. 2675(a).


§§ 750.37-750.40 [Reserved]

Subpart C – Military Claims Act

§ 750.41 Scope of subpart C.

This section prescribes the substantive bases and special procedural requirements for the settlement of claims against the United States for death, personal injury, or damage, loss, or destruction of property:


(a) Caused by military personnel or civilian employees of the Department of the Navy (DON) (hereinafter DON personnel). For the purposes of this section, DON personnel include all military personnel of the Navy and Marine Corps, volunteer workers, and others serving as employees of the DON with or without compensation, and members of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration or of the Public Health Service when serving with the DON. DON personnel does not include DON contractors or their employees.


(b) Incident to noncombat activities of the DON. Claims for personal injury or death of a member of the Armed Forces or Coast Guard, or civilian officer or employee of the U.S. Government whose injury or death is incident to service, however, are not payable.


(c) Territorial limitation. There is no geographical limitation on the application of the MCA, but if a claim arising in a foreign country is cognizable under the Foreign Claims Act (10 U.S.C. 2734), the claim shall be processed under that statute. See 10 U.S.C. 2733(b)(2).


(d) Suit. The MCA authorizes the administrative settlement and payment of certain claims. The United States has not consented to be sued.


§ 750.42 Statutory authority.

10 U.S.C. 2733, as amended, commonly referred to as the Military Claims Act (MCA).


§ 750.43 Claims payable.

(a) General. Unless otherwise prescribed, a claim for personal injury, death, or damage or loss of real or personal property is payable under this provision when:


(1) Caused by an act or omission determined to be negligent, wrongful, or otherwise involving fault of DON personnel acting within the scope of their employment; or


(2) Incident to noncombat activities of the DON. A claim may be settled under this provision if it arises from authorized activities essentially military in nature, having little parallel in civilian pursuits, and in which the U.S. Government has historically assumed a broad liability, even if not shown to have been caused by any particular act or omission by DON personnel while acting within the scope of their employment. Examples include practice firing of missiles and weapons, sonic booms, training and field exercises, and maneuvers that include operation of aircraft and vehicles, use and occupancy of real estate, and movement of combat or other vehicles designed especially for military use. Activities incident to combat, whether or not in time of war, and use of DON personnel during civil disturbances are excluded.


(b) Specific claims payable. Claims payable by the DON under § 750.43(a) (1) and (2) shall include, but not be limited to:


(1) Registered or insured mail. Claims for damage to, loss, or destruction, even if by criminal acts, of registered or insured mail while in the possession of DON authorities are payable under the MCA. This provision is an exception to the general requirement that compensable damage, loss, or destruction of personal property be caused by DON personnel while acting within the scope of their employment or otherwise incident to noncombat activities of the DON. The maximum award to a claimant under this section is limited to that to which the claimant would be entitled from the Postal Service under the registry or insurance fee paid. The award shall not exceed the cost of the item to the claimant regardless of the fees paid. Claimant may be reimbursed for the postage and registry or insurance fees.


(2) Property bailed to the DON. Claims for damage to or loss of personal property bailed to the DON, under an express or implied agreement are payable under the MCA, even though legally enforceable against the U.S. Government as contract claims, unless by express agreement the bailor has assumed the risk of damage, loss, or destruction. Claims filed under this paragraph may, if in the best interest of the U.S. Government, be referred to and processed by the Office of the General Counsel, DON, as contract claims.


(3) Real property. Claims for damage to real property incident to the use and occupancy by the DON, whether under an express or implied lease or otherwise, are payable under the MCA even though legally enforceable against the DON as contract claims. Claims filed under this paragraph may, if in the best interest of the U.S. Government, be referred to and processed by the Office of the General Counsel, DON, as contract claims.


(4) Property of U.S. military personnel. Claims of U.S. military personnel for property lost, damaged, or destroyed under conditions in § 750.43(a) (1) and (2) occurring on a military installation, not payable under the Military Personnel and Civilian Employees’ Claims Act, are payable under the MCA.


(5) Health care and Legal Assistance Providers. Claims arising from the personal liability of DON health care and legal assistance personnel for costs, settlements, or judgments for negligent acts or omissions while acting within the scope of assigned duties or employment are payable under the MCA. See § 750.54.


§ 750.44 Claims not payable.

(a) Any claim for damage, loss, destruction, injury, or death which was proximately caused, in whole or in part, by any negligence or wrongful act on the part of the claimant, or his agent or employee, unless the law of the place where the act or omission complained of occurred would permit recovery from a private individual under like circumstances, and then only to the extent permitted by the law.


(b) Any claim resulting from action by the enemy or resulting directly or indirectly from any act by armed forces engaged in combat.


(c) Any claim for reimbursement of medical, hospital, or burial expenses to the extent already paid by the U.S. Government.


(d) Any claim cognizable under:


(1) Military Personnel and Civilian Employees’ Claims Act, as amended. 31 U.S.C. 3721.


(2) Foreign Claims Act. 10 U.S.C. 2734.


(3) 10 U.S.C. 7622, relating to admiralty claims. See part 752 of this Chapter.


(4) Federal Tort Claims Act. 28 U.S.C. 2671, 2672, and 2674-2680.


(5) International Agreements Claims Act. 10 U.S.C. 2734a and 2734b.


(6) Federal Employees’ Compensation Act. 5 U.S.C. 8101-8150.


(7) Longshore and Harbor Workers’ Compensation Act. 33 U.S.C. 901-950.


(e) Any claim for damage to or loss or destruction of real or personal property founded in written contract [except as provided in § 750.43(b) (2) and (3)].


(f) Any claim for rent of real or personal property [except as provided in § 750.43(b) (2) and (3)].


(g) Any claim involving infringement of patents.


(h) Any claim for damage, loss, or destruction of mail prior to delivery by the Postal Service to authorized DON personnel or occurring due to the fault of, or while in the hands of, bonded personnel.


(i) Any claim by a national, or corporation controlled by a national, of a country in armed conflict with the United States, or an ally of such country, unless the claimant is determined to be friendly to the United States.


(j) Any claim for personal injury or death of a member of the Armed Forces or civilian employee incident to his service. 10 U.S.C. 2733(b)(3).


(k) Any claim for damage to or loss of bailed property when bailor specifically assumes such risk.


(l) Any claim for taking private real property by a continuing trespass or by technical trespass such as overflights of aircraft.


(m) Any claim based solely on compassionate grounds.


(n) Any claim to which the exceptions in 28 U.S.C. 2680 apply.


[57 FR 4722, Feb. 7, 1992, as amended at 72 FR 53420, Sept. 19, 2007]


§ 750.45 Filing claim.

(a) Who may file. Under the MCA, specifically, the following are proper claimants:


(1) U.S. citizens and inhabitants.


(2) U.S. military personnel and civilian employees, except not for personal injury or death incident to service.


(3) Persons in foreign countries who are not inhabitants.


(4) States and their political subdivisions (including agencies).


(5) Prisoners of war for personal property, but not personal injury.


(6) Subrogees, to the extent they paid the claim.


(b) Who may not file. (1) Inhabitants of foreign nations for loss or injury occurring in the country they inhabit.


(2) U.S. Government agencies and departments.


(c) When to file/statute of limitations. Claims against the DON must be presented in writing within 2 years after they accrue. In computing the 2 year period, the day the claim accrues is excluded and the day the claim is presented is included. If the incident occurs in time of war or armed conflict, however, or if war or armed conflict intervenes within 2 years after its occurrence, an MCA claim, on good cause shown, may be presented within 2 years after the war or armed conflict is terminated. For the purposes of the MCA, the date of termination of the war or armed conflict is the date established by concurrent resolution of Congress or by the President. See 10 U.S.C. 2733(b)(1).


(d) Where to file. The claim shall be submitted by the claimant to the commanding officer of the naval activity involved, if it is known. Otherwise, it shall be submitted to the commanding officer of any naval activity, preferably the one within which, or nearest to which, the incident occurred, or to the Office of the Judge Advocate General of the Navy, (Claims and Tort Litigation), 1322 Patterson Avenue, SE., Suite 3000, Washington Navy Yard, DC 20375-5066.


(e) Claim form. A claim is correct in form if it constitutes written notification of an incident, signed by the claimant or a duly authorized agent or legal representative, with a claim for money damages in a sum certain. A Standard Form 95 is preferred. A claim should be substantiated as discussed in section 750.27 of this part. A claim must be substantiated as required by this part in order to be paid. See 10 U.S.C. 2733(b)(5).


(f) Amendment of claim. A proper claim may be amended by the claimant at any time prior to final denial or payment of the claim. An amendment shall be submitted in writing and signed by the claimant or a duly authorized agent or legal representative.


(g) Payment. Claims approved for payment shall be forwarded to such disbursing officer as may be designated by the Comptroller of the Navy for payment from appropriations designated for that purpose. If the Secretary of the Navy considers that a claim in excess of $100,000.00 is meritorious and would otherwise be covered by 10 U.S.C. 2733 and § 750.43, he may make a partial payment of $100,000.00 and refer the excess to the General Accounting Office for payment from appropriations provided therefore.


[57 FR 4722, Feb. 7, 1992, as amended at 72 FR 53420, Sept. 19, 2007]


§ 750.46 Applicable law.

(a) Claims arising within the United States, Territories, Commonwealth, and Possessions. The law of the place where the act or omission occurred will be applied in determining liability and the effect of contributory or comparative negligence on claimant’s right of recovery.


(b) Claims within foreign countries. (1) Where the claim is for personal injury, death, or damage to or loss or destruction of real or personal property caused by an act or omission determined to be negligent, wrongful, or otherwise involving fault of DON personnel acting within the scope of their employment, liability of the United States will be assessed under general principles of tort law common to the majority of American jurisdictions.


(2) Apply the law of the foreign country governing the legal effect of contributory or comparative negligence by the claimant to determine the relative merits of the claim. If there is no foreign law on contributory or comparative negligence, apply traditional rules of contributory negligence. Apply foreign rules and regulations on operation of motor vehicles (rules of the road) to the extent those rules are not specifically superseded or preempted by U.S. Armed Forces traffic regulations.


(c) Principles applicable to all MCA claims. (1) “Scope of employment” is determined in accordance with Federal law. Reported FTCA cases provide guidance on this determination;


(2) Claims for emotional distress will be considered only from the injured person or members of the injured person’s immediate family. Claims from the injured person’s immediate “zone of danger” (i.e., immediate vicinity of the incident) and the claimant substantiates the claim with proof of the physical manifestation(s) of the emotional distress; and


(3) Claims under the MCA do not include the principles of absolute liability and punitive damages.


(d) Clarification of terms. Federal law determines the meaning and construction of the MCA.


[57 FR 4722, Feb. 7, 1992, as amended at 72 FR 53420, Sept. 19, 2007]


§ 750.47 Measure of damages for property claims.

Determine the measure of damages in property claims arising in the United States or its territories, commonwealth, or possessions under the law of the place where the incident occurred. Determine the measure of damages in property claims arising overseas under general principles of American tort law, stated as follows:


(a) If the property has been or can be economically repaired, the measure of damages shall be the actual or estimated net cost of the repairs necessary to substantially restore the property to the condition that existed immediately prior to the incident. Damages shall not exceed the value of the property immediately prior to the incident less the value thereof immediately after the incident. To determine the actual or estimated net cost of repairs, the value of any salvaged parts or materials and the amount of any net appreciation in value effected through the repair shall be deducted from the actual or estimated gross cost of repairs. The amount of any net depreciation in the value of the property shall be added to such gross cost of repairs, if such adjustments are sufficiently substantial in amount to warrant consideration. Estimates of the cost of repairs shall be based upon the lower or lowest of two or more competitive bids, or upon statements or estimates by one or more competent and disinterested persons, preferably reputable dealers or officials familiar with the type of property damaged, lost, or destroyed.


(b) If the property cannot be economically repaired, the measure of damages shall be the value of the property immediately prior to the incident less the value immediately after the incident. Estimates of value shall be made, if possible, by one or more competent and disinterested persons, preferably reputable dealers or officials familiar with the type of property damaged, lost, or destroyed.


(c) Loss of use of damaged property which is economically repairable may, if claimed, be included as an additional element of damage to the extent of the reasonable expense actually incurred for appropriate substitute property, for such period reasonably necessary for repairs, as long as idle property of the claimant was not employed as a substitute. When substitute property is not obtainable, other competent evidence such as rental value, if not speculative or remote, may be considered. When substitute property is reasonably available but not obtained and used by the claimant, loss of use is normally not payable.


§ 750.48 Measure of damages in injury or death cases.

(a) Where an injury or death arises within the United States or its territories, commonwealth, or possessions, determine the measure of damages under the law of the location where the injury arises.


(b) Where an injury or death arises in a foreign country and is otherwise cognizable and meritorious under this provision, damages will be determined in accordance with general principles of American tort law. The following is provided as guidance.


(1) Measure of damages for overseas personal injury claims. Allowable compensation includes reasonable medical and hospital expenses necessarily incurred, compensation for lost earnings and services, diminution of earning capacity, anticipated medical expenses, physical disfigurement, and pain and suffering.


(2) Wrongful death claims arising in foreign countries. (i) Allowable compensation includes that in paragraph (b)(1) of this section, burial expenses, loss of support and services, loss of companionship, comfort, society, protection, and consortium, and loss of training, guidance, education, and nurturing, as applicable.


(ii) The claim may be presented by or on behalf of the decedent’s spouse, parent, child, or dependent relative. Claims may be consolidated for joint presentation by a representative of some or all of the beneficiaries or may be filed by a proper beneficiary individually.


§ 750.49 Delegations of adjudicating authority.

(a) Settlement authority. (1) The Secretary of the Navy may settle or deny claims in any amount. The Secretary may pay the first $100,000.00 and report the excess to the Comptroller General for payment under 31 U.S.C. 1304. See 10 U.S.C. 2733(d).


(2) The Judge Advocate General has delegated authority to settle claims for $100,000.00 or less.


(3) The Deputy Judge Advocate General, the Assistant Judge Advocate General (General Law), the Deputy Assistant Judge Advocate General (Claims and Tort Litigation), and Head, Tort Claims Branch (Claims and Tort Litigation), have delegated authority to settle claims for $25,000.00 or less, and have denial authority in any amount.


(4) Individuals with settlement authority under paragraph (a)(3) of this section may delegate all or part of their settlement authority. Such delegation must be in writing.


(b) Appellate authority. Adjudicating authorities have the same authority as delegated in paragraph (a) of this section to act upon appeals. No appellate authority below the Secretary of the Navy may deny an appeal of a claim it had previously denied.


[57 FR 4722, Feb. 7, 1992, as amended at 72 FR 53420, Sept. 19, 2007]


§ 750.50 Advance payments.

(a) Scope. This paragraph applies exclusively to the payment of amounts not to exceed $100,000.00 under 10 U.S.C. 2736 in advance of submission of a claim.


(b) Statutory authority. Title 10 U.S.C. 2736 authorizes the Secretary of the Navy or designee to pay an amount not in excess of $100,000.00 in advance of the submission of a claim to or for any person, or the legal representative of any person, who was injured or killed, or whose property was damaged or lost, as the result of an accident for which allowance of a claim is authorized by law. Payment under this law is limited to that which would be payable under the MCA (10 U.S.C. 2733). Payment of an amount under this law is not an admission by the United States of liability for the accident concerned. Any amount so paid shall be deducted from any amount that may be allowed under any other provision of law to the person or his legal representative for injury, death, damage, or loss attributable to the accident concerned.


(c) Officials with authority to make advance payments. (1) The Secretary of the Navy has authority to make advance payments up to $100,000.00


(2) The Judge Advocate General has delegated authority to make advance payments up to $100,000.00.


(3) The Deputy Assistant Judge Advocate General (Claims and Tort Litigation) and the Head, Tort Claims Branch (Claims and Tort Litigation) have delegated authority to make advance payments up to $25,000.00.


(4) Naval Legal Service Office commanding officers and the Officer in Charge, U.S. Sending State Office for Italy have delegated authority to make advance payments up to $5,000.00.


(5) Officers in Charge of Naval Legal Service Office Detachments, when specifically designated by cognizant Commanding Officers of Naval Legal Service Offices; and the Staff Judge Advocate at the U.S. Naval Station, Panama Canal have delegated authority to make advance payments up to $3,000.00.


(6) Overseas commands with a Judge Advocate General’s Corps officer or a judge advocate of the Marine Corps attached, have delegated authority to make advance payments up to $3,000.00.


(d) Conditions for advance payments. Prior to making an advance payment under 10 U.S.C. 2736, the adjudicating authority shall ascertain that:


(1) The injury, death, damage, or loss would be payable under the MCA (10 U.S.C. 2733);


(2) The payee, insofar as can be determined, would be a proper claimant, or is the spouse or next of kin of a proper claimant who is incapacitated;


(3) The provable damages are estimated to exceed the amount to be paid;


(4) There exists an immediate need of the person who suffered the injury, damage, or loss, or of his family, or of the family of a person who was killed, for food, clothing, shelter, medical, or burial expenses, or other necessities, and other resources for such expenses are not reasonably available;


(5) The prospective payee has signed a statement that it is understood that payment is not an admission by the Navy or the United States of liability for the accident concerned, and that the amount paid is not a gratuity but shall constitute an advance against and shall be deducted from any amount that may be allowed under any other provision of law to the person or his legal representative for injury, death, damage, or loss attributable to the accident concerned; and


(6) No payment under 10 U.S.C. 2736 may be made if the accident occurred in a foreign country in which the NATO Status of Forces Agreement (4 U.S.T. 1792, TIAS 2846) or other similar agreement is in effect and the injury, death, damage, or loss


(i) Was caused by a member or employee of the DON acting within the scope of employment or


(ii) Occurred “incident to noncombat activities” of the DON as defined in § 750.43.


[57 FR 4722, Feb. 7, 1992, as amended at 72 FR 53421, Sept. 19, 2007]


§ 750.51 Final disposition.

(a) Claimant to be notified. The adjudicating authority shall notify the claimant, in writing, of the action taken on the claim.


(b) Final denial. A final denial, in whole or in part, of any MCA claim shall be in writing and sent to the claimant, or his attorney or legal representative, by certified or registered mail, return receipt requested. The notification of denial shall include a statement of the reason or reasons for denial and that the claimant may appeal. The notification shall also inform the claimant:


(1) The title of the appellate authority who will act on the appeal and that the appeal will be addressed to the adjudicating authority who last acted on the claim.


(2) No form is prescribed for the appeal, but the grounds for appeal should be set forth fully.


(3) The appeal must be submitted within 30 days of receipt by the claimant of notice of action on the claim.


§ 750.52 Appeal.

(a) A claim which is disapproved in whole or in part may be appealed by the claimant at any time within 30 days after receipt of notification of disapproval. An appeal shall be in writing and state the grounds relied upon. An appeal is not an adversary proceeding and a hearing is not authorized; however, the claimant may obtain and submit any additional evidence or written argument for consideration by the appellate authority.


(b) Upon receipt, the adjudicating authority examines the appeal, determines whether the appeal complies with this regulation, and reviews the claims investigative file to ensure it is complete. The claim, with the complete investigative file and a memorandum of law, will be forwarded to the appellate authority for action. If the evidence in the file, including information submitted by the claimant with the appeal, indicates the appeal should be approved, the adjudicating authority may treat the appeal as a request for reconsideration.


(c) Processing of the appeal may be delayed pending further efforts by the adjudicating authority to settle the claim. Where the adjudicating authority does not reach a final agreement on an appealed claim, it shall send the entire claim file to the next higher settlement authority, who is the appellate authority for that claim.


(d) The appellate authority shall notify the claimant in writing of the determination on appeal; that such determination constitutes the final administrative action on the claim; and there is no right to sue under the MCA.


§ 750.53 Cross-servicing.

(a) See § 750.13 or information about single-service claims responsibility under DODDIR 5515.8 of 9 June 1990.


(b) Claims settlement procedures. Where a single service has been assigned a country or area claims responsibility, that service will settle claims cognizable under the MCA under the regulations of that service. The forwarding command shall afford any assistance necessary to the appropriate service in the investigation and adjudication of such claims.


§ 750.54 Payment of costs, settlements, and judgments related to certain medical or legal malpractice claims.

(a) General. Requests for reimbursement/indemnification of costs, settlements, and judgments cognizable under 10 U.S.C. 1089(f) [for personal injury or death caused by any physician, dentist, nurse, pharmacist, paramedic, or other supporting personnel (including medical and dental technicians, nurse assistants, and therapists)] or 10 U.S.C. 1054(f) (for damages for injury or loss of property caused by any attorney, paralegal, or other member of a legal staff) while acting as DON personnel will be paid if:


(1) The alleged negligent or wrongful actions or omissions arose in connection with either providing health care functions or legal services and within the scope of employment; and


(2) Such personnel furnish prompt notification and delivery of all process served or received, and other documents, information, and assistance as requested; and cooperate in defending the action on the merits.


(b) Requests for Indemnification. All requests for indemnification for personal liability of DON personnel for acts or omissions arising out of assigned duties shall be forwarded to the Judge Advocate General for action.


§ 750.55 Attorney’s fees.

Attorney’s fees not in excess of 20 percent of any settlement may be allowed. Attorney’s fees so determined are to be paid out of the amount awarded and not in addition to the award. These fee limitations shall be incorporated in any settlement agreement secured from a claimant.


§§ 750.56-750.60 [Reserved]

Subpart D – Claims Not Cognizable Under Any Other Provision of Law

§ 750.61 Scope of subpart D.

This section provides information on payment of claims against the United States, not payable under any other statute, caused by the act or omission, negligent, wrongful, or otherwise involving fault, of Department of the Navy (DON) military and civilian personnel (hereinafter DON personnel) acting outside the scope of their employment.


§ 750.62 Statutory authority.

Section 2737 of title 10, United States Code, provides authority for the administrative settlement in an amount not to exceed $1,000.00 of any claim against the United States not cognizable under any other provision of law for damage, loss, or destruction of property or for personal injury or death caused by military personnel or a civilian official or employee of a military department incident to the use of a vehicle of the United States at any place, or any other property of the United States on a Government installation. There is no right to sue. There are no territorial limitations and the Act has worldwide application.


§ 750.63 Definitions.

(a) Civilian official or employee. Any civilian employee of the DON paid from appropriated funds at the time of the incident.


(b) Vehicle. Includes every description of carriage or other artificial contrivance used, or capable of being used, as a means of transportation on land. See 1 U.S.C. 4.


(c) Government installation. Any Federal facility having fixed boundaries and owned or controlled by the U.S. Government. It includes both military bases and nonmilitary installations.


§ 750.64 Claim procedures.

(a) The general provisions of subpart A of this part shall apply in determining what is a proper claim, who is a proper claimant, and how a claim is to be investigated and processed under 10 U.S.C. 2737 and this section.


(b) A claim is presented when the DON receives from a claimant or the claimant’s duly authorized agent, written notification of a nonscope claim incident accompanied by a demand for money damages in a sum certain.


(c) A claimant may amend a claim at any time prior to final action. Amendments will be submitted in writing and signed by the claimant or the claimant’s duly authorized agent.


(d) Claims submitted under the provisions of the Federal Tort Claims Act (FTCA) or Military Claims Act (MCA) shall be considered automatically for an award under this section when payment would otherwise be barred because the DON personnel were not in the scope of their employment at the time of the incident. If a tender of payment under this section is not accepted by the claimant in full satisfaction of the claim, no award will be made, and the claim will be denied pursuant to the rules applicable to the statute under which it was submitted.


(e) Damages caused by latent defects of ordinary, commercial type, Government equipment that were not payable under the MCA, Foreign Claims Act, or FTCA are payable under this section.


(f) Nonscope claims for damages caused by local national DON employees overseas are also payable under this section if the injury was caused by the use of Government equipment.


(g) Payment may not be made on a nonscope claim unless the claimant accepts the amount offered in full satisfaction of the claim and signs a settlement agreement.


(h) Payment for nonscope claims adjudicated by field commands will be affected through their local disbursing office by use of funds obtained from the Judge Advocate General.


(i) Claims submitted solely under 10 U.S.C. 2737 shall be promptly considered. If a nonscope claim is denied, the claimant shall be informed of reasons in writing and advised he may appeal in writing to the Secretary of the Navy (Judge Advocate General) provided the appeal is received within 30 days of the notice of denial. The provisions of § 750.51(b) of subpart C also apply to denials of nonscope claims.


§ 750.65 Statute of limitations.

(a) A claim must be presented in writing within 2 years after it accrues. It accrues at the time the claimant discovers, or in the exercise of reasonable care should have discovered, the existence of the act or omission for which the claim is filed.


(b) In computing time to determine whether the period of limitation has expired, exclude the incident date and include the date the claim was presented.


§ 750.66 Officials with authority to settle.

Judge Advocate General; Deputy Judge Advocate General; Assistant Judge Advocate General (General Law); Deputy Assistant Judge Advocate General (Claims and Tort Litigation); and Head, Tort Claims Branch (Claims and Tort Litigation) may settle a nonscope claim.


[72 FR 53421, Sept. 19, 2007]


§ 750.67 Scope of liability.

(a) Subject to the exceptions in § 750.68 of specific claims not payable, the United States shall not pay more than $1,000.00 for a claim against the United States, not cognizable under any other provision of law, except Article 139, UCMJ.


(b) Article 139, UCMJ, 10 U.S.C. 939, is not preemptive. The prohibition in 10 U.S.C. 2737 on paying claims “not cognizable under any other provisions of law” applies only to law authorizing claims against the United States. Article 139 authorizes claims against servicemembers. See part 755 of this chapter.


§ 750.68 Claims not payable.

(a) A claim for damage, loss, or destruction of property or the personal injury or death caused wholly or partly by a negligent or wrongful act of the claimant or his agent or employee.


(b) A claim, or any part thereof, that is legally recoverable by the claimant under an indemnifying law or indemnity contract.


(c) A subrogated claim.


§ 750.69 Measure of damages.

Generally, the measure-of-damage provisions under the MCA are used to determine the extent of recovery for nonscope claims. Compensation is computed in accordance with §§ 750.47 and 750.48 of subpart C, except damages for personal injury or death under this section shall not be for more than the cost of reasonable medical, hospital, and burial expenses actually incurred and not otherwise furnished or paid for by the United States.


PART 751 – PERSONNEL CLAIMS REGULATIONS


Authority:5 U.S.C. 301, 10 U.S.C. 5013 and 5148; E.O. 12473, 3 CFR, 1984 Comp., p. 201.


Source:57 FR 5055, Feb. 12, 1992, unless otherwise noted.

Subpart A – Claims Against the United States

§ 751.1 Scope.

This part prescribes procedures and substantive bases for administrative settlement of claims against the United States submitted by Department of Navy (DoN) personnel and civilian employees of the naval establishment.


[72 FR 53422, Sept. 19, 2007]


§ 751.2 Claims against the United States: In general.

(a) Maximum amount payable. The Military and Civilian Employees’ Personnel Claims Act (Personnel Claims Act, 31 U.S.C. 3701, 3702, and 3721 (2004)), provides that the maximum amount payable for any loss or damage arising from a single incident is limited to $40,000.00. Where the loss of or damage to personal property arose from emergency evacuations or other extraordinary circumstances, the maximum is $100,000.00.


(b) Additional instructions. The Judge Advocate General of the Navy may issue additional instructions or guidance as necessary to give full force and effect to this section.


(c) Preemption. The provisions of this section and the Personnel Claims Act are preemptive of other claims regulations. Claims not allowable under the Personnel Claims Act may, however, be allowable under another claims act.


(d) Other claims. Claims arising from the operation of a ship’s store, laundry, dry cleaning facility, tailor shop, or cobbler shop should be processed in accordance with NAVSUP P487.


[57 FR 5055, Feb. 12, 1992, as amended at 72 FR 53422, Sept. 19, 2007]


§ 751.3 Authority.

The Personnel Claims Act provides the authority for maximum payment up to $40,000, $100,000 in extraordinary circumstances for loss, damage, or destruction of personal property of military personnel or civilian employees incident to their service. No claim may be paid unless it is presented in writing within 2 years of the incident that gave rise to the claim.


[72 FR 53422, Sept. 19, 2007]


§ 751.4 Construction.

The provisions of this section and the Personnel Claims Act provide limited compensation to service members and civilian employees of the DON for loss and damage to personal property incurred incident to service. This limited compensation is not a substitute for private insurance. Although not every loss may be compensated under the Personnel Claims Act, its provisions shall be broadly construed to provide reasonable compensation on meritorious claims. Adjudications must be based on common sense and the reasoned judgment of the claims examiner giving the benefit of realistic doubt to the claimant.


§ 751.5 Definitions.

(a) Proper claimants – (1) Members of the DON. All Navy and Marine Corps active duty members and reservists on active duty for training under Federal law whether commissioned, enrolled, appointed, or enlisted. A retired member may only claim under this Act if loss or damage occurred while the claimant was on active duty or in connection with the claimant’s last movement of personal property incident to service.


(2) Civilian employees of the Navy. Federal employees of the naval establishment paid from appropriated funds. This term does not include Red Cross employees, USO personnel, and employees of Government contractors (including technical representatives).


(3) Claims by non-appropriated fund employees. Claims by employees of Navy and Marine Corps non-appropriated fund activities for loss, damage, or destruction of personal property incident to their employment will be processed and adjudicated in accordance with this part and forwarded to the appropriate local non-appropriated fund activity that employs the claimant for payment from non-appropriated funds.


(4) Separation from service. Separation from the service or termination of employment shall not bar former military personnel or civilian employees from filing claims or bar designated personnel from considering, ascertaining, adjusting, determining, and authorizing payment of claims otherwise falling within the provision of these regulations when such claim accrued prior to separation or termination.


(5) Agent or legal representative. The authorized agent or legal representative of a proper claimant may file on behalf of the claimant if the agent provides a power of attorney that complies with local law. Certain relatives of a deceased proper claimant may file any claim the claimant could have filed. The PCA identifies these relatives in order of priority. If multiple persons who the statute lists as equals in priority file separate claims, the first claim settled extinguishes the rights of the other claimants. The estate of a deceased proper party claimant is not a proper claimant, nor is an executor or personal representative who cannot file as a survivor. The PCA ranks surviving relatives in the following order of priority:


(i) Spouse;


(ii) Child or children;


(iii) Father, mother, or both;


(iv) Brother, sister, or both.


(b) Improper claimants. Insurers, assignees, subrogees, vendors, lienholders, contractors, subcontractors and their employees, and other persons not specifically mentioned as proper claimants.


(c) Unusual occurrence. Serious events and natural disaster not expected to take place in the normal course of events and hazards outside the normal risks of day-to-day living and working. Two different types of incidents may be considered unusual occurrences: those of an unusual nature and those of a common nature that occur to an unexpected degree of severity. Examples of unusual occurrences include structural defects in quarters, faulty plumbing maintenance, termite or rodent damage, unusually large size hail, and hazardous health conditions due to Government use of toxic chemicals. Examples of occurrences that are not unusual include potholes or foreign objects in the road, ice and snow sliding off a roof onto a vehicle, and tears, rips, snags, or stains on clothing. Claims that electrical or electronic devices were damaged by a power surge may be paid when lightning has actually struck the claimant’s residence or objects outside the residence, such as a transformer box, or when power company records or similar evidence shows that a particular residence or group of residences was subjected to a power surge of unusual intensity. In areas subject to frequent thunderstorms or power fluctuations, claimants are expected to use surge suppressors, if available, to protect delicate items such as computers or videocassette recorders.


(d) Personal property. Property including but not limited to household goods, unaccompanied baggage, privately owned vehicles (POV’s), mobile homes, and boats.


(e) Intangible property. Property that has no intrinsic marketable value such as bankbooks, checks, promissory notes, non-negotiable stock certificates, bonds, baggage checks, insurance policies, money orders, and travelers checks.


(f) Vehicles. Include automobiles, motorcycles, mopeds, jet skis, utility trailers, camping trailers, trucks, mounted camper bodies, motor homes, boats, boat trailers, bicycles, and aircraft. Mobile homes and other property used as dwelling places are not considered vehicles.


[57 FR 5055, Feb. 12, 1992, as amended at 72 FR 53422, Sept. 19, 2007]


§ 751.6 Claims payable.

Claims for loss, damage, or destruction of property may be considered as set out below if possession of the property was reasonable and useful under the circumstances and the loss did not result from the negligence of the claimant. The following are examples of more common claims. Not all situations that may result in a claim are covered, but the processes described in the examples on how to approach, investigate, and adjudicate claims are applicable to all claims filed.


(a) Transportation and storage losses. (1) Incurred during transportation under orders, whether in possession of the Government, carrier, storage warehouse, or other Government contractor.


(2) Incurred during travel under orders, including temporary duty.


(3) Incurred during travel on a space available basis on a military aircraft, vessel, or vehicle.


(4) Do-it-yourself (DITY) moves. In certain circumstances, loss of or damage to property during a DITY move is compensable. Claimants, however, are required to substantiate the fact of loss or damage in shipment. Claimants who do not prepare inventories have difficulty substantiating thefts. In addition, unless evidence shows that something outside the claimant’s control caused the damage, breakage is presumed to be the result of improper packing by the claimant. For example, if a claimant’s truck is rear-ended by a drunk driver during a DITY move, it is out of claimant’s control. If the claimant can substantiate that he was free from negligence, he can file a claim for damages to his household goods.


(5) Shipment or storage at the claimant’s expense. The Government will not compensate a claimant for loss or damage that occurs while property is being shipped or stored at the claimant’s expense, even if the Government reimburses the claimant for the shipment or storage fees. The reason for this is that there is no contract, called a Government Bill of Lading, between the Government and the carrier. In such cases, the claimant must claim against the carrier.


(b) Losses at assigned quarters or other authorized places. Damage or loss caused by fire, explosion, theft, vandalism, lightning, flood, earthquake, and unusual occurrences is cognizable. Losses due to theft may only be paid if the claimant took reasonable measures to safeguard the property and theft occurred as a result of a forced entry. Claimants are expected to secure windows and doors of their barracks, quarters, wall lockers, and other storage areas so that the thief must force an entry. If a police report states that there were no signs of forced entry and the claimant asserts with absolute certainty that the area was in fact secure, the claims examiner must consider whether forced entry would have left visible signs. Claimants are also expected to take extra measures to protect cash, valuable jewelry, and similar small, easily pilferable items. Normally, such items should be kept in a locked container within a secured room. It is also advisable that the locked container be large enough that it is not convenient for a thief to carry off. Bicycles located at quarters or on base must be secured to a fixed object. Overseas housing is considered assigned quarters for claimants who are not local inhabitants.


(c) Vehicle losses. (1) Losses incurred while a vehicle is used in the performance of a military duty, if such use was authorized or directed for the convenience of the Government, provided the travel did not include commuting to or from a permanent place of duty, and did not arise from mechanical or structural defect of the vehicle. There is no requirement that the loss be due to fire, flood, hurricane, or other unusual occurrence, or to theft or vandalism. As a general rule, however, travel is not considered to be for the convenience of the Government unless it was pursuant to written orders authorizing use for which the claimant is entitled to reimbursement. The claimant must be free from negligence in order to be paid for a collision loss. Travel by the claimant to other buildings on the installation is not loss. Travel by the claimant to other buildings on the installation is not considered to be under orders for the convenience of the Government. Travel off the installation without written orders may only be deemed to be for the convenience of the Government if the claimant was authorized mileage reimbursement for the travel. The issuance of written orders after the fact raises the presumption that travel was not authorized for the convenience of the Government. The maximum payment authorized by the Allowance List-Depreciation Guide (ALDG) still applies to loss of or damage to vehicles and contents. This maximum does not apply to DITY moves.


(2) Losses incurred while a vehicle is shipped at Government expense are compensable provided the loss or damage did not arise from mechanical or structural defect of the vehicle during such shipment. Damage caused during shipment at the claimant’s expense or while the vehicle is being moved to or from the port by an agent of the claimant is not compensable.


(3) Losses incurred while a vehicle is located at quarters or other authorized place of lodging, including garages, carports, driveways, assigned parking spaces, if the loss or damage is caused by fire, flood, hurricane, theft, or vandalism, or other unusual occurrence. Vandalism is damage intentionally caused. Stray marks caused by children playing, falling branches, gravel thrown by other vehicles, or similar occurrences are not vandalism. The amount payable on vandalism claims is limited to the maximum payment authorized by the ALDG.


(4) Incurred while a vehicle is located at places other than quarters but on a military installation, if the loss or damage is caused by fire, flood, hurricane, theft, or vandalism, or other unusual occurrence. “Military installation” is used broadly to describe any fixed land area, wherever situated, controlled, and used by military activities or the Department of Defense (DOD). A vehicle properly on the installation should be presumed to be used incident to the claimant’s service. A vehicle that is not properly insured or registered in accordance with local regulations is not properly on the installation. A vehicle left in a remote area of the installation that is not a designated long-term parking area for an undue length of time is presumed not to be on the installation incident to service.


(5) Theft of property stored inside a vehicle. A loss resulting from theft of property stored inside a vehicle is compensable if it was reasonable for the claimant to have the property in the vehicle and neither the claimant nor the claimant’s agents were negligent in protecting the property. Neither the passenger compartment nor the trunk of a vehicle is a proper place for the long-term storage of property unconnected with the use of the vehicle. The passenger compartment of a vehicle does not provide adequate security, except for very short periods of time for articles that are not of high value or easily pilferable. Car covers and bras are payable if bolted or secured to the vehicle with a wire locking device.


(6) Rental vehicles. Damage to rental vehicles is considered under paragraphs of the Joint Federal Travel Regulations (JFTR), rather than as a loss incident to service.


(d) Mobile homes and contents in shipment. Claims for damage to mobile homes and contents in shipment are payable unless the damage was caused by structural or mechanical defects or by the claimant’s negligence in securing the mobile home or packing its contents.


(e) Borrowed property (including vehicles). Loss or damage to borrowed property is compensable if it was borrowed for claimant’s or dependent’s own use. A statement will be provided by the owner of the property attesting to the use of the property by the claimant.


(f) Clothing and articles being worn. Repairs/replacement of clothing and articles being worn while on a military installation or in the performance of official duty may be paid if loss is caused by fire, flood, hurricane, theft, or vandalism, or other unusual occurrence. This paragraph shall be broadly construed in favor of compensation, but see § 751.5(c) for the definition of unusual occurrence. Articles being worn include hearing aids, eyeglasses, and items the claimant is carrying, such as a briefcase.


(g) Personal property held as evidence or confiscated property. If property belonging to the victim of a crime is to be held as evidence for an extended period of time (in excess of 2 months) and the temporary loss of the property will work a grave hardship on the claimant, a claim for the loss may be considered for payment. This provision will not be used unless every effort has been made to determine whether secondary evidence, such as photographs, may be substituted for the item. No compensation is allowed to a person suspected of an offense for property seized from that same person in the investigation of that offense. This also applies to property a foreign government unjustly confiscates or an unjust change in a foreign law that forces surrender or abandonment of property.


(h) Theft from possession of claimant. Theft from the person of the claimant is reimbursable if the theft occurred by use of force, violence, or threat to do bodily harm, or by snatching or pickpocketing, and at the time of theft the claimant was either on a military installation, utilizing a recreation facility operated or sponsored by the Department of Defense or any agency thereof, or in the performance of official duty. The theft must have been reported to appropriate police authorities as soon as practicable, and it must have been reasonable for the claimant to have had on his person the quality and the quantity of the property allegedly stolen.


(i) Property used for the benefit of the Government. Compensation is authorized where property is damaged or lost while being used in the performance of Government business at the direction or request of superior authority or by reason of military necessity.


(j) Money deposited for safekeeping, transmittal, or other authorized disposition. Compensation is authorized for personal funds delivered to and accepted by military and civilian personnel authorized by the commanding officer to receive these funds for safekeeping, deposit, transmittal, or other authorized disposition, if the funds were neither applied as directed by the owner nor returned to the owner.


(k) Fees – (1) For obtaining certain documents. The fees for replacing birth certificates, marriage certificates, college diplomas, passports, or similar documents may be allowed if the original or a certified copy is lost or destroyed incident to service. In general, compensation will only be allowed for replacing documents with a raised seal that are official in nature. No compensation will be allowed for documents that are representative of value, such as stock certificates, or for personal letters or records.


(2) Estimate fees. An estimate fee is a fixed cost charged by a person in the business of repairing property to provide an estimate of what it would cost to repair property. An estimate fee in excess of $75.00 should be examined with great care to determine whether it is reasonable. A person becomes obligated to pay an estimated fee when the estimate is prepared. An estimate fee should not be confused with an appraisal fee, which is not compensable (see § 751.7(m)). A reasonable estimate fee is compensable if it is not going to be credited toward the cost of repair. If it is to be credited toward the cost of repair, it is not compensable regardless of whether the claimant chooses to have the work done. When an estimate fee is claimed, the file must reflect whether the fee is to be credited.


[57 FR 5055, Feb. 12, 1992, as amended at 72 FR 53422, Sept. 19, 2007]


§ 751.7 Claims not payable.

(a) Losses in unassigned quarters in the United States. Claims for property damaged or lost at quarters occupied by the claimant within the United States that are not assigned or otherwise provided by the Government.


(b) Currency or jewelry shipped or stored in baggage. Claims for lost currency, shipped or stored in baggage are not payable. Small, valuable, highly pilferable items should normally be hand-carried rather than shipped, however, if expensive or valuable jewelry or coin collections are shipped, a full description of each item of expensive jewelry and of any coin or money collection must be listed and described on the inventory for its loss to be payable. Each item must also be listed as missing at the time of delivery. If not noted at the time of delivery, the claimant must satisfactorily explain why.


(c) Enemy property or war trophies. This includes only property that was originally enemy property or a war trophy that passed into the hands of a collector and was then purchased by a claimant.


(d) Unserviceable or Worn-Out Property.


(e) Loss or damage to property to the extent of any available insurance coverage. Except for claims for loss or damage to household goods or privately-owned vehicles (POVS) while shipped or stored at Government expense, when the property lost, damaged, or destroyed is insured, the claimant must make a demand for payment against the insurance company under the terms of the policy.


(f) Inconvenience or loss of use. Expenses arising from late delivery of personal property, including but not limited to the expenses for food, lodging, and furniture rental, loss of use, interest, carrying charges, attorney’s fees, telephone calls, additional costs of transporting claimant or family members, time spent in preparation of claim, or cost of insurance are not compensable. While such claims do not lie against the Government, members should be referred to the Personal Property Office for assistance in filing their inconvenience claims against the commercial carriers.


(g) Items of speculative value. Theses, manuscripts, unsold paintings, or a similar creative or artistic work done by the claimant, friend, or a relative is limited to the cost of materials only. The value of such items is speculative. Compensation for a utilitarian object made by the claimant, such as a quilt or bookcase, is limited to the value of an item of similar quality.


(h) Loss or damage to property due to negligence of the claimant. Negligence is a failure to exercise the degree of care expected under the circumstances that is the proximate cause of the loss. Losses due, in whole or in part, to the negligence of the claimant, the claimant’s spouse, child, houseguest, employee, or agent are not compensable.


(i) Business property. Losses of items acquired for resale or use in a private business are not compensable. If property is acquired for both business and personal use, compensation will not be allowed if business use is substantial, or is the primary purpose for which the item was purchased, or if the item is designed for professional use and is not normally intended for personal use.


(j) Motor vehicles. Collision damage is not payable unless it meets the criteria for payment as property used for the benefit of the Government as established in § 751.6(c)(1).


(k) Violation of law or directives. Property acquired, possessed, or transported unlawfully or in violation of competent regulations or directives. This includes vehicles, weapons, or property shipped to accommodate another person, as well as property used to transport contraband.


(l) Sales tax. Sales taxes associated with repair or replacement costs will not be considered unless the claimant provides proof that the sales tax was actually paid.


(m) Appraisal fees. An appraisal, as distinguished from an estimate of replacement or repair, is defined as a valuation of an item provided by a person who is not in the business of selling or repairing that type of property. Normally, claimants are expected to obtain appraisals on expensive items at their own expense.


(n) Quantities of property not reasonable or useful under the circumstances are not compensable. Factors to be considered are claimant’s living conditions, family size, social obligations, and any particular need to have more than average quantities, as well as the actual circumstances surrounding the acquisition and loss.


(o) Intangible Property, such as Bankbooks, Checks, Promissory Notes, Stock Certificates, Bonds, Bills of Lading, Warehouse Receipts, Baggage Checks, Insurance Policies, Money Orders, and Traveler’s Checks are not Compensable.


(p) Property Owned by the United States, Except where the Claimant is Responsible to an Agency of the Government other than the DON.


(q) Contractual coverage. Losses, or any portion thereof, that have been recovered or are recoverable pursuant to contract are not compensable.


[57 FR 5055, Feb. 12, 1992, as amended at 72 FR 53423, Sept. 19, 2007]


§ 751.8 Adjudicating authorities.

(a) Claims by Navy personnel. (l) The following officials are authorized to adjudicate and authorize payment of PCA claims up to $100,000:


(i) The Judge Advocate General;


(ii) The Deputy Judge Advocate General;


(iii) Any Assistant Judge Advocate General; and


(iv) The Deputy Assistant Judge Advocate General (Claims and Tort Litigation).


(2) Any individual, when designated by the Deputy Assistant Judge Advocate General (Claims and Tort Litigation Division), may adjudicate and authorize payment of PCA claims up to any designated amount.


(b) Claims by Marine Corps personnel. (1) The following officials are authorized to adjudicate and authorize payment of PCA claims up to $40,000:


(i) Commandant of the Marine Corps;


(ii) Deputy Commandant, Manpower and Reserve Affairs Department;


(iii) Director, Personal and Family Readiness Division;


(iv) Head, Military Personnel Services Branch;


(v) Head, Personal Property Claims Section; and


(vi) Any individual personally designated by the Commandant of the Marine Corps may adjudicate and authorize payment of PCA claims up to any delegated amount not to exceed $40,000.


(2) The Assistant Head, Personal Property Claims Section is authorized to adjudicate and authorize payment of PCA claims up to $25,000.


(3) Any individual at Marine Corps Field Transportation Management Office/Claims Activities, when personally designated by the Director, Personal and Family Readiness Division, may be authorized to adjudicate and authorize payment of PCA claims up to any delegated amount not to exceed $40,000.


[72 FR 53423, Sept. 19, 2007]


§ 751.9 Presentment of claim.

(a) General. A claim shall be submitted in writing and, if practicable, be presented to the Personnel Claims Unit or Marine Corps claims office serving the area where the claim accrued, such as where the House Hold Goods were delivered. If submission in accordance with the foregoing is impractical under the circumstance, the claim may be submitted in writing to any installation or establishment of the Armed Forces which will forward the claim to the appropriate Navy or Marine Corps claims office for processing. To constitute a filing, a claim must be presented in writing to one of the military departments.


(b) Statute of limitations. A claim must be presented in writing to a military installation within 2 years after it accrues. This requirement is statutory and may only be waived if a claim accrues during armed conflict, or armed conflict intervenes before the 2 years have run, and good cause is shown. In this situation, a claim may be presented not later than 2 years after the end of the armed conflict. A claim accrues on the day the claimant knows or should know of the loss. For losses that occur in shipment of personal property, normally the day of delivery or the day the claimant loses entitlement to storage at Government expense (whichever occurs first) is the day the claim accrues. If a claimant’s entitlement to Government storage terminates, but the property is later delivered at Government expense, the claim accrues on delivery. In computing the 2 years, exclude the first day (day of delivery or incident) and include the last day. If the last day falls on a non-workday, extend the 2 years to the next workday.


(c) Substantiation. The claimant is responsible for substantiating ownership or possession, the fact of loss or damage, and the value of property. Claimants are expected to report losses promptly. The greater the delay in reporting a loss, the more substantiation the claimant is expected to provide.


(1) Obviously damaged or missing inventory items that are not reported at delivery. Claimants are expected to list missing inventory items and obvious damage at time of delivery. Claimants who do not should be questioned. Obviously some claimants will simply not notice readily apparent damage. If, however, the claimant cannot provide an explanation or lacks credibility, payment should be denied based on lack of evidence that the item was lost or damaged in shipment.


(2) Later-discovered shipment loss or damage. A claimant has 70 days to unpack, discover, and report loss and damage that is not obvious at delivery. In most cases, loss and damage that is discovered later and reported in a timely manner should be deemed to have been incurred in shipment.


(3) Damage to POVs in shipment. Persons shipping POVs are expected to list damage on DD Form 788 (Private Vehicle Shipping Document for Automobile) when they pick up the vehicle. Obvious external damage that is not listed is not payable. Damage the claimant could reasonably be expected not to notice at the pickup point should be considered if the claimant reports the damage to claims or transportation office personnel within a short time, normally a few days after arriving at the installation.


(4) Credibility. Factors that indicate a claimant’s credibility is questionable include amounts claimed that are exaggerated in comparison with the cost of similar items, insignificant or almost undetectable damage, very recent purchase dates for most items claimed, and statements that appear incredible. Such claimants should be required to provide more evidence than is normally expected.


(5) Inspections. Whenever a question arises about damage to property, the best way to determine a proper award is to examine the items closely to determine the nature of the damage. For furniture, undersurfaces and the edges of drawers and doors should be examined to determine whether the material is solid hardwood, fine quality veneer over hardwood, veneer over pressed wood, or other types of material. If the inspection is conducted at the claimant’s quarters, the general quality of property should be determined. Observations by repairmen and transportation inspectors are very valuable, but on occasion, claims examiners may request an inspection. Such inspections are necessary to reduce the number of reconsiderations and fraudulent claims and are invaluable in enabling claims personnel to understand the facts in many situations.


[57 FR 5055, Feb. 12, 1992, as amended at 72 FR 53423, Sept. 19, 2007]


§ 751.10 Form of claim.

The claim should be submitted on DD Form 1842 (Claim for Personal Property) accompanied by DD Form 1844 (List of Property). If DD Forms 1842 and 1844
1
are not available, any writing will be accepted and considered if it asserts a demand for a specific sum and substantially describes the facts necessary to support a claim cognizable under these regulations. The claim must be signed by a proper claimant (see § 751.5) or by a person with a power of attorney for a proper claimant. A copy of the power of attorney must be included with the claim.




1 Copies of these forms may be obtained by contacting the legal office or personal property office serving the installation where the claimant is stationed, or nearest to the point where the loss or damage occurred or on the Internet at http://www.jag.navy.mil.


[57 FR 5055, Feb. 12, 1992, as amended at 72 FR 53424, Sept. 19, 2007]


§ 751.11 Investigation of claim.

Upon receipt of a claim, the claim shall be stamped with the date and receiving office, forwarded to the cognizant PCU and be referred to a claims examiner. The examiner shall consider all information and evidence submitted with the claim and shall conduct such further investigation as may be necessary and appropriate.


[72 FR 53424, Sept. 19, 2007]


§ 751.12 Payments.

Payment of approved personnel claims will be made by the Navy or Marine Corps disbursing officer serving the adjudicating authority. Payments will be charged to funds made available to the adjudicating authority for this purpose.


[72 FR 53424, Sept. 19, 2007]


§ 751.13 Partial payments.

(a) Partial payments when hardship exists. When claimants suffer a significant, compensable loss of items that are needed for daily living, and can demonstrate a need for immediate funds to replace some of those items (e.g., food, clothes, baby items, etc.) the adjudicating authority may authorize a partial payment of an appropriate amount, normally one-half of the estimated total payment. When a partial payment is made a copy of the payment voucher and all other information related to the partial payment shall be placed in the claim file. Action shall be taken to ensure the amount of the partial payment is deducted from the adjudicated value of the claim when final payment is made.


(b) Marine hardship payments. The Marine claimant’s Transportation Management Office shall ensure compliance with all requirements of § 751.14(a), and may request authority for payment by message from the Commandant of the Marine Corps (MRP-2).


(c) Effect of partial payment. Partial payments are to be subtracted from the adjudicated value of the claim before payment of the balance due. Overpayments are to be properly recouped.


[72 FR 53424, Sept. 19, 2007]


§ 751.14 Reconsideration and appeal.

(a) General. When a claim is denied either in whole or in part, the claimant shall be given written notification of the initial adjudication and of the right to submit a written request for reconsideration to the original adjudicating authority within 6 months from the date the claimant receives notice of the initial adjudication of the claim. If a claimant requests reconsideration and if it is determined that the original action was erroneous or incorrect, it shall be modified and, when appropriate, a supplemental payment shall be approved. If full additional payment is not granted, the file shall be forwarded for reconsideration to the next higher adjudicating authority. For claims originally adjudicated by the Head, Personnel Claims Unit Norfolk, the files will be forwarded to the Judge Advocate General (Claims and Tort Litigation)(Code 15) for final action. The claimant shall be notified of this action either by letter or by copy of the letter forwarding the file to higher adjudicating authority. The forwarding letter shall include a synopsis of action taken on the file and reasons for the action or denial, as well as a recommendation of further action or denial.


(b) Files forwarded to JAG. For files forwarded to JAG in accordance with § 751.14(a), the forwarding endorsement shall include the specific reasons why the requested relief was not granted and shall address the specific points or complaints raised by the claimant’s request for reconsideration.


(c) Appeals procedure for claims submitted by Marine Corps personnel. Where any of the Marine Corps adjudication authorities listed in § 751.8(b) fail to grant the relief requested, or otherwise resolve the claim to the satisfaction of the claimant, the request for reconsideration shall be forwarded together with the entire original file and the adjudicating authority’s recommendation, to the Judge Advocate General.


[72 FR 53424, Sept. 19, 2007]


§§ 751.15-751.20 [Reserved]

Subpart B [Reserved]

PART 752 – ADMIRALTY CLAIMS


Authority:5 U.S.C. 301; 10 U.S.C. 5013, 5148 and 7621-7623; 32 CFR 700.105 and 700.331.

§ 752.1 Scope.

This part applies to admiralty-tort claims. These include claims against the United States for damage caused by a vessel in the naval service or by other property under the jurisdiction of the Navy, or damage caused by a maritime tort committed by an agent or employee of the Navy for which the Navy has assumed an obligation to respond for damage. Affirmative claims by the United States for damage caused by a vessel or floating object to Navy property are covered under this part.


[72 FR 56268, Oct. 3, 2007]


§ 752.2 Organization.

(a) Administrative authority of the Secretary of the Navy. The Secretary of the Navy has administrative authority for settlement and direct payment where the amount paid does not exceed $15,000,000 and where the matter is not in litigation, of claims for damage caused by naval vessels or by other property under the jurisdiction of the Navy, or damage caused by a maritime tort committed by an agent or employee of the Navy, and for towage or salvage services rendered to naval vessels (10 U.S.C. 7622). The Secretary also has authority to settle affirmative admiralty claims for damage caused by a vessel or floating object to property under the jurisdiction of the Navy (10 U.S.C. 7623).


(b) Admiralty and Maritime Law Division of the Office of the Judge Advocate General. The Navy’s admiralty-tort claims are processed and adjudicated in the Admiralty and Maritime Law Division of the Office of the Judge Advocate General. All correspondence with the Admiralty and Maritime Law Division should be addressed to the Office of the Judge Advocate General (Code 11), 1322 Patterson Avenue SE, Suite 3000, Washington Navy Yard, DC 20374-5066.


(c) Mission and policy. The primary mission of the Admiralty and Maritime Law Division is to effect prompt and equitable settlements of admiralty claims, both against and in favor of the United States. The settlement procedure has evolved to eliminate the expenses and delays arising out of litigation and to obtain results advantageous to the financial interests of the United States. Where settlements cannot be made, litigation ensues in the Federal Courts. The final test of whether a settlement is justified is the probable result of litigation. Settlements are therefore considered and determined by the probable results of litigation. The policy of the Navy is to effect fair and prompt settlements of admiralty claims wherever legal liability exists.


(d) Admiralty-tort claims. As indicated above, the Admiralty and Maritime Law Division primarily handles admiralty-tort claims. These are claims for damage caused by vessels in the naval service or by other property under the jurisdiction of the Navy, or damage caused by a maritime tort committed by an agent or employee of the Navy, and claims for damage caused by a privately owned vessel to a vessel or property of the Navy (affirmative claims). The Admiralty and Maritime Law Division also handles claims for towage and salvage services rendered to a vessel in the naval service.


(e) Admiralty-contract claims. Admiralty-contract claims arising out of the operations of the Military Sealift Command (MSC) are handled by its Office of Counsel. MSC is responsible for the procurement of vessels and space for the commercial ocean transportation of Department of Defense cargo, mail, and personnel. It is also responsible for the maintenance, repair, and alteration of Government-owned vessels assigned to it. The Office of Counsel, MSC, deals with the various claims of a contract nature which arise out of these operations. These include claims for cargo damage, charter hire, redelivery, general average, and claims arising under MSC ship-repair contracts.


(f) Damage caused by Navy contract stevedores. Office of Counsel, Naval Supply Systems Command, has cognizance of admiralty claims for damage caused by Navy contract stevedores. Under these stevedore contracts, the stevedoring companies are responsible for negligent acts of their employees which result in vessel damage. It is important that the extent of any such damage be accurately determined and promptly reported to the contracting officer having cognizance of the particular stevedore contract involved.


(g) Resolving conflicts. Admiralty-tort claims, such as collision, personal-injury, and death claims, are dealt with by the Admiralty and Maritime Law Division, irrespective of whether an MSC vessel or other naval vessel is involved. Whether any particular claim is to be handled by JAG or by MSC, therefore, is determined by the nature of the claim. Cases may arise which could be handled by either office. If doubt exists, such matters should be reported both to JAG and to MSC. An agreement will then be reached between the Admiralty and Maritime Law Division and the Office of Counsel, MSC, as to how the incident should be handled.


[39 FR 9962, Mar. 15, 1974, as amended at 55 FR 12173, Apr. 2, 1990; 65 FR 60861, 60862, Oct. 13, 2000; 69 FR 20542, Apr. 16, 2004; 72 FR 56268, Oct. 3, 2007]


§ 752.3 Claims against the Navy.

(a) Settlement authority. 10 U.S.C. 7622 provides settlement authority for damage caused by a vessel in the naval service or by other property under the jurisdiction of the Department of the Navy; compensation for towage or salvage service, including contract salvage, rendered to a vessel in the naval service or to other property of the Navy; or damage caused by a maritime tort committed by any agent or employee of the Department of the Navy or by property under the jurisdiction of the Department of the Navy. The limit on the Secretary’s settlement authority is payment of $15,000,000. A claim which is settled for an amount over $15,000,000 is certified to Congress for payment. Section 7622 provides that the Secretary may delegate his settlement authority in matters where the amount to be paid is not over $1,000,000. Under the Secretary’s delegation, settlements not exceeding $500,000 may be effected by the Judge Advocate General. Under the Secretary’s delegation, settlements not exceeding $250,000 may be effected by the Deputy Assistant Judge Advocate General (Admiralty and Maritime Law).


(b) Settlement is final. The legislation specifically authorizes the Secretary to settle, compromise, and pay claims. The settlement, upon acceptance of payment by the claimant, is final and conclusive for all purposes.


(c) Settlement procedures. Where the amount paid is over $500,000, after agreement is reached with counsel or claimants, the procedure is to prepare a settlement recommendation for the approval of the Secretary of the Navy. When settlement has been approved, the voucher required for effecting payment is prepared. The settlement check is then exchanged, in keeping with the commercial practice, for an executed release. In some situations, where the exchange of documents is impracticable, a claimant is requested to forward the executed release by mail, on the understanding that the release does not become effective until the check is received in payment. Claims settled under 10 U.S.C. 7622 are paid out of annual Department of Defense appropriations.


(d) Limitation period. The Secretary’s settlement authorization is subject to a two-year limitation. This limitation is not extended by the filing of claim nor by negotiations or correspondence. A settlement agreement must be reached before the end of the two-year period. If settlement is not accomplished, then the claimant must file suit under the appropriate statute to avoid the limitation bar. The agreement reached in negotiations must receive the approval of the Secretary of the Navy or his designee, depending on the amount involved, prior to the expiration of the two-year period.


(e) Matters in litigation. When suit is filed, the matter comes within the cognizance of the Department of Justice, and the Secretary of the Navy is no longer able to entertain a claim or to make administrative settlement.


[39 FR 9962, Mar. 15, 1974, as amended at 55 FR 12173, Apr. 2, 1990; 65 FR 60861, 60862, Oct. 13, 2000; 69 FR 20542, Apr. 16, 2004; 72 FR 56268, Oct. 3, 2007]


§ 752.4 Affirmative claims.

(a) Settlement authority. The Navy has the same authority to settle affirmative admiralty claims as it does claims against the Navy. The statute conferring this authorization is codified in 10 U.S.C. 7623, and is the reciprocal of 10 U.S.C. 7622 referred to in § 752.3.


(b) Scope. 10 U.S.C. 7623 is a tort claims-settlement statute. It is not limited to affirmative claims arising out of collision, but embraces all instances of damage caused by a vessel or floating object to property of the United States under the jurisdiction of the Department of the Navy or for which the Department of the Navy has assumed an obligation to respond. Perhaps the most frequent instance is where a privately owned vessel damages a Navy pier or shore structure. To eliminate any issue of whether the damaging instrumentality was a vessel, the words “or floating object” were included.


(c) Statute of limitation. The United States is subject to a three-year statute of limitation when it asserts an affirmative claim for money damages grounded in tort. This limitation is subject to the usual exclusions, such as inability to prosecute due to war, unavailability of the “res” or defendant, and certain exemptions from legal process (28 U.S.C. 2415, 2416).


(d) Litigation. 10 U.S.C. 7623 does not apply to any claim where suit is filed. If the Admiralty and Maritime Law Division is unable to effect settlement, the matter is referred to the Department of Justice for the filing of a complaint against the offending party. Thereafter, as in the case of adverse litigated claims, the Navy has no further authority to effect settlement.


[39 FR 9962, Mar. 15, 1974, as amended at 55 FR 12174, Apr. 2, 1990; 65 FR 60861, Oct. 13, 2000; 69 FR 20542, Apr. 16, 2004; 72 FR 56268, Oct. 3, 2007]


§ 752.5 Salvage.

(a) Scope. This section relates to salvage claims against or by the Navy for compensation for towage and salvage services, including contract salvage, rendered to a vessel in the naval service or to other property under the jurisdiction of the Department of the Navy, or for salvage services rendered by the Department of the Navy. Suits for salvage may be maintained under the Public Vessels Act, and salvage claims are within the Secretary of the Navy’s administrative-settlement authority under 10 U.S.C. 7622. Salvage claims against the Navy are reported to and processed by the Judge Advocate General (Admiralty and Maritime Law Division). Both claims and suits for salvage against the United States are subject to the two-year limitation of the Public Vessels Act and the Navy’s settlement authority.


(b) Affirmative claims. Authorization for the settlement of affirmative salvage claims is contained in 10 U.S.C. 7365. Assertion of such claims is handled in the first instance by the Assistant Supervisor of Salvage (Admiralty), USN, Naval Sea Systems Command (SEA OOCL), 2531 Jefferson Davis Highway, NC/3 Room 11E54, Arlington, VA 22242-5160. Salvage claims are referred to the Admiralty Division only if the Assistant Supervisor of Salvage (Admiralty) is unsuccessful in making collection. Any money received in settlement of affirmative salvage claims is credited to appropriations for maintaining salvage facilities by the Navy, pursuant to 10 U.S.C. 7367.


[39 FR 9962, Mar. 15, 1974, as amended at 41 FR 26866, June 30, 1976; 55 FR 12174, Apr. 2, 1990; 65 FR 60861, 60862, Oct. 13, 2000; 69 FR 20542, Apr. 16, 2004]


PART 755 – CLAIMS FOR INJURIES TO PROPERTY UNDER ARTICLE 139 OF THE UNIFORM CODE OF MILITARY JUSTICE


Authority:5 U.S.C. 301; 10 U.S.C. 939, 5013, and5148; E.O. 11476, as reported in 3 CFR, 1969 Comp., p. 132; 32 CFR 700.206 and 700.1202.


Source:56 FR 42232, Aug. 27, 1991, unless otherwise noted.


Note 1:

This part 755 is chapter IV of the Manual of the Judge Advocate General of the Navy.



Note 2:

The Uniform Code of Military Justice (10 U.S.C. 801-940) is referred to in this part 755 as the “UCMJ”. The Manual for Courts-Martial, United States, 1984 (E.O. 12473 of August 1, 1984) is referred to in this part 755 as “MCM 1984”.

§ 755.1 Statutory authority.

Article 139, UCMJ, redress of injuries to property, is the basis for this chapter.


§ 755.2 Scope.

This chapter provides for assessments against the pay of members of the naval service in satisfaction of claims for property damage caused under certain circumstances. Claims for damage, loss, or destruction of privately owned property caused by a person or persons in the naval service, are payable under Article 139, UCMJ, only if such damage, loss, or destruction is caused by riotous conduct, willful conduct, or acts showing such reckless or wanton disregard of the property rights of others that willful damage or destruction is implied. Acts of the type punishable under Article 109, UCMJ, are cognizable under Article 139, UCMJ. Charges against pay under these regulations shall be made only against the pay of persons shown to have been principal offenders or accessories.


§ 755.3 Claims not cognizable.

The following claims are not cognizable under this chapter.


(a) Claims resulting from simple negligence.


(b) Claims of subrogees.


(c) Claims for personal injury or death.


(d) Claims arising from acts or omissions within the scope of employment of the offender.


(e) Claims for reimbursement for damage, loss, or destruction of Government property.


§ 755.4 Limitation on claims.

(a) Time limitations. A claim must be submitted within 90 days of the incident giving rise to it.


(b) Acts of property owner. When the acts or omissions of the property owner, his lessee, or agent were a proximate contributing factor to the loss or damage of the property, assessments will not be made against members of the naval service in excess of the amount for which they are found to be directly responsible, i.e., comparative responsibility for the loss will be the standard for determining financial responsibility.


(c) Only direct damages considered. Assessment will be made only for direct physical damages to the property. Indirect, remote, or inconsequential damage will not be considered.


§ 755.5 Complaint by the injured party and investigation.

(a) A claim shall contain a statement setting forth the amount of the claim, the facts and circumstances surrounding the claim and any other information that will assist in the investigation and resolution of the matter. When there is more than one complaint resulting from a single incident, each claimant must file a claim separately and individually. The claim shall be personally signed by the claimant or his duly authorized representative or agent.


(b) Where the claim alleges misconduct by members of the command, a commanding officer to whom the claim is submitted shall convene an investigation under this Manual to inquire into the matter. Where a complaint is received by a commanding officer to whose command the alleged offenders do not report, he shall forward the claim and other pertinent information about the matter to the member’s commanding officer who will convene an investigation into the incident. Where the command of the alleged offenders cannot be determined, the claim and supporting materials shall be forwarded to the Chief of Naval Personnel or the Commandant of the Marine Corps, as appropriate, for action.


(c) The investigation shall inquire into the circumstances surrounding the claim, gather all relevant information about the matter (answering the who, what, where, when, why, and how questions) and make findings and opinions, as appropriate, about the validity of the claim under Article 139, UCMJ, and these regulations. The investigation shall determine the amount of damage suffered by the property owner.


(d) The investigation shall make recommendations about the amount to be assessed against the pay of the responsible parties. If more than one person is found responsible, recommendations shall be made about the assessments against all individuals.


§ 755.6 Action where offenders are members of one command.

(a) Action by commanding officer. The commanding officer shall ensure the alleged offenders are shown the investigative report and are advised they have 20 days within which to submit a statement or additional information on the incident. If the member declines to submit information, he shall so state in writing within the 20 day period. The commanding officer shall review the investigation and determine whether the claim is properly within the provisions of Article 139, UCMJ, and these regulations, and whether the facts indicate responsibility for the damage on members of the command. If the commanding officer finds the claim payable under these regulations, he shall fix the amount to be assessed against the offenders.


(b) Review. If the commanding officer has authority to convene a general court-martial, no further review of the investigation is required as to the redress of injuries to property. If the commanding officer does not have general court-martial convening authority, the investigation and the commanding officer’s action thereon shall be forwarded to the officer exercising general court-martial jurisdiction (OEGCM) over the command for review and action on the claim. That officer’s action on the claim shall be communicated to the commanding officer who will take action consistent with the determination.


(c) Charge against pay. Where the amount does not exceed $5,000.00, the amount ordered by the commanding officer shall, as provided in the Navy Comptroller Manual, be charged against the pay of the offenders and the amounts so collected will be paid to the claimant. Where the amount exceeds $5,000.00, the claim, the investigation, and the commanding officer’s recommendation shall be forwarded for review prior to checkage to Headquarters, U.S. Marine Corps (Code JAR) or the Judge Advocate General, as appropriate. The amount charged in any single month against the pay of offenders shall not exceed one-half of basic pay, as defined in paragraph 126h(2), Manual for Courts-Martial. The action of the commanding officer in ordering the assessment shall be conclusive on any disbursing officer for payment to the claimant of the damages assessed, approved, charged, and collected.


§ 755.7 Action where offenders are members of different commands.

(a) Action by common superior. The investigative report shall be forwarded to the common superior exercising general court-martial jurisdiction over the commands to which the alleged offenders are assigned. That officer shall ensure the alleged offenders are shown the investigative report and permitted to comment on it, should they desire, before action is taken on the claim. That officer shall review the investigation and determine whether the claim is properly within the provisions of Article 139, UCMJ, and these regulations, and whether the facts indicate responsibility for the damage on members of his command. If the claim is found payable under these regulations, he shall fix the amount to be assessed against the offenders and direct the appropriate commanding officers to take action accordingly.


(b) Forwarding to SECNAV (JAG). Where it is not practical or possible to carry out the procedure in § 755.7(a) of this section, the investigation or investigations shall be forwarded to the Secretary of the Navy (Judge Advocate General) who will take action in the matter. Commanding officers, in such a situation, are not to make charges against the pay of their members until directed by the Secretary of the Navy (Judge Advocate General).


§ 755.8 Reconsideration and appeal.

(a) Reconsideration. The OEGCM may, upon a receipt of a request for reconsideration by either the claimant or a member who has been assessed pecuniary liability, reopen the investigation or take any other action he believes is necessary in the interests of justice. If the OEGCM contemplates acting favorably on the request, he will provide all individuals interested in the claim with notice and an opportunity to respond. The basis for any change will be noted in the OEGCM’s decision.


(b) Appeal. In claims involving $5,000.00 or less, a claimant or member who has been assessed pecuniary liability may appeal the decision to the OEGCM. An appeal must be submitted within 5 days of the receipt of the OEGCM’s decision. Appeals will be forwarded, via the OEGCM, to the Judge Advocate General for review and final action. In the event of an appeal, the imposition of the OEGCM’s decision will be held in abeyance pending the final action by JAG. If it appears that good cause exists that would make it impracticable for an appeal to be submitted within 5 days, the OEGCM may, in his discretion, grant an extension of time, as appropriate. His decision on extensions is final and nonappealable.


§ 755.9 Effect of court-martial proceedings.

Administrative action under these regulations is separate and distinct from and is not affected by any disciplinary action against the offender. The two proceedings are independent. Acquittal or conviction of the alleged offender by court-martial is evidence for the administrative action, but is not determinative on the issue of responsibility for damages under these regulations.


PART 756 – PROCEDURES FOR PROCESSING CLAIMS INVOLVING NON-APPROPRIATED FUND ACTIVITIES AND THEIR EMPLOYEES


Authority:5 U.S.C. 301, 10 U.S.C. 5013 and 5148.


Source:57 FR 4736, Feb. 7, 1992, unless otherwise noted.

§ 756.1 Scope.

This part explains how to settle claims for and against the United States for property damage, personal injury, or death arising out of the operation of non-appropriated fund activities (NAFI).
1




1 DoD Directive 5515.6 establishes policy governing the administrative processing of claims arising out of the operation of non-appropriated fund activities.


[72 FR 53425, Sept. 19, 2007]


§ 756.2 Definitions.

(a) Nonappropriated-fund instrumentality (NAFI). An instrumentality of the Federal Government established to generate and administer nonappropriated-funds for programs and services contributing to the mental and physical well-being of Department of Defense personnel and their dependents. A NAFI is not incorporated under the laws of any State and enjoys the privileges and immunities of the Federal Government.


(b) Nonappropriated-funds. Funds generated through the use and patronage of NAFI’s, not including funds appropriated by Congress.


(c) Employees of NAFIs. Personnel employed by NAFIs whose salaries are paid from non-appropriated funds.


[57 FR 4736, Feb. 7, 1992, as amended at 72 FR 53425, Sept. 19, 2007]


§ 756.3 Notification.

(a) Some NAFI’s, such as flying clubs, carry private commercial insurance to protect them from claims for property damage and personal injury attributable to their operations. The Commandant of the Marine Corps, the Chief of Naval Personnel, and the Commander, Naval Supply Systems Command determine whether NAFI’s within their cognizance shall carry liability insurance or become self-insurers, in whole or in part.


(b) The Marine Corps requires mandatory participation in the Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) Composite Insurance Program by the following operations: MWR operations and retail services, food and hospitality, recreation; and special NAFI activities including flying clubs, rod and gun clubs, Interservice Rifle Fund, Marine Corps Marathon and Dependent Cafeteria Fund. The following organizations may also participate in the MWR Composite Insurance Program, if desired: Child welfare centers, billeting funds, chapel funds, and civilian welfare funds.


(c) When the operations of NAFI’s result in property damage or personal injury, the insurance carrier, if any, should be given immediate written notification. Notification should not be postponed until a claim is filed. When the activity is self-insured, the self-insurance fund shall be notified of the potential liability by the activity.


§ 756.4 Responsibility.

(a) All claims resulting from NAFIs should be submitted to the command having cognizance over the NAFI involved. The claim will then be forwarded to the Tort Claims Unit (TCU) Norfolk located at the following address: Department of the Navy, Office of the Judge Advocate General, Tort Claims Unit Norfolk, 9620 Maryland Avenue, Suite 100, Norfolk, VA 23511-2989.


(b) The TCU Norfolk has cognizance over all DoN claims. Normally, the TCU Norfolk has primary responsibility for the negotiation and settlement of NAFI claims. This is because NAFIs are Federal agencies within the meaning of the Federal Tort Claims Act (FTCA) if the NAFI is charged with an essential function of the DoN and if the degree of control and supervision by the Navy is more than casual or perfunctory. Compare United States v. Holcombe, 277 F.2d 143 (4th Cir. 1960) and Scott v. United States, 226 F. Supp. 846, (D. Ga. 1963). Consequently, to the extent sovereign immunity is waived by the FTCA, 28 U.S.C. 1346(b), 2671-2672, 2674-2680, the United States remains ultimately liable for payment of NAFI claims.


[72 FR 53425, Sept. 19, 2007]


§ 756.5 Investigation.

Claims arising out of the operation of NAFIs, in and outside the United States, shall be investigated in accordance with the procedures for investigating similar claims against appropriated fund activities. The Manual of the Judge Advocate General (JAGMAN), Chapter II
2
provides guidance in conducting an investigation of an incident or event likely to result in claims or civil litigation against or for DoN or the United States.




2 JAGMAN Chapter II (JAG Instruction 5800.7E) is available at the Web site of the Navy Judge Advocate General’s Corps at http://www.jag.navy.mil.


[72 FR 53425, Sept. 19, 2007]


§ 756.6 Negotiation.

(a) General. Claims from NAFIs should be processed primarily through procedures, regulations, and statutes applicable to similar appropriated fund activity claims.


(b) When the NAFI is insured. When a NAFI is insured, the insurer or the contracted third-party claims administrator (TPA) will normally conduct negotiations with claimants. The TCU Norfolk shall monitor the negotiations conducted by the insurer or TPA. Monitoring is normally limited to ascertaining that someone has been assigned to negotiate, to obtain periodic status reports, and to close files on settled claims. Any dissatisfaction with the insurer’s or TPA’s handling of the negotiations should be referred directly to the Judge Advocate General (Claims and Tort Litigation) for appropriate action. If requested by the insurer or TPA, the TCU Norfolk may conduct negotiations. If TCU Norfolk negotiates a final settlement, however, request for payment will be forwarded to the insurer or TPA for payment. Concurrence by the insurer or TPA in the amount of the settlement is not necessary.


(c) When the NAFI is not insured. When there is no private commercial insurer and the NAFI has made no independent arrangements for negotiations, the TCU Norfolk is responsible for conducting negotiations. When an appropriate settlement is negotiated by the Navy, the recommended award will be forwarded to the NAFI for payment from non-appropriated funds.


[72 FR 53425, Sept. 19, 2007]


§ 756.7 Payment.

(a) Claims that can be settled for less than 1,500.00. A claim not covered by insurance (or not paid by the insurer), that can be settled for $1,500.00 or less, may be adjudicated by the TCU Norfolk or single-service authority and forwarded to the commanding officer of the activity concerned or designee for payment out of funds available to the commanding officer. The TCU Norfolk or single-service authority will obtain the required release from the claimant.


(b) Claims that cannot be settled for less than $1,500.00. A claim negotiated by the Navy, not covered by insurance, that is for more than $1,500.00 will be forwarded to the appropriate non-appropriated fund headquarters command for payment from its non-appropriated funds.


(c) When payment is possible under another statute. In some cases, neither the NAFI nor its insurer may be legally responsible. In those instances when there is no negligence, and payment is authorized under some other statute, such as the Foreign Claims Act, 10 U.S.C. 2734-2736, the claim may be considered for payment from appropriated funds or may be referred to the TCU Norfolk for appropriate action.


(d) Other claims. A NAFI’s private insurance policy is usually not available to cover losses that result from some act or omission of a mere participant in a non-appropriated fund activity. In the event the NAFI declines to pay the claim, the file shall be forwarded to the TCU Norfolk for determination.


[72 FR 53426, Sept. 19, 2007]


§ 756.8 Denial.

Claims resulting from non-appropriated fund activities may be denied only by the TCU Norfolk. The denial will begin the six-month limitation on filing suit against the United States for claims filed under the FTCA. Denial of a claim shall be in writing and in accordance with subparts A and B of part 750 of this chapter, as appropriate. The TCU Norfolk should not deny claims that have initially been processed and negotiated by a non-appropriated fund activity, its insurer, or TPA, until the activity or its insurer has clearly stated in writing that it does not intend to pay the claim and has elected to defend the claim in court.


[72 FR 53426, Sept. 19, 2007]


§ 756.9 Claims by employees.

(a) Property. Claims by employees of NAFIs for loss, damage, or destruction of personal property incident to their employment shall be processed and adjudicated in accordance with subparts A or B of part 751 of this chapter, as appropriate. The claims will then be forwarded to the appropriate NAFI for payment from non-appropriated funds.


(b) Personal injury or death – (1) Personal injury or death of citizens or permanent residents of the United States employed anywhere, or foreign nationals employed within the United States. Compensation is provided by the Longshore and Harbor Workers’ Compensation Act (33 U.S.C. 901-950) for employees of NAFIs who have suffered injury or death arising out of, and in the course of, their employment (5 U.S.C. 8171). That Act is the exclusive basis for Government liability for such injuries or deaths that are covered (5 U.S.C. 8173). A claim should first be made under that Act if there is a substantial possibility the injury or death is covered under the Act’s provisions.


(2) Personal injury or death of foreign nationals employed outside of the continental United States. Employees who are not citizens or permanent residents, and who are employed outside the continental United States, may be protected by private insurance of the NAFI or by other arrangements. When a non-appropriated fund activity has elected not to obtain insurance coverage or to make other arrangements, compensation is separately provided by Federal statute, military regulations, and agreements with foreign countries. See 5 U.S.C. 8172, DoD 1401.1-M, Personnel Policy Manual for Non-appropriated Fund Instrumentalities and BUPERINST 5300.10A, NAF Personnel Manual.


[72 FR 53426, Sept. 19, 2007]


PART 757 – AFFIRMATIVE CLAIMS REGULATIONS


Authority:5 U.S.C. 301; 10 U.S.C. 939, 5013, and 5148; E.O. 11476, 3 CFR, 1969 Comp., p. 132; 32 CFR 700.206 and 700.1202.


Source:57 FR 5072, Feb. 12, 1992, unless otherwise noted.

Subpart A – Property Damage Claims

§ 757.1 Scope of subpart A.

Subpart A describes how to assert, administer, and collect claims for damage to or loss or destruction of Government property through negligence or wrongful acts.


§ 757.2 Statutory authority.

(a) General. All affirmative claims for damage to or loss of Government property in favor of the United States are processed in accordance with the Federal Collections Claims Act (31 U.S.C. 3711), as amended by the Debt Collection Act of 1982, PL 97-365, 96 Stat. 1749 (25 October 1982), PL 101-552, 104 Stat. 2736 (15 November 1990) and the Debt Collection Improvement Act of 1996, PL 104-134, 110 Stat. 1321, 1358 (26 April 1996). Department of Defense Directive designees, the authority granted to the Secretary of Defense under the Federal Claims Collection Act.


(b) Statute of limitations. Subject to specific provisions in other statutes, there is a general 3-year statute of limitations on affirmative Government tort claims pursuant to 28 U.S.C. 2415(b).


[72 FR 53427, Sept. 19, 2007]


§ 757.3 Regulatory authority.

The regulations published in 31 CFR Chapter IX control the collection and settlement of affirmative claims. This section supplements the material contained in those regulations. Where this section conflicts with the materials and procedure published in 31 CFR Chapter IX, the latter controls.


[57 FR 5072, Feb. 12, 1992, as amended at 72 FR 53427, Sept. 19, 2007]


§ 757.4 Claims that may be collected.

(a) Against responsible third parties for damage to Government property, or the property of non-appropriated fund activities. It should be noted, however, that as a general rule, the Government does not seek payment from service members and Government employees for damages caused by their simple negligence while acting within the scope of their employment. Exceptions to this general policy will be made when the incident involves aggravating circumstances.


(b) For money paid or reimbursed by the government for damage to a rental car in accordance with the Joint Federal Travel regulations (volume 1, paragraph U 3415-C and volume 2, paragraph C 2101-2). Collection action shall be taken against third parties liable in tort. Collection action shall not be taken against Government personnel who rented the vehicle.


(c) Other claims. Any other claim for money or property in favor of the United States cognizable under the Federal Claims Collections Act not specifically listed above.


[72 FR 53427, Sept. 19, 2007]


§ 757.5 Assertion of claims and collection procedures.

(a) General. The controlling procedures for administrative collection of claims are established in 31 CFR part 901.


(b) Officials authorized to pursue claims. The Judge Advocate General; the Deputy Judge Advocate General; any Assistant Judge Advocate General; the Deputy Assistant Judge Advocate General (Claims and Tort Litigation) are authorized to pursue and collect all affirmative claims in favor of the United States, except in countries where another service has single service responsibility in accordance with DoD Directive 5515.8.


(c) Dollar limitations. All of the officers listed in § 757.5(b) are authorized to compromise and terminate collection action on affirmative claims of $100,000.00 or less.


(d) Determining liability. Liability must be determined in accordance with the law of the place in which the damage occurred, including the applicable traffic laws, elements of tort, and possible defenses.


(e) Assertion of a claim. (1) Assertion of the claim is accomplished by mailing to the tortfeasor a “Notice of Claim.” The notice is to be mailed certified mail, return receipt requested, and should include the following information:


(i) Reference to the statutory right to collect;


(ii) A demand for payment or restoration;


(iii) A description of damage and estimate of repair;


(iv) A description of the incident, including date and place; and


(v) The name, phone number, and office address of the claims personnel to contact.


(2) See also 31 CFR part 901.


(f) Full payment. When a responsible party or insurer tenders full payment or a compromise settlement on a claim, the payment should be in the form of a check or money order made payable to “United States Treasury.” The check or money order shall then be forwarded to the disbursing officer serving the collecting activity for deposit in accordance with the provisions of the Navy Comptroller Manual. For collections for damages to real property, the collection is credited to the account available for the repair or replacement of the real property at the time of recovery. (10 U.S.C. 2782.) For damages to personal property, the money is returned to the general treasury.


(g) Installment payments. See 31 CFR 901.8 for specific procedures. In general, if the debtor is financially unable to pay the debt in one lump sum, an installment payment plan may be arranged. Installment payments will be required on a monthly basis and the size of payment must bear a reasonable relation to the size of the debt and the debtor’s ability to pay. The installment agreements should specify payments of such size and frequency to liquidate the Government’s claim in not more than 3 years. Installment payments of less than $50.00 per month should be accepted only if justified on the grounds of financial hardship or for some other reasonable cause. In all installment arrangements, a confession of judgment note setting out a repayment schedule should be executed.


(h) Damage to nonappropriated-fund instrumentality (NAFI) property. Any amount collected for loss or damage to property of a NAFI shall be forwarded to the headquarters of the nonappropriated-fund activity for deposit with that activity. In those situations where the recovery involves damage to both NAFI-owned property and other Government property, e.g., destruction of an exchange building resulting in damage to both the building and the exchange-owned property inside, recovery for the exchange-owned property shall be forwarded to the NAFI. Recovery for building damage shall be deposited in accordance with § 757.5(f) above.


(i) Damage to industrial-commercial property. When a loss or cost of repair has been borne by an industrial-commercial activity, payment shall be deposited in the Navy Industrial Fund of the activity in accordance with the provisions of the Navy Comptroller Manual. When a claim is based on a loss or damage sustained by such an activity, a notation to this effect shall be included in any claim file forwarded to the Judge Advocate General.


(j) Replacement in kind or repair. The responsible party, or insurer, may want to repair or replace in kind damaged property. The commanding officer or officer in charge of the activity sustaining the loss is authorized to accept repair or replacement if, in his discretion, it is considered to be in the best interests of the United States.


(k) Release. The Supervisory Attorney, Tort Claims Unit, Norfolk is authorized to execute a release of the claim when all repairs have been completed to the Government’s satisfaction, and when all repair bills have been paid. No prior approval from the Judge Advocate General is required for this procedure. If repair or replacement is made, a notation shall be made in any investigation or claims file.


[57 FR 5072, Feb. 12, 1992, as amended at 72 FR 53427, Sept. 19, 2007]


§ 757.6 Waiver, compromise, and referral of claims.

(a) Officials authorized to compromise claims. The officers identified in § 757.5(b) may collect the full amount on all claims, and may compromise, execute releases or terminate collection action on all claims of $20,000.00 or less. Collection action may be terminated for the convenience of the Government if the tortfeasor cannot be located, is found to be judgment-proof, has denied liability, or has refused to respond to repeated correspondence concerning legal liability involving a small claim. A termination for the convenience of the Government is made after it is determined that the case does not warrant litigation or that it is not cost-effective to pursue recovery efforts.


(b) Claims over $100,000.00. Claims in excess of $100,000.00 may not be compromised for less than the full amount or collection action terminated without approval from the Department of Justice (DOJ).


(c) Notification. The Judge Advocate General shall be notified prior to all requests made to the DOJ to compromise, terminate collection, or referral for further collection action or litigation.


(d) Litigation reports. Litigation reports prepared in accordance with 31 CFR part 904 shall be forwarded through the Judge Advocate General (Claims and Tort Litigation) to the Department of Justice along with any case file for further collection action or litigation as required by the Federal Claims Collections Standards.


[57 FR 5072, Feb. 12, 1992, as amended at 72 FR 53428, Sept. 19, 2007]


§§ 757.7-757.10 [Reserved]

Subpart B – Medical Care Recovery Act (MCRA) Claims and Claims Asserted Pursuant to 10 U.S.C. 1095

§ 757.11 Scope of Subpart B.

Subpart B describes the assertion and collection of claims for medical care under the MCRA and 10 U.S.C. 1095. The MCRA states that when the Federal government provides treatment or pays for treatment of an individual who is injured or suffers a disease, the Government is authorized to recover the reasonable value of that treatment from any third party who is legally liable for the injury or disease. Title 10 U.S.C. 1095 provides for the collection from third-party payers for the value of health care services incurred by the Government on behalf of covered beneficiaries.


[72 FR 53428, Sept. 19, 2007]


§ 757.12 Statutory authorities.

(a) Medical Care Recovery Act, 42 U.S.C. 2651-2653 (2005).


(b) Title 10 U.S.C. 1095 (Health Care Services Incurred on Behalf of Covered Beneficiaries: Collection from Third-Party Payers).


(c) Title 10 U.S.C. 1079a (CHAMPUS: Treatment of Refunds and Other Amounts Collected).


[72 FR 53428, Sept. 19, 2007]


§ 757.13 Responsibility for MCRA actions.

(a) JAG designees. (1) Primary responsibility for investigating, asserting, and collecting Department of the Navy (DON) MCRA claims and properly forwarding MCRA claims to other Federal departments or agencies rests with the following personnel:


(i) Deputy Assistant Judge Advocate General (Claims and Tort Litigation Division) (Code 15); and the


(ii) Commanding Officer, Naval Legal Service Command Europe and Southwest Asia (NLSC EURSWA), Naples, Italy, in its area of geographic responsibility.


(2) JAG designee may assert and receive full payment on any MCRA claim. Code 15 may agree to compromise or waive claims for $100,000 or less. NLSC EURSWA may agree to compromise or waive claims for $40,000.00 or less. NLSC EURSWA claims in excess of $40,000.00 may be compromised or waived only with Code 15 approval. See Sec. 757.19 for further discussion of waiver and compromise.


(b) Navy Medical Treatment Facility (MTF). (1) Naval MTFs are responsible for ensuring potential MCRA/10 U.S.C. 1095 claims are brought to the attention of the appropriate JAG designee.


(2) The MTF reports all potential MCRA/10 U.S.C. 1095 cases by forwarding a copy of the daily injury log entries and admission records to the cognizant JAG designee within 7 days of treatment for which a third party may be liable. The JAG designee makes the determination of liability. Recovery for the costs of MTF care is based on Diagnostic Related Group rates or a Relative Value Unit. Rates are established by the Office of Management and Budget and/or the DoD, and published annually in the Federal Register.


(c) TRICARE Fiscal Intermediary. The TRICARE fiscal intermediary is required to identify and promptly mail claims involving certain diagnostic codes to the cognizant JAG designee. Claims are asserted for the actual amount that TRICARE paid.


(d) Department of Justice (DoJ). Only the DoJ may authorize compromise or waiver of an MCRA/10 U.S.C. 1095 claim in excess of $100,000.00 or settle an MCRA/10 U.S.C. 1095 claim in which the third party has filed a suit against the United States as a result of the incident which caused the injury and upon which the claim is based.


[72 FR 53428, Sept. 19, 2007]


§ 757.14 Claims asserted.

(a) General. The DoN asserts MCRA and 10 U.S.C. 1095 claims when medical care is furnished to Navy and Marine Corps active duty personnel, retirees, or their dependents, or any other person when appropriate, and third-party tort or contract liability exists for payment of medical expenses resulting from an injury or disease. Claims are asserted when the injured party is treated in a MTF or when the DoN is responsible for reimbursing a non-Federal care provider.


(b) Independent cause of action. The MCRA creates an independent cause of action for the United States. The Government can administratively assert and litigate MCRA claims in its own name and for its own benefit. Procedural defenses, such as a failure of the injured person to properly file and/or serve a complaint on the third party, that may prevent the injured person from recovering, do not prevent the United States from pursuing its own action to recover the value of medical treatment provided to the injured person. The right arises directly from the statute; the statutory reference to subrogation pertain only to one mode of enforcement. In creating an independent right in the Government, the Act prevents a release given by the injured person to a third party from affecting the Government’s claim.


(c) Liable parties. MCRA and 10 U.S.C 1095 claims may be asserted against individuals, corporations, associations and non-Federal Government agencies subject to the limitation described in § 757.15.


(d) Reasonable value of medical care. The reasonable value of medical care provided to an injured person is determined:


(1) By using the rate set as described in § 757.13 (b)(2) in bills issued by the MTF; or


(2) By the actual amount paid by the Federal Government to non-Federal medical care providers.


(e) Alternate theories of recovery. (1) Often, recovery under the MCRA is not possible because no third-party tort liability exists. For example, if a member, retiree, or dependent is driving a vehicle and is injured in single-car accident, there is no tortfeasor. Title 10 U.S.C. 1095 provides the Government alternate means for recovery as a third-party beneficiary of an insurance contract of the injured party.


(2) Recovery may also be possible under State workers’ compensation laws. Case law in this area is still emerging, but in most jurisdictions, the United States stands in the position of a lien claimant for services rendered.


[57 FR 5072, Feb. 12, 1992, as amended at 72 FR 53428, Sept. 19, 2007]


§ 757.15 Claims not asserted.

In some cases, public policy considerations limit the DoN’s assertion of claims against apparent third-party tortfeasors or a contract where the Government would be a third party beneficiary. Claims are not asserted against:


(a) Federal Government agencies. Claims are not asserted against any department, agency or instrumentality of the United States. “Agency or instrumentality” includes self-insured, non-appropriated-fund activities but does not include private associations.


(b) Injured service members, dependents, and employees of the United States. Claims are not asserted directly against a servicemember, the dependent of a servicemember, or an employee of the United States who is injured as a result of his own willful or negligent acts. The United States does assert, however, against policies that cover the injury.


(c) Employers of merchant seamen. Claims are not asserted against the employer of a merchant seaman who receives Federal medical care under 42 U.S.C. 249.


(d) Department of Veterans’ Affairs care for service-connected disability. Claims are not asserted for care provided to a veteran by the Department of Veterans’ Affairs when the care is for a service-connected disability. The United States will, however, claim for the reasonable value of care provided an individual before he is transferred to a Department of Veterans’ Affairs hospital. This policy does not apply in cases where the MTF referred the patient to the Veterans’ Affairs hospital and then paid for the care.


[57 FR 5072, Feb. 12, 1992, as amended at 72 FR 53428, Sept. 19, 2007]


§ 757.16 Claims asserted only with OJAG approval.

(a) Certain Government contractors. JAG approval is required before asserting a claim against a Federal government contractor when the contract provides that the contractor will be indemnified or held harmless by the Federal government for tort liability.


(b) U.S. personnel. JAG approval is required before asserting MCRA claims directly against servicemembers, their dependents and federal employees and their dependents for injury to another person. No approval is necessary to assert claims against their insurance policies, however, except for injuries caused by servicemembers and federal employees acting “within the scope of their employment.” Intra-familial tort immunity would not preclude the Government from asserting any claims for care furnished to a tortfeasor’s family members.


[72 FR 53429, Sept. 19, 2007]


§ 757.17 Statute of limitations.

(a) Federal. Claims asserted under the MCRA or against an automobile liability insurer through 10 U.S.C. 1095 are founded in tort and must be brought within 3 years after the action “first accrues” (28 U.S.C. 2415b). Normally, a medical care claim “first accrues” on the initial date of treatment.


(b) Claims asserted under 10 U.S.C. 1095. Although legal arguments can be made that claims asserted under 10 U.S.C. 1095 against a no-fault or personal injury protection insurer are founded in contract and can be brought within 6 years (28 U.S.C. 2415a), all claims should be asserted within 3 years of the date when the claim accrued. However, some states require notice of such claims to be filed within a shorter period of time.


[72 FR 53429, Sept. 19, 2007]


§ 757.18 Asserting the claim.

(a) Initial action by the JAG designee. When advised of a potential claim, the JAG designee will determine the Federal agency or department responsible for investigating and asserting the claim.


(1) When DoN has reimbursed a non-Federal provider for health care, or when TRICARE has made payment for a Navy health care beneficiary, the JAG designee will assert any resulting claim.


(2) When care is provided in a Federal treatment facility, the status of the injured person will determine the agency that will assert a resulting claim. Cost of treatment provided or paid for by an MTF is deposited in that MTF’s account, regardless of which service is making the collection.


(i) Where DoN members, retirees, or their dependents receive medical treatment from another Federal agency or department, the DoN will assert any claim on behalf of the United States based on information provided by the treating agency or department.


(ii) Similarly, where a DoN MTF provides care to personnel of another Federal agency or department, that other agency or department will assert any claim on behalf of the United States.


(3) If the claim is one which the DoN should assert, the JAG designee will forward all available information to the appropriate department or agency.


(4) If the claim is one which the DoN should assert, the JAG designee will ensure an appropriate investigation into the circumstances underlying the claim is initiated and will provide notice to the injured party and all third parties who may be liable to the injured person and the United States under the MCRA or 10 U.S.C. 1095.


(b) Investigating the claim. While there is no prescribed form or content for investigating these claims, the claims file will contain sufficient information on which to base valuation, assertion, settlement, waiver, and/or compromise decisions.


(c) Notice of claim. (1) The JAG designee will assert claims by mailing a notice of claim to identified third-party tortfeasors and their insurers or insurers for third-party beneficiary coverage. Many insured tortfeasors fail to notify their insurance companies of incidents. This failure may be a breach of the cooperation clause in the policy and may be grounds for the insurer to refuse to defend the insured or be responsible for any liability. The United States, as a claimant, may preclude such an invocation by giving the requisite notification itself. The purpose of the insurance clause is satisfied if the insurer receives actual notice of the incident, regardless of the informant. This notice should be mailed as soon as it appears an identified third party may be liable for the injuries. The prompt assertion of the claim will ensure that the government is named on the settlement draft. If the United States is not so named, and the claim has been asserted, the insurer settles at its own risk.


(2) The JAG designee will also notify the injured person or his legal representative of the Government’s interest in the value of the medical care provided by the United States. This notice will advise that:


(i) The United States may be entitled to recover the reasonable value of medical care furnished or paid by the Federal government;


(ii) The injured person is required to cooperate in the efforts of the United States to recover the reasonable value of medical care furnished or paid for by the Federal government;


(d) Administering the claim. (1) After investigating and asserting the claim, the JAG designee will maintain contact with all parties, their legal representatives, and insurers.


(2) An effort should be made to coordinate collection of the Federal government’s interest with the injured person’s action to collect on a claim for damages.


(i) Attorneys representing an injured person may be authorized to include the Federal government’s claim as an item of special damages with the injured person’s claim or suit.


(ii) An agreement that the Government’s claim will be made a party of the injured person’s action should be in writing and state the counsel fees will not be paid by the Government or computed on the basis of the Government’s portion of recovery.


(3) If the injured person is not bringing an action for damages or is refusing to include the Federal Government’s interest, the JAG designee will pursue independent collection. The United States is specifically allowed to intervene or join in any action at law brought by or through the injured person against the liable third person or brings an original suit in its own name or in the name of the injured person. The JAG designee will ensure all parties are aware that the United States must be a party to all subsequent collection negotiation.


(4) When the Government’s interests are not being represented by the injured person or his/her attorney, and independent collection efforts have failed, the JAG designee will refer the claims to the DoJ for possible suit.


(e) Access to DoN records and information. (1) Copies of medical records in cases that have potential claims will be sent by the MTFs to the cognizant JAG designee. It is considered a routine use of the records for the JAG designee to release them to an insurance company, if requested, in order to substantiate the claim. However, only the MTF as “keepers of the records” has the authority to make official releases of medical records to anyone else. Records will be protected in accordance with the provisions of the Privacy Act, 5 U.S.C. 552a, and confidentiality of quality assurance medical records, 10 U.S.C. 1102. Non-routine release requires the authorization from the injured individual or legal representative or an order from a court of competent jurisdiction. A clerk or attorney signed subpoena is not “an order from a court of competent jurisdiction.” Subpoenas are processed in accordance with 32 CFR part 725.


(2) Requests for testimony of any Navy employees will be processed in accordance with DoD Directive 5405.2, 32 CFR part 725, and SECNAVINST 5820.8A. If the injured person, or his or her attorney has signed an agreement to protect the Government’s interest and is requesting the testimony of a locally available physician who treated the injured person, however, this request falls within an exception to the regulations. See 32 CFR 725.5(g)(3). In this situation, the injured person or the attorney need only ask the JAG designee for assistance in scheduling the testimony of the treating physician and the JAG designee will coordinate with the physician’s command to determine availability. Such testimony is limited to factual issues. The definition of factual issues is slightly different under the regulations than it is in civil litigation. Opinions that are formed prior to, or contemporaneously with, the treatment at issue and are routinely required in the course of the proper performance of professional duties constitute essentially factual matters. For example, the physician will have opined at the time of treatment if further treatment will be necessary. The physician may testify to that as factual, not opinion, testimony. Opinions that are formed after treatment and are not required for continuing treatment, especially those that respond to hypothetical questions, are not factual and are considered to be expert testimony. This expert testimony, regardless of who requests it, will be processed in accordance with 32 CFR part 725, and must be forwarded to OJAG Code 14, General Litigation Division. Requests for expert testimony are rarely granted.


[72 FR 53429, Sept. 19, 2007]


§ 757.19 Waiver and compromise.

(a) General. OJAG Code 15 (Claims and Tort Litigation) may authorize waiver or compromise of any claim that does not exceed $100,000.00. NLSO EURSWA may agree to compromise or waive claims for $40,000.00 or less. NLSO EURSWA claims in excess of $40,000.00 may be compromised or waived only with Code 15 approval.


(b) Waiver and compromise. The JAG designee may waive the Federal government’s MCRA interest when a responsible third-party tortfeasor cannot be located, is judgment proof, or has refused to pay and litigation is not feasible. Waiver or compromise is also appropriate when, upon written request by the injured person or legal representative, it is determined that collection of the full amount of the claim would result in undue hardship to the injured person. In assessing undue hardship, the following should be considered:


(1) Permanent disability or disfigurement;


(2) Lost earning capacity;


(3) Out-of-pocket expenses;


(4) Financial status;


(5) Disability, pension and similar benefits available;


(6) Amount of settlement or award from third-party tortfeasor or contract insurer; and


(7) Any other factors which objectively indicate fairness requires waiver.


[57 FR 5072, Feb. 12, 1992, as amended at 72 FR 53430, Sept. 19, 2007]


§ 757.20 Receipt and release.

The JAG designee will execute and deliver appropriate releases to third parties who have made full or agreed upon compromised payments. A copy of the release will be kept in the claims file.


[72 FR 53430, Sept. 19, 2007]


SUBCHAPTER F – ISLANDS UNDER NAVY JURISDICTION

PART 761 – NAVAL DEFENSIVE SEA AREAS; NAVAL AIRSPACE RESERVATIONS, AREAS UNDER NAVY ADMINISTRATION, AND THE TRUST TERRITORY OF THE PACIFIC ISLANDS


Authority:5 U.S.C. 301, 10 U.S.C. 5031, 6011, 18 U.S.C. 2152. The text of part 761 contains additional references, including Executive Orders.


Source:28 FR 13778, Dec. 18, 1963, unless otherwise noted.

Subpart A – Introduction

§ 761.1 Scope.

(a) This part provides regulations governing the entry of persons, ships, and aircraft into:


(1) Naval Defensive Sea Areas and Naval Airspace Reservations established by Executive order of the President (see § 761.3(a)).


(2) Areas placed under the Secretary of the Navy for administrative purposes by Executive order of the President (see § 761.3(b)).


(3) The Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands (see § 761.3(c)).


(b) The entry authorizations issued under the authority of this part do not supersede or eliminate the need for visas or other clearances or permits required by other law or regulation.


[28 FR 13778, Dec. 18, 1963, as amended at 35 FR 10008, June 18, 1970]


§ 761.2 Background and general policy.

(a) Certain areas, due to their strategic nature or for purposes of defense, have been subjected to restrictions regarding the free entry of persons, ships, and aircraft. Free entry into the areas listed and defined in this part, and military installations contiguous to or within the boundaries of defense areas, is subject to control as provided for by Executive order or other regulation. The object of controls over entry into naval defensive sea areas, naval airspace reservations, administrative areas, and the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands, is to provide for the protection of military installations as well as other facilities, including the personnel, property, and equipment assigned to or located therein. Persons, ships, and aircraft are excluded unless and until they qualify for admission under the applicable Executive order or regulation.


(b) The control of entry into or movement within defense areas by persons, ships, or aircraft will be exercised so as to fully protect the physical security of, and insure the full effectiveness of, bases, stations, facilities and other installations within or contiguous to defense areas. However, unnecessary interference with the free movement of persons, ships, and aircraft is to be avoided.


(c) This part will be administered so as to provide for the prompt processing of all applications and to insure uniformity of interpretation and application, insofar as changing conditions permit.


(d) In cases of doubt, the determination will be made in favor of the course of action which will best serve the interests of the United States and national defense as distinguished from the private interests of an individual or group.


[28 FR 13778, Dec. 18, 1963, as amended at 35 FR 10008, June 18, 1970]


§ 761.3 Authority.

(a) Naval Defensive Sea Areas and Naval Airspace Reservations. By Executive orders, as amended, the President has reserved, set aside, and established the following Naval Defensive Sea Areas and Naval Airspace Reservations under the control of the Secretary of the Navy. Incorporated therein are provisions for the exercise of control by the Secretary over the entry of persons, ships, and aircraft into the areas so described. (See § 761.4(b) for delineation of areas where entry controls are suspended.)


(1) Atlantic areas. Guantanamo Bay Naval Defensive Sea Area; Guantanamo Bay Naval Airspace Reservation: Executive Order 8749 of May 1, 1941 (6 FR 2252; 3 CFR, 1943 Cum. Supp., p. 931).


(2) Pacific areas. (i) Honolulu Defensive Sea Area: Executive Order 8987 of December 20, 1941 (6 FR 6675; 3 CFR, 1943 Cum. Supp., p. 1048).


(ii) Kaneohe Bay Naval Defensive Sea Area; Kaneohe Bay Naval Airspace Reservation: Executive Order 8681 of February 14, 1941 (6 FR 1014; 3 CFR, 1943 Cum. Supp., p. 893).


(iii) Pearl Harbor Defensive Sea Area: Executive Order 8143 of May 26, 1939 (4 FR 2179; 3 CFR, 1943 Cum. Supp., p. 504).


(iv) Johnston Island Naval Defensive Sea Area; Johnston Island Naval Airspace Reservation: Executive Order 8682 of February 14, 1941 (6 FR 1015; 3 CFR, 1943 Cum. Supp., p. 894) as amended by Executive Order 8729 of April 2, 1941 (6 FR 1791; 3 CFR, 1943 Cum. Supp., p. 919) and Executive Order 9881 of August 4, 1947 (12 FR 5325; 3 CFR, 1943-1948 Comp., p. 662).


(v) Kingman Reef Naval Defensive Sea Area; Kingman Reef Naval Airspace Reservation: Executive Order 8682 of February 14, 1941 (6 FR 1015; 3 CFR, 1943 Cum. Supp., p. 894) as amended by Executive Order 8729 of April 2, 1941 (6 FR 1791; 3 CFR, 1943 Cum. Supp., p. 919) and Executive Order 9881 of August 4, 1947 (12 FR 5325; 3 CFR, 1943-1948 Comp., p. 662).


(vi) Midway Island Naval Defensive Sea Area; Midway Island Naval Airspace Reservation: Executive Order 8682 of February 14, 1941 (6 FR 1015; 3 CFR, 1943 Cum. Supp., p. 894) as amended by Executive Order 8729 of April 2, 1941 (6 FR 1791; 3 CFR, 1943 Cum. Supp., p. 919) and Executive Order 9881 of August 4, 1947 (12 FR 5325; 3 CFR, 1943-1948 Comp., p. 662).


(vii) Wake Island Naval Defensive Sea Area; Wake Island Naval Airspace Reservation: Executive Order 8682 of February 14, 1941 (6 FR 1015; 3 CFR, 1943 Cum. Supp., p. 894) as amended by Executive Order 8729 of April 2, 1941 (6 FR 1791; 3 CFR, 1943 Cum. Supp., p. 919) and Executive Order 9881 of August 4, 1917 (12 FR 5325; 3 CFR, 1943-1948 Comp., p. 662).


(viii) Kiska Island Naval Defensive Sea Area; Kiska Island Naval Airspace Reservation: Executive Order 8680 of February 14, 1941 (6 FR 1014; 3 CFR 1943 Cum. Supp., p. 892) as amended by Executive Order 8729 of April 2, 1941 (6 FR 1791; 3 CFR, 1943 Cum. Supp., p. 919).


(ix) Kodiak Naval Defensive Sea Area: Executive Order 8717 of March 22, 1941 (6 FR 1621; 3 CFR, 1943 Cum. Supp., p. 915). Kodiak Naval Airspace Reservation: Executive Order 8597 of November 18, 1940 (5 FR 4559; 3 CFR, 1943 Cum. Supp., p. 837) as amended by Executive Order 9720 of May 8, 1946 (11 FR 5105; 3 CFR, 1943-1948 Comp., p. 527).


(x) Unalaska Island Naval Defensive Sea Area, Unalaska Island Naval Air-space Reservation: Executive Order 8680 of February 14, 1941 (6 FR 1014; 3 CFR, 1943 Cum. Supp., p. 892) as amended by Executive Order 8729 of April 2, 1941 (6 FR 1791; 3 CFR, 1943 Cum. Supp., p. 919). See § 761.4(d) for delineation of areas where entry controls are suspended.


(b) Administrative areas. By Executive orders, as amended, the President has reserved, set aside, and placed under the control and jurisdiction of the Secretary of the Navy for administrative purposes the following named areas including their appurtenant reefs and territorial waters:


(1) Johnston Island – Executive Order 6935 of December 29, 1934 as amended by Executive Order 11048 of September 4, 1962 (27 FR 8851; 3 CFR, 1962 Supp., p. 241).


(2) Kingman Reef – Executive Order 6935 of December 29, 1934 as amended by Executive Order 11048 of September 4, 1962 (27 FR 8851; 3 CFR, 1962 Supp., p. 241).


(3) Midway Island – Executive Order 11048 of September 4, 1962 (27 FR 8851; 3 CFR, 1962 Supp., p. 241).


(4) Sand Island – Executive Order 6935 of December 29, 1934 as amended by Executive Order 11048 of September 4, 1962 (27 FR 8851; 3 CFR, 1962 Supp., p. 241).


(c) Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands. The Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands is a strategic area administered by the United States under the provisions of a trusteeship agreement with the United Nations. Under Executive Order 11021 of May 7, 1962 (27 FR 4409; 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 600), the Secretary of the Interior is charged with responsibility for administration of the civil government of the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands. Under July 1, 1963 amendment two agreements effective July 1, 1951 and July 1, 1962 between the Department of the Navy and the Department of the Interior concerning responsibility for administration of the Government of the Trust Territory, the entry of individuals, ships and aircraft into the Trust Territory (other than areas under the control of the Department of the Army (Kwajalein Atoll) and of the Defense Nuclear Agency (Eniwetok Atoll) see § 761.4) is controlled by the High Commissioner of the Trust Territory and the Department of the Navy as follows:


(1) Entry of U.S. citizens and nationals and citizens of the Trust Territory, into areas of the Trust Territory other than those areas under control of the Department of the Army and the Defense Nuclear Agency as outlined above, shall be controlled by the High Commissioner.


(2) All other persons: Applications for entry into the Trust Territory except for those areas under control of the Department of the Army or of the Defense Nuclear Agency, of all persons who are not U.S. citizens, U.S. nationals, or who are not citizens of the Trust Territory, shall be made to the High Commissioner for processing in accordance with the laws and regulations of the Trust Territory: Provided, That prior to the issuance of an authorization to enter the Trust Territory, the High Commissioner shall provide the Department of the Navy in all cases (with the exception of alien individuals who possess a valid U.S. visa and seek admission to the Trust Territory for a period of 30 days or less for the purpose of tourism) information on the applicants for its consideration and comment, granting thereby the Department of the Navy the right to object to the issuance of an authorization.


(3) Ships and aircraft: (i) The entry of ships and aircraft, other than U.S. public ships and aircraft, documented under either the laws of the United States or the laws of the Trust Territory into areas of the Trust Territory, excepting those areas where entry is controlled by the Department of the Army (Kwajalein Atoll) and the Defense Nuclear Agency (Eniwetok Atoll), shall be controlled solely by the High Commissioner.


(ii) Applications for entry into the Trust Territory, except for those areas under military control, of ships and aircraft not documented under the laws of the United States or the laws of the Trust Territory, shall be made to the High Commissioner for processing in accordance with the laws and regulations of the Trust Territory: Provided, That prior to the issuance of an authorization to enter the Trust Territory, the High Commissioner shall provide the Department of the Navy in all cases with information on the applicants for its consideration and comment, granting thereby the right of the Department of the Navy to object to the issuance of an authorization.


(d) [Reserved]


(e) Exercise of authority. The authority of the Secretary of the Navy to control entry of ships, planes, and persons into the areas listed is exercised through the Chief of Naval Operations and certain of his subordinates as prescribed in this part.


(f) Penalties. Penalties are provided by law: (1) For violations of orders or regulations governing persons or ships within the limits of defensive sea areas (62 Stat. 799; 18 U.S.C. 2152); (2) for entering military, naval or Coast Guard property for prohibited purposes or after removal or exclusion therefrom by proper authority (62 Stat. 765; 18 U.S.C. 1382); (3) for violation of regulations imposed for the protection or security of military or naval aircraft, airports, air facilities, vessels, harbors, ports, piers, waterfront facilities, bases, forts, posts, laboratories, stations, vehicles, equipment, explosives, or other property or places subject to the jurisdiction, administration, or in the custody of the Department of Defense, any department or agency of which said department or agency consists, or any officer of employee of said department or agency (sec. 21 of the Internal Security Act of 1950 (50 U.S.C. 797) and Department of Defense Directive 5200.8 of 20 August 1954 (19 FR 5446)); and (4) for knowingly and willfully making a false or misleading statement or representation in any matter within the jurisdiction of any department or agency of the United States (18 U.S.C. 1001).


[28 FR 13778, Dec. 18, 1963, as amended at 35 FR 10008, June 18, 1970; 36 FR 21889, Nov. 17, 1971; 41 FR 28957, July 14, 1976]


§ 761.4 Special provisions.

(a) Entry into islands in the Kwajalein Atoll under military jurisdiction is controlled by the Department of the Army. Inquiries concerning entries into islands under military control in the Kwajalein Atoll should be directed to: National Range Commander, U.S. Army Safeguard System Command, ATTN: SSC-R, P.O. Box 1500, Huntsville, AL 35807.


(b) Entry into Eniwetok Atoll is controlled by the Defense Nuclear Agency. Inquiries concerning entries into Eniwetok Atoll should be directed to: Commander, Field Command, Defense Nuclear Agency, Kirtland Air Force Base, NM 87115.


(c) Entry into Johnston Atoll is controlled by the Defense Nuclear Agency. Inquiries concerning entries into Johnston Atoll should be directed to: Commander, Johnston Atoll (FCDNA), APO San Francisco, CA 96305.


(d) Suspension of restrictions. Restrictions imposed under the authority of the above cited Executive Orders on entry into the following Naval Defensive Sea Areas and Naval Airspace Reservations and Administrative Areas have been suspended subject to reinstatement without notice at any time when the purposes of national defense may require.


(1) All Naval Airspace Reservations, except the Guantanamo Bay Naval Airspace Reservation


(2) Honolulu Defensive Sea Area.


(3) Kiska Island Naval Defensive Sea Area.


(4) Kodiak Island Naval Defensive Sea Area.


(5) Unalaska Island Naval Defensive Sea Area.


(6) Wake Island Naval Defensive Sea Area except for entry of foreign flag ships and foreign nationals.


(7) The portion of Kaneohe Defensive Sea Area lying beyond a 500 yard buffer zone around the perimeter of the Kaneohe Marine Corps Air Station (Mokapu Peninsula) and eastward therefrom to Kapoho Point, Oahu.


(e) Suspension of restrictions on entry into a naval airspace reservation, naval defensive sea area, or naval administrative area, does not affect the authority of a commanding officer or other appropriate commander to control entry into or passage through any base, station, or other installation or area, including port or harbor facilities under Navy control.


[41 FR 28957, July 14, 1976]


§ 761.5 Definitions.

(a) Defense area. A naval defensive sea area, naval airspace reservation, or naval administrative area established by Executive order of the President.


(b) Department of Defense. The Department of Defense, including the Departments of the Army, Navy, and Air Force.


(c) Entry authorization. A document which authorizes a ship, aircraft, or person to enter a defense area.


(d) Entry Control Commander. A commander empowered to issue entry authorizations for one or more defense areas (see § 761.9).


(e) Excluded person. A person who does not hold a currently valid entry authorization for the area concerned and who has been notified by an Entry Control Commander that authority for him to enter any defense area has been denied, suspended or revoked.


(f) Foreign nationals. Persons who are not citizens or nationals of the United States.


(g) Military installation. A military (Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, and/or Coast Guard) activity ashore, having a commanding officer, and located in an area having fixed boundaries, within which all persons are subject to military control and to the immediate authority of a commanding officer.


(h) Public vessel or aircraft. A ship or aircraft owned by or belonging to a government and not engaged in commercial activity.


(i) Territorial sea – (1) Trust Territory. In accordance with title 19, section 101(3), of the Trust Territory Code “* * * that part of the sea comprehended within the envelope of all arcs of circles having a radius of three marine miles drawn from all points of the barrier reef, fringing reef, or other reef system of the Trust Territory, measured from the low water line, or, in the absence of such reef system, the distance to be measured from the low water line of any island, islet, atoll, reef, or rocks within the jurisdiction of the Trust Territory.”


(2) Other areas. That part of the sea included within the envelope of all arcs of circles having a radius of three marine miles with centers on the low water line of the coast. For the purpose of this definition, the term “coast” includes the coasts of islands, islets, rocks, atolls, reefs and other areas of land permanently above the high water mark.


(j) Trust Territory Registry. Registration of a ship or aircraft in accordance with the laws of the Trust Territory.


(k) U.S. Registry. Registration of a ship or aircraft in accordance with the laws and regulations of the United States.


(l) U.S. Armed Forces. Military personnel of the Department of Defense, the Departments of the Army, Navy, Air Force, and the United States Coast Guard.


[28 FR 13778, Dec. 18, 1963, as amended at 35 FR 10009, June 18, 1970; 41 FR 28958, July 14, 1976]


Subpart B – Criteria and Basic Controls

§ 761.6 Criteria.

(a) General. (1) Entry authorizations may be issued only after an Entry Control Commander, or a duly authorized subordinate acting in his behalf, has determined that the presence of the person, ship, or aircraft will not, under existing or reasonably foreseeable future conditions, endanger, place an undue burden upon, or otherwise jeopardize the efficiency, capability, or effectiveness of any military installation located within or contiguous to a defense area. Factors to be considered shall include, but not be limited to, the true purpose of the entry, the personal history, character and present or past associates of the individuals involved, the possible burdens or threats to the defense facilities which the presence of the ship, aircraft or the individual or individuals involved impose or might reasonably be expected to impose on the related base complex.


(2) Requests for entry authorizations will be evaluated and adjudged as to whether the entry at the time and for the purpose stated will or will not be inimical to the purposes of national defense.


(b) Adverse. Substantial evidence of any of the following shall preclude the granting of entry authorization except with the specific approval of the Chief of Naval Operations in each case:


(1) Prior noncompliance with entry control regulations or failure to observe terms under which any entry authorization may have been granted;
1




1 The criteria so marked are applicable only to those applications concerning entry into areas under military cognizance.


(2) Willfully furnishing false, incomplete, or misleading information in an application for an entry authorization;
1


(3) Advocacy of the overthrow or alteration of the Government of the United States by unconstitutional means;


(4) Commission of, or attempt or preparation to commit, an act of espionage, sabotage, sedition, or treason, or conspiring with or aiding or abetting another to commit such an act;


(5) Performing, or attempting to perform, duties, or otherwise acting so as to serve the interest of another government to the detriment of the United States;


(6) Deliberate unauthorized disclosure of classified defense information;


(7) Knowing membership with the specific intent of furthering the aims of, or adherence to and active participation in, any foreign or domestic organization, association, movement, group, or combination of persons (hereinafter referred to as organizations) which unlawfully advocates or practices the commission of acts of force or violence to prevent others from exercising their rights under the Constitution or laws of the United States or of any State, or which seeks to overthrow the Government of the United States or any State or subdivision thereof by unlawful means;


(8) Serious mental irresponsibility evidenced by having been adjudged insane, or mentally irresponsible, or an incompetent, or a chronic alcoholic, or treated for serious mental or neurological disorders or for chronic alcoholism, without evidence of cure;
1




1 The criteria so marked are applicable only to those applications concerning entry into areas under military cognizance.


(9) Conviction of any of the following offenses under circumstances indicative of a criminal tendency potentially dangerous to the security of a strategic area containing military establishments; arson, unlawful trafficking in drugs, murder, kidnaping, blackmail, or sex offenses involving minors or perversion.


(10) Chronic alcoholism or addiction to the use of narcotic drugs without adequate evidence of rehabilitation;
1


(11) Illegal presence in the United States, its territories or possessions, having been finally subject to deportation order, or voluntary departure in lieu of deportation order, by the United States Immigration and Naturalization Service;
1


(12) Being the subject of proceedings for deportation or voluntary departure in lieu of deportation for any reasons which have not been determined in the applicant’s favor;
1


(13) Conviction of larceny of property of the United States, willful injury to or destruction of property of the United States, fraudulent enlistment, impersonation of a commissioned officer of the United States or any state or territory thereof, or any offense involving moral turpitude, except offenses, which, in the jurisdiction within which the conviction was obtained, are punishable by imprisonment for not more than one year or a fine of not more than one thousand dollars.
1


(c) Aliens. (1) Entry of aliens for employment or residence in an area entirely within the borders of a defense area is not authorized except when such entry would serve the interests of National Defense, and then only for specified periods and under prescribed conditions.


(2) Entry of aliens for any purpose into areas over which the United States exercises sovereignty is further subject to requirements imposed by law for the obtaining of a United States visa. Naval authorization for entry into areas covered by this part will not be issued to foreign nationals for purposes, places, or periods of time in excess of those stipulated in the visa.


(3) Alien spouses and bona fide dependents of U.S. citizen employees of the United States may, if otherwise qualified, be granted entry authorization so long as the U.S. citizen sponsor or principal remains on duty or resident within the defense area.


(d) Renewals. Entry authorizations having been granted and utilized may be extended or renewed upon request at the expiration of the period for which the entry was originally authorized or extended, provided the justification for remaining in the area or for making a reentry meets the criteria set forth in this part. It shall be the responsibility of every applicant to depart the defense area for which entry was authorized upon expiration of the time prescribed in the authorization, unless such authorization has been extended or renewed. Failure to comply herewith will be considered as evidence of violation of this part and may result in denial of future authorizations.


[28 FR 13778, Dec. 18, 1963, as amended at 36 FR 21890, Nov. 17, 1971; 41 FR 28958, July 14, 1976]


§ 761.7 Basic controls.

(a) General. Except for such persons, ship, or aircraft as are issued an authorization to enter by an Entry Control Commander:


(1) No person, except persons aboard public vessels or aircraft of the United States, shall enter any defense area.


(2) No vessel or other craft, except public vessels of the United States shall enter any naval defensive sea area or other defense area.


(3) No aircraft, except public aircraft of the United States, shall be navigated within any naval airspace reservation of the airspace over other defense areas.


(b) Excluded persons – (1) Entry prohibited. Excluded persons, as defined in § 761.5(e), are prohibited from entering any defense area. In a bona fide emergency which requires an excluded person’s presence in or transit through a military installation which is also a defense area, the commanding officer of the installation may grant permission to enter or transit subject to such restrictions as may be imposed by regulation or which may, in his discretion, be required.


(2) Carrying prohibited. Except in a bona fide emergency and after being authorized by the appropriate local authority, no vessel or aircraft, except public vessels and aircraft of the United States, shall enter into or be navigated within any defense area while carrying any excluded person, as defined in this part, as passenger, officer or crew member.


(c) Control of violators. No commanding officer of a military installation shall permit any ship or aircraft which has entered the limits of his command by passing through a defense area without authorization to land, except in emergency, or, if permitted to land, to disembark passengers or cargo except as authorized by the appropriate Entry Control Commander. Commanding officers will take appropriate action to apprehend violators who come within their jurisdiction and request disposition instructions from the appropriate Entry Control Commander.


(d) Trust Territory. An authorization from the High Commissioner is required for all persons desiring to enter the Trust Territory, except for those areas under military jurisdiction where entry is controlled by the Department of the Army (Kwajalein Atoll) and the Defense Nuclear Agency (Eniwetok Atoll).


(e) Military areas. Entries authorized under this Instruction do not affect the authority of a commanding officer or other appropriate commander to impose and enforce proper regulations pertaining to movement into or within naval stations or other military installations.


(f) Waiver prohibited. No officer of the U.S. Armed Forces, except as authorized in writing by the Chief of Naval Operations, has authority to waive the requirements of this part, and any waiver must be in writing and signed by an authorized person.


[28 FR 13778, Dec. 18, 1963, as amended at 36 FR 21890, Nov. 17, 1971; 41 FR 28958, July 14, 1976]


Subpart C – Entry Authorization

§ 761.8 General.

(a) As indicated in § 761.7(a), certain persons, ships, and aircraft must be specifically authorized under the provisions of this part to enter defense areas.


(b) When entering or transiting a defense area each person, ship, or aircraft must have a valid authorization or satisfactory evidence thereof.


§ 761.9 Entry Control Commanders.

The following commanders are designated Entry Control Commanders with authority to approve or disapprove individual entry authorizations for persons, ships, or aircraft as indicated (Commander Seventeenth Coast Guard District has been designated an Entry Control Commander by the authority of the Commandant, U.S. Coast Guard and Commander, Western Area, U.S. Coast Guard);


(a) Chief of Naval Operations. Authorization for all persons, ships, or aircraft to enter all defense areas.


(b) Commander in Chief, U.S. Atlantic Fleet. Authorization for all persons, ships, or aircraft to enter defense areas in the Atlantic.


(c) Commander in Chief, U.S. Pacific Fleet. Authorization for all persons, ships, or aircraft to enter defense areas in the Pacific.


(d) Commander U.S. Naval Forces Caribbean. Authorization for all persons, ships, and aircraft to enter the Guantanamo Bay Naval Defensive Sea Area and the Guantanamo Naval Airspace Reservation. (This authority delegated to Commander U.S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay.)


(e) Commander U.S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay. Authorization for all persons, ships, and aircraft to enter the Guantanamo Bay Naval Defensive Sea Area and the Guantanamo Naval Airspace Reservation.


(f) Commander Third Fleet. Authorization for U.S. citizens and U.S. registered private vessels to enter Midway Island, Kingman Reef, Kaneohe Bay Naval Defensive Sea Area, Pearl Harbor Defensive Sea Area and Filipino workers employed by U.S. contractors to enter Wake Island.


(g) Commander U.S. Naval Forces, Marianas. Authorization in conjunction with the High Commissioner, for non-U.S. citizens, ships, or aircraft documented under laws other than those of the United States or the Trust Territory to enter those portions of the Trust Territory where entry is not controlled by the Department of the Army or the Defense Nuclear Agency.


(h) Senior naval commander in defense area. Emergency authorization for persons, ships, or aircraft in cases of emergency or distress. In all cases the Chief of Naval Operations, and as appropriate, the Commander in Chief, U.S. Atlantic Fleet or the Commander in Chief, U.S. Pacific Fleet, and other interested commands, shall be informed immediately of the nature of the emergency, and action taken.


(i) U.S. Coast Guard. The U.S. Coast Guard regulates the movement of shipping within the Honolulu Harbor under the authority of Executive Orders 10173 and 10289; such shipping is considered to be under U.S. authorized supervision within the meaning of Executive Order 8987. The Commandant, Fourteenth Naval District, as representative of the Secretary of the Navy, retains responsibility for security of the Honolulu Defensive Sea Area, as required by naval interest, and, as such, issues amplifying instructions relating to the Honolulu Defensive Sea Area.


[41 FR 28958, July 14, 1976]


§ 761.10 Persons: Group authorizations.

Persons in the following categories, except those persons who have been denied individual authorization or have had a prior authorization revoked, may enter the defense areas indicated without individual authorization:


(a) Persons aboard U.S. public vessels or aircraft entering a Naval Defensive Sea Area or a Naval Airspace Reservation.


(b) Military members of the U.S. Armed Forces or U.S. civil service employees of the Department of Defense when traveling on official orders.


(c) U.S. ambassadors, cabinet members, elected U.S. Government officers and U.S. citizen civil service employees of the U.S. Government traveling on official orders on U.S. Government business may enter defense areas as required by their orders.


(d) Dependents of military members of the U.S. Armed Forces and U.S. citizen dependents of U.S. civil service employees traveling on official orders and entering for purposes of joining a principal permanently stationed in an area covered by this part.


(e) U.S. Navy Technicians, U.S. Army Contract Technicians, or U.S. Air Force Contract Technicians, who are traveling on official (does not include invitational) travel orders on U.S. Government business, may enter defense areas as specifically required by such orders.


(f) [Reserved]


(g) Individuals on board any foreign public vessel or aircraft which has been granted diplomatic or other official U.S. Government authorization to enter an area covered by this part.


(h) Through passengers and bona fide regularly employed crew members, unless otherwise excluded, on nonpublic vessels authorized to enter areas covered by this part. This does not include an authorization to disembark at a port contiguous to or within the areas covered in this part. Application for authorization to disembark may be submitted to an Entry Control Commander having jurisdiction over the particular port.


(i) Through passengers and bona fide regularly employed crew members, unless otherwise excluded, on nonpublic aircraft authorized to enter areas covered by this part. Such persons are subject to local regulations governing entry into or movement within military air stations or facilities. Application for authorization to disembark may be submitted to an Entry Control Commander having jurisdiction over the air facility.


(j) U.S. citizen news correspondents and photographers when properly accredited by the Department of Defense to enter areas covered by this part except that special authorization is required to enter the restricted areas listed in § 761.4(a).


[28 FR 13778, Dec. 18, 1963, as amended at 36 FR 21890, Nov. 17, 1971]


§ 761.11 Persons: Individual authorizations.

(a) Application; filing. Applications for authorization to enter defense areas shall be filed with one of the following:


(1) Chief of Naval Operations.


(2) Commander in Chief, U.S. Atlantic Fleet.


(3) Commander in Chief, U.S. Pacific Fleet.


(4) Any Naval Sea Frontier Commander.


(5) Any Naval Fleet or Force Commander.


(6) Any Naval District Commandant.


(7) Any Naval Attache. The Commander or Attache with whom the application is filed is responsible for taking such action on the application as he may be empowered to do or for forwarding the application to the nearest Entry Control Commander authorized by this part to take action thereon. Applications received in the United States and those received indicating that the applicant has resided in the United States for the major portion of ten years immediately prior to date of request will normally be forwarded to the Chief of Naval Operations for action. In all cases where the forwarding activity has information regarding the applicant or his employer, appropriate comment and/or recommendation for disposition will be included in the forwarding letter.


(b) Form. (1) Applications for entry authorizations will be made on the standard form Statement of Personal History, DD 398, which is available at most military installations. In addition to the information required by the form, an entry application shall include the following additional information under Item 20, “Remarks”:



21. Purpose of proposed visit: (Detailed statement including names of principal persons, firms, or establishments to be visited)


22. Proposed duration of visit:


23. Estimated date of arrival:


24. Address to which authorization should be mailed:


In the event that a DD 398 form is not available, a locally produced form containing identical information including the certification and signature of applicant and witness may be utilized.

(2) Incomplete forms will be returned for completion.


(3) When time is of the essence, emergency applications may be forwarded by message to the appropriate Entry Control Commander. Such messages shall include the following:


(i) Name of applicant.


(ii) Date and place of birth.


(iii) Citizenship.


(iv) Residence for last ten (10) years.


(v) Employers and their addresses for last ten (10) years.


(vi) Results of Local Agency Check, if pertinent.


(vii) Place to be entered and date of entry.


(viii) Purpose of entry and duration of stay.


(ix) Comments and/or recommendations of forwarding officer as appropriate.


(x) A statement that a completed DD 398 or appropriate substitute has been mailed prior to the sending of the message.


(c) Processing. The Entry Control Commander empowered to issue entry authorizations shall upon receipt of an application take the following action:


(1) Initiate or conduct such investigation as may be required to establish facts upon which to make a determination that the entry of the applicant at the time and for the purpose indicated is or is not in accordance with the criteria set forth in § 761.6.


(2) Request additional information from the applicant if required, or


(3) Issue an entry authorization as requested or modified as circumstances require, or


(4) Deny the request and advise the applicant of his right to appeal, or,


(5) Forward the application to the next superior in command together with a statement of the investigation conducted and the reason for forwarding and comments or recommendations as appropriate.


(d) Authorizations. Entry authorizations will state the purpose for which the entry is authorized and such other information and conditions as are pertinent to the particular authorization. Authorizations to enter and re-enter may be issued to resident U.S. citizens and be valid for a specified time not to exceed two years. Authorizations may be issued to U.S. citizens residing abroad and to aliens to enter and re-enter for a specified period of time required to accomplish the purpose for which the authorization was issued not to exceed one year.


[28 FR 13778, Dec. 18, 1963, as amended at 41 FR 28958, July 14, 1976]


§ 761.12 Ships: Group authorizations.

Ships or other craft in the following categories, except those ships which have been denied individual authorization or have had a prior authorization revoked, may enter the defense areas indicated without individual authorizations:


(a) U.S. Public vessels, to enter all defense areas.


(b) U.S. private vessels which are: (1) Under charter to the Department of Defense (including the Military Sealift Command), or (2) operating under a contract or charter with the Department of Defense providing for the employment of such vessels, or (3) routed by a Naval Control of Shipping Office, or (4) employed exclusively in support of and in connection with a Department of Defense construction, maintenance, or repair contract and whose crews carry individual entry clearances, to enter defense areas as authorized by controlling Defense Department agency.


(c) [Reserved]


(d) Privately owned local craft, registered with and licensed by appropriate local U.S. Government authorities, and owned and operated by local inhabitants who have been granted an authorization to enter the local defense area at the discretion of the local commanders.


(e) Foreign flag ships traveling on diplomatic or other special clearance or for which special arrangements have been made under international agreements or treaties.


(f) Ships operating under a group authorization issued by the Chief of Naval Operations.


(g) Ships in distress, subject to local clearances and control by senior officer present.


[28 FR 13778, Dec. 18, 1963, as amended at 36 FR 21890, Nov. 17, 1971]


§ 761.13 Ships: Individual authorizations.

(a) Applications; form; filing. Applications for authorization to navigate ships within the limits of defense areas shall be filed with the cognizant Entry Control Commander by letter or telegram including the following information and any additional information that may be relative to the proposed operation:


(1) Name of ship.


(2) Place of registry and registry number.


(3) Name, nationality and address of operator.


(4) Name, nationality and address of owner.


(5) Gross tonnage of ship.


(6) Nationality and numbers of officers and crew (include crewlist when practicable).


(7) Number of passengers (include list when practicable).


(8) Last port of call prior to entry into area for which clearance is requested.


(9) Purpose of visit.


(10) Proposed date of entry and estimated duration of stay.


(b) Processing. Authorization for single entries or for multiple entries for a period not to exceed one year may be granted or denied by an Entry Control Commander. Authorizations for multiple entries for a period to exceed one year or for special group entries must be forwarded to the Chief of Naval Operations with appropriate comments and recommendations.


§ 761.14 Aircraft: Group authorizations.

Aircraft in the following categories, except those aircraft which have been denied individual authorization or have had a prior authorization revoked, may enter the defense areas indicated without individual authorization:


(a) U.S. public aircraft to enter all defense areas.


(b) U.S. private aircraft which are under charter to the Department of Defense (including the Military Airlift Command), or operating under a contract with the Department of Defense providing for the employment of such aircraft to overfly U.S. island positions to enter defense areas as authorized by controlling Defense Department agency. If landing at U.S. military facilities is required, see § 761.15(a).


(c) Foreign flag aircraft for which special arrangements have been made under international agreements or treaties.


(d) Aircraft operated by companies authorized to utilize naval facilities in defense areas for regular commercial activity, to enter defense areas associated therewith. For landing clearance at U.S. military facilities, see § 761.15(a).


(e) Any aircraft in distress, subject to local clearance and control by senior officer present.


[41 FR 28958, July 14, 1976]


§ 761.15 Aircraft: Individual authorizations.

(a) Special procedures. In addition to the entry authorization to enter or navigate within the defense area concerned, certain special procedures must be followed by aircraft:


(1) If landing at U.S. naval aviation facilities, an Aviation Facility License must be obtained, in accordance with Secretary of the Navy Instruction 3770.1B, Use of Department of the Navy aviation facilities by other than United States Department of Defense aircraft.


(2) If landing at U.S. Air Force aviation facilities, a Civil Aircraft Landing Permit must be obtained, in accordance with Department of the Airforce Regulation 55-20, Use of United States Air Force installations by other than United States Department of Defense aircraft.


(3) Foreign public aircraft must obtain diplomatic clearance or clearance under applicable special agreements or treaties.


(b) Application; Form; Filing. Applications for authorization to navigate aircraft within the limits of defense areas shall be made by letter or telegram addressed to the appropriate entry control commander as indicated in § 761.9 with information copies to the Chief of Naval Operations, Commander in Chief, U.S. Atlantic (or Pacific) Fleet, as appropriate, and other local commanders who are known to be concerned. Applications shall include the following:


(1) Type and serial number of aircraft (the number of aircraft in flight if a mass movement is involved), nationality and name of registered owner.


(2) Name and rank of senior pilot.


*
(3) Number in crew.



*See “Note” to this paragraph.


*(4) Number of passengers and whether military or civilian; include name (and rank) of distinguished passengers.


(5) Purpose of flight.


(6) Plan of flight route, including:


(i) Point of origin of flight and its destination.


(ii) Estimated date and times of arrival and departure at all airspaces covered by this part 761 including stops within the Trust Territory, when pertinent.


(7) Radio call signs of aircraft and radio frequencies available.


(8) Whether cameras are to be carried and whether they will be used.


*(9) Whether arms are to be carried.


*(10) Whether authorization to land as indicated in § 761.15(a) has been obtained.



Note:

Information on those items marked with an asterisk (*) need not be reported when the aircraft will only overfly the areas covered by this part.


(c) Processing. Authorization for individual entries or for multiple entries for a period not to exceed three months may be granted by an Entry Control Commander. Authorizations for multiple entries over a period to exceed three months and applications for group authorizations must be forwarded to the Chief of Naval Operations with appropriate comments and recommendations.


[41 FR 28958, July 14, 1976]


§ 761.16 Notice of action.

All applicants will be kept advised of action being taken relative to the processing of applications. Individuals whose applications cannot be processed promptly (usually within ten working days) or whose applications must be forwarded to another office for processing will be notified of the anticipated delay and advised of the approximate time when action may be expected to be taken. Under no circumstances will a notice of disapproval include a statement of the reason therefor. Copies of all notices will be distributed to commands and Entry Control Commanders concerned. Copies of all notices of disapproval will be mailed to the Chief of Naval Operations concurrently with the mailing to the applicant.


§ 761.17 Revocation.

Entry authorizations will be revoked only by an Entry Control Commander upon being advised of the discovery of information which would have been ground for denial of the initial request. Such a revocation will be confirmed in writing to the holder of an entry authorization. No reason for revocation of the entry authorization will be given. When an entry authorization is revoked, a one-way permit will be issued as appropriate, to permit the ship, aircraft, or person to transit the defense area in order to depart from a contiguous area.


§ 761.18 Appeals.

(a) Appeals may be filed with the Entry Control Commander who issued the denial or revocation. It shall contain a complete statement of the purpose of the proposed entry and a statement of reasons why the entry should be authorized, including a showing that the entry will be consistent with the purposes of national defense.


(b) Appeal letters shall be forwarded promptly to the next superior Entry Control Commander with an endorsement setting forth the reasons for the denial or revocation and a recommendation as to the action to be taken by the superior.


(c) The superior may act on the appeal and notify the applicant of the decision, or he may forward the appeal to the next superior and notify the applicant of this referral.


[28 FR 13778, Dec. 18, 1963, as amended at 41 FR 28959, July 14, 1976]


§ 761.19 Forms.

The following forms shall be used in connection with the processing of applications for authorization to enter defense areas and for revocation of authorizations as indicated:


(a) Application. Statement of Personal History (Form DD 398, Stock Number 0102-004-220) may be obtained from NAVPUBFORMCEN, Building 26, 5801 Tabor Ave., Philadelphia, PA 19120.


(b) Entry authorization. (1) Defense Area Entry Authorization (OPNAVForm 4600-2 (Rev. 5-59) may be obtained from Office of the Chief of Naval Operations (OP-09B33), Navy Department, Washington, DC 20350.


(2) Letter or message authorization.


(c) Disapproval of request for entry authorization.



My Dear ______: Your application of ___ has been reviewed and we regret to advise you that the requested authorization for ________ to enter ________ is not granted as the entry at this time for the purpose stated is not considered to be in the interest of national defense.


The application may be resubmitted again in six months at which time it will be reconsidered in the light of then existing circumstances.


If you desire to appeal this decision, you may do so by submitting a letter to this office setting forth in full why you consider that the granting of the application would be in the interest of national defense and any other information that you believe will be of value of this person considering the appeal. Your letter will be forwarded to the appropriate authority for review and you will be advised in due course of his determination.


Sincerely yours,

(d) Revocation of entry authorization.



My Dear ______: This is to notify you that entry authorization to enter ________ granted by (issuing activity) on ____ is hereby revoked effective this date.


Sincerely yours,

[41 FR 28959, July 14, 1976]


Subpart D – Additional Instructions

§ 761.20 Additional regulations governing persons and vessels in Naval Defensive Sea Areas.

(a) By virtue of the authority vested in the President by section 44 of the United States Criminal Code, as amended and reenacted in 18 U.S.C. 2152, the President has prescribed the following additional regulations in Executive Order 9275 of November 23, 1942 (7 FR 9767; 1943 Cum. Supp. p. 1227) to govern persons and vessels within the limits of defensive sea areas theretofore or thereafter established.


(1) No person shall have in his possession within the limits of any defensive sea area, any camera or other device for taking pictures, or any film, plate or other device upon or out of which a photographic imprint, negative or positive, can be made, except in the performance of official duty or employment in connection with the national defense, or when authorized pursuant to the provisions of the Act approved June 25, 1942 (Pub. L. 627, 77th Congress), as amended (50 U.S.C. App. 781-785), and the regulations promulgated thereunder (7 FR 7307; 32 CFR 765.19(b)).


(2) It shall be the duty of the master or officer in charge of any vessel to take custody of and safeguard all cameras or other devices for taking pictures, or film, plate or other device upon or out of which a photographic imprint, positive or negative, can be made, the possession of which is prohibited by Executive Order 9275, from any person, prior to the time any vessel enters any defensive sea area or upon the boarding by any person of any vessel while within a defensive sea area, and to retain custody thereof until such vessel is outside the defensive sea area or the person is about to disembark.


(3) There shall be prominently displayed on board all vessels, except public war vessels of the United States manned by personnel in the naval service, a printed notice containing the regulations prescribed in Executive Order 9275.


(4) Any person violating section 1 of Executive Order 9275 (restated in paragraph (a)(1) of this section) shall be liable to prosecution as provided in section 44 of the Criminal Code as amended and reenacted in 18 U.S.C. 2152.


(b) The regulations stated in paragraph (a) of this section are not a limitation on prosecution under any other statute that may have been violated by acts or omissions prohibited by Executive Order 9275.


PART 762 [RESERVED]

SUBCHAPTER G – MISCELLANEOUS RULES

PART 765 – RULES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC


Authority:Secs. 5031, 6011, 70A Stat. 278, 375, as amended; sec. 133, 76 Stat. 517; sec. 301, 80 Stat. 379; 5 U.S.C. 301, 10 U.S.C. 133, 956, 5031, 6011, 7881; DOD 7000.14-R, Financial Management Regulation, Vol. 10.

§§ 765.1-765.5 [Reserved]

§ 765.6 Regulations for Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.

The Commander, U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, is responsible for prescribing and enforcing such rules and regulations as may be necessary for insuring security and for governing the navigation, movements, and anchorage of vessels in the waters of Pearl Harbor and in the entrance channel thereto.


(Sec. 1, 37 Stat. 341, 62 Stat. 799; 18 U.S.C. 2152, 33 U.S.C. 475; E.O. 8143, 4 FR 2179, 3 CFR 1943 Cum. Supp. 504)

[31 FR 16620, Dec. 29, 1966]


§§ 765.9-765.11 [Reserved]

§ 765.12 Navy and Marine Corps absentees; rewards.

The following is set forth as it applies to Navy and Marine Corps absentees. The term “absentee,” as used in this section, refers to a service member who commits the offense of absence without leave. Cf. article 86 of the Uniform Code of Military Justice (10 U.S.C. 886).


(a) Payment of rewards – (1) Authority. When authorized by military officials of the Armed Forces, any civil officer having authority to arrest offenders may apprehend an individual absent without leave from the military service of the United States and deliver him into custody of the military authorities. The receipt of Absentee Wanted by the Armed Forces (DD Form 553) or oral or written notification from military officials or Federal law enforcement officials that the person is absent and that his return to military control is desired is authority for apprehension and will be considered as an offer of a reward. When such a reward has been offered, persons or agency representatives (except salaried officers or employees of the Federal Government, or service members) apprehending or delivering absentees or deserters to military control will be entitled to a payment of


(i) $50 for the apprehension and detention until military authorities assume control, or


(ii) $75 for the apprehension and delivery to military control.


Payment of reward will be made to the person or agency representative actually making the arrest and the turnover or delivery to military control. If two or more persons or agencies join in performing these services, payment may be made jointly or severally but the total payment or payments will not exceed $50 or $75 as applicable. Payment of a reward is authorized whether the absentee or deserter voluntarily surrenders to civil authorities or is apprehended. Payment is not authorized for information merely leading to the apprehension of an absentee or deserter.

(2) Payment procedure. The disbursing officer, special disbursing agent or agent officer of the military activity to which an absentee or deserter is first delivered will be responsible for payment of the reward. Payment of rewards will be made on SF 1034 or NAVCOMPT Form 2277 supported by a copy of DD Form 553 or other form or notification that an individual is absent and that his return to military control is desired, and a statement signed by the claimant specifying that he apprehended (or accepted voluntary surrender) and detained the absentee or deserter until military authorities assumed control, or that he apprehended (or accepted voluntary surrender) and delivered the absentee or deserter to military control. If oral notification was made in lieu of written notification, the claimant will so certify and provide the date of notification and the name, rank or rate, title, and organization of the person who made the authorized notice of reward for apprehension of the absentee or deserter.


(b) Reimbursement for actual expenses – (1) Authority. When a reward has not been offered or when conditions for payment of a reward otherwise cannot be met, reimbursement, not to exceed $75, may be made to any person or agency for actual expenses incurred in the apprehension and detention or delivery to military control of an absentee or deserter. If two or more persons or agencies join in performing these services, payment may be made jointly or severally, but the total payment or payments may not exceed $25. Reimbursement may not be made for the same apprehension and detention or delivery for which a reward has been paid. Actual expenses for which reimbursement may be made include:


(i) Transportation costs, including mileage at the rate established by the Joint Travel Regulation for travel by privately owned vehicle, for a round trip from either the place of apprehension or civil police headquarters to place of return to military control;


(ii) Meals furnished the service member for which the cost was assumed by the apprehending person or agency representative;


(iii) Telephone or telegraph communication costs;


(iv) Damages to property of the apprehending person or agency if caused directly by the service member during the apprehension, detention, or delivery;


(v) Such other reasonable and necessary expenses incurred in the actual apprehension, detention, or delivery as may be considered justifiable and reimbursable by the commanding officer. Reimbursement will not be made for:


(a) Lodging at nonmilitary confinement facilities;


(b) Transportation performed by the use of official Federal, State, county, or municipal vehicles;


(c) Personal services of the apprehending, detaining, or delivering person or agency.


(2) Payment procedure. The disbursing officer or special disbursing agent of the military activity to which an absentee or deserter is first delivered will be responsible for making reimbursement for actual expenses. Reimbursement will be effected on SF 1034 or NAVCOMPT Form 2277 supported by an itemized statement in triplicate signed by the claimant and approved by the commanding officer.


(c) Reimbursement for subsistence furnished – (1) Authority. Civil authorities may be reimbursed for the cost of subsistence furnished absentees or deserters placed in their custody for safekeeping at the request of military authorities. Such reimbursement will be in addition to rewards and reimbursement for actual expenses authorized in paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section.


(2) Payment procedure. The disbursing officer or special disbursing agent of the military activity requesting the safekeeping confinement will be responsible for making reimbursement for subsistence furnished by civil authorities. Reimbursement will be effected on SF 1034 or NAVCOMPT Form 2277 supported by an itemized statement signed by the claimant and approved by the officer who requested the confinement.


(d) Nothing said in this section shall be construed to restrict or exclude authority to apprehend an offender in accordance with law.


(Sec. 807, 70A Stat. 39; 10 U.S.C. 807. Interpret or apply secs. 808, 7214, 70A Stat. 40, 445; 10 U.S.C. 808, 7214)

[25 FR 1075, Feb. 6, 1960, as amended at 51 FR 22283, June 19, 1986; 65 FR 53172, Sept. 1, 2000]


§ 765.13 Insignia to be worn on uniform by persons not in the service.

(a) Under title 10 U.S.C., section 773, members of military societies composed of persons discharged honorably or under honorable conditions from the United States Army, Navy, Air Force or Marine Corps, regular or reserve, may, when authorized by regulations prescribed by the President, wear the uniform duly prescribed by such societies to be worn by the members thereof.


(b) The law cited in paragraph (a) of this section further provides that instructors and members of duly organized cadet corps at certain institutions of learning may wear the uniform duly prescribed by the authorities of such institutions.


(c) The law cited in paragraph (a) of this section further provides that the uniform worn by members of the military societies or by members and instructors of the cadet corps referred to in paragraph (a) of this section shall include some distinctive mark or insignia prescribed by the Secretary of the military department concerned to distinguish such uniforms from the uniforms of the Army, Navy, Air Force, or Marine Corps.


(d) Accordingly, except as otherwise provided in this paragraph, the following mark is hereby designated to be worn by all persons wearing the Navy or Marine Corps uniform as provided in paragraphs (a), (b), and (c) of this section: A diamond, 3
1/2 inches long in the vertical axis, and 2 inches wide in the horizontal axis, of any cloth material, white on blue clothing, forestry green on khaki clothing, and blue on white clothing. The figure shall be worn on all outer clothing on the right sleeve, at the point of the shoulder, the upper tip of the diamond to be one-fourth inch below the shoulder seam. For persons who are participating in United States Marine Corps Junior ROTC programs, the following mark is designated to be worn: A round patch, three inches in diameter, which contains a gold Marine Corps emblem centered on a scarlet field. The scarlet field is surrounded with a blue border containing the words “United States Marine Corps Junior ROTC” in white lettering. Surrounding the blue field will be a gold border. Unless otherwise directed, the patch will be worn in the manner described above in connection with the “diamond” insignia.


(e) Within the meaning of paragraph (a) of this section, the occasions when members of the military societies may wear the uniform of their respective society are official functions which such a member attends in his capacity as a war veteran or as a member of such military society.


(f) Marine Corps Uniform Regulations may be examined and individual copies of pertinent provisions thereof may be purchased in accordance with § 701.1 of this chapter.


(Sec. 773, 70A Stat. 35; 10 U.S.C. 773)

[13 FR 8971, Dec. 28, 1948, as amended at 26 FR 11794, Dec. 12, 1961; 37 FR 6472, Mar. 30, 1972; 44 FR 37610, June 28, 1979]


§ 765.14 Unofficial use of the seal, emblem, names, or initials of the Marine Corps.

(a) Purpose. To establish procedures to determine whether to grant permission to use or imitate the seal, emblem, names, or initials of the Marine Corps in connection with commercial and certain noncommercial activities pursuant to 10 U.S.C. 7881. The Secretary of the Navy, in Secretary of the Navy Instruction 5030.7, has provided the policy and delegated to the Commandant of the Marine Corps (CMC), power to subdelegate to certain subordinate officers in writing, the authority to grant permission required by section 7881(b) of 10 U.S.C. for such use or imitation.


(b) Scope. The provisions of this Order requiring prior approval of the Secretary of the Navy, CMC, or the designee apply only to the use or imitation of the seal, emblem, names, or initials of the Marine Corps that suggest official approval, endorsement, or authorization is in connection with a promotion, goods, services, or commercial activity.


(c) Standards – (1) No unofficial use or imitation of the Marine Corps seal. Reproduction and use of the Marine Corps seal, as designated in Executive Order No. 10538 of June 22, 1954, is restricted to materials emanating from Headquarters Marine Corps. Except for manufacture of official letterhead stationery and related items of official Marine Corps use, reproduction and use of the Marine Corps seal is prohibited.


(2) Unofficial use or imitation of the Marine Corps emblem, names, or initials. Requests from civilian enterprises to use or imitate the Marine Corps emblem, names, or initials will ordinarily be approved where use or imitation merely provides a Marine Corps accent or flavor to otherwise fungible goods. Disapproval, however, usually may be expected where such use or imitation reasonably would:


(i) Imply any official or unofficial connection between the Marine Corps and the user;


(ii) Tend to create the impression that the Marine Corps or the United States is in any way responsible for any financial or legal obligation of the user;


(iii) Give the impression that the Marine Corps selectively benefits the particular manufacturer, commercial entity, or other user, as in displaying the Marine Corps emblem, names, or initials on musical instruments, weapons, or the like, and in using the emblem, names, or initials in connection with advertising, naming, or describing products and services such as insurance, real estate, or financial services; or


(iv) Tend to subject the Marine Corps to discredit or would be inimical to the health, safety, welfare, or morale of the members of the Marine Corps.


(3) Acceptable use of imitation of the Marine Corps insignia. No request for permission is required when a use or imitation of the Marine Corps emblem, names, or initials includes prominent display of the disclaimer, “Neither the United States Marine Corps nor any other component of the Department of Defense has approved, endorsed, or authorized this product (or promotion, or service, or activity)” as an integral part of the use of imitation. A “prominent display” is one located on the same page as the first use of the insignia, prominent in that use, and printed in letters at least one half the size and density of the insignia.


(d) Action – (1) When permission required. Commercial or noncommercial use or imitation of the Marine Corps emblem, names, or initials is prohibited unless permission is first obtained in writing from the CMC, except when such use does not suggest that the use or imitation is approved, endorsed, or authorized by the Marine Corps or any other component of the Department of Defense.


(2) Redelegation of authority. The CMC hereby redelegates, pursuant to the authorization in paragraph 4 of the Secretary of the Navy 5030.7, authority to grant written permission to use the Marine Corps emblem, names, or initials to the Director, Administration Resource Management (ARDE). Prior to granting approval for commercial usage of the Marine Corps insignia, the CMC (ARDE) shall forward such requests to the Head, Marine Corps Exchange Service Branch, Facilities and Services Division, Installations and Logistics Department (CMC) (LFE)) and to the Counsel for the Commandant (CMC (CL)) for comment and concurrence. All other requests shall be routed to the Director, Judge Advocate Division (CMC (JAR)) for comment and concurrence.


(3) Procedures for obtaining written permission. Requests for written permission to use or imitate the Marine Corps emblem, names, or initials shall be in writing and shall be directed to the CMC (ARDE). The request should, at a minimum, contain the following information:


(i) Name and address of the requester.


(ii) A description of the type of activity in which the requester is engaged or proposes to engage.


(iii) A statement of whether the requester considers the proposed use or imitation to be commercial or noncommercial, and why.


(iv) A brief description and illustration or sample of the proposed use or imitation, as well as a description of the product or service in connection with which it will be used. This description will provide sufficient detail to enable the Marine Corps to determine whether there is a reasonable tendency to suggest such use or imitation is approved, endorsed, or authorized by the Marine Corps or any other component of the Department of Defense.


(v) In the case of a noncommercial use of imitation, a copy of the charter, constitution, bylaws, and similar organizational documents of the requester, together with a detailed description of its function or purpose. Insufficiently specific requests will be returned for additional information.


(e) Reserve applicability. This Order is applicable to the Marine Corps Reserve.


[51 FR 45467, Dec. 19, 1986, as amended at 65 FR 62619, Oct. 19, 2000]


PART 766 – USE OF DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY AVIATION FACILITIES BY CIVIL AIRCRAFT


Authority:49 U.S.C. 1507.


Source:35 FR 14451, Sept. 15, 1970, unless otherwise noted.


Note:

The provisions of this part 766 are SECNAV Instruction 3770.1B of 30 June 1970.

§ 766.1 Purpose.

This part establishes the policy and procedures for the use of Navy and Marine Corps aviation facilities by aircraft other than U.S. Department of Defense aircraft.


§ 766.2 Definition of terms.

For the purpose of this part certain terms are defined as follows:


(a) Alternate use. Use of the aviation facility, specified in the flight plan, to which an aircraft may divert when a landing at the point of first intended landing becomes impractical because of weather. (Aircraft may not be dispatched, prior to takeoff from the airport of origin, to a facility licensed for alternate use.)


(b) Civil aircraft. Domestic or foreign aircraft operated by private individuals or corporations, or foreign government-owned aircraft operated for commercial purposes. This includes:


(1) Contract aircraft. Civil aircraft operated under charter or other contract to any U.S. Government department or agency.


(2) Leased aircraft. U.S. Government-owned aircraft delivered by the Government to a lessee subject to terms prescribed in an agreement which does not limit the lessee’s use of the aircraft to Government business.


(c) Civil aviation. All flying activity by civil aircraft including:


(1) Commercial aviation. Transportation by aircraft of passengers or cargo for hire and the ferrying of aircraft as a commercial venture.


(2) General aviation. All types of civil aviation other than commercial aviation as defined above.


(d) Facility. A separately located and officially defined area of real property in which the Navy exercises a real property interest and which has been designated as a Navy or Marine Corps aviation facility by cognizant authority; or where the Department of the Navy has jurisdiction over real property agreements, expressed or implied, with foreign governments, or by rights of occupation. (This definition does not include aircraft carriers nor any other type of naval vessel with a landing area for aircraft.)


(e) Government aircraft. Aircraft owned or operated by any department or agency of either the United States or a foreign government (except a foreign government-owned aircraft operated for commercial purposes). Also aircraft owned by any department, agency, or political subdivision of a State, territory, or possession of the United States when such local government has sole responsibility for operating the aircraft. Government aircraft includes:


(1) Military aircraft. Aircraft used in the military services of any government.


(2) Bailed aircraft. U.S. Government-owned aircraft delivered by the Government to a Government contractor for a specific purpose directly related to a Government contract.


(3) Loaned aircraft. U.S. Government-owned aircraft delivered gratuitously by any Department of Defense agency to another Government agency, to a U.S. Navy or Marine Corps Flying Club, or to a U.S. Army or Air Force Aero Club.


(f) Joint-use facility. A Navy or Marine Corps facility where a specific agreement between the Department of the Navy and a civilian community, or between the U.S. Government and a foreign government, provides for civil aircraft use of the runways and taxiways. Civil aircraft terminal, parking, and servicing facilities are established and controlled by civil authorities in an area separate from those of the Navy or Marine Corps.


(g) Official business. Business, in the interest of the U.S. Government, which personnel aboard an aircraft must transact with U.S. Government organizations or personnel at or near the naval aviation facility concerned. Use of a facility to solicit U.S. Government business is not “official business.”


(h) Provisional use. Use of a naval aviation facility for the purpose of providing adequate service to a community where, because of repair, construction or the performance of other work, the regular civil airport servicing the community is not available for an extended period. (An aircraft may be dispatched prior to takeoff from the airport of origin to a naval aviation facility authorized for provisional use.)


(i) Scheduled use. Use of a facility on a scheduled or regularly recurring basis by an air carrier certified by the Civil Aeronautics Board to provide passenger and cargo service to a community or area.


(j) Services in connection with Government contracts. This type of operation, cited on the Aviation Facility License, indicates the use of a facility for transporting the contractor’s supplies and personnel for the performance of work at the facility under the terms of a specific U.S. Government contract.


(k) Technical stop. An en route landing for the purpose of obtaining fuel, oil, minor repairs, or crew rest. This does not include passenger accommodations nor passenger/cargo enplaning or deplaning privileges unless specifically authorized by the Chief of Naval Operations.


(l) User. An individual, corporation, or company named in the Aviation Facility License and the Certificate of Insurance.


§ 766.3 Authority.

Section 1107(a) of the Federal Aviation Act of 1958 (49 U.S.C. 1507, 1508) states that “Air navigation facilities owned or operated by the United States may be made available for public use under such conditions and to such extent as the head of the department or other agency having jurisdiction thereof deems advisable and may by regulation prescribe.” (See § 766.13 for restrictions imposed by the Federal Aviation Act of 1958.)


§ 766.4 Policy.

Navy and Marine Corps aviation facilities are established to support the operation of Navy and Marine Corps aircraft. Equipment, personnel and material are maintained only at a level necessitated by these requirements and shall not be used to support the operation or maintenance of civil aircraft or non U.S. Government aircraft, except as noted below. (Nothing in this part, however, should be interpreted to prohibit any aircraft from landing at any suitable Navy or Marine Corps aviation facility in case of a bona fide emergency.) (See § 766.5(i).)


(a) General. Subject to the procedures established elsewhere in this part, civil aircraft and government aircraft, other than those belonging to the U.S. Government may use Navy or Marine Corps facilities, if necessary, Provided, That:


(1) They do not interfere with military requirements, and the security of military operations, facilities, or equipment is not compromised.


(2) No adequate civil airport is available. (Exception to this provision may be made when the aircraft is operated in connection with official business as defined in this part.)


(3) Pilots comply with regulations promulgated by the cognizant military agency and the commanding officer of the facility.


(4) Civil aircraft users assume the risk in accordance with the provisions of the Aviation Facility License.


(5) Each aircraft is equipped with two-way radio which provides a capability for voice communications with the control tower on standard Navy/Marine Corps frequencies.


(6) The user, or requesting government, has obtained permission through diplomatic channels from the host country wherein the facility of intended landing is located, if applicable.


(b) Civil Aircraft owned and operated by – (1) Military personnel. Private aircraft owned and operated by active duty U.S. military personnel or by Navy/Marine Corps Reservists on inactive duty may be authorized to land at a facility, provided such aircraft is not engaging in air commerce, and such landing is for official business required by written orders. Under no conditions shall such aircraft be allowed to base or operate from a facility for personal convenience nor base at a facility under the guise of official business.


(2) Civil employees of the U.S. Government. Private aircraft owned and operated by civil employees of the U.S. Government may be authorized to land at a facility, provided such aircraft is not engaging in air commerce, and such landing is for official business required by written orders. Such aircraft shall not be allowed to base or operate from a facility for personal convenience. (Employees of U.S. Government contractors are not considered civil employees of the U.S. Government.)


(3) Non-U.S. Government personnel. An individual or corporation owned and/or operated aircraft may be authorized to land at a facility for:


(i) Sales or service representation to authorized military agents (e.g. the exchange, commissary, or contracting officer).


(ii) Services in connection with U.S. Government contracts. Contracting agency and contract number(s) must be cited in the application for an Aviation Facility License.


(c) Department of defense charter or contract. Aircraft operating under a Military Traffic Management and Terminal Service (MTMTS), Military Airlift Command (MAC), or Navy charter or contract for the movement of DOD passengers or cargo may be authorized to use Navy or Marine Corps aviation facilities when required for loading, en route or terminal stops.


(d) Test and experimental use. Aircraft being produced for a military agency under contract may use Navy/Marine Corps facilities for testing and experimental purposes, if the contract so provides, or if it is determined to be in the best interests of the U.S. Government to do so. Unless otherwise provided in the contract, an Aviation Facility License is required, and the user shall furnish a Certificate of Insurance as provided in this part.


(e) Aircraft demonstrations. Manufacturers of aircraft or installed equipment may be authorized to use Navy/Marine Corps facilities in demonstrating and/or showing aircraft or installed equipment to officials of the U.S. Government when:


(1) It is determined to be in the best interest of the U.S. Government.


(2) The aircraft was produced in accordance with U.S. Government specifications either with or without the aid of Federal funds.


(3) There is an expressed interest on the part of the U.S. Government officials responsible for procurement, approval, or certification of the aircraft.


(f) Joint use. When a specific agreement is entered into by the Department of the Navy pertaining to joint civil/military use of a Navy or Marine Corps facility, the terms of that agreement shall take precedence over the provisions of this part.


(g) Diplomatic agreements. For diplomatic agreements and clearances to use U.S. Navy and Marine Corps aviation facilities in foreign countries, the provisions of this part are subject to the provisions of status of forces agreements, treaties of mutual cooperation or other international agreements. This part shall be used as a guide in negotiating agreements at the local level with representatives of a foreign military service, the U.S. Embassy, and the host government concerning the use of naval facilities by other than U.S. military aircraft. Approval shall be obtained from the Chief of Naval Operations for proposed terms which are in conflict with this part.


§ 766.5 Conditions governing use of aviation facilities by civil aircraft.

(a) Risk. The use of Navy or Marine Corps aviation facilities by civil aircraft shall be at the risk of the operator. Except as hereinafter provided for U.S. Government contractors, the Department of the Navy shall assume no liability or responsibility by reason of the condition of the landing area, taxiways, radio and navigational aids, or other equipment or for notification of such condition; or by the acts of its agents in connection with the granting of the right to use such naval facility. No responsibility is assumed for the security of or damage to aircraft while on property owned or controlled by the U.S. Government.


(b) Military rules. Operators of civil aircraft utilizing a Navy or Marine Corps aviation facility shall be required to comply with the air and ground rules promulgated by the Department of the Navy and the commanding officer of the aviation facility. Such compliance shall pertain specifically to clearance authorization for the entry, departure, or movement of aircraft within the confines of the terminal area normally controlled by the commanding officer of the aviation facility.


(c) Federal aviation regulations. Operators of civil aircraft shall be required to comply with all Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) rules and regulations including filing of flight plans. When such flight plans are required, they shall be filed with the commanding officer or his authorized representative prior to the departure of the aircraft. When such a flight plan is not required, a list of passengers and crew members, the airport of first intended landing, the alternate airport, and fuel supply in hours shall be placed on file prior to takeoff, with the commanding officer or with the local company representative as appropriate.


(d) Hours of operation. The use of a Navy/Marine Corps aviation facility by civil aircraft shall be limited to the hours when the facility is normally in operation.


(e) Weather minimums. Civil aircraft shall comply with weather minimums as follows:


(1) Visual Flight Operations shall be conducted in accordance with Federal Aviation Regulations (FAR), § 91.105 of this title. If more stringent visual flight rules minimums have been established for the point of departure or destination, as noted in the aerodrome remarks section of the Department of Defense Flight Information Publication (en Route) Instrument Flight Rules – Supplement, then the ceiling and visibility must be at or above these minimums in the applicable control zone.


(2) Instrument flight operations shall be conducted in accordance with FAR, § 91.116 of this title.


(f) Inspection. The commanding officer may conduct such inspection of a transiting civil aircraft and its crew, passengers and cargo as he may consider appropriate or necessary to the carrying out of his duties and responsibilities.


(g) Customs, immigration, agriculture, and public health inspection. (1) The civil aircraft commander shall be responsible for compliance with all applicable customs, immigration, agriculture, and public health laws and regulations. He shall also be responsible for paying fees, charges for overtime services, and for all other costs connected with the administration of such laws and regulations.


(2) The commanding officer of the Navy/Marine Corps aviation facility will inform the appropriate public officials of the arrival of civil aircraft subject to such laws and regulations. He will not issue clearances for a civil aircraft to takeoff until such laws and regulations have been complied with. Procedures for insuring compliance with such laws and regulations shall be as mutually agreed to by the commanding officer of the aviation facility and the local public officials.


(h) Weather alternate. If a Navy/Marine Corps aviation facility has been approved for use as an alternate airport, radio clearance must be obtained from such facility as soon as the decision is made en route for such use.


(i) Emergency landings. Any aircraft may land at a Navy/Marine Corps aviation facility when necessary as a result of a bona fide emergency. However, whenever the nature of the emergency permits the pilot to select the time and place of landing, it is preferred that the pilot land his aircraft at a civil field.


(1) The commanding officer of the aviation facility will require that the pilot of the aircraft pay all fees and charges and execute the Aviation Facility License. A statement explaining the circumstances of the emergency landing must be noted in § 766.5 of the license application. If a narrative report from the pilot is available, it may be attached to the application.


(2) Clearance of runway. The Department of the Navy reserves the right to use any method to clear a runway of aircraft or wreckage consistent with operational requirements. Care will be exercised to preclude unnecessary damage in removing wrecked aircraft; however, the Navy assumes no liability as a result of such removal.


(3) Repairs. (i) Aircraft requiring major repairs may be stored temporarily in damaged condition. If repairs cannot be completed within a reasonable time, the aircraft must be removed from the facility by the owner or operator of the aircraft without delay.


(ii) No aircraft will be given a major or minor overhaul.


(iii) Engine or air frame minor components may be furnished, when not available through commercial sources, provided such supplies can be spared and are not known to be in short supply. The issuance of such supplies must be approved by the commanding officer.


(iv) Minor components in short supply or major components for which there is a repeated demand can be furnished only on message authority obtained from the Aviation Supply Office, Philadelphia, PA (for continental facilities) or local fleet air command or major aviation supply depot (for extracontinental facilities). Complete engines, airplane wings, or other major items of equipment shall not be furnished under this authority.


(v) If the commanding officer believes it is desirable to furnish requested material or services in excess of the restrictions stated herein, he shall request instructions from the Chief of Naval Operations, giving a brief description of the material or services requested together with his recommendations.


(4) Reimbursement for costs. (i) The civil user making an emergency landing will be billed in accordance with paragraphs 032500-032503 of the NAVCOMPT Manual and paragraphs 25345-25363 of the NAVSUP Manual for payment of all costs incurred by the Government as a direct result of the emergency landing. Such costs will include those associated with labor, material, rental of equipment, vehicles or tools, etc., for:


(a) Spreading foam on runway before the aircraft attempts emergency landing.


(b) Fire and crash control and rescue.


(c) Movement and storage of aircraft or wreckage.


(d) Damage to runway, lights, navigation aids, etc.


(ii) There will be no charge for naval meteorological services and naval communications facilities for the handling of arrival and departure reports, air traffic control messages, position reports and safety messages.


(iii) The determination as to whether landing fees shall be charged pursuant to an emergency landing for maintenance or repair shall be the prerogative of the commanding officer of the facility.


[35 FR 14451, Sept. 15, 1970, as amended at 51 FR 22804, June 23, 1986]


§ 766.6 Approving authority for landings at Navy/Marine Corps aviation facilities.

(a) Except as indicated in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section, the commanding officer of an active Navy/Marine Corps aviation facility may approve or disapprove landings of civil aircraft at his facility when such landing is:


(1) Directly connected with or in support of U.S. Government business (except those listed in paragraph (c) of this section).


(2) In connection with U.S. Government or community interests on an infrequent basis when no adequate civil airport is reasonably available.


(3) By aircraft owned and operated by Navy/Marine Corps Flying Clubs or U.S. Army or Air Force Aero Clubs which are operated as instrumentalities of the U.S. Government.


(4) By aircraft owned and operated by U.S. Government personnel when such use is in accordance with § 766.4(b) (1) and (2).


(5) By civil aircraft either owned or personally chartered by:


(i) The President or Vice President of the United States or a past President of the United States.


(ii) The head of any Federal department or agency.


(iii) A Member of Congress.


(6) By a bailed, leased, or loaned aircraft (as defined in § 766.2) when operated in connection with official business only.


(7) By aircraft owned and operated by States, counties, or municipalities of the United States when used for official business of the owner.


(b) Except as limited by paragraph (c) of this section, the Commander in Chief, U.S. Naval Forces, Europe; Chief of Naval Material; Commander in Chief, U.S. Atlantic Fleet; Commander in Chief, U.S. Pacific Fleet; Chief of Naval Air Training; Commander, Pacific Missile Range; Commander, Marine Corps Air Bases, Eastern Area; Commander, Marine Corps Air Bases, Western Area; and Commanding General, Fleet Marine Force, Pacific may approve civil aircraft use of any active aviation facility under their control. (At overseas locations, aircraft landing authorizations must be in consonance with the provisions of applicable international agreements.)


(c) The Chief of Naval Operations may approve any of the above requests, and is the only agency empowered to approve all other requests for use of naval facilities by civil and government aircraft, for example:


(1) Applications for use of more than one facility when the facilities are not under the control of one major command.


(2) Application for use of naval aviation facilities when participating in U.S. Government or Department of Defense single-manager contract and charter airlift operations; i.e., Military Airlift Command (MAC) or Military Traffic Management and Terminal Service (MTMTS).


(3) Application for a facility to be used as a regular civil airfield for a community, by either commercial or general aviation.


(4) Requests for use of a facility by foreign civil or government aircraft when:


(i) Such use is not covered by an agreement between the U.S. Government and the government of the aircraft’s registry, or


(ii) The facility is located in a country other than that in which the foreign aircraft is registered.


§ 766.7 How to request use of naval aviation facilities.

(a) Forms required. Each applicant desiring use of a Navy/Marine Corps aviation facility will be required to:


(1) Execute an application for an Aviation Facility License (OPNAV Form 3770/1 (Rev. 7-70)).


(2) Submit a Certificate of Insurance (NAVFAC 7-11011/36) showing coverage as provided by § 766.9 of this part.


(b) Exceptions. Exceptions to the foregoing requirements are:


(1) Aircraft owned and operated by departments or agencies of the U.S. Government for official business.


(2) Aircraft owned and operated or noncommercial purposes by agencies of a foreign government, except in cases where the foreign government charges fees for U.S. Government aircraft.


(3) Aircraft owned and operated by States, possessions, and territories of the United States and political subdivisions, thereof, when used for official business of the owner.


(4) Aircraft owned and operated by either Navy/Marine Corps Flying Clubs or Aero Clubs of other military services which are operated as instrumentalities of the U.S. Government.


(5) Bailed aircraft, provided the bailment contract specifies that the U.S. Government is the insurer for liability.


(c) Obtaining forms. The applicant may obtain the required forms listed in paragraph (a) of this section, from the commanding officer of any Navy or Marine Corps aviation facility or from the Chief of Naval Operations (OP-53C). Navy units may obtain the forms through regular supply channels as a Cog “I” item.


(d) Preparation of forms. (1) The license application will be completed in quadruplicate by the applicant in accordance with detailed instructions set forth in Aviation Facility License (OPNAV Form 3770/1 (REV. 7-70)).


(2) The Certificate of Insurance will be completed by the insurer. Only the signed original certificate and one copy are required to be submitted.


(e) Submission of forms. (1) The forms executed by the applicant shall be submitted to the commanding officer of the aviation facility concerned, except that applications requiring approval by higher authority shall be submitted to the appropriate approving authority, as indicated in paragraph (b) or (c) of this section at least 30 days prior to the first intended landing.


(2) Once the NAVFAC 7-11011/36, Certificate of Insurance, is on file with an executing authority, it is valid until insurance expiration date and may be used by that executing authority as a basis for his action on any subsequent OPNAV Forms 3770/1 submitted for approval.


(f) Security deposit. All applications, other than those listed in § 766.11(a) contemplating more than one landing per month, will be accompanied by a security deposit in the form of a certified check payable to the “Treasurer of the United States” in payment of the estimated costs of landing, hangar and outside parking fees, for 3 months in advance, calculated as provided in § 766.11 (c) and (d). Security deposits will be handled as set forth in paragraph 032102 of the NAVCOMPT Manual.


(g) Nonexclusive use airports. When either the Chief of Naval Operations or Commandant of the U.S. Marine Corps does not have exclusive operational control over a landing area, the aircraft operator will obtain permission to land from the appropriate civil or military authority.


§ 766.8 Procedure for review, approval, execution and distribution of aviation facility licenses.

(a) Review of application by the commanding officer. The commanding officer will review each application for Aviation Facility License and Certificate of Insurance received and determine whether such forms have been completed by the applicant in accordance with the instructions for their preparation as indicated in the Aviation Facility License (OPNAV Form 3770/1 (REV. 7-70)) and the Certificate of Insurance (NAVFAC 7-11011/36(7-70)). As appropriate, the commanding officer will require each applicant to furnish a security deposit as stipulated in § 766.7(f).


(b) Processing application. The commanding officer will approve/disapprove the application or forward it to higher authority for approval as required by § 766.6(b) or (c). If the application is approved, the approving authority will then forward all copies of the license and Certificate of Insurance to the Commander, Naval Facilities Engineering Command or his designated representative for review and execution of the license.


(c) Action by the Commander, Naval Facilities Engineering Command or his designated representative. (1) Upon receipt, the Commander, Naval Facilities Engineering Command, or his designated representative, will review the license and Certificate of Insurance. He shall determine whether the insurance coverage conforms to the requirements prescribed by § 766.9 of this part or to such requirements as may be promulgated from time to time by the Chief of Naval Material.


(2) Upon approval, he will then execute the license in triplicate, conform all additional copies, and make distribution as provided in paragraph (d) of this section. Applications which are not approved will be returned to the applicant with an explanation of deficiencies which must be corrected prior to execution.


(d) Distribution. (1) After execution of a license, distribution will be made as follows:



Original – To the licensee.

Executed copy – To the commanding officer.

Executed copy – To the Commander, Naval Facilities Engineering Command or his designated representative.

Conformed copy – To the Chief of Naval Operations (OP-53).

Conformed copy – To the cognizant commander under § 766.6(b).

Conformed copy – To the disbursing officer serving the performing activity in the case of local deposits, and to the Office of the Navy Comptroller (NAFC3) in the case of central deposits held at the Washington, DC level.

Conformed copy – To the Military Airlift Command (MAC) for DOD contract or charter airlift operations.

Conformed copy – To the Military Traffic Management and Terminal Service (MTMTS) for DOD contract or charter airlift operations.

(2) Licenses issued under this authority are to be disposed of under provisions of paragraph 4280 of SECNAVINST 5212.5B, Disposal of Navy and Marine Corps Records. In accordance therewith, official executed copies of licenses are to be retained for a period of 6 years after completion or termination of the agreement. They may be transferred to the nearest Federal records center when superseded, revoked, canceled, or expired for retention by the center until expiration of the 6-year retention period.


§ 766.9 Insurance requirements.

(a) Control of insurance. The Commander, Naval Facilities Engineering Command, or his designee, shall be responsible for requiring aircraft owners or operators to procure and maintain liability insurance conforming to the standards prescribed by the Chief of Naval Material. The insurance policy must be obtained at the expense of the civil aircraft owner or operator and with a company acceptable to the U.S. Navy.


(b) Insurance coverage. Except for those aircraft exempted by paragraph (c) below, each civil aircraft is required to be covered by insurance of the types and minimum limits established by the Chief of Naval Material. The Certificate of Insurance, must state all coverages in U.S. dollars. Current minimums are:


(1) Privately owned commercially-operated aircraft used for cargo carrying only and aircraft being flight-tested or ferried without passengers will be insured for:


(i) Bodily injury liability. At least $100,000 for each person in any one accident with at least $1 million for each accident.


(ii) Property damage liability. At least $1 million for each accident.


(2) Privately owned commercially-operated aircraft used for passenger carrying and privately owned noncommercially-operated aircraft of 12,500 pounds or more certified maximum gross takeoff weight will be insured for:


(i) Bodily injury liability (excluding passengers). At least $100,000 for each person in any one accident with at least $1 million for each accident.


(ii) Property damage liability. At least $1 million for each accident.


(iii) Passenger liability. At least $100,000 for each passenger, with a minimum for each accident determined as follows: multiply the minimum for each passenger, $100,000 by the next highest whole number resulting from taking 75 percent of the total number of passenger seats (exclusive of crew seats). For example: The minimum passenger coverage for each accident for an aircraft with 94 passenger seats is computed: 94 × 0.75 = 70.5 – next highest whole number resulting in 71. Therefore, 71 × $100,000 = $7,100,000.


(3) Privately owned noncommercially-operated aircraft of less than 12,500 pounds will be insured for:


(i) Bodily injury liability (excluding passengers). At least $100,000 for each person in any one accident with at least $500,000 for each accident.


(ii) Property damage liability. At least $500,000 for each accident.


(iii) Passenger liability. At least $100,000 for each passenger, with a minimum for each accident determined by multiplying the minimum for each passenger, $100,000 by the total number of passenger seats (exclusive of crew seats).


(4) Aircraft insured for a single limit of liability must have coverage equal to or greater than the combined required minimums for bodily injury, property damage, and passenger liability for the type of use requested and for the passenger capacity and gross takeoff weight of the aircraft being operated. For example: the minimum single limit of liability acceptable for an aircraft operating as described in paragraph (b)(2) of this section is $1,000,000 + $1,000,000 + $7,100,000 = $9,100,000.


(5) Aircraft insured by a combination of primary and excess policies must have combined coverage equal to or greater than the required minimums for bodily injury, property damage, and passenger liability, for the type of use, and for the passenger capacity and gross takeoff weight of the aircraft.


(6) Each policy must specifically provide that:


(i) The insurer waives any right to subrogation the insurer may have against the United States by reason of any payment under the policy for damage or injury which might arise out of or in connection with the insured’s use of any Navy installation or facility.


(ii) The insurance afforded by the policy applies to the liability assumed by the insured under OPNAV Form 3770/1, Aviation Facility License.


(iii) If the insurer cancels or reduces the amount of insurance afforded under the listed policy, the insurer shall send written notice of the cancellation or reduction to Commander, Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Department of the Navy, Washington, DC 20390 by registered mail at least 30 days in advance of the effective date of the cancellation; the policy must state that any cancellation or reduction will not be effective until at least 30 days after such notice is sent, regardless of the effective date specified therein.


(iv) If the insured requests cancellation or reduction, the insurer shall notify the Commander, Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Department of the Navy, Washington, DC 20390 immediately upon receipt of such request.


(c) Exemption. Government aircraft, as defined in § 766.2(e) are exempt from the insurance requirements specified above. However, this exemption applies to bailed aircraft only if the contract under which the aircraft is bailed specifies that insurance is not required.


§ 766.10 Cancellation or suspension of the aviation facility license (OPNAV Form 3770/1).

(a) Cancellation. (1) If the user fails to comply with the terms of the Aviation Facility License (OPNAV Form 3770/1) or of any applicable regulations, all current Aviation Facility Licenses for that user will be canceled. A canceled Aviation Facility License cannot be reinstated; a new application must be submitted for approval as explained in § 766.7.


(2) If the commanding officer of a naval aviation facility has reason to believe that the use of an Aviation Facility License is not in accordance with the terms of the license he should immediately notify the Chief of Naval Operations, giving the name of the user, the Aviation Facility License number, and citing the circumstances of the misuse.


(b) Suspension. The approving authority, or the commanding officer of the facility, may suspend an approved Aviation Facility License when such licensed use would be inconsistent with Navy/Marine Corps or national defense interests. Whenever possible, the Department of the Navy will avoid suspension of licenses which have been issued for official business or scheduled air carrier use. In all cases, suspensions will be lifted as quickly as possible. A suspension will not have the effect of extending the expiration date of an approved Aviation Facility License.


§ 766.11 Fees for landing, parking and storage.

(a) The commanding officer of a facility will collect landing, parking, and storage fees, as applicable, from all users required to have an Aviation Facility License by § 766.7 except for the following:


(1) Government aircraft (see definition § 766.2(g)) except that foreign government aircraft will be charged fees if their government charges similar fees for U.S. Government aircraft.


(2) Aircraft being produced under a contract of the U.S. Government.


(3) Any contract aircraft (see definition § 766.2(b)(1)) or other civil aircraft which is authorized to use the facility on official business.


(4) Aircraft employed to train operators in the use of precision approach systems (GCA, ILS, et al.) provided full-stop or touch-and-go landings are not performed.


(5) Aircraft owned and operated by either Navy/Marine Corps Flying Clubs or Aero Clubs or other military services which are operated as instrumentalities of the U.S. Government.


(6) Aircraft owned and operated by military personnel on active duty (Regular and Reserve) or retired, provided the aircraft is not used for commercial purposes.


(7) Landing fees incident to emergency landings for which the landing fee has been waived by the commanding officer in accordance with § 766.5(i)(5)(i).


(b) Fee for unauthorized landing. If an aircraft lands at a Navy/Marine Corps aviation facility without obtaining prior permission (except for a bona fide emergency landing), a landing fee in excess of the normal landing fee will be charged to cover the additional expenses incurred due to special handling and processing. The fee for an unauthorized landing will be as follows:


(1) For aircraft weighing less than 12,500 pounds: $100.


(2) For aircraft weighing 12,500 pounds but less than 40,000 pounds: $250.


(3) For aircraft weighing 40,000 pounds but less than 100,000 pounds: $500.


(4) For aircraft weighing above 100,000 pounds: $600.


(c) Normal landing fee. The normal landing fee is based on the aircraft maximum authorized gross takeoff weight, to the nearest 1,000 pounds. The maximum gross takeoff weight may be determined either from item 7F of OPNAV Form 3770/1 or from the “Airplane Flight Manual” carried aboard each aircraft. If the weight cannot be determined, it should be estimated.



Charge Per Landing

Inside CONUS – 0.20/1,000 pounds or any portion thereof with a minimum of $5.

Outside CONUS – 0.30/1,000 pounds or any portion thereof with a minimum of $7.50.

(d) Parking and storage fees. Fixed and rotary wing aircraft parking and storage fees are based upon the gross takeoff weight of the aircraft as follows:


(1) Outside a hangar. Charges begin 6 hours after the aircraft lands. The rate is 10 cents per thousand pounds for each 24-hour period or fraction thereof, with a minimum charge of $1.50 per aircraft.


(2) Inside a hangar. Charges begin as soon as the aircraft is placed inside the hangar. The rate is 20 cents per 1,000 pounds for each 24-hour period or fraction thereof, with a minimum charge of $5 per aircraft.


(e) Reimbursement. Collections incident to direct (out of pocket) costs will be credited to local operating and maintenance funds. All other collections, such as for landing, parking, and storage fees will be credited to Navy General Fund Receipt Account 172426. Accumulation of costs and preparation of billing documents are prescribed in paragraphs 032500-032503 of the NAVCOMPT Manual.


§ 766.12 Unauthorized landings.

An aircraft that lands at a Navy/Marine Corps aviation facility without obtaining prior permission from an approving authority, except in a bona fide emergency, is in violation of this part. Civil aircraft landing in violation of this regulation will have to pay the fee prescribed in § 766.11(b). In those cases where an unauthorized landing is made at a facility within a Naval Defense Area, proclaimed as such by Executive order of the President, civil aircraft may be impounded and the operator prosecuted as indicated in OPNAVINST 5500.11C of November 12, 1963. In any event, before the aircraft is authorized to depart, the commanding officer of the facility will:


(a) Inform the aircraft operator of the provisions of this part and the OP NAVINST 5500.11C of November 12, 1963, if applicable.


(b) Require the aircraft operator (or owner), before takeoff, to pay all fees and charges and to comply with the following procedure:


(1) Execute OPNAV Form 3770/1, explaining in item 6 of that form the reason for the landing.


(2) In lieu of submitting a Certificate of Insurance (NAVFAC 7-11011/36), the insurer must furnish evidence of sufficient insurance to include waiver of any right of subrogation against the United States, and that such insurance applies to the liability assumed by the insured under OPNAV Form 3770/1.


(3) When it appears that the violation may have been deliberate, or is a repeated violation, departure authorization must be obtained from the Chief of Naval Operations.


(4) Waiver of the requirements in paragraphs (b)(1) and (2) of this section may be obtained from the Chief of Naval Operations to expedite removal of these aircraft when such waiver is considered appropriate.


[35 FR 14451, Sept. 15, 1970, as amended at 51 FR 22804, June 23, 1986]


§ 766.13 Sale of aviation fuel, oil, services and supplies.

(a) General policy. In accordance with sections 1107 and 1108 of the Federal Aviation Act of 1958 (72 Stat. 798 as amended, 49 U.S.C. 1507, 1508), Navy/Marine Corps Aviation fuel, oil, services, and supplies are not sold to civil aircraft in competition with private enterprise. Sections 1107 and 1108 of Federal Aviation Act of 1958 (72 Stat. 798 as amended, 49 U.S.C. 1507, 1508), however, does authorize the sales of fuel, oil, equipment, supplies, mechanical service, and other assistance by reason of an emergency. Such sales will be made only where there is no commercial source and only in the amount necessary for the aircraft to continue on its course to the nearest airport operated by private enterprise.


(b) Contract aircraft. The sale of aviation fuel, oil, supplies, etc. to aircraft under U.S. Government contract or charter is permitted at, and limited to, points where passengers or cargo are loaded into or discharged from the aircraft under terms of the contract or charter. Sales are not authorized at naval aviation facilities where commercial supplies and service are available.