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Title 40—Protection of Environment–Volume 8

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Title 40—Protection of Environment–Volume 8


Part


chapter i—Environmental Protection Agency (Continued)

60

CHAPTER I—ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED)

SUBCHAPTER C—AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED)

PART 60—STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY SOURCES (CONTINUED)


Authority:42 U.S.C. 7401 et seq.


Source:36 FR 24877, Dec. 23, 1971, unless otherwise noted.

Subpart XX—Standards of Performance for Bulk Gasoline Terminals That Commenced Construction, Modification, or Reconstruction After December 17, 1980, and On or Before June 10, 2022


Source:48 FR 37590, Aug. 18, 1983, unless otherwise noted.

§ 60.500 Applicability and designation of affected facility.

(a) The affected facility to which the provisions of this subpart apply is the total of all the loading racks at a bulk gasoline terminal which deliver liquid product into gasoline tank trucks.


(b) Each facility under paragraph (a) of this section, the construction or modification of which is commenced after December 17, 1980, and on or before June 10, 2022, is subject to the provisions of this subpart.


(c) For purposes of this subpart, any replacement of components of an existing facility, described in paragraph (a) of this section, commenced before August 18, 1983 in order to comply with any emission standard adopted by a State or political subdivision thereof will not be considered a reconstruction under the provisions of 40 CFR 60.15.



Note:

The intent of these standards is to minimize the emissions of VOC through the application of best demonstrated technologies (BDT). The numerical emission limits in this standard are expressed in terms of total organic compounds. This emission limit reflects the performance of BDT.


[48 FR 37590, Aug. 18, 1983, as amended at 89 FR 39344, May 8, 2024]


§ 60.501 Definitions.

The terms used in this subpart are defined in the Clean Air Act, in § 60.2 of this part, or in this section as follows:


Bulk gasoline terminal means any gasoline facility which receives gasoline by pipeline, ship or barge, and has a gasoline throughput greater than 75,700 liters per day. Gasoline throughput shall be the maximum calculated design throughput as may be limited by compliance with an enforceable condition under Federal, State or local law and discoverable by the Administrator and any other person.


Continuous vapor processing system means a vapor processing system that treats total organic compounds vapors collected from gasoline tank trucks on a demand basis without intermediate accumulation in a vapor holder.


Existing vapor processing system means a vapor processing system [capable of achieving emissions to the atmosphere no greater than 80 milligrams of total organic compounds per liter of gasoline loaded], the construction or refurbishment of which was commenced before December 17, 1980, and which was not constructed or refurbished after that date.


Flare means a thermal oxidation system using an open (without enclosure) flame.


Gasoline means any petroleum distillate or petroleum distillate/alcohol blend having a Reid vapor pressure of 27.6 kilopascals or greater which is used as a fuel for internal combustion engines.


Gasoline tank truck means a delivery tank truck used at bulk gasoline terminals which is loading gasoline or which has loaded gasoline on the immediately previous load.


Intermittent vapor processing system means a vapor processing system that employs an intermediate vapor holder to accumulate total organic compounds vapors collected from gasoline tank trucks, and treats the accumulated vapors only during automatically controlled cycles.


Loading rack means the loading arms, pumps, meters, shutoff valves, relief valves, and other piping and valves necessary to fill delivery tank trucks.


Refurbishment means, with reference to a vapor processing system, replacement of components of, or addition of components to, the system within any 2-year period such that the fixed capital cost of the new components required for such component replacement or addition exceeds 50 percent of the cost of a comparable entirely new system.


Thermal oxidation system means a combustion device used to mix and ignite fuel, air pollutants, and air to provide a flame to heat and oxidize hazardous air pollutants. Auxiliary fuel may be used to heat air pollutants to combustion temperatures.


Total organic compounds means those compounds measured according to the procedures in § 60.503.


Vapor collection system means any equipment used for containing total organic compounds vapors displaced during the loading of gasoline tank trucks.


Vapor processing system means all equipment used for recovering or oxidizing total organic compounds vapors displaced from the affected facility.


Vapor-tight gasoline tank truck means a gasoline tank truck which has demonstrated within the 12 preceding months that its product delivery tank will sustain a pressure change of not more than 750 pascals (75 mm of water) within 5 minutes after it is pressurized to 4,500 pascals (450 mm of water). This capability is to be demonstrated using the pressure test procedure specified in Method 27.


[48 FR 37590, Aug. 18, 1983, as amended at 65 FR 61763, Oct. 17, 2000; 68 FR 70965, Dec. 19, 2003]


§ 60.502 Standard for Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) emissions from bulk gasoline terminals.

On and after the date on which § 60.8(a) requires a performance test to be completed, the owner or operator of each bulk gasoline terminal containing an affected facility shall comply with the requirements of this section.


(a) Each affected facility shall be equipped with a vapor collection system designed to collect the total organic compounds vapors displaced from tank trucks during product loading.


(b) The emissions to the atmosphere from the vapor collection system due to the loading of liquid product into gasoline tank trucks are not to exceed 35 milligrams of total organic compounds per liter of gasoline loaded, except as noted in paragraph (c) of this section.


(c) For each affected facility equipped with an existing vapor processing system, the emissions to the atmosphere from the vapor collection system due to the loading of liquid product into gasoline tank trucks are not to exceed 80 milligrams of total organic compounds per liter of gasoline loaded.


(d) Each vapor collection system shall be designed to prevent any total organic compounds vapors collected at one loading rack from passing to another loading rack.


(e) Loadings of liquid product into gasoline tank trucks shall be limited to vapor-tight gasoline tank trucks using the following procedures:


(1) The owner or operator shall obtain the vapor tightness documentation described in § 60.505(b) for each gasoline tank truck which is to be loaded at the affected facility.


(2) The owner or operator shall require the tank identification number to be recorded as each gasoline tank truck is loaded at the affected facility.


(3)(i) The owner or operator shall cross-check each tank identification number obtained in paragraph (e)(2) of this section with the file of tank vapor tightness documentation within 2 weeks after the corresponding tank is loaded, unless either of the following conditions is maintained:


(A) If less than an average of one gasoline tank truck per month over the last 26 weeks is loaded without vapor tightness documentation then the documentation cross-check shall be performed each quarter; or


(B) If less than an average of one gasoline tank truck per month over the last 52 weeks is loaded without vapor tightness documentation then the documentation cross-check shall be performed semiannually.


(ii) If either the quarterly or semiannual cross-check provided in paragraphs (e)(3)(i) (A) through (B) of this section reveals that these conditions were not maintained, the source must return to biweekly monitoring until such time as these conditions are again met.


(4) The terminal owner or operator shall notify the owner or operator of each non-vapor-tight gasoline tank truck loaded at the affected facility within 1 week of the documentation cross-check in paragraph (e)(3) of this section.


(5) The terminal owner or operator shall take steps assuring that the nonvapor-tight gasoline tank truck will not be reloaded at the affected facility until vapor tightness documentation for that tank is obtained.


(6) Alternate procedures to those described in paragraphs (e)(1) through (5) of this section for limiting gasoline tank truck loadings may be used upon application to, and approval by, the Administrator.


(f) The owner or operator shall act to assure that loadings of gasoline tank trucks at the affected facility are made only into tanks equipped with vapor collection equipment that is compatible with the terminal’s vapor collection system.


(g) The owner or operator shall act to assure that the terminal’s and the tank truck’s vapor collection systems are connected during each loading of a gasoline tank truck at the affected facility. Examples of actions to accomplish this include training drivers in the hookup procedures and posting visible reminder signs at the affected loading racks.


(h) The vapor collection and liquid loading equipment shall be designed and operated to prevent gauge pressure in the delivery tank from exceeding 4,500 pascals (450 mm of water) during product loading. This level is not to be exceeded when measured by the procedures specified in § 60.503(d).


(i) No pressure-vacuum vent in the bulk gasoline terminal’s vapor collection system shall begin to open at a system pressure less than 4,500 pascals (450 mm of water).


(j) Each calendar month, the vapor collection system, the vapor processing system, and each loading rack handling gasoline shall be inspected during the loading of gasoline tank trucks for total organic compounds liquid or vapor leaks. For purposes of this paragraph, detection methods incorporating sight, sound, or smell are acceptable. Each detection of a leak shall be recorded and the source of the leak repaired within 15 calendar days after it is detected.


[48 FR 37590, Aug. 18, 1983; 48 FR 56580, Dec. 22, 1983, as amended at 54 FR 6678, Feb. 14, 1989; 64 FR 7466, Feb. 12, 1999]


§ 60.503 Test methods and procedures.

(a) In conducting the performance tests required in § 60.8, the owner or operator shall use as reference methods and procedures the test methods in appendix A of this part or other methods and procedures as specified in this section, except as provided in § 60.8(b). The three-run requirement of § 60.8(f) does not apply to this subpart.


(b) Immediately before the performance test required to determine compliance with § 60.502 (b), (c), and (h), the owner or operator shall use Method 21 to monitor for leakage of vapor all potential sources in the terminal’s vapor collection system equipment while a gasoline tank truck is being loaded. The owner or operator shall repair all leaks with readings of 10,000 ppm (as methane) or greater before conducting the performance test.


(c) The owner or operator shall determine compliance with the standards in § 60.502 (b) and (c) as follows:


(1) The performance test shall be 6 hours long during which at least 300,000 liters of gasoline is loaded. If this is not possible, the test may be continued the same day until 300,000 liters of gasoline is loaded or the test may be resumed the next day with another complete 6-hour period. In the latter case, the 300,000-liter criterion need not be met. However, as much as possible, testing should be conducted during the 6-hour period in which the highest throughput normally occurs.


(2) If the vapor processing system is intermittent in operation, the performance test shall begin at a reference vapor holder level and shall end at the same reference point. The test shall include at least two startups and shutdowns of the vapor processor. If this does not occur under automatically controlled operations, the system shall be manually controlled.


(3) The emission rate (E) of total organic compounds shall be computed using the following equation:




where:

E = emission rate of total organic compounds, mg/liter of gasoline loaded.

Vesi = volume of air-vapor mixture exhausted at each interval “i”, scm.

Cei = concentration of total organic compounds at each interval “i”, ppm.

L = total volume of gasoline loaded, liters.

n = number of testing intervals.

i = emission testing interval of 5 minutes.

K = density of calibration gas, 1.83 × 10
6 for propane and 2.41 × 10
6 for butane, mg/scm.

(4) The performance test shall be conducted in intervals of 5 minutes. For each interval “i”, readings from each measurement shall be recorded, and the volume exhausted (Vesi) and the corresponding average total organic compounds concentration (Cei) shall be determined. The sampling system response time shall be considered in determining the average total organic compounds concentration corresponding to the volume exhausted.


(5) The following methods shall be used to determine the volume (Vesi) air-vapor mixture exhausted at each interval:


(i) Method 2B shall be used for combustion vapor processing systems.


(ii) Method 2A shall be used for all other vapor processing systems.


(6) Method 25A or 25B shall be used for determining the total organic compounds concentration (Cei) at each interval. The calibration gas shall be either propane or butane. The owner or operator may exclude the methane and ethane content in the exhaust vent by any method (e.g., Method 18) approved by the Administrator.


(7) To determine the volume (L) of gasoline dispensed during the performance test period at all loading racks whose vapor emissions are controlled by the processing system being tested, terminal records or readings from gasoline dispensing meters at each loading rack shall be used.


(d) The owner or operator shall determine compliance with the standard in § 60.502(h) as follows:


(1) A pressure measurement device (liquid manometer, magnehelic gauge, or equivalent instrument), capable of measuring up to 500 mm of water gauge pressure with ±2.5 mm of water precision, shall be calibrated and installed on the terminal’s vapor collection system at a pressure tap located as close as possible to the connection with the gasoline tank truck.


(2) During the performance test, the pressure shall be recorded every 5 minutes while a gasoline truck is being loaded; the highest instantaneous pressure that occurs during each loading shall also be recorded. Every loading position must be tested at least once during the performance test.


(e) The performance test requirements of paragraph (c) of this section do not apply to flares defined in § 60.501 and meeting the requirements in § 60.18(b) through (f). The owner or operator shall demonstrate that the flare and associated vapor collection system is in compliance with the requirements in §§ 60.18(b) through (f) and 60.503(a), (b), and (d).


(f) The owner or operator shall use alternative test methods and procedures in accordance with the alternative test method provisions in § 60.8(b) for flares that do not meet the requirements in § 60.18(b).


[54 FR 6678, Feb. 14, 1989; 54 FR 21344, May 17, 1989, as amended at 68 FR 70965, Dec. 19, 2003]


§ 60.504 [Reserved]

§ 60.505 Reporting and recordkeeping.

(a) The tank truck vapor tightness documentation required under § 60.502(e)(1) shall be kept on file at the terminal in a permanent form available for inspection.


(b) The documentation file for each gasoline tank truck shall be updated at least once per year to reflect current test results as determined by Method 27. This documentation shall include, as a minimum, the following information:


(1) Test title: Gasoline Delivery Tank Pressure Test—EPA Reference Method 27.


(2) Tank owner and address.


(3) Tank identification number.


(4) Testing location.


(5) Date of test.


(6) Tester name and signature.


(7) Witnessing inspector, if any: Name, signature, and affiliation.


(8) Test results: Actual pressure change in 5 minutes, mm of water (average for 2 runs).


(c) A record of each monthly leak inspection required under § 60.502(j) shall be kept on file at the terminal for at least 2 years. Inspection records shall include, as a minimum, the following information:


(1) Date of inspection.


(2) Findings (may indicate no leaks discovered; or location, nature, and severity of each leak).


(3) Leak determination method.


(4) Corrective action (date each leak repaired; reasons for any repair interval in excess of 15 days).


(5) Inspector name and signature.


(d) The terminal owner or operator shall keep documentation of all notifications required under § 60.502(e)(4) on file at the terminal for at least 2 years.


(e) As an alternative to keeping records at the terminal of each gasoline cargo tank test result as required in paragraphs (a), (c), and (d) of this section, an owner or operator may comply with the requirements in either paragraph (e)(1) or (2) of this section.


(1) An electronic copy of each record is instantly available at the terminal.


(i) The copy of each record in paragraph (e)(1) of this section is an exact duplicate image of the original paper record with certifying signatures.


(ii) The permitting authority is notified in writing that each terminal using this alternative is in compliance with paragraph (e)(1) of this section.


(2) For facilities that utilize a terminal automation system to prevent gasoline cargo tanks that do not have valid cargo tank vapor tightness documentation from loading (e.g., via a card lock-out system), a copy of the documentation is made available (e.g., via facsimile) for inspection by permitting authority representatives during the course of a site visit, or within a mutually agreeable time frame.


(i) The copy of each record in paragraph (e)(2) of this section is an exact duplicate image of the original paper record with certifying signatures.


(ii) The permitting authority is notified in writing that each terminal using this alternative is in compliance with paragraph (e)(2) of this section.


(f) The owner or operator of an affected facility shall keep records of all replacements or additions of components performed on an existing vapor processing system for at least 3 years.


[48 FR 37590, Aug. 18, 1983; 48 FR 56580, Dec. 22, 1983, as amended at 68 FR 70965, Dec. 19, 2003]


§ 60.506 Reconstruction.

For purposes of this subpart:


(a) The cost of the following frequently replaced components of the affected facility shall not be considered in calculating either the “fixed capital cost of the new components” or the “fixed capital costs that would be required to construct a comparable entirely new facility” under § 60.15: pump seals, loading arm gaskets and swivels, coupler gaskets, overfill sensor couplers and cables, flexible vapor hoses, and grounding cables and connectors.


(b) Under § 60.15, the “fixed capital cost of the new components” includes the fixed capital cost of all depreciable components (except components specified in § 60.506(a)) which are or will be replaced pursuant to all continuous programs of component replacement which are commenced within any 2-year period following December 17, 1980. For purposes of this paragraph, “commenced” means that an owner or operator has undertaken a continuous program of component replacement or that an owner or operator has entered into a contractual obligation to undertake and complete, within a reasonable time, a continuous program of component replacement.


Subpart XXa—Standards of Performance for Bulk Gasoline Terminals that Commenced Construction, Modification, or Reconstruction After June 10, 2022


Source:89 FR 39344, May 8, 2024, unless otherwise noted.

§ 60.500a Applicability and designation of affected facility.

(a) You are subject to the applicable provisions of this subpart if you are the owner or operator of one or more of the affected facilities listed in paragraphs (a)(1) and (2) of this section.


(1) Each gasoline loading rack affected facility, which is the total of all the loading racks at a bulk gasoline terminal that deliver liquid product into gasoline cargo tanks including the gasoline loading racks, the vapor collection systems, and the vapor processing system.


(2) Each collection of equipment at a bulk gasoline terminal affected facility, which is the total of all equipment associated with the loading of gasoline at a bulk gasoline terminal including the lines and pumps transferring gasoline from storage vessels, the gasoline loading racks, the vapor collection systems, and the vapor processing system.


(b) Each affected facility under paragraph (a) of this section for which construction, modification (as defined in § 60.2 and detailed in § 60.14), or reconstruction (as detailed in § 60.15 and paragraph (e) of this section) is commenced after June 10, 2022, is subject to the provisions of this subpart.


(c) All standards including emission limitations shall apply at all times, including periods of startup, shutdown, and malfunction. As provided in § 60.11(f), this paragraph (c) supersedes the exemptions for periods of startup, shutdown, and malfunction in subpart A of this part.


(d) A newly constructed gasoline loading rack affected facility that was subject to the standards in § 60.502a(b) will continue to be subject to the standards in § 60.502a(b) for newly constructed gasoline loading rack affected facilities if they are subsequently modified or reconstructed.


(e) For purposes of this subpart:


(1) The cost of the following frequently replaced components of the gasoline loading rack affected facility shall not be considered in calculating either the “fixed capital cost of the new components” or the “fixed capital cost that would be required to construct a comparable entirely new facility” under § 60.15: pump seals, loading arm gaskets and swivels, coupler gaskets, overfill sensor couplers and cables, flexible vapor hoses, and grounding cables and connectors.


(2) Under § 60.15, the “fixed capital cost of the new components” includes the fixed capital cost of all depreciable components, except components specified in paragraph (e)(1) of this section which are or will be replaced pursuant to all continuous programs of component replacement which are commenced within any 2-year period following June 10, 2022. For purposes of this paragraph (e)(2), “commenced” means that an owner or operator has undertaken a continuous program of component replacement or that an owner or operator has entered into a contractual obligation to undertake and complete, within a reasonable time, a continuous program of component replacement.


§ 60.501a Definitions.

The terms used in this subpart are defined in the Clean Air Act, in § 60.2, or in this section as follows:


3-hour rolling average means the arithmetic mean of the previous thirty-six 5-minute periods of valid operating data collected, as specified, for the monitored parameter. Valid data excludes data collected during periods when the monitoring system is out of control, while conducting repairs associated with periods when the monitoring system is out of control, or while conducting required monitoring system quality assurance or quality control activities. The thirty-six 5-minute periods should be consecutive, but not necessarily continuous if operations or the collection of valid data were intermittent.


Bulk gasoline terminal means any gasoline facility which receives gasoline by pipeline, ship, barge, or cargo tank and subsequently loads all or a portion of the gasoline into gasoline cargo tanks for transport to bulk gasoline plants or gasoline dispensing facilities and has a gasoline throughput greater than 20,000 gallons per day (75,700 liters per day). Gasoline throughput shall be the maximum calculated design throughput for the facility as may be limited by compliance with an enforceable condition under Federal, State, or local law and discoverable by the Administrator and any other person.


Continuous monitoring system is a comprehensive term that may include, but is not limited to, continuous emission monitoring systems, continuous parameter monitoring systems, or other manual or automatic monitoring that is used for demonstrating compliance on a continuous basis.


Equipment means each valve, pump, pressure relief device, open-ended valve or line, sampling connection system, and flange or other connector in the gasoline liquid transfer and vapor collection systems. This definition also includes the entire vapor processing system except the exhaust port(s) or stack(s).


Flare means a thermal combustion device using an open or shrouded flame (without full enclosure) such that the pollutants are not emitted through a conveyance suitable to conduct a performance test.


Gasoline means any petroleum distillate or petroleum distillate/alcohol blend having a Reid vapor pressure of 4.0 pounds per square inch (27.6 kilopascals) or greater which is used as a fuel for internal combustion engines.


Gasoline cargo tank means a delivery tank truck or railcar which is loading gasoline or which has loaded gasoline on the immediately previous load.


In gasoline service means that a piece of equipment is used in a system that transfers gasoline or gasoline vapors.


Loading rack means the loading arms, pumps, meters, shutoff valves, relief valves, and other piping and valves necessary to fill gasoline cargo tanks.


Submerged filling means the filling of a gasoline cargo tank through a submerged fill pipe whose discharge is no more than the 6 inches from the bottom of the tank. Bottom filling of gasoline cargo tanks is included in this definition.


Thermal oxidation system means an enclosed combustion device used to mix and ignite fuel, air pollutants, and air to provide a flame to heat and oxidize air pollutants. Auxiliary fuel may be used to heat air pollutants to combustion temperatures. Thermal oxidation systems emit pollutants through a conveyance suitable to conduct a performance test.


Total organic compounds (TOC) means those compounds measured according to the procedures in Method 25, 25A, or 25B of appendix A-7 to this part. The methane content may be excluded from the TOC concentration as described in § 60.503a.


Vapor collection system means any equipment used for containing total organic compounds vapors displaced during the loading of gasoline cargo tanks.


Vapor processing system means all equipment used for recovering or oxidizing total organic compounds vapors displaced from the affected facility.


Vapor recovery system means processing equipment used to absorb and/or condense collected vapors and return the total organic compounds for blending with gasoline or other petroleum products or return to a petroleum refinery or transmix facility for further processing. Vapor recovery systems include but are not limited to carbon adsorption systems or refrigerated condensers.


Vapor-tight gasoline cargo tank means a gasoline cargo tank which has demonstrated within the 12 preceding months that it meets the annual certification test requirements in § 60.503a(f).


§ 60.502a Standard for volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from bulk gasoline terminals.

(a) Each gasoline loading rack affected facility shall be equipped with a vapor collection system designed and operated to collect the total organic compounds vapors displaced from gasoline cargo tanks during product loading.


(b) For each newly constructed gasoline loading rack affected facility, the facility owner or operator must meet the applicable emission limitations in paragraph (b)(1) or (2) of this section no later than the date on which § 60.8(a) requires a performance test to be completed. A flare cannot be used to comply with the emission limitations in this paragraph (b).


(1) If a thermal oxidation system is used, maintain the emissions to the atmosphere from the vapor collection system due to the loading of liquid product into gasoline cargo tanks at or below 1.0 milligram of total organic compounds per liter of gasoline loaded (mg/L). Continual compliance with this requirement must be demonstrated as specified in paragraphs (b)(1)(i) and (ii) of this section.


(i) Conduct initial and periodic performance tests as specified in § 60.503a(a) through (c) and meet the emission limitation in this paragraph (b)(1).


(ii) Maintain combustion zone temperature of the thermal oxidation system at or above the 3-hour rolling average operating limit established during the performance test when loading liquid product into gasoline cargo tanks. Valid operating data must exclude periods when there is no liquid product being loaded. If previous contents of the cargo tanks are known, you may also exclude periods when liquid product is loaded but no gasoline cargo tanks are being loaded provided that you excluded these periods in the determination of the combustion zone temperature operating limit according to the provisions in § 60.503a(c)(8)(ii).


(2) If a vapor recovery system is used:


(i) Maintain the emissions to the atmosphere from the vapor collection system at or below 550 parts per million by volume (ppmv) of TOC as propane determined on a 3-hour rolling average when the vapor recovery system is operating;


(ii) Operate the vapor recovery system during all periods when the vapor recovery system is capable of processing gasoline vapors, including periods when liquid product is being loaded, during carbon bed regeneration, and when preparing the beds for reuse; and


(iii) Operate the vapor recovery system to minimize air or nitrogen intrusion except as needed for the system to operate as designed for the purpose of removing VOC from the adsorption media or to break vacuum in the system and bring the system back to atmospheric pressure. Consistent with § 60.12, the use of gaseous diluents to achieve compliance with a standard which is based on the concentration of a pollutant in the gases discharged to the atmosphere is prohibited.


(c) For each modified or reconstructed gasoline loading rack affected facility, the facility owner or operator must meet the applicable emission limitations in paragraphs (c)(1) through (3) of this section no later than the date on which § 60.8(a) requires a performance test to be completed.


(1) If a thermal oxidation system is used, maintain the emissions to the atmosphere from the vapor collection system due to the loading of liquid product into gasoline cargo tanks at or below 10 mg/L. Continual compliance with this requirement must be demonstrated as specified in paragraphs (c)(1)(i) through (iii) of this section.


(i) Conduct initial and periodic performance tests as specified in § 60.503a(a) through (c) and meet the emission limitation in this paragraph (c)(1).


(ii) Maintain combustion zone temperature of the thermal oxidation system at or above the 3-hour rolling average operating limit established during the performance test when loading liquid product into gasoline cargo tanks. Valid operating data must exclude periods when there is no liquid product being loaded. If previous contents of the cargo tanks are known, you may also exclude periods when liquid product is loaded but no gasoline cargo tanks are being loaded provided that you excluded these periods in the determination of the combustion zone temperature operating limit according to the provisions in § 60.503a(c)(8)(ii).


(iii) As an alternative to the combustion zone temperature operating limit, you may elect to use the monitoring provisions as specified in paragraph (c)(3) of this section.


(2) If a vapor recovery system is used:


(i) Maintain the emissions to the atmosphere from the vapor collection system at or below 5,500 ppmv of TOC as propane determined on a 3-hour rolling average when the vapor recovery system is operating;


(ii) Operate the vapor recovery system during all periods when the vapor recovery system is capable of processing gasoline vapors, including periods when liquid product is being loaded, during carbon bed regeneration, and when preparing the beds for reuse; and


(iii) Operate the vapor recovery system to minimize air or nitrogen intrusion except as needed for the system to operate as designed for the purpose of removing VOC from the adsorption media or to break vacuum in the system and bring the system back to atmospheric pressure. Consistent with § 60.12, the use of gaseous diluents to achieve compliance with a standard which is based on the concentration of a pollutant in the gases discharged to the atmosphere is prohibited.


(3) If a flare is used or if a thermal oxidation system for which these provisions are specified as a monitoring alternative is used, meet all applicable requirements specified in § 63.670(b) through (g) and (i) through (n) of this chapter except as provided in paragraphs (c)(3)(i) through (ix) of this section.


(i) For the purpose of this subpart, “regulated materials” refers to “vapors displaced from gasoline cargo tanks during product loading”. If you do not know the previous contents of the cargo tank, you must assume that cargo tank is a gasoline cargo tank.


(ii) In § 63.670(c) of this chapter for visible emissions:


(A) The phrase “specify the smokeless design capacity of each flare and” does not apply.


(B) The phrase “and the flare vent gas flow rate is less than the smokeless design capacity of the flare” does not apply.


(C) Substitute “The owner or operator shall monitor for visible emissions from the flare as specified in § 60.504a(c)(4).” for the sentence “The owner or operator shall monitor for visible emissions from the flare as specified in paragraph (h) of this section.”


(iii) The phrase “and the flare vent gas flow rate is less than the smokeless design capacity of the flare” in § 63.670(d) of this chapter for flare tip velocity requirements does not apply.


(iv) Substitute “pilot flame or flare flame” for each occurrence of “pilot flame.”


(v) Substitute “gasoline distribution facility” for each occurrence of “petroleum refinery” or “refinery.”


(vi) As an alternative to the flow rate monitoring alternatives provided in § 63.670(i) of this chapter, you may elect to determine flare waste gas flow rate by monitoring the cumulative loading rates of all liquid products loaded into cargo tanks for which the displaced vapors are managed by the affected facility’s vapor collection system and vapor processing system.


(vii) If using provision in § 63.670(j)(6) of this chapter for flare vent gas composition monitoring, you must comply with those provisions as specified in paragraphs (c)(3)(vii)(A) through (G) of this section.


(A) You must submit a separate written application to the Administrator for an exemption from monitoring, as described in § 63.670(j)(6)(i) of this chapter.


(B) You must determine the minimum ratio of gasoline loaded to total liquid product loaded for which the affected source must operate at or above at all times when liquid product is loaded into cargo tanks for which vapors collected are sent to the flare or, if applicable, thermal oxidation system and include that in the explanation of conditions expected to produce the flare gas with lowest net heating value as required in § 63.670(j)(6)(i)(C) of this chapter. For air assisted flares or thermal oxidation systems, you must also establish a minimum gasoline loading rate (i.e., volume of gasoline loaded in a 15-minute period) for which the affected source must operate at or above at all times and include that in the explanation of conditions that ensure the flare gas net heating value is consistent and representative of the lowest net heating value as required in § 63.670(j)(6)(i)(C).


(C) As required in § 63.670(j)(6)(i)(D) of this chapter, samples must be collected at the conditions identified in § 63.670(j)(6)(i)(C) of this chapter, which includes the applicable conditions specified in paragraph (c)(3)(vii)(B) of this section.


(D) The first change from winter gasoline to summer gasoline or from summer gasoline to winter gasoline, whichever comes first, is considered a change in operating conditions under § 63.670(j)(6)(iii) of this chapter and must be evaluated according to the provisions in § 63.670(j)(6)(iii). If separate net heating values are determined for summer gasoline loading versus winter gasoline loading, you may use the summer net heating value for all subsequent summer gasoline loading operations and the winter net heating value for all subsequent winter gasoline loading operations provided there are no other changes in operations.


(E) You must monitor the volume of gasoline loaded and the total volume of liquid product loaded on a 5-minute block basis and maintain the ratio of gasoline loaded to total liquid product loaded at or above the value determined in paragraph (c)(3)(vii)(B) of this section and, for air assisted flares or thermal oxidation systems, maintain the gasoline loading rate at or above the value determined in paragraph (c)(3)(vii)(B) on a rolling 15-minute period basis, calculated based on liquid product loaded during 3 contiguous 5-minute blocks, considering only those periods when liquid product is loaded into gasoline cargo tanks for any portion of three contiguous 5-minute block periods.


(F) For unassisted or perimeter air assisted flares or thermal oxidation systems, if the net heating value determined in § 63.670(j)(6)(i)(F) of this chapter meets or exceeds 270 British thermal units per standard cubic feet (Btu/scf), compliance with the ratio of gasoline loaded to total liquid product loaded as specified in paragraph (c)(3)(vii)(E) of this section demonstrates compliance with the flare combustion zone net heating value (NHVcz) operating limit in § 63.670(e) of this chapter.


(G) For perimeter air assisted flares or thermal oxidation systems, if the net heating value determined in § 63.670(j)(6)(i)(F) of this chapter meets or exceeds the net heating value dilution parameter (NHVdil) operating limit of 22 British thermal units per square foot (Btu/ft
2) at the flow rate associated with the minimum gasoline loading rate determined in paragraph (c)(3)(vii)(B) of this section at any air assist rate used, compliance with the minimum gasoline loading rate as specified in paragraph (c)(3)(vii)(E) of this section demonstrates compliance with the NHVdil operating limit in § 63.670(f) of this chapter.


(viii) You may elect to establish a minimum supplemental gas addition rate and monitor the supplemental gas addition rate, in addition to the operating limits in paragraph (c)(3)(vii)(E) of this section, to demonstrate compliance with the flare combustion zone operating limit in § 63.670(e) of this chapter and, if applicable, flare dilution operating limit in § 63.670(f) of this chapter, as follows.


(A) Use the minimum flare vent gas net heating value prior to addition of supplemental gas as established in paragraph (c)(3)(vii) of this section.


(B) Determine the maximum flow rate based on the maximum cumulative loading rate for a 15-minute block period considering all loading racks at the affected facility and considering restrictions on maximum loading rates necessary for compliance with the maximum pressure limits for the vapor collection and liquid loading equipment specified in paragraph (h) of this section.


(C) Determine the supplemental gas addition rate needed to yield NHVcz of 270 Btu/scf using equation in § 63.670(m)(1) of this chapter.


(D) For flares (or thermal oxidation systems) with perimeter assist air, determine the supplemental gas addition rate needed to yield NHVdil of 22 Btu/ft
2 using equation in § 63.670(n)(1) of this chapter at the flare vent gas net heating value determined in paragraph (c)(3)(vii) of this section, the flare gas flow rate associated with the minimum gasoline loading rate as determined in paragraph (c)(3)(vii)(B) of this section, and the fixed air assist rate. If the air assist rate is varied based on total liquid product loading rates, you must use the air assist rate used at low flow rates and repeat the calculation using the minimum flow rate associated with each air assist rate setting and select the maximum supplemental gas addition rate across any of the air assist rate settings.


(E) Maintain the supplemental gas addition rate above the greater of the values determined in paragraphs (c)(3)(viii)(C) and, if applicable, (c)(3)(viii)(D) of this section on a 15-minute block period basis when liquid product is loaded into gasoline cargo tanks for at least 15-minutes.


(ix) As an alternative to determining the flare tip velocity rate for each 15-minute block to determine compliance with the flare tip velocity operating limit as specified in § 63.670(k)(2) of this chapter, you may elect to conduct a one-time flare tip velocity operating limit compliance assessment as provided in paragraphs (c)(3)(ix)(A) through (D) of this section. If the flare or loading rack configurations change (e.g., flare tip modified or additional loading racks are added for which vapors are directed to the flare), you must repeat this one-time assessment based on the new configuration.


(A) Determine the unobstructed cross-sectional area of the flare tip, in units of square feet, as specified in § 63.670(k)(1) of this chapter.


(B) Determine the maximum flow rate, in units of cubic feet per second, based on the maximum cumulative loading rate for a 15-minute block period considering all loading racks at the gasoline loading racks affected facility and considering restrictions on maximum loading rates necessary for compliance with the maximum pressure limits for the vapor collection and liquid loading equipment specified in paragraph (h) of this section.


(C) Calculate the maximum flare tip velocity as the maximum flow rate from paragraph (c)(3)(ix)(B) of this section divided by the unobstructed cross-sectional area of the flare tip from paragraph (c)(3)(ix)(A) of this section.


(D) Demonstrate that the maximum flare tip velocity as calculated in paragraph (c)(3)(ix)(C) of this section is less than 60 feet per second.


(d) Each vapor collection system for the gasoline loading rack affected facility shall be designed to prevent any total organic compounds vapors collected at one loading rack from passing to another loading rack.


(e) Loadings of liquid product into gasoline cargo tanks at a gasoline loading rack affected facility shall be limited to vapor-tight gasoline cargo tanks according to the methods in § 60.503a(f) using the following procedures:


(1) The owner or operator shall obtain the vapor tightness annual certification test documentation described in § 60.505a(a)(3) for each gasoline cargo tank which is to be loaded at the affected facility. If you do not know the previous contents of a cargo tank, you must assume that cargo tank is a gasoline cargo tank.


(2) The owner or operator shall obtain and record the cargo tank identification number of each gasoline cargo tank which is to be loaded at the affected facility.


(3) The owner or operator shall cross-check each cargo tank identification number obtained in paragraph (e)(2) of this section with the file of gasoline cargo tank vapor tightness documentation specified in paragraph (e)(1) of this section prior to loading any liquid product into the gasoline cargo tank.


(f) Loading of liquid product into gasoline cargo tanks at a gasoline loading rack affected facility shall be conducted using submerged filling, as defined in § 60.501a, and only into gasoline cargo tanks equipped with vapor collection equipment that is compatible with the terminal’s vapor collection system. If you do not know the previous contents of a cargo tank, you must assume that cargo tank is a gasoline cargo tank.


(g) Loading of liquid product into gasoline cargo tanks at a gasoline loading rack affected facility shall only be conducted when the terminal’s and the cargo tank’s vapor collection systems are connected. If you do not know the previous contents of a cargo tank, you must assume that cargo tank is a gasoline cargo tank.


(h) The vapor collection and liquid loading equipment for a gasoline loading rack affected facility shall be designed and operated to prevent gauge pressure in the gasoline cargo tank from exceeding 18 inches of water (460 millimeters (mm) of water) during product loading. This level is not to be exceeded and must be continuously monitored according to the procedures specified in § 60.504a(d).


(i) No pressure-vacuum vent in the gasoline loading rack affected facility’s vapor collection system shall begin to open at a system pressure less than 18 inches of water (460 mm of water) or at a vacuum of less than 6.0 inches of water (150 mm of water).


(j) Each owner or operator of a collection of equipment at a bulk gasoline terminal affected facility shall perform leak inspection and repair of all equipment in gasoline service, which includes all equipment in the vapor collection system, the vapor processing system, and each loading rack and loading arm handling gasoline, according to the requirements in paragraphs (j)(1) through (8) of this section. The owner or operator must keep a list, summary description, or diagram(s) showing the location of all equipment in gasoline service at the facility.


(1) Conduct leak detection monitoring of all pumps, valves, and connectors in gasoline service using either of the methods specified in paragraph (j)(1)(i) or (ii) of this section.


(i) Use optical gas imaging (OGI) to quarterly monitor all pumps, valves, and connectors in gasoline service as specified in § 60.503a(e)(2).


(ii) Use Method 21 of appendix A-7 to this part as specified in § 60.503a(e)(1) and paragraphs (j)(1)(ii)(A) through (C) of this section.


(A) All pumps must be monitored quarterly, unless the pump meets one of the requirements in § 60.482-1a(d) or § 60.482-2a(d) through (g). An instrument reading of 10,000 ppm or greater is a leak.


(B) All valves must be monitored quarterly, unless the valve meets one of the requirements in § 60.482-1a(d) or § 60.482-7a(f) through (h). An instrument reading of 10,000 ppm or greater is a leak.


(C) All connectors must be monitored annually, unless the connector meets one of the requirements in § 60.482-1a(d) or § 60.482-11a(e) or (f). An instrument reading of 10,000 ppm or greater is a leak.


(2) During normal duties, record leaks identified by audio, visual, or olfactory methods.


(3) If evidence of a potential leak is found at any time by audio, visual, olfactory, or any other detection method for any equipment (as defined in § 60.501a), a leak is detected.


(4) For pressure relief devices, comply with the requirements in paragraphs (j)(4)(i) through (ii) of this section.


(i) Conduct instrument monitoring of each pressure relief device quarterly and within 5 calendar days after each pressure release to detect leaks by the methods specified in paragraph (j)(1) of this section, except as provided in § 60.482-4a(c).


(ii) If emissions are observed when using OGI, a leak is detected. If Method 21 is used, an instrument reading of 10,000 ppm or greater indicates a leak is detected.


(5) For sampling connection systems, comply with the requirements in § 60.482-5a.


(6) For open-ended valves or lines, comply with the requirements in § 60.482-6a.


(7) When a leak is detected for any equipment, comply with the requirements of paragraphs (j)(7)(i) through (iii) of this section.


(i) A weatherproof and readily visible identification, marked with the equipment identification number, must be attached to the leaking equipment. The identification on equipment may be removed after it has been repaired.


(ii) An initial attempt at repair shall be made as soon as practicable, but no later than 5 calendar days after the leak is detected. An initial attempt at repair is not required if the leak is detected using OGI and the equipment identified as leaking would require elevating the repair personnel more than 2 meters above a support surface.


(iii) Repair or replacement of leaking equipment shall be completed within 15 calendar days after detection of each leak, except as provided in paragraph (j)(8) of this section.


(A) For leaks identified pursuant to instrument monitoring required under paragraph (j)(1) of this section, the leak is repaired when instrument re-monitoring of the equipment does not detect a leak.


(B) For leaks identified pursuant to paragraph (j)(2) of this section, the leak is repaired when the leak can no longer be identified using audio, visual, or olfactory methods.


(8) Delay of repair of leaking equipment will be allowed according to the provisions in paragraphs (j)(8)(i) though (iv) of this section. The owner or operator shall provide in the semiannual report specified in § 60.505a(c), the reason(s) why the repair was delayed and the date each repair was completed.


(i) Delay of repair of equipment will be allowed for equipment that is isolated from the affected facility and that does not remain in gasoline service.


(ii) Delay of repair for valves and connectors will be allowed if:


(A) The owner or operator demonstrates that emissions of purged material resulting from immediate repair are greater than the fugitive emissions likely to result from delay of repair, and


(B) When repair procedures are effected, the purged material is collected and destroyed or recovered in a control device complying with § 60.482-10a or the requirements in paragraph (b) or (c) of this section, as applicable.


(iii) Delay of repair will be allowed for a valve, but not later than 3 months after the leak was detected, if valve assembly replacement is necessary, valve assembly supplies have been depleted, and valve assembly supplies had been sufficiently stocked before the supplies were depleted.


(iv) Delay of repair for pumps will be allowed if:


(A) Repair requires the use of a dual mechanical seal system that includes a barrier fluid system; and


(B) Repair is completed as soon as practicable, but not later than 6 months after the leak was detected.


(k) You must not allow gasoline to be handled at a bulk gasoline terminal that contains an affected facility listed under § 60.500a(a) in a manner that would result in vapor releases to the atmosphere for extended periods of time. Measures to be taken include, but are not limited to, the following:


(1) Minimize gasoline spills;


(2) Clean up spills as expeditiously as practicable;


(3) Cover all open gasoline containers and all gasoline storage tank fill-pipes with a gasketed seal when not in use; and


(4) Minimize gasoline sent to open waste collection systems that collect and transport gasoline to reclamation and recycling devices, such as oil/water separators.


§ 60.503a Test methods and procedures.

(a) General performance test and performance evaluation requirements. (1) In conducting the performance tests or evaluations required by this subpart (or as requested by the Administrator), the owner or operator shall use the test methods and procedures as specified in this section, except as provided in § 60.8(b). The three-run requirement of § 60.8(f) does not apply to this subpart.


(2) Immediately before the performance test, conduct leak detection monitoring following the methods in paragraph (e)(1) of this section to identify leakage of vapor from all equipment, including loading arms, in the gasoline loading rack affected facility while gasoline is being loaded into a gasoline cargo tank to ensure the terminal’s vapor collection system equipment is operated with no detectable emissions. The owner or operator shall repair all leaks identified with readings of 500 ppmv (as methane) or greater above background before conducting the performance test and within the timeframe specified in § 60.502a(j)(7).


(b) Performance test or performance evaluation timing. (1) For each gasoline loading rack affected facility subject to the mass emission limits in § 60.502a(b)(1) or (c)(1), conduct the initial performance test of the vapor collection and processing systems according to the timing specified in § 60.8(a). For each gasoline loading rack affected facility subject to the emission limits in § 60.502a(b)(2) or (c)(2), conduct the initial performance evaluation of the continuous emissions monitoring system (CEMS) according to the timing specified for performance tests in § 60.8(a).


(2) For each gasoline loading rack affected facility complying with the mass emission limits in § 60.502a(b)(1) or (c)(1), conduct subsequent performance test of the vapor collection and processing system no later than 60 calendar months after the previous performance test.


(3) For each gasoline loading rack affected facility complying with the concentration emission limits in § 60.502a(b)(2) or (c)(2), conduct subsequent performance evaluations of CEMS for the vapor collection and processing system no later than 12 calendar months after the previous performance evaluation.


(c) Performance test requirements for mass loading emission limit. The owner or operator of a gasoline loading rack affected facility shall conduct performance tests of the vapor collection and processing system subject to the emission limits in § 60.502a(b)(1) or (c)(1), as specified in paragraphs (c)(1) through (8) of this section.


(1) The performance test shall be 6 hours long during which at least 80,000 gallons (300,000 liters) of gasoline is loaded. If this is not possible, the test may be continued the same day until 80,000 gallons (300,000 liters) of gasoline is loaded. If 80,000 gallons (300,000 liters) cannot be loaded during the first day of testing, the test may be resumed the next day with another 6-hour period. During the second day of testing, the 80,000-gallon (300,000-liter) criterion need not be met. However, as much as possible, testing should be conducted during the 6-hour period in which the highest throughput of gasoline normally occurs.


(2) If the vapor processing system is intermittent in operation and employs an intermediate vapor holder to accumulate total organic compounds vapors collected from gasoline cargo tanks, the performance test shall begin at a reference vapor holder level and shall end at the same reference point. The test shall include at least two startups and shutdowns of the vapor processor. If this does not occur under automatically controlled operations, the system shall be manually controlled.


(3) The emission rate (E) of total organic compounds shall be computed using the following equation:



Equation 1 to paragraph (c)(3)


Where:

E = emission rate of total organic compounds, mg/liter of gasoline loaded.

Vesi = volume of air-vapor mixture exhausted at each interval “i”, scm.

Cei = concentration of total organic compounds at each interval “i”, ppm.

L = total volume of gasoline loaded, liters.

n = number of testing intervals.

i = emission testing interval of 5 minutes.

K = density of calibration gas, 1.83 × 10
6 for propane, mg/scm.

(4) The performance test shall be conducted in intervals of 5 minutes. For each interval “i”, readings from each measurement shall be recorded, and the volume exhausted (Vesi) and the corresponding average total organic compounds concentration (Cei) shall be determined. The sampling system response time shall be accounted for when determining the average total organic compounds concentration corresponding to the volume exhausted.


(5) Method 2B of appendix A-1 to this part shall be used to determine the volume (Vesi) of air-vapor mixture exhausted at each interval.


(6) Method 25, 25A, or 25B of appendix A-7 to this part shall be used for determining the total organic compounds concentration (Cei) at each interval. Method 25 must not be used if the outlet TOC concentration is less than 50 ppmv. The calibration gas shall be propane. If the owner or operator conducts the performance test using either Method 25A or Method 25B, the methane content in the exhaust vent may be excluded following the procedures in paragraphs (c)(6)(i) through (v) of this section. Alternatively, an instrument that uses gas chromatography with a flame ionization detector may be used according to the procedures in paragraph (c)(6)(vi) of this section.


(i) Measure the methane concentration by Method 18 of appendix A-6 to this part or Method 320 of appendix A to part 63 of this chapter.


(ii) Calibrate the Method 25A or Method 25B analyzer using both propane and methane to develop response factors to both compounds.


(iii) Determine the TOC concentration with the Method 25A or Method 25B analyzer on an as methane basis.


(iv) Subtract the methane measured according to paragraph (c)(6)(i) of this section from the concentration determined in paragraph (c)(6)(iii) of this section.


(v) Convert the concentration difference determined in paragraph (c)(6)(iv) of this section to TOC (minus methane), as propane, by using the response factors determined in paragraph (c)(6)(ii) of this section. Multiply the concentration difference in paragraph (c)(6)(iv) of this section by the ratio of the response factor for propane to the response factor for methane.


(vi) Methane must be separated by the gas chromatograph and measured by the flame ionization detector, followed by a back-flush of the chromatographic column to directly measure TOC concentration minus methane. Use a direct interface and heated sampling line from the sampling point to the gas chromatographic injection valve. All sampling components leading to the analyzer must be heated to greater than 110 °C. Calibrate the instrument with propane. Calibration error and calibration drift must be demonstrated according to Method 25A, and the appropriate procedures in Method 25A must be followed to ensure the calibration error and calibration drift are within Method 25A limits. The TOC concentration minus methane must be recorded at least once every 15 minutes. The performance test report must include the calibration results and the results demonstrating proper separation of methane from the TOC concentration.


(7) To determine the volume (L) of gasoline dispensed during the performance test period at all loading racks whose vapor emissions are controlled by the processing system being tested, terminal records or readings from gasoline dispensing meters at each loading rack shall be used.


(8) Monitor the temperature in the combustion zone using the continuous parameter monitoring system (CPMS) required in § 60.504a(a) and determine the operating limit for the combustion device using the following procedures:


(i) Record the temperature or average temperature for each 5-minute period during the performance test.


(ii) Using only the 5-minute periods in which liquid product is loaded into gasoline cargo tanks, determine the 1-hour average temperature for each hour of the performance test. If you do not know the previous contents of the cargo tank, you must assume liquid product loading is performed in gasoline cargo tanks such that you use all 5-minute periods in which liquid product is loaded into gasoline cargo tanks when determining the 1-hour average temperature for each hour of the performance test.


(iii) Starting at the end of the third hour of the performance test and at the end of each successive hour, calculate the 3-hour rolling average temperature using the 1-hour average values in paragraph (c)(8)(ii) of this section. For a 6-hour test, this would result in four 3-hour averages (averages for hours 1 through 3, 2 through 4, 3 through 5, and 4 through 6).


(iv) Set the operating limit at the lowest 3-hour average temperature determined in paragraph (c)(8)(iii) of this section. New operating limits become effective on the date that the performance test report is submitted to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Compliance and Emissions Data Reporting Interface (CEDRI), per the requirements of § 60.505a(b).


(d) Performance evaluation requirements for concentration emission limit. The owner or operator shall conduct performance evaluations of the CEMS for vapor collection and processing systems subject to the emission limits in § 60.502a(b)(2) or (c)(2) as specified in paragraph (d)(1) or (2) of this section, as applicable.


(1) If the CEMS uses a nondispersive infrared analyzer, the CEMS must be installed, evaluated, and operated according to the requirements of Performance Specification 8 of appendix B to this part. Method 25B in appendix A-7 to this part must be used as the reference method, and the calibration gas must be propane. The owner or operator may request an alternative test method under § 60.8(b) to use a CEMS that excludes the methane content in the exhaust vent.


(2) If the CEMS uses a flame ionization detector, the CEMS must be installed, evaluated, and operated according to the requirements of Performance Specification 8A of appendix B to this part. As part of the performance evaluation, conduct a relative accuracy test audit (RATA) following the procedures in Performance Specification 2, section 8.4, of appendix B to this part; the relative accuracy must meet the criteria of Performance Specification 8, section 13.2, of appendix B to this part. Method 25A in appendix A-7 to this part must be used as the reference method, and the calibration gas must be propane. The owner or operator may exclude the methane content in the exhaust following the procedures in paragraphs (d)(2)(i) through (iv) of this section.


(i) Methane must be separated using a chromatographic column and measured by the flame ionization detector, followed by a back-flush of the chromatographic column to directly measure TOC concentration minus methane.


(ii) The CEMS must be installed, evaluated, and operated according to the requirements of Performance Specification 8A of appendix B to this part, except the target compound is TOC minus methane. As part of the performance evaluation, conduct a RATA following the procedures in Performance Specification 2, section 8.4, of appendix B to this part; the relative accuracy must meet the criteria of Performance Specification 8, section 13.2, of appendix B to this part.


(iii) If the concentration of TOC minus methane in the exhaust stream is greater than 50 ppmv, Method 25 in appendix A-7 to this part must be used as the reference method, and the calibration gas must be propane. If the concentration of TOC minus methane in the exhaust stream is 50 ppmv or less, Method 25A in appendix A-7 to this part must be used as the reference method, and the calibration gas must be propane. If Method 25A is the reference method, the procedures in paragraph (c)(6) of this section may be used to subtract methane from the TOC concentration.


(iv) The TOC concentration minus methane must be recorded at least once every 15 minutes.


(e) Leak detection monitoring. Conduct the leak detection monitoring specified in § 60.502a(j)(1) for the collection of equipment at a bulk gasoline terminal affected facility using one of the procedures specified in paragraph (e)(1) or (2) of this section. Conduct the leak detection monitoring specified in paragraph (a)(2) of this section using the procedures specified in paragraph (e)(1) of this section, except that the instrument reading that defines a leak is specified in paragraph (a)(2) for all equipment, including loading arms, in the gasoline loading rack affected facility and the calibration gas in paragraph (e)(1)(ii) must be at a concentration of 500 ppm methane.


(1) Method 21 in appendix A-7 to this part. The instrument reading that defines a leak is 10,000 ppmv (as methane). The instrument shall be calibrated before use each day of its use by the procedures specified in Method 21 of appendix A-7. The calibration gases in paragraphs (e)(1)(i) and (ii) of this section must be used. The drift assessment specified in paragraph (e)(1)(iii) of this section must be performed at the end of each monitoring day.


(i) Zero air (less than 10 ppm of hydrocarbon in air); and


(ii) Methane and air at a concentration of 10,000 ppm methane.


(iii) At the end of each monitoring day, check the instrument using the same calibration gas that was used to calibrate the instrument before use. Follow the procedures specified in Method 21 of appendix A-7 to this part, section 10.1, except do not adjust the meter readout to correspond to the calibration gas value. If multiple scales are used, record the instrument reading for each scale used. Divide the arithmetic difference of the initial and post-test calibration response by the corresponding calibration gas value for each scale and multiply by 100 to express the calibration drift as a percentage. If a calibration drift assessment shows a negative drift of more than 10 percent, then re-monitor all equipment monitored since the last calibration with instrument readings between the leak definition and the leak definition multiplied by (100 minus the percent of negative drift) divided by 100. If any calibration drift assessment shows a positive drift of more than 10 percent from the initial calibration value, then, at the owner/operator’s discretion, all equipment with instrument readings above the leak definition and below the leak definition multiplied by (100 plus the percent of positive drift) divided by 100 monitored since the last calibration may be re-monitored.


(2) OGI according to all the requirements in appendix K to this part. A leak is defined as any emissions plume imaged by the camera from equipment regulated by this subpart.


(f) Annual certification test. The annual certification test for gasoline cargo tanks shall consist of the following test methods and procedures:


(1) Method 27 of appendix A-8 to this part. Conduct the test using a time period (t) for the pressure and vacuum tests of 5 minutes. The initial pressure (Pi) for the pressure test shall be 460 mm water (H2O) (18 in. H2O), gauge. The initial vacuum (Vi) for the vacuum test shall be 150 mm H2O (6 in. H2O), gauge. The maximum allowable pressure and vacuum changes (Δ p, Δ v) are as shown in table 1 to this paragraph (f)(1).


Table 1 to Paragraph (f)(1)—Allowable Gasoline Cargo Tank Test Pressure or Vacuum Change

Gasoline cargo tank or

compartment capacity,

gallons

(liters)
Annual certification-

allowable pressure or

vacuum change

(Δ p, Δ v) in

5 minutes, mm H2O

(in. H2O)
2,500 or more (9,464 or more)12.7 (0.50)
1,500 to 2,499 (5,678 to 9,463)19.1 (0.75)
1,000 to 1,499 (3,785 to 5,677)25.4 (1.00)
999 or less (3,784 or less)31.8 (1.25)

(2) Pressure test of the gasoline cargo tank’s internal vapor valve as follows:


(i) After completing the tests under paragraph (f)(1) of this section, use the procedures in Method 27 to repressurize the gasoline cargo tank to 460 mm H2O (18 in. H2O), gauge. Close the gasoline cargo tank’s internal vapor valve(s), thereby isolating the vapor return line and manifold from the gasoline cargo tank.


(ii) Relieve the pressure in the vapor return line to atmospheric pressure, then reseal the line. After 5 minutes, record the gauge pressure in the vapor return line and manifold. The maximum allowable 5-minute pressure increase is 65 mm H2O (2.5 in. H2O).


(3) As an alternative to paragraph (f)(1) of this section, you may use the procedure in § 63.425(i) of this chapter.


§ 60.504a Monitoring requirements.

(a) Monitoring requirements for thermal oxidation systems complying with the combustion zone temperature operating limit. Install, operate, and maintain a CPMS for measuring the combustion zone temperature as specified in paragraphs (a)(1) through (5) of this section.


(1) Install the temperature CPMS in the combustion (flame) zone or in the exhaust gas stream as close as practical to the combustion burners in a position that provides a representative temperature of the combustion zone of the thermal oxidation system.


(2) The temperature CPMS must be capable of measuring temperature with an accuracy of ±1 percent over the normal range of temperatures measured.


(3) The temperature CPMS must be capable of recording the temperature at least once every 5 minutes and calculating hourly block averages that include only those 5-minute periods in which liquid product was loaded into gasoline cargo tanks.


(4) At least quarterly, inspect all components for integrity and all electrical connections for continuity, oxidation, and galvanic corrosion, unless the CPMS has a redundant temperature sensor.


(5) Conduct calibration checks at least annually and conduct calibration checks following any period of more than 24 hours throughout which the temperature exceeded the manufacturer’s specified maximum rated temperature or install a new temperature sensor.


(b) Monitoring requirements for vapor recovery systems. Install, calibrate, operate, and maintain a CEMS for measuring the concentration of TOC in the atmospheric vent from the vapor recovery system as specified in paragraphs (b)(1) and (2) of this section. Locate the sampling probe or other interface at a measurement location such that you obtain representative measurements of emissions from the vapor recovery system.


(1) The requirements of Performance Specification 8 of appendix B to this part, or, if the CEMS uses a flame ionization detector, Performance Specification 8A of appendix B to this part, the quality assurance requirements in Procedure 1 of appendix F to this part, and the procedures under § 60.13 must be followed for installation, evaluation, and operation of the CEMS. For CEMS certified using Performance Specification 8A of appendix B, conduct the RATA required under Procedure 1 according to the requirements in § 60.503a(d). As required by § 60.503a(b)(3), conduct annual performance evaluations of each TOC CEMS according to the requirements in § 60.503a(d). Conduct accuracy determinations quarterly and calibration drift tests daily in accordance with Procedure 1 in appendix F.


(2) The span value of the TOC CEMS must be approximately 2 times the applicable emission limit.


(c) Monitoring requirements for flares and thermal oxidation systems for which flare monitoring alternative is provided. Install, operate, and maintain CPMS for flares used to comply with the emission limitations in § 60.502a(c)(3), including monitors used for gasoline and total liquid product loading rates, following the requirements specified in § 63.671 of this chapter as specified in paragraphs (c)(1) through (3) of this section and conduct visible emission observations as specified in paragraph (c)(4) of this section.


(1) Substitute “pilot flame or flare flame” for each occurrence of “pilot flame.”


(2) You may elect to determine compositional analysis for net heating value with a continuous process mass spectrometer without the use of a gas chromatograph. If you choose to determine compositional analysis for net heating value with a continuous process mass spectrometer, then you must comply with the requirements specified in paragraphs (c)(2)(i) through (vii) of this section.


(i) You must meet the requirements in § 63.671(e)(2) of this chapter. You may augment the minimum list of calibration gas components found in § 63.671(e)(2) with compounds found during a pre-survey or known to be in the gas through process knowledge.


(ii) Calibration gas cylinders must be certified to an accuracy of 2 percent and traceable to National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) standards.


(iii) For unknown gas components that have similar analytical mass fragments to calibration compounds, you may report the unknowns as an increase in the overlapped calibration gas compound. For unknown compounds that produce mass fragments that do not overlap calibration compounds, you may use the response factor for the nearest molecular weight hydrocarbon in the calibration mix to quantify the unknown component’s net heating value of flare vent gas (NHVvg).


(iv) You may use the response factor for n-pentane to quantify any unknown components detected with a higher molecular weight than n-pentane.


(v) You must perform an initial calibration to identify mass fragment overlap and response factors for the target compounds.


(vi) You must meet applicable requirements in Performance Specification 9 of appendix B to this part for continuous monitoring system acceptance including, but not limited to, performing an initial multi-point calibration check at three concentrations following the procedure in section 10.1 of Performance Specification 9 and performing the periodic calibration requirements listed for gas chromatographs in table 13 to part 63, subpart CC, of this chapter, for the process mass spectrometer. You may use the alternative sampling line temperature allowed under Net Heating Value by Gas Chromatograph in table 13 to part 63, subpart CC.


(vii) The average instrument calibration error (CE) for each calibration compound at any calibration concentration must not differ by more than 10 percent from the certified cylinder gas value. The CE for each component in the calibration blend must be calculated using the following equation:



Equation 1 to paragraph (c)(2)(vii)


Where:

Cm = Average instrument response (ppm).

Ca = Certified cylinder gas value (ppm).

(3) If you use a gas chromatograph or mass spectrometer for compositional analysis for net heating value, then you may choose to use the CE of net heating value (NHV) measured versus the cylinder tag value NHV as the measure of agreement for daily calibration and quarterly audits in lieu of determining the compound-specific CE. The CE for NHV at any calibration level must not differ by more than 10 percent from the certified cylinder gas value. The CE for NHV must be calculated using the following equation:



Equation 2 to paragraph (c)(3)


Where:

NHVmeasured = Average instrument response (Btu/scf)

NHVa = Certified cylinder gas value (Btu/scf).

(4) If visible emissions are observed for more than one continuous minute during normal duties, visible emissions observation using Method 22 of appendix A-7 to this part must be conducted for 2 hours or until 5-minutes of visible emissions are observed.


(d) Pressure CPMS requirements. The owner or operator shall install, operate, and maintain a CPMS to measure the pressure of the vapor collection system to determine compliance with the standard in § 60.502a(h) as specified in paragraphs (d)(1) through (4) of this section.


(1) Install a pressure CPMS (liquid manometer, magnehelic gauge, or equivalent instrument), capable of measuring up to 500 mm of water gauge pressure with ±2.5 mm of water precision on the terminal’s vapor collection system at a pressure tap located as close as possible to the connection with the gasoline cargo tank. If necessary to obtain representative loading pressures, install pressure CPMS for each loading rack.


(2) Check the calibration of the pressure CPMS at least annually. Check the calibration of the pressure CPMS following any period of more than 24 hours throughout which the pressure exceeded the manufacturer’s specified maximum rated pressure or install a new pressure sensor.


(3) At least quarterly, visually inspect components of the pressure CPMS for integrity, oxidation and galvanic corrosion, unless the system has a redundant pressure sensor.


(4) The output of the pressure CPMS must be reviewed each operating day to ensure that the pressure readings fluctuate as expected during loading of gasoline cargo tanks to verify the pressure taps are not plugged. Plugged pressure taps must be unplugged or otherwise repaired within 24 hours or prior to the next gasoline cargo tank loading, whichever time period is longer.


(e) Limited alternative requirements for vapor recovery systems. If the CEMS used for measuring the concentration of TOC in the atmospheric vent from the vapor recovery system as specified in paragraph (b) of this section requires maintenance such that it is off-line for more than 15 minutes, you may follow the requirements in paragraphs (e)(1) and (2) of this section and monitor product loading quantities and regeneration cycle parameters as an alternative to the monitoring requirement in paragraph (b) for no more than 240 hours in a calendar year.


(1) Determine the quantity of liquid product loaded in gasoline cargo tanks for the past 10 adsorption cycles prior to the CEMS going off-line and select the smallest of these values as your product loading quantity operating limit.


(2) Determine the vacuum pressure, purge gas quantities, and duration of the vacuum/purge cycles used for the past 10 desorption cycles prior to the CEMS going off-line. You must operate vapor recovery system desorption cycles as specified in paragraphs (e)(2)(i) through (iii) of this section.


(i) The vacuum pressure for each desorption cycle must be at or above the average vacuum pressure from the past 10 desorption cycles. Note: a higher vacuum means a lower absolute pressure.


(ii) Purge gas quantity used for each desorption cycle must be at or above the average quantity of purge gas used from the past 10 desorption cycles.


(iii) Duration of the vacuum/purge cycle for each desorption cycle must be at or above the average duration of the vacuum/purge cycle used from the past 10 desorption cycles.


§ 60.505a Recordkeeping and reporting.

(a) Recordkeeping requirements. For each affected facility listed under § 60.500a(a), keep records as specified in paragraphs (a)(1) through (9) of this section, as applicable, for a minimum of five years unless otherwise specified in this section. These recordkeeping requirements supersede the requirements in § 60.7(b).


(1) For each thermal oxidation system used to comply with the emission limitations in § 60.502a(b)(1) or (c)(1) by monitoring the combustion zone temperature as specified in § 60.502a(b)(1)(ii) or (c)(1)(ii), for each pressure CPMS used to comply with the requirements in § 60.502a(h), and for each vapor recovery system used to comply with the emission limitations in § 60.502a(b)(2) or (c)(2), maintain records, as applicable, of:


(i) The applicable operating or emission limit for the continuous monitoring system (CMS). For combustion zone temperature operating limits, include the applicable date range the limit applies based on when the performance test was conducted.


(ii) Each 3-hour rolling average combustion zone temperature measured by the temperature CPMS, each 5-minute average reading from the pressure CPMS, and each 3-hour rolling average TOC concentration (as propane) measured by the TOC CEMS.


(iii) For each deviation of the 3-hour rolling average combustion zone temperature operating limit, maximum loading pressure specified in § 60.502a(h), or 3-hour rolling average TOC concentration (as propane), the start date and time, duration, cause, and the corrective action taken.


(iv) For each period when there was a CMS outage or the CMS was out of control, the start date and time, duration, cause, and the corrective action taken. For TOC CEMS outages where the limited alternative for vapor recovery systems in § 60.504a(e) is used, the corrective action taken shall include an indication of the use of the limited alternative for vapor recovery systems in § 60.504a(e).


(v) Each inspection or calibration of the CMS including a unique identifier, make, and model number of the CMS, and date of calibration check. For TOC CEMS, include the type of CEMS used (i.e., flame ionization detector, nondispersive infrared analyzer) and an indication of whether methane is excluded from the TOC concentration reported in paragraph (a)(1)(ii) of this section.


(vi) For TOC CEMS outages where the limited alternative for vapor recovery systems in § 60.504a(e) is used, also keep records of:


(A) The quantity of liquid product loaded in gasoline cargo tanks for the past 10 adsorption cycles prior to the CEMS outage.


(B) The vacuum pressure, purge gas quantities, and duration of the vacuum/purge cycles used for the past 10 desorption cycles prior to the CEMS outage.


(C) The quantity of liquid product loaded in gasoline cargo tanks for each adsorption cycle while using the alternative.


(D) The vacuum pressure, purge gas quantities, and duration of the vacuum/purge cycles for each desorption cycle while using the alternative.


(2) For each flare used to comply with the emission limitations in § 60.502a(c)(3) and for each thermal oxidation system using the flare monitoring alternative as provided in § 60.502a(c)(1)(iii), maintain records of:


(i) The output of the monitoring device used to detect the presence of a pilot flame as required in § 63.670(b) of this chapter for a minimum of 2 years. Retain records of each 15-minute block during which there was at least one minute that no pilot flame was present when gasoline vapors were routed to the flare for a minimum of 5 years. The record must identify the start and end time and date of each 15-minute block.


(ii) Visible emissions observations as specified in paragraphs (a)(2)(ii)(A) and (B) of this section, as applicable, for a minimum of 3 years.


(A) If visible emissions observations are performed using Method 22 of appendix A-7 to this part, the record must identify the date, the start and end time of the visible emissions observation, and the number of minutes for which visible emissions were observed during the observation. If the owner or operator performs visible emissions observations more than one time during a day, include separate records for each visible emissions observation performed.


(B) For each 2-hour period for which visible emissions are observed for more than 5 minutes in 2 consecutive hours but visible emissions observations according to Method 22 of appendix A-7 to this part were not conducted for the full 2-hour period, the record must include the date, the start and end time of the visible emissions observation, and an estimate of the cumulative number of minutes in the 2-hour period for which emissions were visible based on best information available to the owner or operator.


(iii) Each 15-minute block period during which operating values are outside of the applicable operating limits specified in § 63.670(d) through (f) of this chapter when liquid product is being loaded into gasoline cargo tanks for at least 15-minutes identifying the specific operating limit that was not met.


(iv) The 15-minute block average cumulative flows for flare vent gas or the thermal oxidation system vent gas and, if applicable, total steam, perimeter assist air, and premix assist air specified to be monitored under § 63.670(i) of this chapter, along with the date and start and end time for the 15-minute block. If multiple monitoring locations are used to determine cumulative vent gas flow, total steam, perimeter assist air, and premix assist air, retain records of the 15-minute block average flows for each monitoring location for a minimum of 2 years, and retain the 15-minute block average cumulative flows that are used in subsequent calculations for a minimum of 5 years. If pressure and temperature monitoring is used, retain records of the 15-minute block average temperature, pressure and molecular weight of the flare vent gas, thermal oxidation system vent gas, or assist gas stream for each measurement location used to determine the 15-minute block average cumulative flows for a minimum of 2 years, and retain the 15-minute block average cumulative flows that are used in subsequent calculations for a minimum of 5 years. If you use the supplemental gas flow rate monitoring alternative in § 60.502a(c)(3)(viii), the required minimum supplemental gas flow rate (winter and summer, if applicable) and the actual monitored supplemental gas flow rate for the 15-minute block. Retain the supplemental gas flow rate records for a minimum of 5 years.


(v) The flare vent gas compositions or thermal oxidation system vent gas specified to be monitored under § 63.670(j) of this chapter. Retain records of individual component concentrations from each compositional analyses for a minimum of 2 years. If an NHVvg analyzer is used, retain records of the 15-minute block average values for a minimum of 5 years. If you demonstrate your gas streams have consistent composition using the provisions in § 63.670(j)(6) of this chapter as specified in § 60.502a(c)(3)(vii), retain records of the required minimum ratio of gasoline loaded to total liquid product loaded and the actual ratio on a 5-minute block basis. If applicable, you must retain records of the required minimum gasoline loading rate as specified in § 60.502a(c)(3)(vii) and the actual gasoline loading rate on a 5-minute block basis for a minimum of 5 years.


(vi) Each 15-minute block average operating parameter calculated following the methods specified in § 63.670(k) through (n) of this chapter, as applicable.


(vii) All periods during which the owner or operator does not perform monitoring according to the procedures in § 63.670(g), (i), and (j) of this chapter or in § 60.502a(c)(3)(vii) and (viii) as applicable. Note the start date, start time, and duration in minutes for each period.


(viii) An indication of whether “vapors displaced from gasoline cargo tanks during product loading” excludes periods when liquid product is loaded but no gasoline cargo tanks are being loaded or if liquid product loading is assumed to be loaded into gasoline cargo tanks according to the provisions in § 60.502a(c)(3)(i), records of all time periods when “vapors displaced from gasoline cargo tanks during product loading”, and records of time periods when there were no “vapors displaced from gasoline cargo tanks during product loading”.


(ix) If you comply with the flare tip velocity operating limit using the one-time flare tip velocity operating limit compliance assessment as provided in § 60.502a(c)(3)(ix), maintain records of the applicable one-time flare tip velocity operating limit compliance assessment for as long as you use this compliance method.


(x) For each parameter monitored using a CMS, retain the records specified in paragraphs (a)(2)(x)(A) through (C) of this section, as applicable:


(A) For each deviation, record the start date and time, duration, cause, and corrective action taken.


(B) For each period when there is a CMS outage or the CMS is out of control, record the start date and time, duration, cause, and corrective action taken.


(C) Each inspection or calibration of the CMS including a unique identifier, make, and model number of the CMS, and date of calibration check.


(3) The gasoline cargo tank vapor tightness documentation required under § 60.502a(e)(1) for each gasoline cargo tank loading at the affected facility shall be kept on file at the terminal in either a hardcopy or electronic form available for inspection. The documentation shall include, at a minimum, the following information:


(i) Test title: Annual Certification Test—EPA Method 27 or Railcar Bubble Leak Test Procedure.


(ii) Cargo tank owner’s name and address.


(iii) Cargo tank identification number.


(iv) Test location and date.


(v) Tester name and signature.


(vi) Witnessing inspector, if any: Name, signature, and affiliation.


(vii) Vapor tightness repair: Nature of repair work and when performed in relation to vapor tightness testing.


(viii) Test results: Tank or compartment capacity, test pressure; pressure or vacuum change, mm of water; time period of test; number of leaks found with instrument; and leak definition.


(4) Records of each instance in which liquid product was loaded into a gasoline cargo tank for which vapor tightness documentation required under § 60.502a(e)(1) was not provided or available in the terminal’s records. These records shall include, at a minimum:


(i) Cargo tank owner and address.


(ii) Cargo tank identification number.


(iii) Date and time liquid product was loaded into a gasoline cargo tank without proper documentation.


(iv) Date proper documentation was received or statement that proper documentation was never received.


(5) Records of each instance when liquid product was loaded into gasoline cargo tanks not using submerged filling, as defined in § 60.501a, not equipped with vapor collection equipment that is compatible with the terminal’s vapor collection system, or not properly connected to the terminal’s vapor collection system. These records shall include, at a minimum:


(i) Date and time of liquid product loading into gasoline cargo tank not using submerged filling, improperly equipped, or improperly connected.


(ii) Type of deviation (e.g., not submerged filling, incompatible equipment, not properly connected).


(iii) Cargo tank identification number.


(6) A record [list, summary description, or diagram(s) showing the location] of all equipment in gasoline service at the collection of equipment at a bulk gasoline terminal affected facility and at the loading rack affected facility. A record of each leak inspection and leak identified under §§ 60.503a(a)(2) and 60.502a(j) as specified in paragraphs (a)(6)(i) through (iv) of this section:


(i) For each leak inspection, keep the following records:


(A) An indication if the leak inspection was conducted under § 60.502a(j) or § 60.503a(a)(2).


(B) Leak determination method used for the leak inspection.


(ii) For leak inspections conducted with Method 21 of appendix A-7 to this part, keep the following additional records:


(A) Date of inspection.


(B) Inspector name.


(C) Monitoring instrument identification.


(D) Identification of all equipment surveyed and the instrument reading for each piece of equipment.


(E) Date and time of instrument calibration and initials of operator performing the calibration.


(F) Calibration gas cylinder identification, certification date, and certified concentration.


(G) Instrument scale used.


(H) Results of the daily calibration drift assessment.


(iii) For leak inspections conducted with OGI, keep the records specified in section 12 of appendix K to this part.


(iv) For each leak detected during a leak inspection or by audio/visual/olfactory methods during normal duties, record the following information:


(A) The equipment type and identification number.


(B) The date the leak was detected, the name of the person who found the leak, the nature of the leak (i.e., vapor or liquid), and the method of detection (i.e., audio/visual/olfactory, Method 21 of appendix A-7 to this part, or OGI).


(C) The dates of each attempt to repair the leak and the repair methods applied in each attempt to repair the leak.


(D) The date of successful repair of the leak, the method of monitoring used to confirm the repair, and if Method 21 of appendix A-7 to this part is used to confirm the repair, the maximum instrument reading measured by Method 21 of appendix A-7. If OGI is used to confirm the repair, keep video footage of the repair confirmation.


(E) For each repair delayed beyond 15 calendar days after discovery of the leak, record “Repair delayed”, the reason for the delay, and the expected date of successful repair. The owner or operator (or designate) whose decision it was that repair could not be carried out in the 15-calendar-day timeframe must sign the record.


(F) For each leak that is not repairable, the maximum instrument reading measured by Method 21 of appendix A-7 to this part at the time the leak is determined to be not repairable, a video captured by the OGI camera showing that emissions are still visible, or a signed record that the leak is still detectable via audio/visual/olfactory methods.


(7) Records of each performance test or performance evaluation conducted on the affected facility and each notification and report submitted to the Administrator. For each performance test, include an indication of whether liquid product loading is assumed to be loaded into gasoline cargo tanks or periods when liquid product is loaded but no gasoline cargo tanks are being loaded are excluded in the determination of the combustion zone temperature operating limit according to the provision in § 60.503a(c)(8)(ii).


(8) Records of all 5-minute time periods during which liquid product is loaded into gasoline cargo tanks or assumed to be loaded into gasoline cargo tanks and records of all 5-minute time periods when there was no liquid product loaded into gasoline cargo tanks.


(9) Any records required to be maintained by this subpart that are submitted electronically via the EPA’s Compliance and Emissions Reporting Interface (CEDRI) may be maintained in electronic format. This ability to maintain electronic copies does not affect the requirement for facilities to make records, data, and reports available upon request to a delegated authority or the EPA as part of an on-site compliance evaluation.


(b) Reporting requirements for performance tests and evaluations. Within 60 days after the date of completing each performance test and each CEMS performance evaluation required by this subpart, you must submit the results following the procedures specified in paragraph (e) of this section. As required by § 60.8(f)(2)(iv), you must include the value for the combustion zone temperature operating parameter limit set based on your performance test in the performance test report. Data collected using test methods supported by the EPA’s Electronic Reporting Tool (ERT) and performance evaluations of CEMS measuring RATA pollutants that are supported by the EPA’s ERT as listed on the EPA’s ERT website (https://www.epa.gov/electronic-reporting-air-emissions/electronic-reporting-tool-ert) at the time of the test or performance evaluation must be submitted in a file format generated using the EPA’s ERT. Alternatively, you may submit an electronic file consistent with the extensible markup language (XML) schema listed on the EPA’s ERT website. Data collected using test methods that are not supported by the EPA’s ERT and performance evaluations of CEMS measuring RATA pollutants that are not supported by the EPA’s ERT as listed on the EPA’s ERT website at the time of the test or performance evaluation must be included as an attachment in the ERT or an alternate electronic file.


(c) Reporting requirements for semiannual report. You must submit to the Administrator semiannual reports with the applicable information in paragraphs (c)(1) through (7) of this section by the dates specified in paragraph (d) of this section following the procedure specified in paragraph (e) of this section. For this subpart, the semiannual reports supersede the excess emissions and monitoring systems performance report and/or summary report form required under § 60.7. Beginning on July 8, 2024, or once the report template for this subpart has been available on the CEDRI website (https://www.epa.gov/electronic-reporting-air-emissions/cedri) for one year, whichever date is later, submit all subsequent reports using the appropriate electronic report template on the CEDRI website for this subpart and following the procedure specified in paragraph (e). The date report templates become available will be listed on the CEDRI website. Unless the Administrator or delegated State agency or other authority has approved a different schedule for submission of reports, the report must be submitted by the deadline specified in this subpart, regardless of the method in which the report is submitted.


(1) Report the following general facility information:


(i) Facility name.


(ii) Facility physical address, including city, county, and State.


(iii) Latitude and longitude of facility’s physical location. Coordinates must be in decimal degrees with at least five decimal places.


(iv) The following information for the contact person:


(A) Name.


(B) Mailing address.


(C) Telephone number.


(D) Email address.


(v) Date of report and beginning and ending dates of the reporting period. You are no longer required to provide the date of report when the report is submitted via CEDRI.


(vi) Statement by a responsible official, with that official’s name, title, and signature, certifying the truth, accuracy, and completeness of the content of the report. If your report is submitted via CEDRI, the certifier’s electronic signature during the submission process replaces the requirement in this paragraph (c)(1)(vi).


(2) For each thermal oxidation system used to comply with the emission limitations in § 60.502a(b)(1) or (c)(1) by monitoring the combustion zone temperature as specified in § 60.502a(b)(1)(ii) or (c)(1)(ii), for each pressure CPMS used to comply with the requirements in § 60.502a(h), and for each vapor recovery system used to comply with the emission limitations in § 60.502a(b)(2) or (c)(2) report the following information for the CMS:


(i) For all instances when the temperature CPMS measured 3-hour rolling averages below the established operating limit or when the vapor collection system pressure exceeded the maximum loading pressure specified in § 60.502a(h) when liquid product was being loaded into gasoline cargo tanks or when the TOC CEMS measured 3-hour rolling average concentrations higher than the applicable emission limitation when the vapor recovery system was operating:


(A) The date and start time of the deviation.


(B) The duration of the deviation in hours.


(C) Each 3-hour rolling average combustion zone temperature, average pressure, or 3-hour rolling average TOC concentration during the deviation. For TOC concentration, indicate whether methane is excluded from the TOC concentration.


(D) A unique identifier for the CMS.


(E) The make, model number, and date of last calibration check of the CMS.


(F) The cause of the deviation and the corrective action taken.


(ii) For all instances that the temperature CPMS for measuring the combustion zone temperature or pressure CPMS was not operating or was out of control when liquid product was loaded into gasoline cargo tanks, or the TOC CEMS was not operating or was out of control when the vapor recovery system was operating:


(A) The date and start time of the deviation.


(B) The duration of the deviation in hours.


(C) A unique identifier for the CMS.


(D) The make, model number, and date of last calibration check of the CMS.


(E) The cause of the deviation and the corrective action taken. For TOC CEMS outages where the limited alternative for vapor recovery systems in § 60.504a(e) is used, the corrective action taken shall include an indication of the use of the limited alternative for vapor recovery systems in § 60.504a(e).


(F) For TOC CEMS outages where the limited alternative for vapor recovery systems in § 60.504a(e) is used, report either an indication that there were no deviations from the operating limits when using the limited alternative or report the number of each of the following types of deviations that occurred during the use of the limited alternative for vapor recovery systems in § 60.504a(e).


(1) The number of adsorption cycles when the quantity of liquid product loaded in gasoline cargo tanks exceeded the operating limit established in § 60.504a(e)(1). Enter 0 if no deviations of this type.


(2) The number of desorption cycles when the vacuum pressure was below the average vacuum pressure as specified in § 60.504a(e)(2)(i). Enter 0 if no deviations of this type.


(3) The number of desorption cycles when the quantity of purge gas used was below the average quantity of purge gas as specified in § 60.504a(e)(2)(ii). Enter 0 if no deviations of this type.


(4) The number of desorption cycles when the duration of the vacuum/purge cycle was less than the average duration as specified in § 60.504a(e)(2)(iii). Enter 0 if no deviations of this type.


(3) For each flare used to comply with the emission limitations in § 60.502a(c)(3) and for each thermal oxidation system using the flare monitoring alternative as provided in § 60.502a(c)(1)(iii), report:


(i) The date and start and end times for each of the following instances:


(A) Each 15-minute block during which there was at least one minute when gasoline vapors were routed to the flare and no pilot flame was present.


(B) Each period of 2 consecutive hours during which visible emissions exceeded a total of 5 minutes. Additionally, report the number of minutes for which visible emissions were observed during the observation or an estimate of the cumulative number of minutes in the 2-hour period for which emissions were visible based on best information available to the owner or operator.


(C) Each 15-minute period for which the applicable operating limits specified in § 63.670(d) through (f) of this chapter were not met. You must identify the specific operating limit that was not met. Additionally, report the information in paragraphs (c)(3)(i)(C)(1) through (3) of this section, as applicable.


(1) If you use the loading rate operating limits as determined in § 60.502a(c)(3)(vii) alone or in combination with the supplemental gas flow rate monitoring alternative in § 60.502a(c)(3)(viii), the required minimum ratio and the actual ratio of gasoline loaded to total product loaded for the rolling 15-minute period and, if applicable, the required minimum quantity and the actual quantity of gasoline loaded, in gallons, for the rolling 15-minute period.


(2) If you use the supplemental gas flow rate monitoring alternative in § 60.502a(c)(3)(viii), the required minimum supplemental gas flow rate and the actual supplemental gas flow rate including units of flow rates for the 15-minute block.


(3) If you use parameter monitoring systems other than those specified in paragraphs (c)(3)(i)(C)(1) and (2) of this section, the value of the net heating value operating parameter(s) during the deviation determined following the methods in § 63.670(k) through (n) of this chapter as applicable.


(ii) The start date, start time, and duration in minutes for each period when “vapors displaced from gasoline cargo tanks during product loading” were routed to the flare or thermal oxidation system and the applicable monitoring was not performed.


(iii) For each instance reported under paragraphs (c)(3)(i) and (ii) of this section that involves CMS, report the following information:


(A) A unique identifier for the CMS.


(B) The make, model number, and date of last calibration check of the CMS.


(C) The cause of the deviation or downtime and the corrective action taken.


(4) For any instance in which liquid product was loaded into a gasoline cargo tank for which vapor tightness documentation required under § 60.502a(e)(1) was not provided or available in the terminal’s records, report:


(i) Cargo tank owner and address.


(ii) Cargo tank identification number.


(iii) Date and time liquid product was loaded into a gasoline cargo tank without proper documentation.


(iv) Date proper documentation was received or statement that proper documentation was never received.


(5) For each instance when liquid product was loaded into gasoline cargo tanks not using submerged filling, as defined in § 60.501a, not equipped with vapor collection equipment that is compatible with the terminal’s vapor collection system, or not properly connected to the terminal’s vapor collection system, report:


(i) Date and time of liquid product loading into gasoline cargo tank not using submerged filling, improperly equipped, or improperly connected.


(ii) Type of deviation (e.g., not submerged filling, incompatible equipment, or not properly connected).


(iii) Cargo tank identification number.


(6) Report the following information for each leak inspection required under §§ 60.502a(j)(1) and 60.503a(a)(2) and each leak identified under § 60.502a(j)(2).


(i) For each leak detected during a leak inspection required under §§ 60.502a(j)(1) and 60.503a(a)(2), report:


(A) The date of inspection.


(B) The leak determination method (OGI or Method 21 of appendix A-7 to this part).


(C) The total number and type of equipment for which leaks were detected.


(D) The total number and type of equipment for which leaks were repaired within 15 calendar days.


(E) The total number and type of equipment for which no repair attempt was made within 5 calendar days of the leaks being identified.


(F) The total number and type of equipment placed on the delay of repair, as specified in § 60.502a(j)(8).


(ii) For leaks identified under § 60.502a(j)(2), report:


(A) The total number and type of equipment for which leaks were identified.


(B) The total number and type of equipment for which leaks were repaired within 15 calendar days.


(C) The total number and type of equipment for which no repair attempt was made within 5 calendar days of the leaks being identified.


(D) The total number and type of equipment placed on the delay of repair, as specified in § 60.502a(j)(8).


(iii) The total number of leaks on the delay of repair list at the start of the reporting period.


(iv) The total number of leaks on the delay of repair list at the end of the reporting period.


(v) For each leak that was on the delay of repair list at any time during the reporting period, report:


(A) Unique equipment identification number.


(B) Type of equipment.


(C) Leak determination method (OGI, Method 21 of appendix A-7 to this part, or audio, visual, or olfactory).


(D) The reason(s) why the repair was not feasible within 15 calendar days.


(E) If applicable, the date repair was completed.


(7) If there were no deviations from the emission limitations, operating parameters, or work practice standards, then provide a statement that there were no deviations from the emission limitations, operating limits, or work practice standards during the reporting period. If there were no periods during which a CMS (including a CEMS or CPMS) was inoperable or out-of-control, then provide a statement that there were no periods during which a CMS was inoperable or out-of-control during the reporting period.


(d) Timeframe for semiannual report submissions. (1) The first semiannual report will cover the date starting with the date the source first becomes an affected facility subject to this subpart and ending with the last day of the month five months later. For example, if the source becomes an affected facility on April 15, the first semiannual report would cover the period from April 15 to September 30. The first semiannual report must be submitted on or before the last day of the month two months after the last date covered by the semiannual report. In this example, the first semiannual report would be due November 30.


(2) Subsequent semiannual reports will cover subsequent 6 calendar month periods with each report due on or before the last day of the month two months after the last date covered by the semiannual report.


(e) Requirements for electronically submitting reports. For reports required to be submitted following the procedures specified in this paragraph (e), you must submit reports to the EPA via CEDRI, which can be accessed through the EPA’s Central Data Exchange (CDX) (https://cdx.epa.gov/). The EPA will make all the information submitted through CEDRI available to the public without further notice to you. Do not use CEDRI to submit information you claim as confidential business information (CBI). Although we do not expect persons to assert a claim of CBI, if you wish to assert a CBI claim for some of the information in the report, you must submit a complete file in the format specified in this subpart, including information claimed to be CBI, to the EPA following the procedures in paragraphs (e)(1) and (2) of this section. Clearly mark the part or all of the information that you claim to be CBI. Information not marked as CBI may be authorized for public release without prior notice. Information marked as CBI will not be disclosed except in accordance with procedures set forth in 40 CFR part 2. All CBI claims must be asserted at the time of submission. Anything submitted using CEDRI cannot later be claimed CBI. Furthermore, under CAA section 114(c), emissions data are not entitled to confidential treatment, and the EPA is required to make emissions data available to the public. Thus, emissions data will not be protected as CBI and will be made publicly available. You must submit the same file submitted to the CBI office with the CBI omitted to the EPA via the EPA’s CDX as described earlier in this paragraph (e).


(1) The preferred method to receive CBI is for it to be transmitted electronically using email attachments, File Transfer Protocol, or other online file sharing services. Electronic submissions must be transmitted directly to the OAQPS CBI Office at the email address [email protected], and as described above, should include clear CBI markings. ERT files should be flagged to the attention of the Group Leader, Measurement Policy Group; all other files should be flagged to the attention of the Gasoline Distribution Sector Lead. If assistance is needed with submitting large electronic files that exceed the file size limit for email attachments, and if you do not have your own file sharing service, please email [email protected] to request a file transfer link.


(2) If you cannot transmit the file electronically, you may send CBI information through the postal service to the following address: U.S. EPA, Attn: OAQPS Document Control Officer, Mail Drop: C404-02, 109 T.W. Alexander Drive, P.O. Box 12055, RTP, NC 27711. ERT files should be flagged to the attention of the Group Leader, Measurement Policy Group, and all other files should also be flagged to the attention of the Gasoline Distribution Sector Lead. The mailed CBI material should be double wrapped and clearly marked. Any CBI markings should not show through the outer envelope.


(f) Claims of EPA system outage. If you are required to electronically submit a report through CEDRI in the EPA’s CDX, you may assert a claim of EPA system outage for failure to timely comply with that reporting requirement. To assert a claim of EPA system outage, you must meet the requirements outlined in paragraphs (f)(1) through (7) of this section.


(1) You must have been or will be precluded from accessing CEDRI and submitting a required report within the time prescribed due to an outage of either the EPA’s CEDRI or CDX systems.


(2) The outage must have occurred within the period of time beginning five business days prior to the date that the submission is due.


(3) The outage may be planned or unplanned.


(4) You must submit notification to the Administrator in writing as soon as possible following the date you first knew, or through due diligence should have known, that the event may cause or has caused a delay in reporting.


(5) You must provide to the Administrator a written description identifying:


(i) The date(s) and time(s) when CDX or CEDRI was accessed and the system was unavailable;


(ii) A rationale for attributing the delay in reporting beyond the regulatory deadline to EPA system outage;


(iii) A description of measures taken or to be taken to minimize the delay in reporting; and


(iv) The date by which you propose to report, or if you have already met the reporting requirement at the time of the notification, the date you reported.


(6) The decision to accept the claim of EPA system outage and allow an extension to the reporting deadline is solely within the discretion of the Administrator.


(7) In any circumstance, the report must be submitted electronically as soon as possible after the outage is resolved.


(g) Claims of force majeure. If you are required to electronically submit a report through CEDRI in the EPA’s CDX, you may assert a claim of force majeure for failure to timely comply with that reporting requirement. To assert a claim of force majeure, you must meet the requirements outlined in paragraphs (g)(1) through (5) of this section.


(1) You may submit a claim if a force majeure event is about to occur, occurs, or has occurred or there are lingering effects from such an event within the period of time beginning five business days prior to the date the submission is due. For the purposes of this section, a force majeure event is defined as an event that will be or has been caused by circumstances beyond the control of the affected facility, its contractors, or any entity controlled by the affected facility that prevents you from complying with the requirement to submit a report electronically within the time period prescribed. Examples of such events are acts of nature (e.g., hurricanes, earthquakes, or floods), acts of war or terrorism, or equipment failure or safety hazard beyond the control of the affected facility (e.g., large scale power outage).


(2) You must submit notification to the Administrator in writing as soon as possible following the date you first knew, or through due diligence should have known, that the event may cause or has caused a delay in reporting.


(3) You must provide to the Administrator:


(i) A written description of the force majeure event;


(ii) A rationale for attributing the delay in reporting beyond the regulatory deadline to the force majeure event;


(iii) A description of measures taken or to be taken to minimize the delay in reporting; and


(iv) The date by which you propose to report, or if you have already met the reporting requirement at the time of the notification, the date you reported.


(4) The decision to accept the claim of force majeure and allow an extension to the reporting deadline is solely within the discretion of the Administrator.


(5) In any circumstance, the reporting must occur as soon as possible after the force majeure event occurs.


Subparts YY-ZZ [Reserved]

Subpart AAA—Standards of Performance for New Residential Wood Heaters


Source:80 FR 13702, Mar. 16, 2015, unless otherwise noted.

§ 60.530 Am I subject to this subpart?

(a) You are subject to this subpart if you manufacture, sell, offer for sale, import for sale, distribute, offer to distribute, introduce or deliver for introduction into commerce in the United States, or install or operate an affected wood heater specified in paragraphs (a)(1) or (a)(2) of this section, except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section.


(1) Each adjustable burn rate wood heater, single burn rate wood heater and pellet stove manufactured on or after July 1, 1988, with a current EPA certificate of compliance issued prior to May 15, 2015 according to the certification procedures in effect in this subpart at the time of certification is an affected wood heater.


(2) All other residential wood heaters as defined in § 60.531 manufactured or sold on or after May 15, 2015 are affected wood heaters, except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section.


(b) Each affected wood heater must comply with the provisions of this subpart unless exempted under paragraphs (b)(1) through (b)(6) of this section. These exemptions are determined by rule applicability and do not require EPA notification or public notice.


(1) Affected wood heaters manufactured in the United States for export are exempt from the applicable emission limits of § 60.532 and the requirements of § 60.533.


(2) Affected wood heaters used for research and development purposes that are never offered for sale or sold and that are not used for the purpose of providing heat are exempt from the applicable emission limits of § 60.532 and the requirements of § 60.533. No more than 50 wood heaters manufactured per model line can be exempted for this purpose.


(3) Appliances that do not burn wood or wood pellets (such as coal-only heaters that meet the definition in § 60.531 or corn-only pellet stoves) are exempt from the applicable emission limits of § 60.532 and the requirements of § 60.533 provided that all advertising and warranties exclude wood burning.


(4) Cook stoves as defined in § 60.531 are exempt from the applicable emission limits of § 60.532 and the requirements of § 60.533.


(5) Camp stoves as defined in § 60.531 are exempt from the applicable emission limits of § 60.532 and the requirements of § 60.533.


(6) Modification or reconstruction, as defined in §§ 60.14 and 60.15 of subpart A of this part does not, by itself, make a wood heater an affected facility under this subpart.


(c) The following are not affected wood heaters and are not subject to this subpart:


(1) Residential hydronic heaters and residential forced-air furnaces subject to subpart QQQQ of this part.


(2) Residential masonry heaters that meet the definition in § 60.531.


(3) Appliances that are not residential heating devices (for example, manufactured or site-built masonry fireplaces).


(4) Traditional Native American bake ovens that meet the definition in § 60.531.


§ 60.531 What definitions must I know?

As used in this subpart, all terms not defined herein have the meaning given them in the Clean Air Act and subpart A of this part.


Adjustable burn rate wood heater means a wood heater that is equipped with or installed with a damper or other mechanism to allow the operator to vary burn rate conditions, regardless of whether it is internal or external to the appliance. This definition does not distinguish between heaters that are free standing, built-in or fireplace inserts.


Approved test laboratory means a test laboratory that is approved for wood heater certification testing under § 60.535 or is an independent third-party test laboratory that is accredited under ISO-IEC Standard 17025 to perform testing using the test methods specified in § 60.534 by an accreditation body that is a full member signatory to the International Laboratory Accreditation Cooperation Mutual Recognition Arrangement and approved by the EPA for conducting testing under this subpart.


Camp stove (sometimes also called cylinder stove or wall tent stove) means a portable stove equipped with a pipe or chimney exhaust capable of burning wood or coal intended for use in a tent or other temporary structure used for hunting, camping, fishing or other outdoor recreation. The primary purpose of the stove is to provide space heating, although cooking and heating water may be additional functions.


Catalytic combustor means a device coated with a noble metal used in a wood heater to lower the temperature required for combustion.


Chip wood fuel means wood chipped into small pieces that are uniform in size, shape, moisture, density and energy content.


Coal-only heater means an enclosed, coal-burning appliance capable of space heating or space heating and domestic water heating, which is marketed and warranted solely as a coal-only heater and has all of the following characteristics:


(1) An opening for emptying ash that is located near the bottom or the side of the appliance;


(2) A system that admits air primarily up and through the fuel bed;


(3) A grate or other similar device for shaking or disturbing the fuel bed or a power-driven or mechanical stoker;


(4) Installation instructions, owner’s manual and marketing information that state that the use of wood in the stove, except for coal ignition purposes, is prohibited by law; and


(5) A safety listing as a coal-only heater, except for coal ignition purposes, under accepted American or Canadian safety codes, as documented by a permanent label from a nationally recognized certification body.


Commercial owner means any person who owns or controls a wood heater in the course of the business of the manufacture, importation, distribution (including shipping and storage), or sale of the wood heater.


Cook stove means a wood-fired appliance that is designed, marketed and warranted primarily for cooking food and that has the following characteristics:


(1) An oven, with volume of 0.028 cubic meters (1 cubic foot) or greater, and an oven rack;


(2) A device for measuring oven temperatures;


(3) A flame path that is routed around the oven;


(4) An ash pan;


(5) An ash clean-out door below the oven;


(6) The absence of a fan or heat channels to dissipate heat from the appliance;


(7) A cooking surface with an area measured in square inches or square feet that is at least 1.5 times greater than the volume of firebox measured in cubic inches or cubic feet. Example: A cook stove with a firebox of 2 cubic feet must have a cooking surface of at least 3 square feet;


(8) A portion of at least four sides of the oven (which may include the bottom and/or top) is exposed to the flame path during the heating cycle of the oven. A flue gas bypass may exist for temperature control.


Fireplace means a wood-burning appliance intended to be used primarily for aesthetic enjoyment and not as a space heater. An appliance is a fireplace if it is in a model line that satisfies the requirements in paragraphs (1), (2) or (3) of this definition.


(1) The model line includes a safety listing under recognized American or Canadian safety standards, as documented by a permanent label from a nationally recognized certification body affixed on each unit sold, and that said safety listing only allows operation of the fireplace with doors fully open. Operation with any required safety screen satisfies this requirement.


(2) The model line has a safety listing that allows operation with doors closed, has no user-operated controls other than flue or outside air dampers that can only be adjusted to either a fully closed or fully opened position, and the requirements in either paragraph (2)(i) or (2)(ii) of this definition are satisfied.


(i) Appliances are sold with tempered glass panel doors only (either as standard or optional equipment), or


(ii) The fire viewing area is equal to or greater than 500 square inches.


(3)(i) A model line that is clearly positioned in the marketplace as intended to be used primarily for aesthetic enjoyment and not as a room heater, as demonstrated by product literature (including owner’s manuals), advertising targeted at the trade or public (including web-based promotional materials) or training materials is presumptively a fireplace model line.


(ii) The presumption in paragraph (3)(i) of this definition can be rebutted by test data from an EPA-approved test laboratory reviewed by an EPA-approved third-party certifier that were generated when operating the appliance with the door(s) closed, and that demonstrate an average stack gas carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration over the duration of the test run equal to or less than 5.00 percent and a ratio of the average stack gas CO2 to the average stack gas carbon monoxide (CO) equal to or greater than 15:1. The stack gas average CO2 and CO concentrations for the test run shall be determined in accordance with the requirements in CSA B415.1-10 (IBR, see § 60.17), clause 6.3, using a sampling interval no greater than 1 minute. The average stack gas CO2 and CO concentrations for purposes of this determination shall be the average of the stack gas concentrations from all sampling intervals over the full test run.


Manufactured means completed and ready for shipment (whether or not assembled or packaged) for purposes of determining the date of manufacture.


Manufacturer means any entity that constructs or imports into the United States a wood heater.


Model line means all wood heaters offered for sale by a single manufacturer that are similar in all material respects that would affect emissions as defined in this section.


Particulate matter (PM) means total particulate matter including coarse particulate (PM10) and fine particulate (PM2.5).


Pellet fuel means refined and densified fuel shaped into small pellets or briquettes that are uniform in size, shape, moisture, density and energy content.


Pellet stove (sometimes called pellet heater or pellet space heater) means an enclosed, pellet or chip fuel-burning device capable of and intended for residential space heating or space heating and domestic water heating. Pellet stoves include a fuel storage hopper or bin and a fuel feed system. Pellet stoves include, but are not limited to:


(1) Free-standing pellet stoves—pellet stoves that are installed on legs or on a pedestal or other supporting base. These stoves generally are safety listed under ASTM E1509, UL-1482, ULC S627 or ULC-ORD C1482.


(2) Pellet stove fireplace inserts—pellet stoves intended to be installed in masonry fireplace cavities or in other enclosures. These stoves generally are safety listed under ASTM E1509, UL-1482, ULC-S628 or ULC-ORD C1482.


(3) Built-in pellet stoves—pellet stoves intended to be recessed into the wall. These stoves generally are safety listed under ASTM E1509, UL-127, ULC-S610 or ULC-ORD C1482.


Representative affected wood heater means an individual wood heater that is similar in all material respects that would affect emissions to other wood heaters within the model line it represents.


Residential masonry heater means a factory-built or site-built wood-burning device in which the heat from intermittent fires burned rapidly in the firebox is stored in the refractory mass for slow release to building spaces. Masonry heaters are site-built (using local materials or a combination of local materials and manufactured components) or site-assembled (using factory-built components), solid fuel-burning heating appliances constructed mainly of refractory materials (e.g., masonry materials or soapstone. They typically have an interior construction consisting of a firebox and heat exchange channels built from refractory components, through which flue gases are routed. ASTM E-1602 “Standard Guide for Construction of Solid Fuel Burning Masonry Heaters” provides design and construction information for the range of masonry heaters most commonly built in the United States. The site-assembled models are generally listed to UL-1482.


Sale means the transfer of ownership or control, except that a transfer of control of an affected wood heater for research and development purposes within the scope of § 60.530(b)(2) is not a sale.


Similar in all material respects that would affect emissions means that the construction materials, exhaust and inlet air systems and other design features are within the allowed tolerances for components identified in § 60.533(k)(2), (3) and (4).


Single burn rate wood heater means a wood heater that is not equipped with or installed with a burn control device to allow the operator to vary burn rate conditions. Burn rate control devices include stack dampers that control the outflow of flue gases from the heater to the chimney, whether built into the appliance, sold with it, or recommended for use with the heater by the manufacturer, retailer or installer; and air control slides, gates or any other type of mechanisms that control combustion air flow into the heater.


Sold at retail means the sale by a commercial owner of a wood heater to the ultimate purchaser/user or noncommercial purchaser.


Third-party certifier (sometimes called third-party certifying body or product certifying body) means an independent third party that is accredited under ISO-IEC Standards 17025 and 17065 to perform certifications, inspections and audits by an accreditation body that is a full member signatory to the International Laboratory Accreditation Cooperation Mutual Recognition Arrangement and approved by the EPA for conducting certifications, inspections and audits under this subpart.


Traditional Native American bake oven means a wood or other solid fuel burning appliance that is designed primarily for use by Native Americans for food preparation, cooking, warming or for instructional, recreational, cultural or ceremonial purposes.


Unseasoned wood means wood with an average moisture content of 20 percent or more.


Valid certification test means a test that meets the following criteria:


(1) The Administrator was notified about the test in accordance with § 60.534(g);


(2) The test was conducted by an approved test laboratory as defined in this section;


(3) The test was conducted on a wood heater similar in all material respects that would affect emissions to other wood heaters of the model line that is to be certified; and


(4) The test was conducted in accordance with the test methods and procedures specified in § 60.534.


Wood heater means an enclosed, wood burning-appliance capable of and intended for residential space heating or space heating and domestic water heating. These devices include, but are not limited to, adjustable burn rate wood heaters, single burn rate wood heaters and pellet stoves. Wood heaters may or may not include air ducts to deliver some portion of the heat produced to areas other than the space where the wood heater is located. Wood heaters include, but are not limited to:


(1) Free-standing wood heaters—Wood heaters that are installed on legs, on a pedestal or suspended from the ceiling. These products generally are safety listed under UL-1482, UL-737 or ULC-S627.


(2) Fireplace insert wood heaters—Wood heaters intended to be installed in masonry fireplace cavities or in other enclosures. These appliances generally are safety listed under UL-1482, UL-737 or ULC-S628.


(3) Built-in wood heaters—Wood heaters that are intended to be recessed into the wall. These appliances generally are safety listed under UL-1482, UL-737, UL-127 or ULC-S610.


§ 60.532 What standards and associated requirements must I meet and by when?

(a) 2015 particulate matter emission standards. Unless exempted under § 60.530(b), each affected wood heater manufactured, imported into the United States, and/or sold at retail on or after May 15, 2015 must be certified to not discharge into the atmosphere any gases that contain particulate matter in excess of a weighted average of 4.5 g/hr (0.010 lb/hr), except that a wood heater manufactured before May 15, 2015 may be imported into the United States and/or sold at retail on or before December 31, 2015. Compliance for all heaters must be determined by the test methods and procedures in § 60.534.


(b) 2020 particulate matter emission standards. Unless exempted under § 60.530(b) or electing to use the cord wood alternative means of compliance option in paragraph (c) of the section, each affected wood heater manufactured or sold at retail for use in the United States on or after May 15, 2020 must not discharge into the atmosphere any gases that contain particulate matter in excess of a weighted average of 2.0 g/hr (0.0044 lb/hr). Compliance for all heaters must be determined by the test methods and procedures in § 60.534.


(c) 2020 cord wood alternative compliance option. Each affected wood heater manufactured or sold at retail for use in the United States on or after May 15, 2020 must not discharge into the atmosphere any gases that contain particulate matter in excess of a weighted average of 2.5 g/hr (0.0055 lb/hr). Compliance must be determined by a cord wood test method approved by the Administrator and the procedures in § 60.534.


(d) Chip wood fuel requirements. Operators of wood heaters that are certified to burn chip wood fuels must only burn chip wood fuels that have been specified in the owner’s manual. The chip wood fuel must meet the following minimum requirements:


(1) Moisture content: less than 35 percent;


(2) Inorganic fines: less than or equal to 1 percent;


(3) Chlorides: less than or equal to 300 parts per million by weight;


(4) Ash content: no more than 2 percent;


(5) No demolition or construction waste; and


(6) Trace metals: less than 100 mg/kg.


(e) Pellet fuel requirements. Operators of wood heaters that are certified to burn pellet fuels may burn only pellets that have been specified in the owner’s manual and graded under a licensing agreement with a third-party organization approved by the EPA (including a certification by the third-party organization that the pellets do not contain, and are not manufactured from, any of the prohibited fuels in paragraph (f) of this section). The Pellet Fuels Institute, ENplus, and CANplus are initially deemed to be approved third-party organizations for this purpose, and additional organizations may apply to the Administrator for approval.


(f) Prohibited fuel types. No person is permitted to burn any of the following materials in an affected wood heater:


(1) Residential or commercial garbage;


(2) Lawn clippings or yard waste;


(3) Materials containing rubber, including tires;


(4) Materials containing plastic;


(5) Waste petroleum products, paints or paint thinners, or asphalt products;


(6) Materials containing asbestos;


(7) Construction or demolition debris;


(8) Paper products, cardboard, plywood, or particleboard. The prohibition against burning these materials does not prohibit the use of fire starters made from paper, cardboard, sawdust, wax and similar substances for the purpose of starting a fire in an affected wood heater;


(9) Railroad ties, pressure-treated wood or pallets;


(10) Manure or animal remains;


(11) Salt water driftwood or other previously salt water saturated materials;


(12) Unseasoned wood;


(13) Any materials that are not included in the warranty and owner’s manual for the subject wood heater; or


(14) Any materials that were not included in the certification tests for the subject wood heater.


(g) Operation of affected wood heaters. The user of an affected residential wood heater must operate the heater in a manner consistent with the owner’s manual. The owner’s manual must clearly specify that operation in a manner inconsistent with the owner’s manual would void the warranty.


(h) Temperature sensor requirement. An affected wood heater equipped with a catalytic combustor must be equipped with a temperature sensor that can monitor combustor gas stream temperatures within or immediately downstream [within 2.54 centimeters (1 inch)] of the catalytic combustor surface.


[80 FR 13702, Mar. 16, 2015, as amended at 85 FR 18455, Apr. 2, 2020]


§ 60.533 What compliance and certification requirements must I meet and by when?

(a) Certification requirement. Each affected wood heater must be certified to be in compliance with the applicable emission standards and other requirements of this subpart. For each model line manufactured or sold by a single entity (e.g., company or manufacturer), compliance with applicable emission standards of § 60.532 must be determined based on testing of representative affected wood heaters within the model line. If one entity licenses a model line to another entity, each entity’s model line must be certified. If an entity intends to change the name of the entity or the name of the model, the manufacturer must apply for a new certification 60 days before the intended name change.


(1) Except for model lines meeting the requirements of paragraph (h)(1) of this section, on or after May 15, 2015, the manufacturer must submit to the Administrator the information required in paragraph (b) of this section and follow either the certification process in paragraphs (c) through (e) of this section or the third-party certifier-based application process specified in paragraph (f) of this section.


(2) On or after May 16, 2016, the manufacturer must submit the information required in paragraph (b) of this section and follow the third-party certifier-based application process specified in paragraph (f) of this section.


(b) Application for a certificate of compliance. Any manufacturer of an affected wood heater must apply to the Administrator for a certificate of compliance for each model line. The application must be submitted to: [email protected]. The application must be signed by a responsible representative of the manufacturer or an authorized representative and must contain the following:


(1) The model name and design number. The model name and design number must clearly distinguish one model from another. The name and design number cannot include the EPA symbol or logo or name or derivatives such as “EPA.”


(2) Engineering drawings and specifications of components that may affect emissions (including specifications for each component listed in paragraph (k)(2), (3) and (4) of this section). Manufacturers may use assembly or design drawings that have been prepared for other purposes, but must designate on the drawings the dimensions of each component listed in paragraph (k) of this section. Manufacturers must identify tolerances of components listed in paragraph (k)(2) of this section that are different from those specified in that paragraph, and show that such tolerances cannot reasonably be anticipated to cause wood heaters in the model line to exceed the applicable emission limits. The drawings must identify how the emission-critical parts, such as air tubes and catalyst, can be readily inspected and replaced.


(3) A statement whether the firebox or any firebox component (including the materials listed in paragraph (k)(3) of this section) will be composed of material different from the material used for the firebox or firebox component in the wood heater on which certification testing was performed, a description of any such differences and demonstration that any such differences may not reasonably be anticipated to adversely affect emissions or efficiency.


(4) Clear identification of any claimed confidential business information (CBI). Submit such information under separate cover to the EPA CBI Office; Attn: Residential Wood Heater Compliance Program Lead, 1200 Pennsylvania Ave. NW., Washington, DC 20004. Note that all emissions data, including all information necessary to determine emission rates in the format of the standard, cannot be claimed as CBI.


(5) All documentation pertaining to a valid certification test, including the complete test report and, for all test runs: Raw data sheets, laboratory technician notes, calculations and test results. Documentation must include the items specified in the applicable test methods. Documentation must include discussion of each test run and its appropriateness and validity, and must include detailed discussion of all anomalies, whether all burn rate categories were achieved, any data not used in the calculations and, for any test runs not completed, the data collected during the test run and the reason(s) that the test run was not completed and why. The burn rate for the low burn rate category must be no greater than the rate that an operator can achieve in home use and no greater than is advertised by the manufacturer or retailer. The test report must include a summary table that clearly presents the individual and overall emission rates, efficiencies and heat outputs. Submit the test report and all associated required information, according to the procedures for electronic reporting specified in § 60.537(f).


(6) A copy of the warranties for the model line, which must include a statement that the warranties are void if the unit is used to burn materials for which the unit is not certified by the EPA and void if not operated according to the owner’s manual.


(7) A statement that the manufacturer will conduct a quality assurance program for the model line that satisfies the requirements of paragraph (m) of this section.


(8) A statement describing how the tested unit was sealed by the laboratory after the completion of certification testing and asserting that such unit will be stored by the manufacturer in the sealed state until 5 years after the certification test.


(9) Statements that the wood heaters manufactured under this certificate will be—


(i) Similar in all material respects that would affect emissions as defined in § 60.531 to the wood heater submitted for certification testing, and


(ii) Labeled as prescribed in § 60.536.


(iii) Accompanied by an owner’s manual that meets the requirements in § 60.536. In addition, a copy of the owner’s manual must be submitted to the Administrator and be available to the public on the manufacturer’s Web site.


(10) A statement that the manufacturer has entered into contracts with an approved laboratory and an approved third-party certifier that satisfy the requirements of paragraph (f) of this section.


(11) A statement that the approved laboratory and approved third-party certifier are allowed to submit information on behalf of the manufacturer, including any claimed to be CBI.


(12) A statement that the manufacturer will place a copy of the certification test report and summary on the manufacturer’s Web site available to the public within 30 days after the Administrator issues a certificate of compliance.


(13) A statement of acknowledgment that the certificate of compliance cannot be transferred to another manufacturer or model line without written approval by the Administrator.


(14) A statement acknowledging that it is unlawful to sell, distribute or offer to sell or distribute an affected wood heater without a valid certificate of compliance.


(15) Contact information for the responsible representative of the manufacturer and all authorized representatives, including name, affiliation, physical address, telephone number and email address.


(c) Administrator approval process. (1) The Administrator may issue a certificate of compliance for a model line if the Administrator determines, based on all information submitted by the applicant and any other relevant information available, that:


(i) A valid certification test demonstrates that the representative affected wood heater complies with the applicable emission standards in § 60.532;


(ii) Any tolerances or materials for components listed in paragraph (k)(2) or (3) of this section that are different from those specified in those paragraphs may not reasonably be anticipated to cause wood heaters in the model line to exceed the applicable emission limits; and


(iii) The requirements of paragraph (b) of this section have been met.


(2) The Administrator will deny certification if the Administrator determines that the criteria in paragraph (c)(1) of this section have not been satisfied. Upon denying certification under this paragraph, the Administrator will give written notice to the manufacturer setting forth the basis for this determination.


(d) Level of compliance certification. The Administrator will issue the certificate of compliance for the most stringent particulate matter emission standard that the tested representative wood heater meets under § 60.532.


(e) Conditional, temporary certificate of compliance. A conditional, temporary certificate of compliance may be granted by the Administrator until May 16, 2016 based on the manufacturer’s submittal of a complete certification application meeting all the requirements in § 60.533(b). The application must include the full test report by an EPA-approved laboratory and all required compliance statements by the manufacturer with the exception of a certificate of conformity by an EPA-approved third-party certifier. The conditional, temporary certificate of compliance would allow manufacture and sales of the affected wood heater model line until May 16, 2016 or until the Administrator completes the review of the application, whichever is earlier. By May 16, 2016, the manufacturer must submit a certificate of conformity by an EPA-approved third-party certifier.


(f) Third-party certifier-based application process. (1) Any manufacturer of an affected wood heater must apply to the Administrator for a certificate of compliance for each model line. The manufacturer must meet the following requirements:


(i) The manufacturer must contract with a third-party certifier for certification services. The contract must include regular (at least annual) unannounced audits under ISO-IEC Standard 17065 to ensure that the manufacturer’s quality assurance plan is being implemented. The contract must also include a report for each audit under ISO-IEC Standard 17065 that fully documents the results of the audit. The contract must include authorization and requirement for the third-party certifier to submit all such reports to the Administrator and the manufacturer within 30 days of the audit. The audit report must identify deviations from the manufacturer’s quality assurance plan and specify the corrective actions that need to be taken to address each identified deficiency.


(ii) The manufacturer must submit the materials specified in paragraph (b) of this section and a quality assurance plan that meets the requirements of paragraph (m) of this section to the third-party certifier. The quality assurance plan must ensure that units within a model line will be similar in all material respects that would affect emissions to the wood heater submitted for certification testing, and it must include design drawings for the model line.


(iii) The manufacturer must apply to the third-party certifier for a certification of conformity with the applicable requirements of this subpart for the model line.


(A) After testing by an approved test laboratory is complete, certification of conformity with the emission standards in § 60.532 must be performed by the manufacturer’s contracted third-party certifier.


(B) The third-party certifier may certify conformity if the emission tests have been conducted per the appropriate guidelines; the test report is complete and accurate; the instrumentation used for the test was properly calibrated; the test report shows that the representative affected wood heater meets the applicable emission limits specified in § 60.532; the quality assurance plan is adequate to ensure that units within the model line will be similar in all material respects that would affect emissions to the wood heater submitted for certification testing; and that the affected heaters would meet all applicable requirements of this subpart.


(iv) The manufacturer must then submit to the Administrator an application for a certificate of compliance that includes the certification of conformity, quality assurance plan, test report and all supporting documentation specified in paragraph (b) of this section.


(v) The submission also must include a statement signed by a responsible official of the manufacturer or authorized representative that the manufacturer has complied with and will continue to comply with all requirements of this subpart for certificate of compliance and that the manufacturer remains responsible for compliance regardless of any error by the test laboratory or third-party certifier.


(2) The Administrator will issue to the manufacturer a certificate of compliance for a model line if it is determined, based on all of the information submitted in the application for certification and any other relevant information, that:


(i) A valid certification of conformity has demonstrated that the representative affected wood heater complies with the applicable emission standards in § 60.532;


(ii) Any tolerances or materials for components listed in paragraph (k)(2) or (3) of this section that are different from those specified in those paragraphs may not be reasonably anticipated to cause wood heaters in the model line to exceed the applicable emission limits;


(iii) The requirements of paragraph (b) of this section have been met; and


(iv) A valid certificate of conformity for the model line has been prepared and submitted.


(3) The Administrator will deny certification if the Administrator determines that the criteria in paragraph (f)(2) of this section have not been satisfied. Upon denying certification under this paragraph, the Administrator will give written notice to the manufacturer setting forth the basis for the determination.


(g) Waiver from submitting test results. An applicant for certification may apply for a potential waiver of the requirement to submit the results of a certification test pursuant to paragraph (b)(5) of this section, if the wood heater meets either of the following conditions:


(1) The wood heaters of the model line are similar in all material respects that would affect emissions, as defined in § 60.531, to another model line that has already been issued a certificate of compliance. A manufacturer that seeks a waiver of certification testing must identify the model line that has been certified, and must submit a copy of an agreement with the owner of the design permitting the applicant to produce wood heaters of that design.


(2) The manufacturer has previously conducted a valid certification test to demonstrate that the wood heaters of the model line meet the applicable standard specified in § 60.532.


(h) Certification period. Unless revoked sooner by the Administrator, a certificate of compliance will be valid for the following periods as applicable:


(1) For a model line that was previously certified as meeting the 1990 Phase II emission standards under the 1988 NSPS, in effect prior to May 15, 2015, at an emission level equal to or less than the 2015 emission standards in § 60.532(a), the model line is deemed to have a certificate of compliance for the 2015 emission standards in § 60.532(a), which is valid until the effective date for the 2020 standards in § 60.532(b) (i.e., until May 15, 2020).


(2) For a model line certified as meeting emission standards in § 60.532, a certificate of compliance will be valid for 5 years from the date of issuance or until a more stringent standard comes into effect, whichever is sooner.


(i) Renewal of certification. (1) The manufacturer must request renewal of a model line’s certificate of compliance or recertify the model line every 5 years, or the manufacturer may choose to no longer manufacture or sell that model line after the expiration date. If the manufacturer chooses to no longer manufacture that model line, then the manufacturer must submit a statement to the Administrator to that effect.


(2) A manufacturer of an affected wood heater model line may apply to the Administrator for potential renewal of its certificate of compliance by submitting the material specified in paragraph (b) and following the procedures specified in paragraph (f) of this section, or by affirming in writing that the wood heaters in the model line continue to be similar in all material respects that would affect emissions to the representative wood heater submitted for testing on which the original certificate of compliance was based and requesting a potential waiver from certification testing. The application must include a copy of the review of the draft application and approval by the third-party certifier.


(3) If the Administrator grants a renewal of certification, the Administrator will give written notice to the manufacturer setting forth the basis for the determination and issue a certification renewal.


(4) If the Administrator denies the request for a renewal of certification, the Administrator will give written notice to the manufacturer setting forth the basis for the determination.


(5) If the Administrator denies the request for a renewal of certification, the manufacturer and retailer must not manufacture or sell the previously-certified wood heaters after the expiration date of the certificate of compliance.


(j) [Reserved]


(k) Recertification. (1) The manufacturer must recertify a model line whenever any change is made in the design submitted pursuant to paragraph (b)(2) of this section that affects or is presumed to affect the particulate matter emission rate for that model line. The manufacturer of an affected wood heater must apply to the Administrator for potential recertification by submitting the material specified in paragraph (b) and following the procedures specified in paragraph (f) of this section, or by affirming in writing that the change will not cause wood heaters in the model line to exceed applicable emission limits and requesting a potential waiver from certification testing. The application for recertification must be reviewed and approved by the contracted third-party certifier and a copy of the review and approval must be included. The Administrator may waive this requirement upon written request by the manufacturer, if the manufacturer presents adequate rationale and the Administrator determines that the change may not reasonably be anticipated to cause wood heaters in the model line to exceed the applicable emission limits. The granting of such a waiver does not relieve the manufacturer of any compliance obligations under this subpart.


(2) Any change in the design tolerances or actual dimensions of any of the following components (where such components are applicable) is presumed to affect particulate matter and carbon monoxide emissions and efficiency if that change exceeds ±0.64 cm (±
1/4 inch) for any linear dimension and ±5 percent for any cross-sectional area relating to air introduction systems and catalyst bypass gaps unless other dimensions and cross-sectional areas are previously approved by the Administrator under paragraph (c)(1)(ii) of this section:


(i) Firebox: Dimensions;


(ii) Air introduction systems: Cross-sectional area of restrictive air inlets and outlets, location and method of control;


(iii) Baffles: Dimensions and locations;


(iv) Refractory/insulation: Dimensions and location;


(v) Catalyst: Dimensions and location;


(vi) Catalyst bypass mechanism and catalyst bypass gap tolerances (when bypass mechanism is in closed position): Dimensions, cross-sectional area, and location;


(vii) Flue gas exit: Dimensions and location;


(viii) Door and catalyst bypass gaskets: Dimensions and fit;


(ix) Outer thermal shielding and thermal coverings: Dimensions and location;


(x) Fuel feed system: For wood heaters that are designed primarily to burn pellet fuel or wood chips and other wood heaters equipped with a fuel feed system, the fuel feed rate, auger motor design and power rating, and the angle of the auger to the firebox; and


(xi) Forced-air combustion system: For wood heaters so equipped, the location and horsepower of blower motors and the fan blade size.


(3) Any change in the materials used for the following components is presumed to affect particulate matter emissions and efficiency:


(i) Refractory/insulation; or


(ii) Door and catalyst bypass gaskets.


(4) A change in the make, model or composition of a catalyst is presumed to affect particulate matter and carbon monoxide emissions and efficiency, unless the change has been requested by the heater manufacturer and has been approved in advance by the Administrator, based on test data that demonstrate that the replacement catalyst is equivalent to or better than the original catalyst in terms of particulate matter emission reduction.


(l) Criteria for revocation of certification. (1) The Administrator may revoke certification if it is determined that the wood heaters being manufactured or sold in that model line do not comply with the requirements of this subpart. Such a determination will be based on all available evidence, including but not limited to:


(i) Test data from a retesting of the original unit on which the certification test was conducted or a unit that is similar in all material respects that would affect emissions;


(ii) A finding that the certification test was not valid. The finding will be based on problems or irregularities with the certification test or its documentation, but may be supplemented by other information;


(iii) A finding that the labeling of the wood heater model line, the owner’s manual or the associated marketing information does not comply with the requirements of § 60.536;


(iv) Failure by the manufacturer to comply with reporting and recordkeeping requirements under § 60.537;


(v) Physical examination showing that a significant percentage (as defined in the quality assurance plan approved pursuant to paragraph (m) of this section, but no larger than 1 percent) of production units inspected is not similar in all material respects that would affect emissions to the representative affected wood heater submitted for certification testing;


(vi) Failure of the manufacturer to conduct a quality assurance program in conformity with paragraph (m) of this section; or


(vii) Failure of the approved laboratory to test the wood heater using the methods specified in § 60.534.


(2) Revocation of certification under this paragraph (l) will not take effect until the manufacturer concerned has been given written notice by the Administrator setting forth the basis for the proposed determination and an opportunity to request a hearing under § 60.539.


(m) Quality assurance program. On or after May 16, 2016, for each certified model line, the manufacturer must conduct a quality assurance program that satisfies the requirements of paragraphs (m)(1) through (5) of this section. The quality assurance program requirements of this paragraph (m) supersede the quality assurance plan requirements previously specified in § 60.533(o) that was in effect prior to May 15, 2015. The manufacturer of a model line with a compliance certification under paragraph (h)(1) of this section must conduct a quality assurance program that satisfies the requirements of this paragraph (m) by May 16, 2016.


(1) The manufacturer must prepare and operate according to a quality assurance plan for each certified model line that includes specific inspection and testing requirements for ensuring that all units within a model line are similar in all material respects that would affect emissions to the wood heater submitted for certification testing and meet the emissions standards in § 60.532.


(2) The quality assurance plan must be approved by the third-party certifier as part of the certification of conformity process specified in paragraph (f) of this section.


(3) The quality assurance plan must include regular (at least annual) unannounced audits by the third-party certifier under ISO-IEC Standard 17065 to ensure that the manufacturer’s quality assurance plan is being implemented.


(4) The quality assurance plan must include a report for each audit under ISO-IEC Standard 17065 that fully documents the results of the audit. The third-party certifier must be authorized and required to submit all such reports to the Administrator and the manufacturer within 30 days of the audit. The audit report must identify deviations from the manufacturer’s quality assurance plan and specify the corrective actions that need to be taken to address each identified deficiency.


(5) Within 30 days after receiving each audit report, the manufacturer must report to the third-party certifier and to the Administrator its corrective actions and responses to any deficiencies identified in the audit report. No such report is required if an audit report did not identify any deficiencies.


(n) EPA compliance audit testing. (1)(i) The Administrator may select by written notice wood heaters or model lines for compliance audit testing to determine compliance with the emission standards in § 60.532.


(ii) The Administrator will transmit a written notification of the selected wood heaters or model line(s) to the manufacturer, which will include the name and address of the laboratory selected to perform the audit test and the model name and serial number of the wood heater(s) or model line(s) selected to undergo audit testing.


(2)(i) The Administrator may test, or direct the manufacturer to have tested, a wood heater or a wood heater from the model line(s) selected under paragraph (n)(1)(i) of this section in a laboratory approved under § 60.535. The Administrator may select any approved test laboratory or federal laboratory for this audit testing.


(ii) The expense of the compliance audit test is the responsibility of the wood heater manufacturer.


(iii) The test must be conducted using the same test method used to obtain certification. If the certification test consisted of more than one particulate matter sampling test method, the Administrator may direct the manufacturer and test laboratory as to which of these methods to use for the purpose of audit testing. The Administrator will notify the manufacturer at least 30 days prior to any test under this paragraph, and allow the manufacturer and/or his authorized representatives to observe the test.


(3) Revocation of certification. (i) If emissions from a wood heater tested under paragraph (n)(2) of this section exceed the applicable emission standard by more than 50 percent using the same test method used to obtain certification, the Administrator will notify the manufacturer that certification for that model line is suspended effective 72 hours from the receipt of the notice, unless the suspension notice is withdrawn by the Administrator. The suspension will remain in effect until withdrawn by the Administrator, or the date 30 days from its effective date if a revocation notice under paragraph (n)(3)(ii) of this section is not issued within that period, or the date of final agency action on revocation, whichever occurs earliest.


(ii)(A) If emissions from a wood heater tested under paragraph (n)(2) of this section exceed the applicable emission limit, the Administrator will notify the manufacturer that certification is revoked for that model line.


(B) A revocation notice under paragraph (n)(3)(ii)(A) of this section will become final and effective 60 days after the date of written notification to the manufacturer, unless it is withdrawn, a hearing is requested under § 60.539(a)(2), or the deadline for requesting a hearing is extended.


(C) The Administrator may extend the deadline for requesting a hearing for up to 60 days for good cause.


(D) A manufacturer may extend the deadline for requesting a hearing for up to 6 months, by agreeing to a voluntary suspension of certification.


(iii) Any notification under paragraph (n)(3)(i) or (n)(3)(ii) of this section will include a copy of a preliminary test report from the approved test laboratory or federal test laboratory. The test laboratory must provide a preliminary test report to the Administrator within 14 days of the completion of testing, if a wood heater exceeds the applicable emission limit in § 60.532. The test laboratory must provide the Administrator and the manufacturer, within 30 days of the completion of testing, all documentation pertaining to the test, including the complete test report and raw data sheets, laboratory technician notes, and test results for all test runs.


(iv) Upon receiving notification of a test failure under paragraph (n)(3)(ii) of this section, the manufacturer may request that up to four additional wood heaters from the same model line be tested at the manufacturer’s expense, at the test laboratory that performed the emissions test for the Administrator.


(v) Whether or not the manufacturer proceeds under paragraph (n)(3)(iv) of this section, the manufacturer may submit any relevant information to the Administrator, including any other test data generated pursuant to this subpart. The manufacturer must bear the expense of any additional testing.


(vi) The Administrator will withdraw any notice issued under paragraph (n)(3)(ii) of this section if tests under paragraph (n)(3)(iv) of this section show either—


(A) That exactly four additional wood heaters were tested for the manufacturer and all four met the applicable emission limits; or


(B) That exactly two additional wood heaters were tested for the manufacturer and each of them met the applicable emission limits and the average emissions of all three tested heaters (the original audit heater and the two additional heaters) met the applicable emission limits.


(vii) If the Administrator withdraws a notice pursuant to paragraph (n)(3)(vi) of this section, the Administrator will revise the certification values for the model line based on the test data and other relevant information. The manufacturer must then revise the model line’s labels and marketing information accordingly.


(viii) The Administrator may withdraw any proposed revocation, if the Administrator finds that an audit test failure has been rebutted by information submitted by the manufacturer under paragraph (n)(3)(iv) of this section and/or (n)(3)(v) of this section or by any other relevant information available to the Administrator.


§ 60.534 What test methods and procedures must I use to determine compliance with the standards and requirements for certification?

Test methods and procedures specified in this section or in appendices of this part, except as provided under § 60.8(b), must be used to determine compliance with the standards and requirements for certification under §§ 60.532 and 60.533 and for reporting carbon monoxide emissions and efficiency as follows:


(a)(1) For affected wood heaters subject to the 2015 and 2020 particulate matter emission standards of §§ 60.532(a) and (b), the manufacturer must have an EPA-approved test laboratory conduct testing according to paragraphs (a)(1)(i) or (ii) of this section. The manufacturer or manufacturer’s authorized representative must submit a summary and the full test reports with all supporting information, including detailed discussion of all anomalies, whether all burn rate categories were properly achieved, any data not used in the calculations and, for any test runs not completed, the data that were collected and the reason that the test run was not completed. The burn rate for the low burn rate category must be no greater than the rate that an operator can achieve in home use and no greater than is advertised by the manufacturer or retailer. The manufacturer has the option of submitting test results obtained pursuant to either paragraph (a)(1)(i) or (ii) of this section to the Administrator as specified under § 60.537 as part of a request for a certification of compliance.


(i) Conduct testing with crib wood using EPA Method 28R of appendix A-8 of this part or an alternative crib wood test method approved by the Administrator or the ASTM E2779-10 (IBR, see § 60.17) pellet heater test method to establish the certification test conditions and the particulate matter emission values.


(ii) Conduct testing with cord wood using an alternative cord wood test method approved by the Administrator to establish the certification test conditions and the particulate matter emission values.


(2) For the 2020 cord wood alternative means of compliance option specified in § 60.532(c), the manufacturer must have an EPA-approved test laboratory conduct testing with cord wood using an alternative cord wood test method approved by the Administrator to establish the certification test conditions and the particulate matter emission values.


(b) [Reserved]


(c) For affected wood heaters subject to the 2015 and 2020 particulate matter emission standards specified in § 60.532(a) through (c), particulate matter emission concentrations must be measured with ASTM E2515-11 (IBR, see § 60.17) with the following exceptions: eliminate section 9.6.5.1 of ASTM E2515-11 and perform the post-test leak checks as described in paragraph (c)(1) of this section. Additionally, if a component change of either sampling train is needed during sampling, then perform the leak check specified in paragraph (c)(2) of this section. Four-inch filters and Teflon membrane filters or Teflon-coated glass fiber filters may be used in ASTM E2515-11.


(1) Post-test leak check. A leak check of each sampling train is mandatory at the conclusion of each sampling run before sample recovery. The leak check must be performed in accordance with the procedures of ASTM E2515-11, section 9.6.4.1 (IBR, see § 60.17), except that it must be conducted at a vacuum equal to or greater than the maximum value reached during the sampling run. If the leakage rate is found to be no greater than 0.0003 m
3/min (0.01 cfm) or 4% of the average sampling rate (whichever is less), the leak check results are acceptable. If a higher leakage rate is obtained, the sampling run is invalid.


(2) Leak checks during sample run. If, during a sampling run, a component (e.g., filter assembly) change becomes necessary, a leak check must be conducted immediately before the change is made. Record the sample volume before and after the leak test. The sample volume collected during any leak checks must not be included in the total sample volume for the test run. The leak check must be done according to the procedure outlined in ASTM E2515-11, section 9.6.4.1 (IBR, see § 60.17), except that it must be done at a vacuum equal to or greater than the maximum value recorded up to that point in the sampling run. If the leakage rate is found to be no greater than 0.0003 m
3/min (0.01 cfm) or 4% of the average sampling rate (whichever is less), the leak check results are acceptable. If a higher leakage rate is obtained, the sampling run is invalid.



Note 1 to paragraph (c):

Immediately after component changes, leak checks are optional but highly recommended. If such leak checks are done, the procedure in paragraph (c)(1) of this section should be used.


(d) For all tests conducted using ASTM E2515-11 (IBR, see § 60.17), with the exceptions described in paragraphs (c)(1) and (2) of this section, and pursuant to this section, the manufacturer and approved test laboratory must also measure the first hour of particulate matter emissions for each test run by sampling with a third, identical and independent sampling train operated concurrently for the first hour of PM paired train compliance testing according to paragraph (c) of this section. The manufacturer and approved test laboratory must report the test results from this third train separately as the first hour emissions.


(e) The manufacturer must have the approved test laboratory measure the efficiency, heat output and carbon monoxide emissions of the tested wood heater using Canadian Standards Administration (CSA) Method B415.1-10 (IBR, see § 60.17), section 13.7.


(f) Douglas fir may be used in ASTM E2779-10, ASTM E2780-10 and CSA B415.1-10 (IBR, see § 60.17).


(g) The manufacturer of an affected wood heater model line must notify the Administrator of the date that certification testing is scheduled to begin by email to [email protected]. This notice must be received by the EPA at least 30 days before the start of testing. The notification of testing must include the manufacturer’s name and physical and email addresses, the approved test laboratory’s name and physical and email addresses, the third-party certifier name, the model name and number (or, if unavailable, some other way to distinguish between models), and the dates of testing. The laboratory may substitute certification testing of another affected wood heater on the original date in order to ensure regular laboratory testing operations.


(h) The approved test laboratory must allow the manufacturer, the manufacturer’s approved third-party certifier, the EPA and delegated state regulatory agencies to observe certification testing. However, manufacturers must not involve themselves in the conduct of the test after the pretest burn has begun. Communications between the manufacturer and laboratory or third-party certifier personnel regarding operation of the wood heater must be limited to written communications transmitted prior to the first pretest burn of the certification test series. During certification tests, the manufacturer may communicate with the third-party certifier, and only in writing, to notify them that the manufacturer has observed a deviation from proper test procedures by the laboratory. All communications must be included in the test documentation required to be submitted pursuant to § 60.533(b)(5) and must be consistent with instructions provided in the owner’s manual required under § 60.536(g).


[80 FR 13702, Mar. 16, 2015, as amended at 85 FR 63403, Oct. 7, 2020; 88 FR 18402, Mar. 29, 2023]


§ 60.535 What procedures must I use for EPA approval of a test laboratory or EPA approval of a third-party certifier?

(a) Test laboratory approval. (1) A laboratory must apply to the Administrator for approval to test under this rule by submitting documentation that the laboratory is accredited by a nationally recognized accrediting entity under ISO-IEC Standard 17025 to perform testing using the test methods specified under § 60.534. Laboratories accredited by EPA prior to May 15, 2015 may have until March 16, 2018 to submit documentation that they have accreditation under ISO-IEC Standard 17025 to perform testing using the test methods specified under § 60.534. ISO accreditation is required for all other laboratories performing testing beginning on November 16, 2015.


(2) As part of the application, the test laboratory must:


(i) Agree to participate biennially in an independently operated proficiency testing program with no direct ties to the participating laboratories;


(ii) Agree to allow the Administrator, regulatory agencies and third-party certifiers access to observe certification testing;


(iii) Agree to comply with calibration, reporting and recordkeeping requirements that affect testing laboratories; and


(iv) Agree to perform a compliance audit test at the manufacturer’s expense at the testing cost normally charged to such manufacturer if the laboratory is selected by the Administrator to conduct the compliance audit test of the manufacturer’s model line. The test laboratory must provide a preliminary audit test report to the Administrator within 14 days of the completion of testing, if the tested wood heater exceeds the applicable emission limit in § 60.532. The test laboratory must provide the Administrator and the manufacturer, within 30 days of the completion of audit testing, all documentation pertaining to the test, including the complete test report and raw data sheets, laboratory technician notes, and test results for all test runs.


(v) Have no conflict of interest and receive no financial benefit from the outcome of certification testing conducted pursuant to § 60.533.


(vi) Agree to not perform initial certification tests on any models manufactured by a manufacturer for which the laboratory has conducted research and development design services within the last 5 years.


(vii) Agree to seal any wood heater on which it performed certification tests, immediately upon completion or suspension of certification testing, by using a laboratory-specific seal.


(viii) Agree to immediately notify the Administrator of any suspended tests through email and in writing, giving the date suspended, the reason(s) why, and the projected date for restarting. The laboratory must submit the operation and test data obtained, even if the test is not completed.


(3) If the EPA approves the laboratory, the Administrator will provide the test laboratory with a certificate of approval for testing under this rule. If the EPA does not approve the laboratory, the Administrator will give written notice to the laboratory setting forth the basis for the determination.


(b) Revocation of test laboratory approval. (1) The Administrator may revoke the EPA laboratory approval if it is determined that the laboratory:


(i) Is no longer accredited by the accreditation body;


(ii) Does not follow required procedures or practices;


(iii) Has falsified data or otherwise misrepresented emission data;


(iv) Has failed to participate in a proficiency testing program, in accordance with its commitment under paragraph (a)(2)(i) of this section; or


(v) Has failed to seal a wood heater in accordance with paragraph (a)(2)(vii) of this section.


(2) Revocation of approval under this paragraph (b) will not take effect until the laboratory concerned has been given written notice by the Administrator setting forth the basis for the proposed determination and an opportunity for a hearing under § 60.539. However, if revocation is ultimately upheld, all tests conducted by the laboratory after written notice was given will, at the discretion of the Administrator, be declared invalid.


(c) Period of test laboratory approval (1) With the exception of laboratories meeting the provisions of paragraph (c)(2) of this section, and unless revoked sooner, a certificate of approval for testing under this rule is valid for 5 years from the date of issuance.


(2) Laboratories accredited by the EPA by May 15, 2015, under the provisions of § 60.535 as in effect prior to that date may continue to be EPA accredited and deemed EPA approved for testing under this subpart until May 15, 2018, at which time the EPA accreditation and approval ends unless the laboratory has obtained accreditation under § 60.535 as in effect on that date.


(d) Third-party certifier approval. (1) A third-party certifier may apply to the Administrator for approval to be an EPA-approved third-party certifier by submitting credentials demonstrating that it has been accredited by a nationally recognized accrediting entity to perform certifications and inspections under ISO-IEC Standard 17025, ISO-IEC Standard 17065 and ISO-IEC Standard 17020.


(2) As part of the application, the third-party certifier must:


(i) Agree to offer to contract with wood heater manufacturers to perform third-party certification activities according to the requirements of this subpart;


(ii) Agree to periodically conduct audits as described in § 60.533(m) and the manufacturer’s quality assurance program;


(iii) Agree to comply with reporting and recordkeeping requirements that affect approved wood heater testing laboratories and third-party certifiers;


(iv) Have no conflict of interest and receive no financial benefit from the outcome of certification testing conducted pursuant to § 60.533;


(v) Agree to make available to the Administrator supporting documentation for each wood heater certification and audit; and


(vi) Agree to not perform initial certification reviews on any models manufactured by a manufacturer for which the third-party certifier has conducted research and development design services within the last 5 years.


(3) If approved, the Administrator will provide the third-party certifier with a certificate of approval. The approval will expire 5 years after being issued unless renewed by the third-party certifier. If the EPA denies the approval, the Administrator will give written notice to the third-party certifier for the basis for the determination.


(e) Revocation of third-party certifier approval. (1) The Administrator will revoke a third-party certifier’s EPA approval if it is determined that the certifier;


(i) Is no longer accredited by the accreditation body;


(ii) Does not follow required procedures or practices; or


(iii) Has falsified certification data or otherwise misrepresented emission data.


(2) Revocation of approval under this paragraph (e) will not take effect until the certifier concerned is given written notice by the Administrator setting forth the basis for the proposed determination and an opportunity for a hearing under § 60.539. However, if revocation is upheld, all certifications by the certifier after written notice was given will, at the discretion of the Administrator, be declared invalid.


§ 60.536 What requirements must I meet for permanent labels, temporary labels (hangtags), and owner’s manuals?

(a) General permanent label requirements. (1) Each affected wood heater manufactured on or after the date the applicable standards come into effect as specified in § 60.532, must have a permanent label affixed to it that meets the requirements of this section.


(2) Except for wood heaters subject to § 60.530(b)(1) through (5), the permanent label must contain the following information:


(i) Month and year of manufacture of the individual unit;


(ii) Model name or number;


(iii) Certification test emission value, test method and standard met (e.g., 2015, 2020 crib wood, or 2020 cord wood); and


(iv) Serial number.


(3) The permanent label must:


(i) Be affixed in a readily visible or readily accessible location in such a manner that it can be easily viewed before and after the appliance is installed (an easily-removable facade may be used for aesthetic purposes, however the bottom of a free-standing heater is not considered to be readily visible or readily accessible);


(ii) Be at least 8.9 cm long and 5.1 cm wide (3
1/2 inches long and 2 inches wide);


(iii) Be made of a material expected to last the lifetime of the wood heater;


(iv) Present the required information in a manner so that it is likely to remain legible for the lifetime of the wood heater; and


(v) Be affixed in such a manner that it cannot be removed from the appliance without damage to the label.


(4) The permanent label may be combined with any other label, as long as the required information is displayed, the integrity of the permanent label is not compromised, and the permanent label meets the requirements in § 60.536(a)(3).


(5) Any label statement under paragraph (b) or (c) of this section constitutes a representation by the manufacturer as to any wood heater that bears it:


(i) That a certification of compliance was in effect at the time the wood heater left the possession of the manufacturer;


(ii) That the manufacturer was, at the time the label was affixed, conducting a quality assurance program in conformity with § 60.533(m); and


(iii) That all wood heaters individually tested for emissions by the manufacturer under its quality assurance program pursuant to § 60.533(m) met the applicable emissions limits.


(b) Permanent label requirements for adjustable burn rate wood heaters and pellet stoves. If an adjustable burn rate wood heater or pellet stove belongs to a model line certified under § 60.533, and no wood heater in the model line has been found to exceed the applicable emission limits or tolerances through quality assurance testing, one of the following statements, as appropriate, must appear on the permanent label:



“U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Certified to comply with 2015 particulate emission standards. Not approved for sale after May 15, 2020.” or

“U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Certified to comply with 2020 particulate emission standards using crib wood.” or

“U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Certified to comply with 2020 particulate emission standards using cord wood.”

(c) Permanent label requirements for single burn rate wood heaters. If the single burn rate wood heater belongs to a model line certified under § 60.533, and no heater in the model line has been found to exceed the applicable emission limits or tolerances through quality assurance testing, one of the following statements, as appropriate, must appear on the permanent label:



“U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Certified to comply with 2015 particulate emission standards for single burn rate heaters. Not approved for sale after May 15, 2020. This single burn rate wood heater is not approved for use with a flue damper.” or

“U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Certified to comply with 2020 particulate emission standards for single burn rate heaters. This single burn rate wood heater is not approved for use with a flue damper.”

(d) Additional permanent label content. The permanent label for all certified wood heaters must also contain the following statement:



“This wood heater needs periodic inspection and repair for proper operation. Consult the owner’s manual for further information. It is against federal regulations to operate this wood heater in a manner inconsistent with the operating instructions in the owner’s manual.”


(e) Permanent label requirements for affected wood heaters with exemptions under § 60.530(b). (1) If an affected wood heater is manufactured in the United States for export as provided in § 60.530(b)(1), the following statement must appear on the permanent label:



“U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Export stove. May not be sold or operated within the United States.”

(2) If an affected wood heater is manufactured for use for research and development purposes as provided in § 60.530(b)(2), the following statement must appear on the permanent label:



“U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Not certified. Research Stove. Not approved for sale or for operation other than for research.”

(3) If a wood heater is exclusively a non-wood-burning heater as provided § 60.530(b)(3), the following statement must appear on the permanent label:



“U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY This heater is not certified for wood burning. Use of any wood fuel is a violation of federal regulations.”

(4) If an affected wood heater is a cook stove that meets the definition in § 60.531, the following statement must appear on the permanent label:



“U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY This unit is not a certified residential wood heater. The primary use for this unit is for cooking or baking.”

(5) If an affected wood heater is a camp stove that meets the definition in § 60.531, the following statement must appear on the permanent label:



“U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY This unit is not a certified residential wood heater. For portable and temporary use only.”

(f) Temporary label (hangtag) voluntary option. (1) Each model certified to meet the 2020 particulate matter emission standards of § 60.532(b) prior May 15, 2020 may display the temporary labels (hangtags) specified in section 3 of appendix I of this part. The electronic template will be provided by the Administrator upon approval of the certification.


(2) The hangtags in paragraph (f)(1) of this section end on May 15, 2020.


(3) Each model certified to meet the 2020 Cord Wood Alternative Compliance Option of § 60.532(c) may display the cord wood temporary label specified in section 3 of appendix I of this part. The electronic template will be provided by the Administrator upon approval of the certification.


(g) Owner’s manual requirements. (1) Each affected wood heater offered for sale by a commercial owner must be accompanied by an owner’s manual that must contain the information listed in paragraph (g)(2) of this section (pertaining to installation) and paragraph (g)(3) of this section (pertaining to operation and maintenance). Such information must be adequate to enable consumers to achieve optimal emissions performance. Such information must be consistent with the operating instructions provided by the manufacturer to the approved test laboratory for operating the wood heater during certification testing, except for details of the certification test that would not be relevant to the user. The commercial owner must also make current and historical owner’s manuals available on the company Web site and upon request to the EPA.


(2) Guidance on proper installation, include stack height, location and achieving proper draft.


(3) Proper operation and maintenance information, including minimizing visible emissions:


(i) Fuel loading and re-loading procedures; recommendations on fuel selection and warnings on what fuels not to use, such as unseasoned wood, treated wood, colored paper, cardboard, solvents, trash and garbage;


(ii) Fire starting procedures;


(iii) Proper use of air controls, including how to establish good combustion and how to ensure good combustion at the lowest burn rate for which the heater is warranted;


(iv) Ash removal procedures;


(v) Instructions for replacement of gaskets, air tubes and other parts that are critical to the emissions performance of the unit, and other maintenance and repair instructions;


(vi) For catalytic or hybrid models, information on the following pertaining to the catalytic combustor: Procedures for achieving and maintaining catalyst activity, maintenance procedures, procedures for determining deterioration or failure, procedures for replacement and information on how to exercise warranty rights;


(vii) For catalytic or hybrid models, the following statement—



“This wood heater contains a catalytic combustor, which needs periodic inspection and replacement for proper operation. It is against federal regulations to operate this wood heater in a manner inconsistent with operating instructions in this manual, or if the catalytic element is deactivated or removed.”

(viii) For noncatalytic models, the following statement—



“This wood heater needs periodic inspection and repair for proper operation. It is against federal regulations to operate this wood heater in a manner inconsistent with operating instructions in this manual.”

(4) Any manufacturer using the EPA-recommended language contained in appendix I of this part to satisfy any requirement of this paragraph (g) will be considered to be in compliance with that requirement, provided that the particular language is printed in full, with only such changes as are necessary to ensure accuracy for the particular wood heater model line.


(h) Wood heaters that are affected by this subpart, but that have been owned and operated by a noncommercial owner, are not subject to paragraphs (f) and (g) of this section when offered for resale.


§ 60.537 What records must I keep and what reports must I submit?

(a)(1) Each manufacturer who holds a certificate of compliance pursuant to § 60.533(c), (e) or (f) for a model line must maintain records containing the information required by paragraph (a)(2) through (4) of this section with respect to that model line for at least 5 years.


(2) All documentation pertaining to the certification test used to obtain certification, including the full test report and raw data sheets, laboratory technician notes, calculations, the test results for all test runs, and discussions of the appropriateness and validity of all test runs, including runs attempted but not completed. The retained certification test documentation must include, as applicable, detailed discussion of all anomalies, whether all burn rate categories were properly achieved, any data not used in the calculations and, for any test runs not completed, the data that were collected and the reason that the test run was not completed. The retained certification test also must include documentation that the burn rate for the low burn rate category was no greater than the rate that an operator can achieve in home use and no greater than is advertised by the manufacturer or retailer.


(3) Results of the quality assurance program inspections pursuant to § 60.533(m).


(4) For emissions tests conducted pursuant to the quality assurance program required by § 60.533(m), all test reports, data sheets, laboratory technician notes, calculations, and test results for all test runs, the corrective actions taken, if any, and any follow-up actions such as additional testing.


(b) Each approved test laboratory and third-party certifier must maintain records consisting of all documentation pertaining to each certification test, quality assurance program inspection and audit test, including the full test report and raw data sheets, technician notes, calculations, and the test results for all test runs. Each approved test laboratory must submit accreditation credentials and all proficiency test results to the Administrator. Each third-party certifier must submit each certification test, quality assurance program inspection report and ISO IEC accreditation credentials to the Administrator.


(c) Each manufacturer must retain each wood heater upon which certification tests were performed based upon which certification was granted under § 60.533(c) or (f) at the manufacturer’s facility for a minimum of 5 years after the certification test. Each wood heater must remain sealed and unaltered. Any such wood heater must be made available to the Administrator upon request for inspection and testing.


(d) Each manufacturer of an affected wood heater model line certified under § 60.533(c) or (f) must submit a report to the Administrator every 2 years following issuance of a certificate of compliance for each model line. This report must include the sales for each model by state and certify that no changes in the design or manufacture of this model line have been made that require recertification under § 60.533(k).


(e)(1) Unless otherwise specified, all records required under this section must be maintained by the manufacturer, commercial owner of the affected wood heater, approved test laboratory or third-party certifier for a period of no less than 5 years.


(2) Unless otherwise specified, all reports to the Administrator required under this subpart must be made to: [email protected].


(f) Within 60 days after the date of completing each performance test, e.g., initial certification test, tests conducted for quality assurance, and tests for renewal or recertification, each manufacturer must submit the performance test data electronically to [email protected]. Owners or operators who claim that some of the information being submitted is CBI (e.g., design drawings) must submit a complete file, including the information claimed to be CBI, on a compact disk or other commonly used electronic storage media (including, but not limited to, flash drives) by mail, and the same file, with the CBI omitted, electronically. The compact disk must be clearly marked as CBI and mailed to U.S. EPA, OECA CBI Office, Attention: Residential Wood Heater Compliance Program Lead, 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue NW., Washington, DC 20004. Emission data, including all information necessary to determine compliance, except sensitive engineering drawings and sensitive detailed material specifications, may not be claimed as CBI.


(g) Within 30 days of receiving a certification of compliance for a model line, the manufacturer must make the full non-CBI test report and the summary of the test report available to the public on the manufacturer’s Web site.


(h) Each manufacturer who uses the exemption for R&D heaters under § 60.530(b)(2) must maintain records for at least 5 years documenting where the heaters were located, that the heaters were never offered for sale or sold and that the heaters were not used for the purpose of heating.


§ 60.538 What activities are prohibited under this subpart?

(a) No person is permitted to advertise for sale, offer for sale, sell or operate an affected wood heater that does not have affixed to it a permanent label pursuant to § 60.536 (b) through (e), as applicable.


(b) No person is permitted to advertise for sale, offer for sale, or sell an affected wood heater labeled under § 60.536(e)(1) except for export. No person is permitted to operate an affected wood heater in the United States if it is labeled under § 60.536(e)(1).


(c)(1) No commercial owner is permitted to advertise for sale, offer for sale or sell an affected wood heater permanently labeled under § 60.536 (b) through (d), as applicable, unless:


(i) The affected wood heater has been certified to comply with the 2015 or 2020 particulate matter emission standards pursuant to § 60.532, as applicable. This prohibition does not apply to wood heaters affected by this subpart that have been previously owned and operated by a noncommercial owner; and


(ii) The commercial owner provides any purchaser or transferee with an owner’s manual that meets the requirements of § 60.536(g) and a copy of the warranty.


(2) No commercial owner is permitted to advertise for sale, offer for sale, or sell an affected wood heater permanently labeled under § 60.536(b) and (c), unless the affected wood heater has been certified to comply with the 2015 or 2020 particulate matter emission standards of § 60.532, as applicable.


(3) A commercial owner other than a manufacturer complies with the requirements of paragraph (c)(1) of this section if the commercial owner—


(i) Receives the required documentation from the manufacturer or a previous commercial owner; and


(ii) Provides that documentation unaltered to any person to whom the wood heater that it covers is sold or transferred.


(d)(1) In any case in which the Administrator revokes a certificate of compliance either for the submission of false or inaccurate information or other fraudulent acts, or based on a finding under § 60.533(l)(1)(ii) that the certification test was not valid, the Administrator may give notice of that revocation and the grounds for it to all commercial owners.


(2) On and after the date of receipt of the notice given under paragraph (d)(1) of this section, no commercial owner is permitted to sell any wood heater covered by the revoked certificate (other than to the manufacturer) unless the model line has been recertified in accordance with this subpart.


(e) No person is permitted to install or operate an affected wood heater except in a manner consistent with the instructions on its permanent label and in the owner’s manual pursuant to § 60.536(g), including only using fuels for which the unit is certified.


(f) No person is permitted to operate, sell or offer for sale an affected wood heater that was originally equipped with a catalytic combustor if the catalytic element is deactivated or removed.


(g) No person is permitted to operate, sell or offer for sale an affected wood heater that has been physically altered to exceed the tolerance limits of its certificate of compliance, pursuant to § 60.533(k).


(h) No person is permitted to alter, deface, or remove any permanent label required to be affixed pursuant to § 60.536(a) through (e), as applicable.


(i) If a temporary label is affixed to the wood heater, retailers may not sell or offer for sale that wood heater unless the temporary label affixed is in accordance with § 60.536(f), as applicable.


§ 60.539 What hearing and appeal procedures apply to me?

(a)(1) The affected manufacturer, laboratory or third-party certifier may request a hearing under this section within 30 days following receipt of the required notification in any case where the Administrator—


(i) Denies an application for a certificate of compliance under § 60.533(c) or § 60.533(f);


(ii) Denies an application for a renewal of certification under § 60.533(i);


(iii) Issues a notice of revocation of certification under § 60.533(1);


(iv) Denies an application for laboratory approval under § 60.535(a);


(v) Issues a notice of revocation of laboratory approval under § 60.535(b);


(vi) Denies an application for third-party certifier approval under § 60.535(d); or


(vii) Issues a notice of revocation of third-party certifier approval under § 60.535(e).


(2) In any case where the Administrator issues a notice of revocation under § 60.533(n)(3)(ii), the manufacturer may request a hearing under this section with the time limits set out in § 60.533(n)(3)(ii).


(b) Any hearing request must be in writing, must be signed by an authorized representative of the petitioning manufacturer or laboratory and must include a statement setting forth with particularity the petitioner’s objection to the Administrator’s determination or proposed determination.


(c)(1) Upon receipt of a request for a hearing under paragraph (a) of this section, the Administrator will request the Chief Administrative Law Judge to designate an Administrative Law Judge as Presiding Officer for the hearing. If the Chief Administrative Law Judge replies that no Administrative Law Judge is available to perform this function, the Administrator will designate a Presiding Officer who has not had any prior responsibility for the matter under review, and who is not subject to the direct control or supervision of someone who has had such responsibility.


(2) The hearing will commence as soon as practicable at a time and place fixed by the Presiding Officer.


(3)(i) A motion for leave to intervene in any proceeding conducted under this section must set forth the grounds for the proposed intervention, the position and interest of the movant and the likely impact that intervention will have on the expeditious progress of the proceeding. Any person already a party to the proceeding may file an answer to a motion to intervene, making specific reference to the factors set forth in the foregoing sentence and paragraph (c)(3)(iii) of this section, within 10 days after service of the motion for leave to intervene.


(ii) A motion for leave to intervene in a proceeding must ordinarily be filed before the first prehearing conference or, in the absence of a prehearing conference, prior to the setting of a time and place for a hearing. Any motion filed after that time must include, in addition to the information set forth in paragraph (c)(3)(i) of this section, a statement of good cause for the failure to file in a timely manner. The intervener shall be bound by any agreements, arrangements and other matters previously made in the proceeding.


(iii) A motion for leave to intervene may be granted only if the movant demonstrates that his presence in the proceeding would not unduly prolong or otherwise prejudice the adjudication of the rights of the original parties, and that movant may be adversely affected by a final order. The intervener will become a full party to the proceeding upon the granting of leave to intervene.


(iv) Persons not parties to the proceeding may move for leave to file amicus curiae briefs. The movant must state his interest and the reasons why the proposed amicus brief is desirable. If the motion is granted, the Presiding Officer or Administrator will issue an order setting the time for filing such brief. An amicus curia may participate in any briefing after his motion is granted, and will be served with all briefs, reply briefs, motions and orders relating to issues to be briefed.


(4) In computing any period of time prescribed or allowed in this subpart, the day of the event from which the designated period begins to run will not be included. Saturdays, Sundays and federal legal holidays will be included. When a stated time expires on a Saturday, Sunday or legal holiday, the stated time period will be extended to include the next business day.


(d)(l) Upon his appointment, the Presiding Officer must establish a hearing file. The file will consist of the notice issued by the Administrator under § 60.533(c)(2), § 60.533(f)(3), § 60.533(i)(4), § 60.533(l)(2), § 60.533(n)(3)(ii)(A), § 60.535(a)(3), § 60.535(b)(2), § 60.535(d)(3) or § 60.535(e)(2) together with any accompanying material, the request for a hearing and the supporting data submitted therewith, and all documents relating to the request for certification or approval or the proposed revocation of either.


(2) The hearing file must be available for inspection by any party, to the extent authorized by law, at the office of the Presiding Officer, or other place designated by him.


(e) Any party may appear in person, or may be represented by counsel or by any other duly authorized representative.


(f)(1) The Presiding Officer upon the request of any party, or at his discretion, may order a prehearing conference at a time and place specified by him to consider the following:


(i) Simplification of the issues,


(ii) Stipulations, admissions of fact, and the introduction of documents,


(iii) Limitation of the number of expert witnesses,


(iv) Possibility of agreement disposing of all or any of the issues in dispute,


(v) Such other matters as may aid in the disposition of the hearing, including such additional tests as may be agreed upon by the parties.


(2) The results of the conference must be reduced to writing by the Presiding Officer and made part of the record.


(g)(1) Hearings will be conducted by the Presiding Officer in an informal but orderly and expeditious manner. The parties may offer oral or written evidence, subject to the exclusion by the Presiding Officer of irrelevant, immaterial and repetitious evidence.


(2) Witnesses will not be required to testify under oath. However, the Presiding Officer will call to the attention of witnesses that their statements may be subject to penalties under title 18 U.S.C. 1001 for knowingly making false statements or representations or using false documents in any matter within the jurisdiction of any department or agency of the United States.


(3) Any witness may be examined or cross-examined by the Presiding Officer, the parties or their representatives.


(4) Hearings must be recorded verbatim. Copies of transcripts of proceedings may be purchased by the applicant from the reporter.


(5) All written statements, charts, tabulations and similar data offered in evidence at the hearings must, upon a showing satisfactory to the Presiding Officer of their authenticity, relevancy and materiality, be received in evidence and will constitute a part of the record.


(h)(1) The Presiding Officer will make an initial decision which must include written findings and conclusions and the reasons or basis therefor on all the material issues of fact, law or discretion presented on the record. The findings, conclusions and written decision must be provided to the parties and made a part of the record. The initial decision will become the decision of the Administrator without further proceedings unless there is an appeal to the Administrator or motion for review by the Administrator. Except as provided in paragraph (h)(3) of this section, any such appeal must be taken within 20 days of the date the initial decision was filed.


(2) On appeal from or review of the initial decision, the Administrator will have all the powers which he would have in making the initial decision including the discretion to require or allow briefs, oral argument, the taking of additional evidence or the remanding to the Presiding Officer for additional proceedings. The decision by the Administrator must include written findings and conclusions and the reasons or basis therefor on all the material issues of fact, law or discretion presented on the appeal or considered in the review.


(3) In any hearing requested under paragraph (a)(2) of this section the Presiding Officer must render the initial decision within 60 days of that request. Any appeal to the Administrator must be taken within 10 days of the initial decision, and the Administrator must render a decision in that appeal within 30 days of the filing of the appeal.


§ 60.539a Who implements and enforces this subpart?

(a) Under section 111(c) of the Clean Air Act, the Administrator may delegate the following implementation and enforcement authority to a state, local or tribal authority upon request:


(1) Enforcement of prohibitions on the installation and operation of affected wood heaters in a manner inconsistent with the installation and owner’s manual;


(2) Enforcement of prohibitions on operation of catalytic wood heaters where the catalyst has been deactivated or removed;


(3) Enforcement of prohibitions on advertisement and/or sale of uncertified model lines;


(4) Enforcement of prohibitions on advertisement and/or sale of affected heaters that do not have required permanent label;


(5) Enforcement of proper labeling of affected wood heaters; and


(6) Enforcement of compliance with other labeling requirements for affected wood heaters.


(7) Enforcement of certification testing procedures;


(8) Enforcement of requirements for sealing of the tested heaters and meeting parameter limits; and


(9) Enforcement of compliance requirements of EPA-approved laboratories.


(b) Delegations shall not include:


(1) Decisions on certification;


(2) Revocation of certification;


(3) Establishment or revision of standards;


(4) Establishment or revision of test methods;


(5) Laboratory and third-party certifier approvals and revocations;


(6) Enforcing provisions governing content of owner’s manuals; and


(7) Hearings and appeals procedures.


(c) Nothing in these delegations will prohibit the Administrator from enforcing any applicable requirements.


(d) Nothing in these delegations will limit delegated entities from using their authority under section 116 of the Clean Air Act to adopt or enforce more restrictive requirements.


§ 60.539b What parts of the General Provisions do not apply to me?

The following provisions of subpart A of part 60 do not apply to this subpart:


(a) Section 60.7;


(b) Section 60.8(a), (c), (d), (e), (f)(1), and (g);


(c) Section 60.14; and


(c) Section 60.15(d).


[80 FR 13702, Mar. 16, 2015, as amended at 88 FR 18402, Mar. 29, 2023]


Subpart BBB—Standards of Performance for the Rubber Tire Manufacturing Industry


Source:52 FR 34874, Sept. 15, 1987, unless otherwise noted.

§ 60.540 Applicability and designation of affected facilities.

(a) The provisions of this subpart, except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, apply to each of the following affected facilities in rubber tire manufacturing plants that commence construction, modification, or reconstruction after January 20, 1983: each undertread cementing operation, each sidewall cementing operation, each tread end cementing operation, each bead cementing operation, each green tire spraying operation, each Michelin-A operation, each Michelin-B operation, and each Michelin-C automatic operation.


(b) The owner or operator of each undertread cementing operation and each sidewall cementing operation in rubber tire manufacturing plants that commenced construction, modification, or reconstruction after January 20, 1983, and before September 15, 1987, shall have the option of complying with the alternate provisions in § 60.542a. This election shall be irreversible. The alternate provisions in § 60.542a do not apply to any undertread cementing operation or sidewall cementing operation that is modified or reconstructed after September 15, 1987. The affected facilities in this paragraph are subject to all applicable provisions of this subpart.


(c) Although the affected facilities listed under § 60.540(a) are defined in reference to the production of components of a “tire,” as defined under § 60.541(a), the percent emission reduction requirements and VOC use cutoffs specified under § 60.542(a)(1), (2), (6), (7)(iii), (7)(iv), (8), (9), and (10) refer to the total amount of VOC used (the amount allocated to the affected facility), including the VOC used in cements and organic solvent-based green tire spray materials for tire types not listed in the § 60.541(a) definition of “tire.”


[52 FR 34874, Sept. 15, 1987, as amended at 54 FR 38635, Sept. 19, 1989]


§ 60.541 Definitions.

(a) All terms that are used in this subpart and are not defined below are given the same meaning as in the Act and in subpart A of this part.


Bead means rubber-covered strands of wire, wound into a circular form, which ensure a seal between a tire and the rim of the wheel onto which the tire is mounted.


Bead cementing operation means the system that is used to apply cement to the bead rubber before or after it is wound into its final circular form. A bead cementing operation consists of a cement application station, such as a dip tank, spray booth and nozzles, cement trough and roller or swab applicator, and all other equipment necessary to apply cement to wound beads or bead rubber and to allow evaporation of solvent from cemented beads.


Component means a piece of tread, combined tread/sidewall, or separate sidewall rubber, or other rubber strip that is combined into the sidewall of a finished tire.


Drying area means the area where VOC from applied cement or green tire sprays is allowed to evaporate.


Enclosure means a structure that surrounds a VOC (cement, solvent, or spray) application area and drying area, and that captures and contains evaporated VOC and vents it to a control device. Enclosures may have permanent and temporary openings.


Green tire means an assembled, uncured tire.


Green tire spraying operation means the system used to apply a mold release agent and lubricant to the inside and/or outside of green tires to facilitate the curing process and to prevent rubber from sticking to the curing press. A green tire spraying operation consists of a booth where spraying is performed, the spray application station, and related equipment, such as the lubricant supply system.


Michelin-A operation means the operation identified as Michelin-A in the Emission Standards and Engineering Division confidential file as referenced in Docket A-80-9, Entry II-B-12.


Michelin-B operation means the operation identified as Michelin-B in the Emission Standards and Engineering Division confidential file as referenced in Docket A-80-9, Entry II-B-12.


Michelin-C-automatic operation means the operation identifed as Michelin-C-automatic in the Emission Standards and Engineering Division confidential file as referenced in Docket A-80-9, Entry II-B-12.


Month means a calendar month or a prespecified period of 28 days or 35 days (utilizing a 4-4-5-week recordkeeping and reporting schedule).


Organic solvent-based green tire spray means any mold release agent and lubricant applied to the inside or outside of green tires that contains more than 12 percent, by weight, of VOC as sprayed.


Permanent opening means an opening designed into an enclosure to allow tire components to pass through the enclosure by conveyor or other mechanical means, to provide access for permanent mechanical or electrical equipment, or to direct air flow into the enclosure. A permanent opening is not equipped with a door or other means of obstruction of air flow.


Sidewall cementing operation means the system used to apply cement to a continuous strip of sidewall component or any other continuous strip component (except combined tread/sidewall component) that is incorporated into the sidewall of a finished tire. A sidewall cementing operation consists of a cement application station and all other equipment, such as the cement supply system and feed and takeaway conveyors, necessary to apply cement to sidewall strips or other continuous strip component (except combined tread/sidewall component) and to allow evaporation of solvent from the cemented rubber.


Temporary opening means an opening into an enclosure that is equipped with a means of obstruction, such as a door, window, or port, that is normally closed.


Tire means any agricultural, airplane, industrial, mobile home, light-duty truck and/or passenger vehicle tire that has a bead diameter less than or equal to 0.5 meter (m) (19.7 inches) and a cross section dimension less than or equal to 0.325 m (12.8 in.), and that is mass produced in an assembly-line fashion.


Tread end cementing operation means the system used to apply cement to one or both ends of the tread or combined tread/sidewall component. A tread end cementing operation consists of a cement application station and all other equipment, such as the cement supply system and feed and takeaway conveyors, necessary to apply cement to tread ends and to allow evaporation of solvent from the cemented tread ends.


Undertread cementing operation means the system used to apply cement to a continuous strip of tread or combined tread/sidewall component. An undertread cementing operation consists of a cement application station and all other equipment, such as the cement supply system and feed and takeaway conveyors, necessary to apply cement to tread or combined tread/sidewall strips and to allow evaporation of solvent from the cemented tread or combined tread/sidewall.


VOC emission control device means equipment that destroys or recovers VOC.


VOC emission reduction system means a system composed of an enclosure, hood, or other device for containment and capture of VOC emissions and a VOC emission control device.


Water-based green tire spray means any mold release agent and lubricant applied to the inside or outside of green tires that contains 12 percent or less, by weight, of VOC as sprayed.


(b) Notations used under this subpart are defined below:



Bo = total number of beads cemented at a particular bead cementing affected facility for a month

Ca = concentration of VOC in gas stream in vents after a control device (parts per million by volume)

Cb = concentration of VOC in gas stream in vents before a control device (parts per million by volume)

Cf = concentration of VOC in each gas stream vented directly to the atmosphere from an affected facility or from a temporary enclosure around an affected facility (parts per million by volume)

Dc = density of cement or spray material (grams per liter (lb per gallon))

Dr = density of VOC recovered by an emission control device (grams per liter (lb per gallon))

E = emission control device efficiency, inlet versus outlet (fraction)

Fc = capture efficiency, VOC captured and routed to one control device versus total VOC used for an affected facility (fraction)

Fo = fraction of total mass of VOC used in a month by all facilities served by a common cement or spray material distribution system that is used by a particular affected facility served by the common distribution system

G = monthly average mass of VOC used per tire cemented or sprayed with a water-based green tire spray for a particular affected facility (grams (lb) per tire)

Gb = monthly average mass of VOC used per bead cemented for a particular bead cementing affected facility (grams (lb) per bead)

Lc = volume of cement or spray material used for a month (liters (gallons))

Lr = volume of VOC recovered by an emission control device for a month (liters (gallons))

M = total mass of VOC used for a month by all facilities served by a common cement or spray material distribution system (grams (lb))

Mo = total mass of VOC used at an affected facility for a month (grams (lb))

Mr = mass of VOC recovered by an emission control device for a month (grams (lb))

N = mass of VOC emitted to the atmosphere per tire cemented or sprayed with a water-based green tire spray for an affected facility for a month (grams (lb) per tire)

Nb = mass of VOC emitted per bead cemented for an affected facility for a month (grams (lb) per bead)

Qa = volumetric flow rate in vents after a control device (dry standard cubic meters (dry standard cubic feet) per hour)

Qb = volumetric flow rate in vents before a control device (dry standard cubic meters (dry standard cubic feet) per hour)

Qf = volumetric flow rate of each stream vented directly to the atmosphere from an affected facility or from a temporary enclosure around an affected facility (dry standard cubic meters (dry standard cubic feet) per hour)

R = overall efficiency of an emission reduction system (fraction)

Td = total number of days in monthly compliance period (days)

To = total number of tires cemented or sprayed with water-based green tire sprays at a particular affected facility for a month

Wo = weight fraction of VOC in a cement or spray material.

[52 FR 34874, Sept. 15, 1987, as amended at 65 FR 61764, Oct. 17, 2000]


§ 60.542 Standards for volatile organic compounds.

(a) On and after the date on which the initial performance test, required by § 60.8, is completed, but no later than 180 days after initial startup, each owner or operator subject to the provisions of this subpart shall comply with the following conditions:


(1) For each undertread cementing operation:


(i) Discharge into the atmosphere no more than 25 percent of the VOC used (75 percent emission reduction) for each month; or


(ii) Maintain total (uncontrolled) VOC use less than or equal to the levels specified below, depending upon the duration of the compliance period:


(A) 3,870 kg (8,531 lb) of VOC per 28 days,


(B) 4,010 kg (8,846 lb) of VOC per 29 days,


(C) 4,150 kg (9,149 lb) of VOC per 30 days,


(D) 4,280 kg (9,436 lb) of VOC per 31 days, or


(E) 4,840 kg (10,670 lb) of VOC per 35 days.


(2) For each sidewall cementing operation:


(i) Discharge into the atmosphere no more than 25 percent of the VOC used (75 percent emission reduction) for each month; or


(ii) Maintain total (uncontrolled) VOC use less than or equal to the levels specified below, depending upon the duration of the compliance period:


(A) 3,220 kg (7,099 lb) of VOC per 28 days,


(B) 3,340 kg (7,363 lb) of VOC per 29 days,


(C) 3,450 kg (7,606 lb) of VOC per 30 days,


(D) 3,570 kg (7,870 lb) of VOC per 31 days, or


(E) 4,030 kg (8,885 lb) of VOC per 35 days.


(3) For each tread end cementing operation: Discharge into the atmosphere no more than 10 grams (0.022 lb) of VOC per tire cemented for each month.


(4) For each bead cementing operation: Discharge into the atmosphere no more than 5 grams (0.011 lb) of VOC per bead cemented for each month.


(5) For each green tire spraying operation where only water-based sprays are used:


(i) Discharge into the atmosphere no more than 1.2 grams (0.0026 lb) of VOC per tire sprayed with an inside green tire spray for each month; and


(ii) Discharge into the atmosphere no more than 9.3 grams (0.021 lb) of VOC per tire sprayed with an outside green tire spray for each month.


(6) For each green tire spraying operation where only ogranic solvent-based sprays are used:


(i) Discharge into the atmosphere no more than 25 percent of the VOC used (75 percent emission reduction) for each month; or


(ii) Maintain total (uncontrolled) VOC use less than or equal to the levels specified below, depending upon the duration of the compliance period:


(A) 3,220 kg (7,099 lb) of VOC per 28 days,


(B) 3,340 kg (7,363 lb) of VOC per 29 days,


(C) 3,450 kg (7,606 lb) of VOC per 30 days,


(D) 3,570 kg (7,870 lb) of VOC per 31 days, or


(E) 4,030 kg (8,885 lb) of VOC per 35 days.


(7) For each green tire spraying operation where both water-based and organic solvent-based sprays are used:


(i) Discharge into the atmosphere no more than 1.2 grams (0.0026 lb) of VOC per tire sprayed with a water-based inside green tire spray for each month; and


(ii) Discharge into the atmosphere no more than 9.3 grams (0.021 lb) of VOC per tire sprayed with a water-based outside green tire spray for each month; and either


(iii) Discharge into the atmosphere no more than 25 percent of the VOC used in the organic solvent-based green tire sprays (75 percent emission reduction) for each month; or


(iv) Maintain total (uncontrolled) VOC use for all organic solvent-based green tire sprays less than or equal to the levels specified under paragraph (a)(6)(ii) of this section.


(8) For each Michelin-A operation:


(i) Discharge into the atmosphere no more than 35 percent of the VOC used (65 percent emission reduction) for each month; or


(ii) Maintain total (uncontrolled) VOC use less than or equal to the levels specified below, depending upon the duration of the compliance period:


(A) 1,570 kg (3,461 lb) of VOC per 28 days,


(B) 1,630 kg (3,593 lb) of VOC per 29 days,


(C) 1,690 kg (3,726 lb) of VOC per 30 days,


(D) 1,740 kg (3,836 lb) of VOC per 31 days, or


(E) 1,970 kg (4,343 lb) of VOC per 35 days.


(9) For each Michelin-B operation:


(i) Discharge into the atmosphere no more than 25 percent of the VOC used (75 percent emission reduction) for each month; or


(ii) Maintain total (uncontrolled) VOC use less than or equal to the levels specified below, depending upon the duration of the compliance period:


(A) 1,310 kg (2,888 lb) of VOC per 28 days,


(B) 1,360 kg (2,998 lb) of VOC per 29 days,


(C) 1,400 kg (3,086 lb) of VOC per 30 days,


(D) 1,450 kg (3,197 lb) of VOC per 31 days, or


(E) 1,640 kg (3,616 lb) of VOC per 35 days.


(10) For each Michelin-C-automatic operation:


(i) Discharge into the atmosphere no more than 35 percent of the VOC used (65 percent emission reduction) for each month; or


(ii) Maintain total (uncontrolled) VOC use less than or equal to the levels specified under paragraph (a)(8)(ii) of this section.


[52 FR 34874, Sept. 15, 1987, as amended at 65 FR 61764, Oct. 17, 2000]


§ 60.542a Alternate standard for volatile organic compounds.

(a) On and after the date on which the initial performance test, required by § 60.8, is completed, but no later than 180 days after September 19, 1989, each owner or operator subject to the provisions in § 60.540(b) shall not cause to be discharged into the atmosphere more than: 25 grams (0.055 lb) of VOC per tire processed for each month if the operation uses 25 grams (0.055 lb) or less of VOC per tire processed and does not employ a VOC emission reduction system.


(b) [Reserved]


[54 FR 38635, Sept. 19, 1989, as amended at 65 FR 61765, Oct. 17, 2000]


§ 60.543 Performance test and compliance provisions.

(a) Section 60.8(d) does not apply to the monthly performance test procedures required by this subpart. Section 60.8(d) does apply to initial performance tests and to the performance tests specified under paragraphs (b)(2) and (b)(3) of this section. Section 60.8(f) does not apply when Method 24 is used.


(b) Performance tests shall be conducted as follows:


(1) The owner or operator of an affected facility shall conduct an initial performance test, as required under § 60.8(a), except as described under paragraph (j) of this section. The owner or operator of an affected facility shall thereafter conduct a performance test each month, except as described under paragraphs (b)(4), (g)(1), and (j) of this section. Initial and monthly performance tests shall be conducted according to the procedures in this section.


(2) The owner or operator of an affected facility who elects to use a VOC emission reduction system with a control device that destroys VOC (e.g., incinerator), as described under paragraphs (f) and (g) of this section, shall repeat the performance test when directed by the Administrator or when the owner or operator elects to operate the capture system or control device at conditions different from the most recent determination of overall reduction efficiency. The performance test shall be conducted in accordance with the procedures described under paragraphs (f)(2) (i) through (iv) of this section.


(3) The owner or operator of an affected facility who seeks to comply with the equipment design and performance specifications, as described under paragraph (j) of this section, shall repeat the performance test when directed by the Administrator or when the owner or operator elects to operate the capture system or control device at conditions different from the most recent determination of control device efficiency or measurement of capture system retention time or face velocity. The performance test shall be conducted in accordance with the procedures described under paragraph (f)(2)(ii) of this section.


(4) The owner or operator of each tread end cementing operation and each green tire spraying operation using only water-based sprays (inside and/or outside) containing less than 1.0 percent, by weight, of VOC is not required to conduct a monthly performance test as described in paragraph (d) of this section. In lieu of conducting a monthly performance test, the owner or operator of each tread end cementing operation and each green tire spraying operation shall submit formulation data or the results of Method 24 analysis annually to verify the VOC content of each tread end cement and each green tire spray material, provided the spraying formulation has not changed during the previous 12 months. If the spray material formulation changes, formulation data or Method 24 analysis of the new spray shall be conducted to determine the VOC content of the spray and reported within 30 days as required under § 60.546(j).


(c) For each undertread cementing operation, each sidewall cementing operation, each green tire spraying operation where organic solvent-based sprays are used, each Michelin-A operation, each Michelin-B operation, and each Michelin-C-automatic operation where the owner or operator seeks to comply with the uncontrolled monthly VOC use limits, the owner or operator shall use the following procedure to determine compliance with the applicable (depending upon duration of compliance period) uncontrolled monthly VOC use limit specified under § 60.542(a) (1)(ii), (2)(ii), (6)(ii), (7)(iv), (8)(ii), (9)(ii), and (10)(ii). If both undertread cementing and sidewall cementing are performed at the same affected facility during a month, then the kg/mo limit specified under § 60.542(a)(1)(ii) shall apply for that month.


(1) Determine the density and weight fraction VOC (including dilution VOC) of each cement or green tire spray from its formulation or by analysis of the cement or green tire spray using Method 24. If a dispute arises, the Administrator may require an owner or operator who used formulation data to analyze the cement or green tire spray using Method 24.


(2) Calculate the total mass of VOC used at the affected facility for the month (Mo) by the following procedure:


(i) For each affected facility for which cement or green tire spray is delivered in batch or via a distribution system that serves only the affected facility:





Where:

“a” equals the number of different cements or green tire sprays used during the month that are delivered in batch or via a distribution system that serves only a single affected facility.

(ii) For each affected facility for which cement or green tire spray is delivered via a common distribution system that also serves other affected or existing facilities:


(A) Calculate the total mass of VOC used for all of the facilities served by the common distribution system for the month (M):





Where:

“b” equals the number of different cements or green tire sprays used during the month that are delivered via a common distribution system that also serves other affected or existing facilities.

(B) Determine the fraction (Fo) of M used at the affected facility by comparing the production records and process specifications for the material cemented or sprayed at the affected facility for the month to the production records and process specifications for the material cemented or sprayed at all other facilities served by the common distribution system for the month or by another procedure acceptable to the Administrator.


(C) Calculate the total monthly mass of VOC used at the affected facility for the month (Mo):


Mo = MFo

(3) Determine the time duration of the monthly compliance period (Td).


(d) For each tread end cementing operation and each green tire spraying operation where water-based cements or sprays containing 1.0 percent, by weight, of VOC or more are used (inside and/or outside) that do not use a VOC emission reduction system, the owner or operator shall use the following procedure to determine compliance with the VOC emission per tire limit specified under § 60.542 (a)(3), (a)(5)(i), (a)(5)(ii), (a)(7)(i), and (a)(7)(ii).


(1) Determine the density and weight fraction VOC as specified under paragraph (c)(1) of this section.


(2) Calculate the total mass of VOC used at the affected facility for the month (Mo) as specified under paragraph (c)(2) of this section.


(3) Determine the total number of tires cemented or sprayed at the affected facility for the month (To) by the following procedure:


(i) For a trend end cementing operation, To equals the number of tread or combined tread/sidewall components that receive an application of tread end cement for the month.


(ii) For a green tire spraying operation that uses water-based inside green tire sprays, To equals the number of green tires that receive an application of water-based inside green tire spray for the month.


(iii) For a green tire spraying operation that uses water-based outside green tire sprays, To equals the number of green tires that receive an application of water-based outside green tire spray for the month.


(4) Calculate the mass of VOC used per tire cemented or sprayed at the affected facility for the month (G):



(5) Calculate the mass of VOC emitted per tire cemented or sprayed at the affected facility for the month (N):


N = G

(e) For each bead cementing operation that does not use a VOC emission reduction system, the owner or operator shall use the following procedure to determine compliance with the VOC emission per bead limit specified under § 60.542(a)(4).


(1) Determine the density and weight fraction VOC as specified under paragraph (c)(1) of this section.


(2) Calculate the total mass of VOC used at the affected facility for the month (Mo) as specified under paragraph (c)(2) of this section.


(3) Determine the number of beads cemented at the affected facility during the month (Bo) using production records; Bo equals the number of beads that receive an application of cement for the month.


(4) Calculate the mass of VOC used per bead cemented at the affected facility for the month (Gb):



(5) Calculate the mass of VOC emitted per bead cemented at the affected facility for the month (Nb):


Nb = Gb

(f) For each tread end cementing operation and each bead cementing operation that uses a VOC emission reduction system with a control device that destroys VOC (e.g., incinerator), the owner or operator shall use the following procedure to determine compliance with the emission limit specified under § 60.542(a) (3) and (4).


(1) Calculate the mass of VOC used per tire cemented at the affected facility for the month (G), as specified under paragraphs (d) (1) through (4) of this section, or mass of VOC used per bead cemented at the affected facility for the month (Gb), as specified under paragraphs (e) (1) through (4) of this section.


(2) Calculate the mass of VOC emitted per tire cemented at the affected facility for the month (N) or mass of VOC emitted per bead cemented for the affected facility for the month (Nb):


N = G (1-R)

Nb = Gb (1-R)

For the initial performance test, the overall reduction efficiency (R) shall be determined as prescribed under paragraphs (f)(2) (i) through (iv) of this section. After the initial performance test, the owner or operator may use the most recently determined overall reduction efficiency (R) for the performance test. No monthly performance tests are required. The performance test shall be repeated during conditions described under paragraph (b)(2) of this section.

(i) The owner or operator of an affected facility shall construct a temporary enclosure around the application and drying areas during the performance test for the purpose of capturing fugitive VOC emissions. The enclosure must be maintained at a negative pressure to ensure that all evaporated VOC are measurable. Determine the fraction (Fc) of total VOC used at the affected facility that enters the control device:





Where:

“m” is the number of vents from the affected facility to the control device, and “n” is the number of vents from the affected facility to the atmosphere and from the temporary enclosure.

(ii) Determine the destruction efficiency of the control device (E) by using values of the volumetric flow rate of each of the gas streams and the VOC content (as carbon) of each of the gas streams in and out of the control device:





Where:

“m” is the number of vents from the affected facility to the control device, and “p” is the number of vents after the control device.

(iii) Determine the overall reduction efficiency (R):


R = EFc

(iv) The owner or operator of an affected facility shall have the option of substituting the following procedure as an acceptable alternative to the requirements prescribed under paragraph (f)(2)(i) of this section. This alternative procedure is acceptable only in cases where a single VOC is used and is present in the capture system. The average capture efficiency value derived from a minimum of three runs shall constitute a test.


(A) For each run, “i,” measure the mass of the material containing a single VOC used. This measurement shall be made using a scale that has both a calibration and a readability to within 1 percent of the mass used during the run. This measurement may be made by filling the direct supply reservoir (e.g., trough, tray, or drum that is integral to the operation) and related application equipment (e.g., rollers, pumps, hoses) to a marked level at the start of the run and then refilling to the same mark from a more easily weighed container (e.g., separate supply drum) at the end of the run. The change in mass of the supply drum would equal the mass of material used from the direct supply reservoir. Alternatively, this measurement may be made by weighing the direct supply reservoir at the start and end of the run or by weighing the direct supply reservoir and related application equipment at the start and end of the run. The change in mass would equal the mass of the material used in the run. If only the direct supply reservoir is weighed, the amount of material in or on the related application equipment must be the same at the start and end of the run. All additions of VOC containing material made to the direct supply reservoir during a run must be properly accounted for in determining the mass of material used during that run.


(B) For each run, “i,” measure the mass of the material containing a single VOC which is present in the direct supply reservoir and related application equipment at the start of the run, unless the ending weight fraction VOC in the material is greater than or equal to 98.5 percent of the starting weight fraction VOC in the material, in which case, this measurement is not required. This measurement may be made directly by emptying the direct supply reservoir and related application equipment and then filling them to a marked level from an easily weighed container (e.g. separate supply drum). The change in mass of the supply drum would equal the mass of material in the filled direct supply reservoir and related application equipment. Alternatively, this measurement may be made by weighing the direct supply reservoir and related application equipment at the start of the run and subtracting the mass of the empty direct supply reservoir and related application equipment (tare weight).


(C) For each run, “i,” the starting weight fraction VOC in the material shall be determined by Method 24 analysis of a sample taken from the direct supply reservoir at the beginning of the run.


(D) For each run, “i,” the ending weight fraction VOC in the material shall be determined by Method 24 analysis of a sample taken from the direct supply reservoir at the end of the run.


(E) For each run, “i,” in which the ending weight fraction VOC in the material is greater than or equal to 98.5 percent of the starting weight fraction VOC in the material, calculate the mass of the single VOC used (Mi) by multiplying the mass of the material used in the run by the starting weight fraction VOC of the material used in the run.


(F) For each run, “i,” in which the ending weight fraction VOC in the material is less than 98.5 percent of the starting weight fraction VOC in the material, calculate the mass of the single VOC used (Mi) as follows:


(1) Calculate the mass of VOC present in the direct supply reservoir and related application equipment at the start of the run by multiplying the mass of material in the direct supply reservoir and related application equipment at the start of the run by the starting weight fraction VOC in the material for that run.


(2) Calculate the mass of VOC present in the direct supply reservoir and related application equipment at the end of the run by multiplying the mass of material in the direct supply reservoir and related application equipment at the end of the run by the ending weight fraction VOC in the material for that run. The mass of material in the direct supply reservoir and related application equipment at the end of the run shall be calculated by subtracting the mass of material used in the run from the mass of material in the direct supply reservoir and related application equipment at the start of the run.


(3) The mass of the single VOC used (Mi) equals the mass of VOC present in the direct supply reservoir and related application equipment at the start of the run minus the mass of VOC present in the direct supply reservoir and related application equipment at the end of the run.


(G) If Method 25A is used to determine the concentration of the single VOC in the capture system, then calculate the capture efficiency (FCi) for each run, “i,” as follows:





Where:

Ci = Average concentration of the single VOC in the capture system during run “i” (parts per million by volume) corrected for background VOC (see § 60.547(a)(5)).

W = Molecular weight of the single VOC, mg/mg-mole (lb/lb-mole).

V = The volume occupied by one mole of ideal gas at standard conditions [20 °C, 760 mm Hg] on a wet basis, 2.405 × 10−5 m
3/mg-mole (385.3 ft
3/lb-mole).

Qi = Volumetric flow in the capture system during run i, on a wet basis, adjusted to standard conditions, m
3 (ft
3) (see § 60.547(a)(5)).

10
6 = ppm per unity.

Mi = Mass of the single VOC used during run i, mg (lb).

(H) If Method 25 is used to determine the concentration of the single VOC in the capture system, then calculate the capture efficiency (FCi) for each run, “i,” as follows:





Where: Ci = Average concentration of the single VOC in the capture system during run “i” (parts per million, as carbon, by volume) corrected for background VOC (see § 60.547(a)(5)).

W = Molecular weight of the single VOC, mg/mg-mole (lb/lb-mole).

V = The volume occupied by one mole of ideal gas at standard conditions [20 °C, 760 mm Hg] on a wet basis, 2.405 × 10−5 m
3/mg-mole (385.3 ft
3/lb-mole).

Qi = Volumetric flow in the capture system during run i, on a wet basis, adjusted to standard conditions, m
3 (ft
3) (see § 60.547(a)(5)).

10
6 = ppm per unity.

Mi = Mass of the single VOC used during run i, mg (lb).

NC = Number of carbon atoms in one molecule of the single VOC.

(I) Calculate the average capture efficiency value, Fc as follows:





Where:

“n” equals the number of runs made in the test (n ≥ 3). In cases where an alternative procedure in this paragraph is used, the requirements in paragraphs (f)(2) (ii) and (iii) of this section remain unchanged.

(g) For each undertread cementing operation, each sidewall cementing operation, each green tire spraying operation where organic solvent-based sprays are used, each Michelin-A operation, each Michelin-B operation, and each Michelin-C-automatic operation that uses a VOC emission reduction system with a control device that destroys VOC (e.g., incinerator), the owner or operator shall use the following procedure to determine compliance with the percent emission reduction requirement specified under § 60.542 (a) (1)(i), (2)(i), (6)(i), (7)(iii), (8)(i), (9)(i), and (10)(i).


(1) For the initial performance test, the overall reduction efficiency (R) shall be determined as prescribed under paragraphs (f)(2) (i) through (iii) of this section. The performance test shall be repeated during conditions described under paragraph (b)(2) of this section. No monthly performance tests are required.


(h) For each tread end cementing operation and each bead cementing operation that uses a VOC emission reduction system with a control device that recovers VOC (e.g., carbon adsorber), the owner or operator shall use the following procedure to determine compliance with the emission limit specified under § 60.542(a) (3) and (4).


(1) Calculate the mass of VOC used per tire cemented at the affected facility for the month (G), as specified under paragraphs (d) (1) through (4) of this section, or mass of VOC used per bead cemented at the affected facility for the month (Gb), as specified under paragraphs (e) (1) through (4) of this section.


(2) Calculate the total mass of VOC recovered from the affected facility for the month (Mr):


Mr = Lr Dr

(3) Calculate the overall reduction efficiency for the VOC emission reduction system (R) for the month:



(4) Calculate the mass of VOC emitted per tire cemented at the affected facility for the month (N) or mass of VOC emitted per bead cemeted at the affected facility for the month (Nb):


N = G (1-R)

Nb = Gb (1-R)

(i) For each undertread cementing operation, each sidewall cemeting operation, each green tire spraying operation where organic solvent-based sprays are used, each Michelin-A operation, each Michelin-B operation, and each Michelin-C-automatic operation that uses a VOC emission reduction system with a control device that recovers (VOC) (e.g., carbon adsorber), the owner or operator shall use the following procedure to determine compliance with the percent reduction requirement specified under § 60.542(a) (1)(i), (2)(i), (6)(i), (7)(iii), (8)(i), (9)(i), and (10)(i).


(1) Determine the density and weight fraction VOC as specified under paragraph (c)(1) of this section.


(2) Calculate the total mass of VOC used at the affected facility for the month (Mo) as described under paragraph (c)(2) of this section.


(3) Calculate the total mass of VOC recovered from the affected facility for the month (Mr) as described under paragraph (h)(2) of this section.


(4) Calculate the overall reduction efficiency for the VOC emission reduction system (R) for the month as described under paragraph (h)(3) of this section.


(j) Rather than seeking to demonstrate compliance with the provisions of § 60.542(a) (1)(i), (2)(i), (6)(i), (7)(iii), or (9)(i) using the performance test procedures described under paragraphs (g) and (i) of this section, an owner or operator of an undertread cementing operation, sidewall cementing operation, green tire spraying operation where organic solvent-based sprays are used, or Michelin-B operation that use a VOC emission reduction system may seek to demonstrate compliance by meeting the equipment design and performance specifications listed under paragraphs (j)(1), (2), and (4) through (6) or under paragraphs (j)(1) and (3) through (6) of this section, and by conducting a control device efficiency performance test to determine compliance as described under paragraph (j)(7) of this section. The owner or operator shall conduct this performance test of the control device efficiency no later than 180 days after initial startup of the affected facility, as specified under § 60.8(a). Meeting the capture system design and performance specifications, in conjunction with operating a 95 percent efficient control device, is an acceptable means of demonstrating compliance with the standard. Therefore, the requirement for the initial performance test on the enclosure, as specified under § 60.8(a), is waived. No monthly performance tests are required.


(1) For each undertread cementing operation, each sidewall cementing operation, and each Michelin-B operation, the cement application and drying area shall be contained in an enclosure that meets the criteria specified under paragraphs (j) (2), (4), and (5) of this section; for each green tire spraying operation where organic solvent-based sprays are used, the spray application and drying area shall be contained in an enclosure that meets the criteria specified under paragraphs (j) (3), (4), and (5) of this section.


(2) The drying area shall be enclosed between the application area and the water bath or to the extent necessary to contain all tire components for at least 30 seconds after cement application, whichever distance is less.


(3) Sprayed green tires shall remain in the enclosure for a minimum of 30 seconds after spray application.


(4) A minimum face velocity of 30.5 meters (100 feet) per minute shall be maintained continuously through each permanent opening into the enclosure when all temporary enclosure openings are closed. The cross-sectional area of each permanent opening shall be divided into at least 12 equal areas, and a velocity measurement shall be performed at the centroid of each equal area with an anemometer or similar velocity monitoring device; the face velocity of each permanent opening is the average value of the velocity measurements taken. The monitoring device shall be calibrated and operated according to the manufacturer’s instructions.


Temporary enclosure openings shall remain closed at all times except when worker access is necessary.

(5) The total area of all permanent openings into the enclosure shall not exceed the area that would be necessary to maintain the VOC concentration of the exhaust gas stream at 25 percent of the lower explosive limit (LEL) under the following conditions:


(i) The facility is operating at the maximum solvent use rate;


(ii) The face velocity through each permanent opening is 30.5 meters (100 feet) per minute; and


(iii) All temporary openings are closed.


(6) All captured VOC are ducted to a VOC emission control device that is operated on a continuous basis and that achieves at least a 95 percent destruction or recovery efficiency.


(7) The efficiency of the control device (E) for the initial performance test is determined by using values of the volumetric flow rate of each of the gas streams and the VOC content (as carbon) of each of the gas streams in and out of the control device as described under paragraph (f)(2)(ii) of this section. The control device efficiency shall be redetermined during conditions specified under paragraph (b)(3) of this section.


(k) Each owner or operator of an affected facility who initially elected to be subject to the applicable percent emission reduction requirement specified under § 60.542(a)(1)(i), (2)(i), (6)(i), (7)(iii), (8)(i), (9)(i), or (10)(i) and who later seeks to comply with the applicable total (uncontrolled) monthly VOC use limit specified under § 60.542(a)(1)(ii), (2)(ii), (6)(ii), (7)(iv), (8)(ii), (9)(ii), or (10)(ii) shall demonstrate, using the procedures described under paragraph (c) of this section, that the total VOC use at the affected facility has not exceeded the applicable total (uncontrolled) monthly VOC use limit during each of the last 6 months of operation. The owner or operator shall be subject to the applicable percent emission reduction requirement until the conditions of this paragraph and § 60.546(h) are satisfied.


(l) In determining compliance for each undertread cementing operation, each sidewall cementing operation, each green tire spraying operation, each Michelin-A operation, each Michelin-B operation, and each Michelin-C-automatic operation, the owner or operator shall include all the VOC used, recovered, or destroyed from cements and organic solvent-based green tire sprays including those cements or sprays used for tires other than those defined under § 60.541(a).


(m) In determining compliance for each tread end cementing operation, each bead cementing operation, and each green tire spraying operation, the owner or operator shall include only those tires defined under § 60.541(a) when determining To and Bo.


(n) For each undertread cementing operation and each sidewall cementing operation that does not use a VOC emission reduction system, the owner or operator shall use the following procedure to determine compliance with the VOC emission per tire limit specified in § 60.542a:


(1) Calculate the total mass of VOC (Mo) used at the affected facility for the month by the following procedure.


(i) For each affected facility for which cement is delivered in batch or via a distribution system which serves only that affected facility:





Where: “n” equals the number of different cements or sprays used during the month.

(ii) For each affected facility for which cement is delivered via a common distribution system which also serves other affected or existing facilities.


(A) Calculate the total mass (M) of VOC used for all of the facilities served by the common distribution system for the month:





Where: “n” equals the number of different cements or sprays used during the month.

(B) Determine the fraction (Fo) of “M” used by the affected facility by comparing the production records and process specifications for the material cemented at the affected facility for the month to the production records and process specifications for the material cemented at all other facilities served by the common distribution system for the month or by another procedure acceptable to the Administrator.


(C) Calculate the total monthly mass of VOC(Mo) used at the affected facility:



(2) Determine the total number of tires (To) processed at the affected facility for the month by the following procedure.


(i) For undertread cementing, To equals the number of tread or combined tread/sidewall components which receive an application of undertread cement.


(ii) For sidewall cementing, To equals the number of sidewall components which receive an application of sidewall cement, divided by 2.


(3) Calculate the mass of VOC used per tire processed (G) by the affected facility for the month:



(4) Calculate the mass of VOC emitted per tire processed (N) for the affected facility for the month:



(5) Where the value of the mass of VOC emitted per tire processed (N) is less than or equal to the VOC emission per tire limit specified under § 60.542a, the affected facility is in compliance.


[52 FR 34874, Sept. 15, 1987; 52 FR 37874, Oct. 9, 1987, as amended at 54 FR 38635, Sept. 19, 1989; 65 FR 61765, Oct. 17, 2000]


§ 60.544 Monitoring of operations.

(a) Each owner or operator subject to the provisions of this subpart shall install, calibrate, maintain, and operate according to manufacturer’s specifications the following equipment, unless alternative monitoring procedures or requirements are approved for that facility by the Administrator:


(1) Where a thermal incinerator is used for VOC emission reduction, a temperature monitoring device equipped with a continuous recorder for the temperature of the gas stream in the combustion zone of the incinerator. The temperature monitoring device shall have an accuracy of 1 percent of the temperature being measured in °C or ±0.5 °C, whichever is greater.


(2) Where a catalytic incinerator is used for VOC emission reduction, temperature monitoring devices, each equipped with a continuous recorder, for the temperature in the gas stream immediately before and after the catalyst bed of the incinerator. The temperature monitoring devices shall have an accuracy of 1 percent of the temperature being measured in °C or ±0.5 °C, whichever is greater.


(3) For an undertread cementing operation, sidewall cementing operation, green tire spraying operation where organic solvent-based sprays are used, or Michelin-B operation where a carbon adsorber is used to meet the performance requirements specified under § 60.543(j)(6), an organics monitoring device used to indicate the concentration level of organic compounds based on a detection principle such as infrared, photoionization, or thermal conductivity, equipped with a continous recorder, for the outlet of the carbon bed.


(b) An owner or operator of an undertread cementing operation, sidewall cementing operation, green tire spraying operation where organic solvent-based sprays are used, or Michelin-B operation where a VOC recovery device other than a carbon adsorber is used to meet the performance requirements specified under § 60.543(j)(6), shall provide to the Administrator information describing the operation of the control device and the process parameter(s) which would indicate proper operation and maintenance of the device. The Administrator may request further information and will specify appropriate monitoring procedures or requirements.


[52 FR 34874, Sept. 15, 1987, as amended at 65 FR 61765, Oct. 17, 2000]


§ 60.545 Recordkeeping requirements.

(a) Each owner or operator of an affected facility that uses a thermal incinerator shall maintain continuous records of the temperature of the gas stream in the combustion zone of the incinerator and records of all 3-hour periods of operation for which the average temperature of the gas stream in the combustion zone was more than 28 °C (50 °F) below the combustion zone temperature measured during the most recent determination of the destruction efficiency of the thermal incinerator that demonstrated that the affected facility was in compliance.


(b) Each owner or operator of an affected facility that uses a catalytic incinerator shall maintain continuous records of the temperature of the gas stream both upstream and downstream of the catalyst bed of the incinerator, records of all 3-hour periods of operation for which the average temperature measured before the catalyst bed is more than 28 °C (50 °F) below the gas stream temperature measured before the catalyst bed during the most recent determination of destruction efficiency of the catalytic incinerator that demonstrated that the affected facility was in compliance, and records of all 3-hour periods for which the average temperature difference across the catalyst bed is less than 80 percent of the temperature difference measured during the most recent determination of the destruction efficiency of the catalytic incinerator that demonstrated that the affected facility was in compliance.


(c) Each owner or operator of an undertread cementing operation, sidewall cementing operation, green tire spraying operation where organic solvent-based sprays are used, or Michelin-B operation that uses a carbon adsorber to meet the requirements specified under § 60.543(j)(6) shall maintain continuous records of all 3-hour periods of operation during which the average VOC concentration level or reading of organics in the exhaust gases is more than 20 percent greater than the exhaust gas concentration level or reading measured by the organics monitoring device during the most recent determination of the recovery efficiency of the carbon adsorber that demonstrated that the affected facility was in compliance.


(d) Each owner or operator of an undertread cementing operation, sidewall cementing operation, green tires spraying operation where organic solvent-based sprays are used, Michelin-A operation, Michelin-B operation, or Michelin-C-automatic operation who seeks to comply with a specified VOC monthly usage limit shall maintain records of monthly VOC use and the number of days in each compliance period.


(e) Each owner or operator that is required to conduct monthly performance tests, as specified under § 60.543(b)(1), shall maintain records of the results of all monthly tests.


(f) Each owner or operator of a tread end cementing operation and green tire spraying operation using water-based cements or sprays containing less than 1.0 percent by weight of VOC, as specified under § 60.543(b)(4), shall maintain records of formulation data or the results of Method 24 analysis conducted to verify the VOC content of the spray.


[52 FR 34874, Sept. 15, 1987, as amended at 54 FR 38637, Sept. 19, 1989; 65 FR 61765, Oct. 17, 2000]


§ 60.546 Reporting requirements.

(a) Each owner or operator subject to the provisions of this subpart, at the time of notification of the anticipated initial startup of an affected facility pursuant to § 60.7(a)(2), shall provide a written report to the Administrator declaring for each undertread cementing operation, each sidewall cementing operation, each green tire spraying operation where organic solvent-based sprays are used, each Michelin-A operation, each Michelin-B operation, and each Michelin-C automatic operation the emission limit he intends to comply with and the compliance method (where § 60.543(j) is applicable) to be employed.


(b) Each owner or operator subject to the provisions of this subpart, at the time of notification of the anticipated initial startup of an affected facility pursuant to § 60.7(a)(2), shall specify the monthly schedule (each calendar month or a 4-4-5-week schedule) to be used in making compliance determinations.


(c) Each owner or operator subject to the provisions of this subpart shall report the results of all initial performance tests, as required under § 60.8(a), and the results of the performance tests required under § 60.543 (b)(2) and (b)(3). The following data shall be included in the report for each of the above performance tests:


(1) For each affected facility for which the owner or operator seeks to comply with a VOC monthly usage limit specified under § 60.542(a): The monthly mass of VOC used (Mo) and the number of days in the compliance period (Td).


(2) For each affected facility that seeks to comply with a VOC emission limit per tire or per bead specified under § 60.542(a) without the use of a VOC emission reduction system: the mass of VOC used (Mo), the number of tires cemented or sprayed (To), the mass of VOC emitted per tire cemented or sprayed (N), the number of beads cemeted (Bo), and the mass of VOC emitted per bead cemented (Nb).


(3) For each affected facility that uses a VOC emission reduction system with a control device that destroys VOC (e.g., incinerator) to comply with a VOC emission limit per tire or per bead specified under § 60.542(a): The mass of VOC used (Mo), the number of tires cemented or sprayed (To), the mass of VOC emitted per tire cemented or sprayed (N), the number of beads cemented (Bo), the mass of VOC emitted per bead cemented (Nb), the mass of VOC used per tire cemented or sprayed (G), the mass of VOC per bead cemented (Gb), the emission control device efficiency (E), the capture system efficiency (Fc), the face velocity through each permanent opening for the capture system with the temporary openings closed, and the overall system emission reduction (R).


(4) For each affected facility that uses a VOC emission reduction system with a control device that destroys VOC (e.g., incinerator) to comply with a percent emission reduction requirement specified under § 60.542(a): The emission control device efficiency (E), the capture system efficiency (Fc), the face velocity through each permanent opening in the capture system with the temporary openings closed, and the overall system emission reduction (R).


(5) For each affected facility that uses a carbon adsorber to comply with a VOC emission limit per tire or per bead specified under § 60.542(a): The mass of VOC used (Mo), the number of tires cemented or sprayed (To), the mass of VOC used per tire cemented or sprayed (G), the number of beads cemented (Bo), the mass of VOC used per bead (Gb), the mass of VOC recovered (Mr), the overall system emission reduction (R), the mass of VOC emitted per tire cemented or sprayed (N), and the mass of VOC emitted per bead cemented (Nb).


(6) For each affected facility that uses a VOC emission reduction system with a control device that recovers VOC (e.g., carbon adsorber) to comply with a percent emission reduction requirement specified under § 60.542(a): The mass of VOC used (Mo), the mass of VOC recovered (Mr), and the overall system emission reduction (R).


(7) For each affected facility that elects to comply with the alternate limit specified under § 60.542a: The mass of VOC used (Mo), the number of tires processed (To), and the mass of VOC emitted per tire processed (N).


(d) Each owner or operator of an undertread cementing operation, sidewall cementing operation, green tire spraying operation where organic solvent-based sprays are used, or Michelin-B operation who seeks to comply with the requirements described under § 60.543(j) shall include in the initial compliance report a statement specifying, in detail, how each of the equipment design and performance specifications has been met. The initial compliance report also shall include the following data: The emission control device efficiency (E), the face velocity through each permanent enclosure opening with all temporary enclosure openings closed, the total area of all permanent enclosure openings, the total area of all temporary enclosure openings, the maximum solvent use rate (kg/hr or lb/hr), the type(s) of VOC used, the lower explosive limit (LEL) for each VOC used, and the length of time each component is enclosed after application of cement or spray material.


(e) Each owner or operator of an affected facility shall include the following data measured by the required monitoring device(s), as applicable, in the report for each performance test specified under paragraph (c) of this section.


(1) The average combustion temperature measured at least every 15 minutes and averaged over the performance test period of incinerator destruction efficiency for each thermal incinerator.


(2) The average temperature before and after the catalyst bed measured at least every 15 minutes and averaged over the performance test period of incinerator destruction efficiency for each catalytic incinerator.


(3) The concentration level or reading indicated by the organics monitoring device at the outlet of the adsorber, measured at least every 15 minutes and averaged over the performance test period of carbon adsorber recovery efficiency while the vent stream is normally routed and constituted.


(4) The appropriate data to be specified by the Administrator where a VOC recovery device other than a carbon adsorber is used.


(f) Once every 6 months each owner or operator subject to the provisions of § 60.545 shall report, as applicable:


(1) Each monthly average VOC emission rate that exceeds the VOC emission limit per tire or per bead specified under § 60.542(a), as applicable for the affected facility.


(2) Each monthly average VOC use rate that exceeds the monthly VOC usage limit specified under § 60.542(a), as applicable for the affected facility.


(3) Each monthly average VOC emission reduction efficiency for a VOC recovery device (e.g., carbon adsorber) less than the percent efficiency limit specified under § 60.542(a), as applicable for the affected facility.


(4) Each 3-hour period of operation for which the average temperature of the gas stream in the combustion zone of a thermal incinerator, as measured by the temperature monitoring device, is more than 28 °C (50 °F) below the combustion zone temperature measured during the most recent determination of the destruction efficiency of the thermal incinerator that demonstrated that the affected facility was in compliance.


(5) Each 3-hour period of operation for which the average temperature of the gas stream immediately before the catalyst bed of a catalytic incinerator, as measured by the temperature monitoring device, is more than 28 °C (50 °F) below the gas stream temperature measured before the catalyst bed during the most recent determination of the destruction efficiency of the catalyst incinerator that demonstrated that the affected facility was in compliance, and any 3-hour period for which the average temperature difference across the catalyst bed (i.e., the difference between the temperatures of the gas stream immediately before and after the catalyst bed), as measured by the temperature monitoring device, is less than 80 percent of the temperature difference measured during the most recent determination of the destruction efficiency of the catalytic incinerator that demonstrated that the affected facility was in compliance.


(6) Each 3-hour period of operation during which the average concentration level or reading of VOC’s in the exhaust gases from a carbon adsorber is more than 20 percent greater than the exhaust gas concentration level or reading measured by the organics monitoring device during the most recent determination of the recovery efficiency of the carbon adsorber that demonstrated that the affected facility was in compliance.


(g) The requirements for semiannual reports remain in force until and unless EPA, in delegating enforcement authority to a State under Section 111(c) of the Act, approves reporting requirements or an alternative means of compliance surveillance adopted by such State. In that event, affected facilities within the State will be relieved of the obligation to comply with these requirements, provided that they comply with the requirements established by the State.


(h) Each owner or operator of an affected facility who initially elected to be subject to the applicable percent emission reduction requirement specified under § 60.542(a) and who later seeks to comply with the applicable total (uncontrolled) monthly VOC use limit specified under § 60.542(a) and who has satisfied the provisions specified under § 60.543(k) shall furnish the Administrator written notification no less than 30 days in advance of the date when he intends to be subject to the applicable VOC use limit instead of the applicable percent emission reduction requirement.


(i) The owner or operator of each undertread cementing operation and each sidewall cementing operation who qualifies for the alternate provisions as described in § 60.542a, shall furnish the Administrator written notification of the election no less than 60 days after September 19, 1989.


(j) The owner or operator of each tread end cementing operation and each green tire spraying (inside and/or outside) operation using water-based sprays containing less than 1.0 percent, by weight, of VOC as described in § 60.543(b)(1) shall furnish the Administrator, within 60 days initially and annually thereafter, formulation data or Method 24 results to verify the VOC content of the water-based sprays in use. If the spray formulation changes before the end of the 12-month period, formulation data or Method 24 results to verify the VOC content of the spray shall be reported within 30 days of the change.


[52 FR 34874, Sept. 15, 1987; 52 FR 37874, Oct. 9, 1987, as amended at 54 FR 38637, Sept. 19, 1989; 65 FR 61765, Oct. 17, 2000]


§ 60.547 Test methods and procedures.

(a) The test methods in appendix A to this part, except as provided under § 60.8(b), shall be used to determine compliance with § 60.542(a) as follows:


(1) Method 24 or formulation data for the determination of the VOC content of cements or green tire spray materials. In the event of dispute, Method 24 shall be the reference method. For Method 24, the cement or green tire spray sample shall be a 1-liter sample collected in a 1-liter container at a point where the sample will be representative of the material as applied in the affected facility.


(2) Method 25 as the reference method for the determination of the VOC concentrations in each stack, both entering and leaving an emission control device. The owner or operator shall notify the Administrator at least 30 days in advance of any test by Method 25. For Method 25, the sampling time for each of three runs shall be at least 1 hour. Method 1 shall be used to select the sampling site, and the sampling point shall be the centroid of the duct or at a point no closer to the walls than 1.0 meter (3.3 feet). The minimum sample volume shall be 0.003 dry standard cubic meter (dscm) (0.11 dry standard cubic feet (dscf)) except that shorter sampling times or smaller volumes, when necessitated by process variables or other factors, may be approved by the Administrator.


(3) Method 2, 2A, 2C, or 2D, as appropriate, as the reference method for determination of the flow rate of the stack gas. The measurement site shall be the same as for the Method 25 sampling. A velocity traverse shall be made once per run within the hour that the Method 25 sample is taken.


(4) Method 4 for determination of stack gas moisture.


(5) Method 25 or Method 25A for determination of the VOC concentration in a capture system prior to a control device when only a single VOC is present (see § 60.543 (f)(2)(iv)(G) and (f)(2)(iv)(H)). The owner or operator shall notify the Administrator at least 30 days in advance of any test by either Method 25 or Method 25A. Method 1 shall be used to select the sampling site and the sampling point shall be the centroid of the duct or at a point no closer to the walls than 1.0 meter (3.3 feet). Method 2, 2A, 2C, or 2D, as appropriate, shall be used as the test method for the concurrent determination of gas flow rate in the capture system.


(i) For Method 25, the sampling time for each run shall be at least 1 hour. For each run, a concurrent sample shall be taken immediately upwind of the application area to determine the background VOC concentration of air drawn into the capture system. Subtract this reading from the reading obtained in the capture system for that run. The minimum sample volume shall be 0.003 dry standard cubic meter (dscm) (0.11 dry standard cubic feet (dscf)) except that shorter sampling times or smaller volumes, when necessitated by process variable or other factors, may be approved by the Administrator. Use Method 3 to determine the moisture content of the stack gas.


(ii) For Method 25A, the sampling time for each run shall be at least 1 hour. Instrument calibration shall be performed by the procedure given in Method 25A using the single VOC present in the capture system. A different calibration gas may be used if the results are corrected using an experimentally determined response factor comparing the alternative calibration gas to the single VOC used in the process. After the instrument has been calibrated, determine the background VOC concentration of the air drawn into the capture system immediately upwind of the application area for each run. The instrument does not need to be recalibrated for the background measurement. Subtract this reading from the reading obtained in the capture system for that run. The Method 25A results shall only be used in the alternative procedure for determination of capture efficiency described under § 60.543(f)(2)(iv)(G).


[52 FR 34874, Sept. 15, 1987, as amended at 54 FR 38638, Sept. 19, 1989; 65 FR 61765, Oct. 17, 2000]


§ 60.548 Delegation of authority.

(a) In delegating implementation and enforcement authority to a State under section 111(c) of the Act, the authorities contained in paragraph (b) of this section shall be retained by the Administrator and not transferred to a State.


(b) Authority which will not be delegated to States: § 60.543(c)(2)(ii)(B).


Subpart CCC [Reserved]

Subpart DDD—Standards of Performance for Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Emissions from the Polymer Manufacturing Industry


Source:55 FR 51035, Dec. 11, 1990, unless otherwise noted.

§ 60.560 Applicability and designation of affected facilities.

(a) Affected facilities. The provisions of this subpart apply to affected facilities involved in the manufacture of polypropylene, polyethylene, polystyrene, or poly (ethylene terephthalate) as defined in § 60.561 of this subpart. The affected facilities designated below for polypropylene and polyethylene are inclusive of all equipment used in the manufacture of these polymers, beginning with raw materials preparation and ending with product storage, and cover all emissions emanating from such equipment.


(1) For process emissions from any polypropylene and polyethylene manufacturing process that uses a continuous process, the affected facilities are each of the following process sections: each raw materials preparation section, each polymerization reaction section, each material recovery section, each product finishing section, and each product storage section. These process sections are affected facilities for process emissions that are emitted continuously and for process emissions that are emitted intermittently.


(2) For process emissions from polystyrene manufacturing processes that use a continuous process, the affected facilities are each material recovery section. These process sections are affected facilities for only those process emissions that are emitted continuously.


(3) For process emissions from poly(ethylene terephthalate) manufacturing processes that use a continuous process, the affected facilities are each polymerization reaction section. If the process uses dimethyl terephthalate, then each material recovery section is also an affected facility. If the process uses terephthalic acid, then each raw materials preparation section is also an affected facility. These process sections are affected facilities for only those process emissions that are emitted continuously.


(4) For VOC emissions from equipment leaks from polypropylene, polyethylene, and polystyrene (including expandable polystyrene) manufacturing processes, the affected facilities are each group of fugitive emissions equipment (as defined in § 60.561) within any process unit (as defined in § 60.561). This subpart does not apply to VOC emissions from equipment leaks from poly(ethylene terephthalate) manufacturing processes.


(i) Affected facilities with a design capacity to produce less than 1,000 Mg/yr (1,102 ton/yr) shall be exempt from § 60.562-2.


(ii) Addition or replacement of equipment for the purposes of improvement which is accomplished without a capital expenditure shall not by itself be considered a modification under § 60.562-2.


(b) Applicability dates. The applicability date identifies when an affected facility becomes subject to a standard. Usually, a standard has a single applicability date. However, some polypropylene and polyethylene affected facilities have a September 30, 1987, applicability date and others have a January 10, 1989, applicability date. The following paragraphs identify the applicability dates for all affected facilities subject to this subpart.


(1) Polypropylene and polyethylene. Each process section in a polypropylene or polyethylene production process is a potential affected facility for both continuous and intermittent emissions. The applicability date depends on when the process section was constructed, modified, or reconstructed and, in some instances, on the type of production process.


(i) The applicability date for any polypropylene or polyethylene affected facility that is constructed, modified, or reconstructed after January 10, 1989, regardless of the type of production process being used, is January 10, 1989.


(ii) Only some polypropylene or polyethylene process sections that are constructed, modified, or reconstructed on or before January 10, 1989, but after September 30, 1987, are affected facilities. These process sections (and the type of emissions to be controlled) are identified by an “x” in table 1. The applicability date for the process sections (and the emissions to be controlled) that are identified by an “x” in table 1 is September 30, 1987. Since the affected facilities that have a September 30, 1987, applicability date are determined by the type of production process (e.g., liquid phase, gas phase), each owner or operator shall identify the particular production process that applies to his or her particular process.


Polymer
Production

process(es)
Process section
Emissions
Continuous
Intermittent
PolypropyleneLiquid PhaseRaw Materials PreparationX
Polymerization ReactionX
Material RecoveryXX
Product FinishingX
Product Storage
PolypropyleneGas PhaseRaw Materials Preparation
Polymerization ReactionX
Material RecoveryX
Product Finishing
Product Storage
Low Density PolyethyleneHigh PressureRaw Materials PreparationX
Polymerization ReactionX
Material RecoveryX
Product FinishingX
Product StorageX
Low Density PolyethyleneLow PressureRaw Materials PreparationXX
High Density PolyethyleneGas PhasePolymerization ReactionX
Material Recovery
Product FinishingX
Product Storage
High Density PolyethyleneLiquid Phase SlurryRaw Materials PreparationX
Polymerization Reaction
Material RecoveryX
Product FinishingX
Product Storage
High Density PolyethyleneLiquid Phase SolutionRaw Materials PreparationXX
Polymerization ReactionX
Material RecoveryXX
Product Finishing
Product Storage

(2) Polystyrene. The applicability date for each polystyrene affected facility is September 30, 1987.


(3) Poly(ethylene terephthalate). The applicability date for each poly(ethylene terephthalate) affected facility is September 30, 1987.


(c) Any facility under paragraph (a) of this section that commences construction, modification, or reconstruction after its applicability date as identified under paragraph (b) of this section is subject to the requirements of this subpart, except as provided in paragraphs (d) through (f) of this section.


(d) Any polypropylene or polyethylene affected facility with a September 30, 1987, applicability date that commenced construction, modification, or reconstruction after September 30, 1987, and on or before January 10, 1989, with an uncontrolled emission rate (as defined in footnote a to table 2) at or below those identified in table 2 is not subject to the requirements of § 60.562-1 unless and until its uncontrolled emission rate exceeds that rate listed for it in table 2 or it is modified or reconstructed after January 10, 1989. At such time, such facility becomes subject to § 60.562-1 and the procedures identified in § 60.562-1(a) shall be used to determine the control of emissions from the facility.


Table 2—Maximum Uncontrolled Threshold Emission Rates
a

Production process
Process section
Uncontrolled emission rate, kg TOC/Mg product (See associated footnote)
Polypropylene, liquid phase processRaw Materials Preparation0.15
b
Polymerization Reaction0.14
b, 0.24
c
Material Recovery0.19
b
Product Finishing1.57
b
Polypropylene, gas phase processPolymerization Reaction0.12
c
Material Recovery0.02
b
Low Density Polyethylene, low pressure processRaw Materials Preparation0.41
d
Polymerization Reaction
(e)
Material Recovery
(e)
Product Finishing
(e)
Product Storage
(e)
Low Density Polythylene, low pressure processRaw Materials Preparation0.05
f
Polymerization Reaction0.03
g
Product Finishing0.01
b
High Density Polyethylene, liquid phase slurry processRaw Materials Preparation0.25
c
Material Recovery0.11
b
Product Finishing0.41
b
High Density Polyethylene, liquid phase solution processRaw Materials Preparation0.24
f
Polymerization Reaction0.16
c
Material Recovery1.68
f
High Density Polyethylene, gas phase processRaw Materials Preparation0.05
f
Polymerization Reaction0.03
g
Product Finishing0.01
b
Polystyrene, continuous processMaterial Recovery0.05
b h
Poly(ethylene terephalate), dimethyl terephthalate processMaterial Recovery0.12
b h
Polymerization Reaction1.80
h i j
Poly(ethlyene terephthalate), terephthalic acid processRaw Materials Preparation(l)
Polymerization Reaction1.80
h j m
3.92
h k m


a “Uncontrolled emission rate” refers to the emission rate of a vent stream that vents directly to the atmosphere and to the emission rate of a vent stream to the atmosphere that would occur in the absence of any add-on control devices but after any material recovery devices that constitute part of the normal material recovery operations in a process line where potential emissions are recovered for recycle or resale.


b Emission rate applies to continuous emissions only.


c Emission rate applies to intermittent emissions only.


d Total emission rate for non-emergency intermittent emissions from raw materials preparation, polymerization reaction, material recovery, product finishing, and product storage process sections.


e See footnote d.


f Emission rate applies to both continuous and intermittent emissions.


g Emission rate applies to non-emergency intermittent emissions only.


h Applies to modified or reconstructed affected facilities only.


i Includes emissions from the cooling water tower.


j Applies to a process line producing low viscosity poly(ethylene terephthlalate).


k Applies to a process line producing high viscosity poly(ethylene terephathalate).


l See footnote m.


m Applies to the sum of emissions to the atmosphere from the polymerization reaction section (including emissions from the cooling tower) and the raw materials preparation section (i.e., the esterifiers).


(e)(1) Modified or reconstructed affected facilities at polystyrene and poly(ethylene terephthalate) plants with uncontrolled emission rates at or below those identified in table 2 are exempt from the requirements of § 60.562-1 unless and until its uncontrolled emission rate exceeds that rate listed for it in table 2. This exemption does not apply to new polystyrene or poly(ethylene terephthalate) affected facilities.


(2) Emissions from modified or reconstructed affected facilities that are controlled by an existing control device and that have uncontrolled emission rates greater than the uncontrolled threshold emission rates identified in table 2 are exempt from the requirements of § 60.562-1 unless and until the existing control device is modified, reconstructed, or replaced.


(f) No process section of an experimental process line is considered an affected facility for continuous or intermittent process emissions.


(g) Individual vent streams that emit continuous emissions with uncontrolled annual emissions of less than 1.6 Mg/yr (1.76 ton/yr) or with a weight percent TOC of less than 0.10 percent from a new, modified, or reconstructed polypropylene or polyethylene affected facility are exempt from the requirements of § 60.562-1(a)(1). If at a later date, an individual stream’s uncontrolled annual emissions become 1.6 Mg/yr (1.76 ton/yr) or greater (if the stream was exempted on the basis of the uncontrolled annual emissions exemption) or VOC concentration becomes 0.10 weight percent or higher (if the stream was exempted on the basis of the VOC concentration exemption), then the stream is subject to the requirements of § 60.562-1.


(h) Emergency vent streams, as defined in § 60.561, from a new, modified, or reconstructed polypropylene or polyethylene affected facility are exempt from the requirements of § 60.562-1(a)(2).


(i) An owner or operator of a polypropylene or polyethylene affected facility that commenced construction, modification, or reconstruction after September 30, 1987, and on or before January 10, 1989, and that is in a process line in which more than one type of polyolefin (i.e., polypropylene, low density polyethylene, high density polyethylene, or their copolymers) is produced shall select one of the polymer/production process combinations in table 1 for purposes of determining applicable affected facilities and uncontrolled threshold emissions rates.


(j) Alternative means of compliance—(1) Option to comply with part 65. Owners or operators may choose to comply with 40 CFR part 65, subpart G, for continuous process vents that are subject to this subpart, that choose to comply with § 60.562-1(a)(1)(i)(A), (B), or (C) as allowed in § 60.562-1(a)(1) and (b)(1)(iii). The requirements of 40 CFR part 65, subpart G, satisfy the requirements of paragraph (c) of this section and §§ 60.563 through 60.566, except for § 60.565(g)(1). Other provisions applying to owners or operators who choose to comply with 40 CFR part 65 are provided in 40 CFR 65.1.


(2) Part 60, subpart A. Owners or operators who choose to comply with 40 CFR part 65, subpart G, must also comply with §§ 60.1, 60.2, 60.5, 60.6, 60.7(a)(1) and (4), 60.14, 60.15, and 60.16 for those process vents. All sections and paragraphs of subpart A of this part that are not mentioned in this paragraph (j)(2) do not apply to owners or operators of process vents complying with 40 CFR part 65, subpart G, except that provisions required to be met prior to implementing 40 CFR part 65 still apply. Owners and operators who choose to comply with 40 CFR part 65, subpart G, must comply with 40 CFR part 65, subpart A.


(3) Initial startup notification. Each owner or operator subject to the provisions of this subpart that chooses to comply with 40 CFR part 65, subpart G, at initial startup shall notify the Administrator of the specific provisions of 40 CFR part 65, subpart G, with which the owner or operator has elected to comply. Notification shall be submitted with the notification of initial startup required by 40 CFR 65.5(b).



(Note:

The numerical emission limits in these standards are expressed in terms of total organic compounds, measured as total organic compounds less methane and ethane.)


[55 FR 51035, Dec. 11, 1990; 56 FR 12299, Mar. 22, 1991, as amended at 65 FR 61765, Oct. 17, 2000; 65 FR 78278, Dec. 14, 2000]


§ 60.561 Definitions.

As used in this subpart, all terms not defined herein shall have the meaning given them in the Act, in subpart A of part 60, or in subpart VV of part 60, and the following terms shall have the specific meanings given them.


Boiler means any enclosed combustion device that extracts useful energy in the form of steam.


Capital expenditure means, in addition to the definition in 40 CFR 60.2, an expenditure for a physical or operational change to an existing facility that exceeds P, the product of the facility’s replacement cost, R, and an adjusted annual asset guideline repair allowance, A, as reflected by the following equation: P = R × A, where


(a) The adjusted annual asset guideline repair allowance, A, is the product of the percent of the replacement cost, Y, and the applicable basic annual asset guideline repair allowance, B, as reflected by the following equation: A = Y × (B ÷ 100);


(b) The percent Y is determined from the following equation: Y = 1.0 − 0.57 log X, where X is 1986 minus the year of construction; and


(c) The applicable basic annual asset guideline repair allowance, B, is equal to 12.5.


Car-sealed means, for purposes of these standards, a seal that is placed on the device used to change the position of a valve (e.g., from opened to closed) such that the position of the valve cannot be changed without breaking the seal and requiring the replacement of the old seal once broken with a new seal.


Closed vent system means a system that is not open to the atmosphere and that is composed of piping, connections, and, if necessary, flow inducing devices that transport gas or vapor from a piece or pieces of equipment to a control device.


Continuous emissions means any gas stream containing VOC that is generated essentially continuously when the process line or any piece of equipment in the process line is operating.


Continuous process means a polymerization process in which reactants are introduced in a continuous manner and products are removed either continuously or intermittently at regular intervals so that the process can be operated and polymers produced essentially continuously.


Control device means an enclosed combustion device, vapor recovery system, or flare.


Copolymer means a polymer that has two different repeat units in its chain.


Decomposition means, for the purposes of these standards, an event in a polymerization reactor that advances to the point where the polymerization reaction becomes uncontrollable, the polymer begins to break down (decompose), and it becomes necessary to relieve the reactor instantaneously in order to avoid catastrophic equipment damage or serious adverse personnel safety consequences.


Decomposition emissions refers to those emissions released from a polymer production process as the result of a decomposition or during attempts to prevent a decomposition.


Emergency vent stream means, for the purposes of these standards, an intermittent emission that results from a decomposition, attempts to prevent decompositions, power failure, equipment failure, or other unexpected cause that requires immediate venting of gases from process equipment in order to avoid safety hazards or equipment damage. This includes intermittent vents that occur from process equipment where normal operating parameters (e.g., pressure or temperature) are exceeded such that the process equipment can not be returned to normal operating conditions using the design features of the system and venting must occur to avoid equipment failure or adverse safety personnel consequences and to minimize adverse effects of the runaway reaction. This does not include intermittent vents that are designed into the process to maintain normal operating conditions of process vessels including those vents that regulate normal process vessel pressure.


End finisher means a polymerization reaction vessel operated under very low pressures, typically at pressures of 2 mm Hg (1 in. H2O) or less, in order to produce high viscosity poly(ethylene terephthalate). An end finisher is preceded in a high viscosity poly(ethylene terephthalate) process line by one or more polymerization vessels operated under less severe vacuums, typically between 5 and 10 mm Hg (3 and 5 in. H2O). A high viscosity poly(ethylene terephthalate) process line may have one or more end finishers.


Existing control device means, for the purposes of these standards, an air pollution control device that has been in operation on or before September 30, 1987, or that has been in operation between September 30, 1987, and January 10, 1989, on those continuous or intermittent emissions from a process section that is marked by an “—” in table 1 of this subpart.


Existing control device is reconstructed means, for the purposes of these standards, the capital expenditure of at least 50 percent of the replacement cost of the existing control device.


Existing control device is replaced means, for the purposes of these standards, the replacement of an existing control device with another control device.


Expandable polystyrene means a polystyrene bead to which a blowing agent has been added using either an in-situ suspension process or a post-impregnation suspension process.


Experimental process line means a polymer or copolymer manufacturing process line with the sole purpose of operating to evaluate polymer manufacturing processes, technologies, or products. An experimental process line does not produce a polymer or resin that is sold or that is used as a raw material for nonexperimental process lines.


Flame zone means that portion of the combustion chamber in a boiler occupied by the flame envelope.


Fugitive emissions equipment means each pump, compressor, pressure relief device, sampling connection system, open-ended valve or line, valve, and flange or other connector in VOC service and any devices or systems required by subpart VV of this part.


Gas phase process means a polymerization process in which the polymerization reaction is carried out in the gas phase; i.e., the monomer(s) are gases in a fluidized bed of catalyst particles and granular polymer.


High density polyethylene (HDPE) means a thermoplastic polymer or copolymer comprised of at least 50 percent ethylene by weight and having a density of greater than 0.940 gm/cm
33 (58.7 lb/ft
3).


High pressure process means the conventional production process for the manufacture of low density polyethylene in which a reaction pressure of about 15,000 psig (103,000 kPa gauge) or greater is used.


High viscosity poly(ethylene terephthalate) means poly(ethylene terephthalate) that has an intrinsic viscosity of 0.9 or higher and is used in such applications as tire cord and seat belts.


Incinerator means an enclosed combustion device that is used for destroying VOC.


In-situ suspension process means a manufacturing process in which styrene, blowing agent, and other raw materials are added together within a reactor for the production of expandable polystyrene.


Intermittent emissions means those gas streams containing VOC that are generated at intervals during process line operation and includes both planned and emergency releases.


Liquid phase process means a polymerization process in which the polymerization reaction is carried out in the liquid phase; i.e., the monomer(s) and any catalyst are dissolved, or suspended in a liquid solvent.


Liquid phase slurry process means a liquid phase polymerization process in which the monomer(s) are in solution (completely dissolved) in a liquid solvent, but the polymer is in the form of solid particles suspended in the liquid reaction mixture during the polymerization reaction; sometimes called a particle form process.


Liquid phase solution process means a liquid phase polymerization process in which both the monomer(s) and polymer are in solution (completely dissolved) in the liquid reaction mixture.


Low density polyethylene (LDPE) means a thermoplastic polymer or copolymer comprised of at least 50 percent ethylene by weight and having a density of 0.940 g/cm
3 (58.7 lb/ft
3) or less.


Low pressure process means a production process for the manufacture of low density polyethylene in which a reaction pressure markedly below that used in a high pressure process is used. Reaction pressure of current low pressure processes typically go up to about 300 psig (2,070 kPa gauge).


Low viscosity poly(ethylene terephthalate) means a poly(ethylene terephthalate) that has an intrinsic viscosity of less than 0.75 and is used in such applications as clothing, bottle, and film production.


Material recovery section means the equipment that recovers unreacted or by-product materials from any process section for return to the process line, off-site purification or treatment, or sale. Equipment designed to separate unreacted or by-product material from the polymer product are to be included in this process section, provided at least some of the material is recovered for reuse in the process, off-site purification or treatment, or sale, at the time the process section becomes an affected facility. Otherwise such equipment are to be assigned to one of the other process sections, as appropriate. Equipment that treats recovered materials are to be included in this process section, but equipment that also treats raw materials are not to be included in this process section. The latter equipment are to be included in the raw materials preparation section. If equipment is used to return unreacted or by-product material directly to the same piece of process equipment from which it was emitted, then that equipment is considered part of the process section that contains the process equipment. If equipment is used to recover unreacted or by-product material from a process section and return it to another process section or a different piece of process equipment in the same process section or sends it off-site for purification, treatment, or sale, then such equipment are considered part of a material recovery section. Equipment used for the on-site recovery of ethylene glycol from poly(ethylene terephthalate) plants, however, are not included in the material recovery section, but are covered under the standards applicable to the polymerization reaction section (§ 60.562-1(c)(1)(ii)(A) or (2)(ii)(A)).


Operating day means, for the purposes of these standards, any calendar day during which equipment used in the manufacture of polymer was operating for at least 8 hours or one labor shift, whichever is shorter. Only operating days shall be used in determining compliance with the standards specified in § 60.562-1(c)(1)(ii)(B), (1)(ii)(C), (2)(ii)(B), and (2)(ii)(C). Any calendar day in which equipment is used for less than 8 hours or one labor shift, whichever is less, is not an “operating day” and shall not be used as part of the rolling 14-day period for determining compliance with the standards specified in § 60.562-1(c)(1)(ii)(B), (1)(ii)(C), (2)(ii)(B), and (2)(ii)(C).


Polyethylene means a thermoplastic polymer or copolymer comprised of at least 50 percent ethylene by weight; see low density polyethylene and high density polyethylene.


Poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) means a polymer or copolymer comprised of at least 50 percent bis-(2-hydroxyethyl)-terephthalate (BHET) by weight.


Poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) manufacture using dimethyl terephthalate means the manufacturing of poly(ethylene terephthalate) based on the esterification of dimethyl terephthalate (DMT) with ethylene glycol to form the intermediate monomer bis-(2-hydroxyethyl)-terephthalate (BHET) that is subsequently polymerized to form PET.


Poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) manufacture using terephthalic acid means the manufacturing of poly(ethylene terephthalate) based on the esterification reaction of terephthalic acid (TPA) with ethylene glycol to form the intermediate monomer bis-(2-hydroxyethyl)-terephthalate (BHET) that is subsequently polymerized to form PET.


Polymerization reaction section means the equipment designed to cause monomer(s) to react to form polymers, including equipment designed primarily to cause the formation of short polymer chains (oligomers or low polymers), but not including equipment designed to prepare raw materials for polymerization, e.g., esterification vessels. For the purposes of these standards, the polymerization reaction section begins with the equipment used to transfer the materials from the raw materials preparation section and ends with the last vessel in which polymerization occurs. Equipment used for the on-site recovery of ethylene glycol from poly(ethylene terephthalate) plants, however, are included in this process section, rather than in the material recovery process section.


Polypropylene (PP) means a thermoplastic polymer or copolymer comprised of at least 50 percent propylene by weight.


Polystyrene (PS) means a thermoplastic polymer or copolymer comprised of at least 80 percent styrene or para-methylstyrene by weight.


Post-impregnation suspension process means a manufacturing process in which polystyrene beads are first formed in a suspension process, washed, dried, or otherwise finished and then added with a blowing agent to another reactor in which the beads and blowing agent are reacted to produce expandable polystyrene.


Process heater means a device that transfers heat liberated by burning fuel to fluids contained in tubular coils, including all fluids except water that is heated to produce steam.


Process line means a group of equipment assembled that can operate independently if supplied with sufficient raw materials to produce polypropylene, polyethylene, polystyrene, (general purpose, crystal, or expandable) or poly(ethylene terephthalate) or one of their copolymers. A process line consists of the equipment in the following process sections (to the extent that these process sections are present at a plant): raw materials preparation, polymerization reaction, product finishing, product storage, and material recovery.


Process section means the equipment designed to accomplish a general but well-defined task in polymer production. Process sections include raw materials preparation, polymerization reaction, material recovery, product finishing, and product storage and may be dedicated to a single process line or common to more than one process line.


Process unit means equipment assembled to perform any of the physical and chemical operations in the production of polypropylene, polyethylene, polystyrene, (general purpose, crystal, or expandable), or poly(ethylene terephthalate) or one of their copolymers. A process unit can operate independently if supplied with sufficient feed or raw materials and sufficient storage facilities for the product. Examples of process units are raw materials handling and monomer recovery.


Product finishing section means the equipment that treats, shapes, or modifies the polymer or resin to produce the finished end product of the particular facility, including equipment that prepares the product for product finishing. For the purposes of these standards, the product finishing section begins with the equipment used to transfer the polymerized product from the polymerization reaction section and ends with the last piece of equipment that modifies the characteristics of the polymer. Product finishing equipment may accomplish product separation, extruding and pelletizing, cooling and drying, blending, additives introduction, curing, or annealing. Equipment used to separate unreacted or by-product material from the product are to be included in this process section, provided the material separated from the polymer product is not recovered at the time the process section becomes an affected facility. If the material is being recovered, then the separation equipment are to be included in the material recovery section. Product finishing does not include polymerization, the physical mixing of the pellets to obtain a homogenous mixture of the polymer (except as noted below), or the shaping (such as fiber spinning, molding, or fabricating) or modification (such as fiber stretching and crimping) of the finished end product. If physical mixing occurs in equipment located between product finishing equipment (i.e., before all the chemical and physical characteristics have been “set” by virtue of having passed through the last piece of equipment in the product finishing section), then such equipment are to be included in this process section. Equipment used to physically mix the finished product that are located after the last piece of equipment in the product finishing section are part of the product storage section.


Product storage section means the equipment that is designed to store the finished polymer or resin end product of the particular facility. For the purposes of these standards, the product storage section begins with the equipment used to transfer the finished product out of the product finishing section and ends with the containers used to store the final product. Any equipment used after the product finishing section to recover unreacted or by-product material are to be considered part of a material recovery section. Product storage does not include any intentional modification of the characteristics of any polymer or resin product, but does include equipment that provide a uniform mixture of product, provided such equipment are used after the last product finishing piece of equipment. This process section also does not include the shipment of a finished polymer or resin product to another facility for further finishing or fabrication.


Raw materials preparation section means the equipment located at a polymer manufacturing plant designed to prepare raw materials, such as monomers and solvents, for polymerization. For the purposes of these standards, this process section begins with the equipment used to transfer raw materials from storage and recovered material from material recovery process sections, and ends with the last piece of equipment that prepares the material for polymerization. The raw materials preparation section may include equipment that accomplishes purification, drying, or other treatment of raw materials or of raw and recovered materials together, activation of catalysts, and esterification including the formation of some short polymer chains (oligomers), but does not include equipment that is designed primarily to accomplish the formation of oligomers, the treatment of recovered materials alone, or the storage of raw materials.


Recovery system means an individual unit or series of material recovery units, such as absorbers, condensers, and carbon adsorbers, used for recovering volatile organic compounds.


Total organic compounds (TOC) means those compounds measured according to the procedures specified in § 60.564.


Vent stream means any gas stream released to the atmosphere directly from an emission source or indirectly either through another piece of process equipment or a material recovery device that constitutes part of the normal recovery operations in a polymer process line where potential emissions are recovered for recycle or resale, and any gas stream directed to an air pollution control device. The emissions released from an air pollution control device are not considered a vent stream unless, as noted above, the control device is part of the normal material recovery operations in a polymer process line where potential emissions are recovered for recycle or resale.


Volatile organic compounds (VOC) means, for the purposes of these standards, any reactive organic compounds as defined in § 60.2 Definitions.


[55 FR 51035, Dec. 11, 1990; 56 FR 9178, Mar. 5, 1991; 56 FR 12299, Mar. 22, 1991; 65 FR 61767, Oct. 17, 2000]


§ 60.562-1 Standards: Process emissions.

(a) Polypropylene, low density polyethylene, and high density polyethylene. Each owner or operator of a polypropylene, low density polyethylene, or high density polyethylene process line containing a process section subject to the provisions of this subpart shall comply with the provisions in this section on and after the date on which the initial performance test required by § 60.8 is completed, but not later than 60 days after achieving the maximum production rate at which the affected facility will be operated, or 180 days after initial startup whichever comes first.


(1) Continuous emissions. For each vent stream that emits continuous emissions from an affected facility as defined in § 60.560(a)(1), the owner or operator shall use the procedures identified in paragraphs (a)(1) (ii) and (iii) of this section for determining which continuous emissions are to be controlled and which level of control listed in paragraph (a)(1)(i) of this section is to be met. The owner or operator shall use the procedures identified in paragraphs (a)(1) (ii) and (iii) of this section each time a process section is constructed, modified, or reconstructed at the plant site.


(i) Level of control Continuous emission streams determined to be subject to control pursuant to the procedures identified in paragraphs (a)(1) (ii) and (iii) of this section, as applicable, shall meet one of the control levels identified in paragraphs (a)(1)(i) (A) through (D) of this section. The procedures in paragraphs (a)(1) (ii) and (iii) of this section identify which level of control may be met. The level of control identified in paragraph (a)(1)(i)(D) of this section is limited to certain continuous emission streams, which are identified through the procedures in paragraphs (a)(1) (ii) and (iii) of this section.


(A) Reduce emissions of total organic compounds (minus methane and ethane) (TOC) by 98 weight percent, or to a concentration of 20 parts per million by volume (ppmv) on a dry basis, whichever is less stringent. The TOC is expressed as the sum of the actual compounds, not carbon equivalents. If an owner or operator elects to comply with the 20 ppmv standard, the concentration shall include a correction to 3 percent oxygen only when supplemental combustion air is used to combust the vent stream.


(B) Combust the emissions in a boiler or process heater with a design heat input capacity of 150 million Btu/hour or greater by introducing the vent stream into the flame zone of the boiler or process heater. (Note: A boiler or process heater of lesser design heat capacity may be used, but must demonstrate compliance with paragraph (a)(1)(i)(A) of this section.)


(C) Combust the emissions in a flare that meets the conditions specified in § 60.18. If the flare is used to control both continuous and intermittent emissions, the flare shall meet the conditions specified in § 60.18 at all times (i.e., which controlling continuous emissions alone or when controlling both continuous and intermittent emissions).


(D) Vent the emissions to a control device located on the plant site.


(ii) Uncontrolled Continuous Emissions. For each vent stream that emits continuous emissions from an affected facility as defined in § 60.560(a)(1) and that is not controlled in an existing control device, the owner or operator shall use the procedures identified in table 3 to identify those continuous emissions from each constructed, modified, or reconstructed affected facility that are to be controlled. The owner shall include in the procedure all uncontrolled continuous vent streams from previously constructed, modified, or reconstructed affected facilities at the plant site each time a process section is constructed, modified, or reconstructed at the plant site. In applying the procedures shown in table 3, the stream characteristics may be either measured or calculated as specified in § 60.564(d). For modified or reconstructed affected facilities, these stream characteristics are to be determined after a modification or reconstruction determination has been made by the Administrator, but before any actual changes have been undertaken, and then again after the actual changes have been made. Figure 1 provides a summary overview of the control determination procedure described in table 3.


Table 3—Procedure for Determining Control and Applicable Standard for Continuous Emission Streams From New, Modified, or Reconstructed Polypropylene and Polyethylene Affected Facilities

Procedure
a
Applicable TOC weight percent range
Control/no control criteria
Applicable standard
1. Sum all uncontrolled streams with TOC weight percent within the applicable weight percent range from all affected facilities at a plant site0.10 1. If total combined uncontrolled emissions are equal to or greater than the calculated threshold emissions (CTE)
b, control
1. § 60.562-1(a)(1)(i) (A), (B), or (C).
2. Calculate total uncontrolled annual emissions for each weight percent range. For modified or affected facilities, use the total uncontrolled emissions after modification or reconstruction 2. If total combined uncontrolled emission are less than the CTE
b, control only individual streams with volume flow rates of 8 scfm or less
2. § 60.562-1(a)(1)(i) (A) through (D).
3. Calculate composite TOC concentration (weight percent) for streams in the 0.10 to less than 5.5 weight percent range and for streams in the 5.5 to less than 20 weight percent range. For modified or reconstructed affected facilities, calculate the composite VOC concentration before and after modification and reconstruction5.5 1. If total combined uncontrolled emissions are equal to or greater than CTE
b, control
1. § 60.562-1(a)(1)(i) (A), (B), or (C)

2. If total combined uncontrolled emissions are less than the CTE
b, control only individual streams with volume flow rates of 8 scfm or less.
4. Select the higher of the two TOC concentrations for each weight percent range for vent streams from a modified or reconstructed affected facility20 to 1001. If total combined uncontrolled emissions are equal to or greater than 18.2 Mg/yr, control1. § 60.562-1(a)(1)(i) (A), (B), or (C).
5. Calculate the threshold emissions for the 0.10 to less than 5.5 weight percent range and for the 5.5 to less than 20 weight percent range using the respective composite TOC concentration selected above2. If total combined uncontrolled emissions are less than 18.2 Mg/yr, control2. § 60.562-1(a)(1)(i) (A) through (D).


a Individual streams excluded under § 60.560(g) from the requirements of § 60.562-1 are to be excluded from all calculations in this table. This paragraph exempts all individual emission streams with individual uncontrolled annual emission rates of less than 1.6 Mg/yr and all individual emission streams with individual TOC concentrations of less than 0.10 percent TOC by weight.


b For the 0.10 to less than 5.5 weight percent range, the following equations are used:


If the percent composite TOC concentration is
Use this equation to calculate threshold emissions
0.10(a × 7.5 × 10
6) + 226
0.12(b × 58.3) + 116.8
0.2(c × 3020) + 71.8
0.3(d × 547) + 54.5
0.448.3 + 31 (0.6−weight percent TOC)
0.648.3


where: a = (0.12 − weight percent TOC).
2 5



c = (0.3−weight percent TOC)
2

d = (0.4−weight percent TOC).
1 5

For the 5.5 to less than 20 weight percent range, the following equations are used.


If the percent composite TOC concentration is
Use this equation to calculate threshold emissions
5.5(e × 740) + 31
7.0(f × 324) + 25.0
9.0(g × 125) + 18.2


where



(iii) Controlled Continuous Emissions. For each vent stream that emits continuous emissions from an affected facility as defined in § 60.560(a)(1) and that is controlled in an existing control device, each owner or operator shall determine whether the emissions entering the control device are greater than or equal to the calculated threshold emissions (CTE) level, which is to be calculated using the TOC concentration of the inlet vent stream and the equations in footnote b of table 3. If the inlet stream’s TOC concentration is equal to or greater than 20 weight percent, the calculated threshold emissions level is 18.2 Mg/yr (20.1 ton/yr). If multiple emission streams are vented to the control device, the individual streams are not to be separated into individual weight percent ranges for calculation purposes as would be done for uncontrolled emission streams. Emissions vented to an existing control device are required to be controlled as described in paragraphs (a)(1)(iii) (A) and (B) of this section. Figure 2 illustrates the control determination procedure for controlled continuous emissions.



(A) If the annual emissions of the stream entering the control device are equal to or greater than the CTE levels, then compliance with one of the requirements identified in § 60.562-1(a)(1)(i) (A), (B), or (C) is required at such time the control device is reconstructed or replaced or has its operating conditions modified as a result of State or local regulations (including changes in the operating permit) including those instances where the control device is reconstructed, replaced, or modified in its operation at the same time the existing process section is modified or reconstructed and becomes an affected facility. If the existing control device already complies with one of the requirements identified in § 60.562-1(a)(1)(i) (A), (B), or (C), no further control is required.


(B) If the annual emissions of the stream entering the control device are less than the CTE level, then the requirements of § 60.562-1(a)(1)(i) (A), (B), or (C) are not applicable at that time. However, if the control device is replaced, reconstructed, or modified at a later date, each owner or operator shall reevaluate the applicability of these standards. This is done by combining with the vent stream entering the control device any uncontrolled vent streams in the same weight percent range as the controlled vent stream and determining whether the annual emissions of the stream entering the control device plus the applicable uncontrolled vent streams are greater than or equal to the CTE level, which is based on the weighted TOC concentration of the controlled vent stream and the uncontrolled vent streams. If the annual emissions entering the control device (including the applicable uncontrolled vent streams) are greater than or equal to the CTE level, then compliance with one of the requirements identified in § 60.562-1(a)(1)(i) (A), (B), or (C) is required at that time for both the controlled and uncontrolled vent streams. If the annual emissions are less than the CTE level, compliance with these standards is again not required at such time. However, if the control device is again replaced, reconstructed, or modified, each owner or operator shall repeat this determination procedure.


(2) Intermittent emissions. The owner or operator shall control each vent stream that emits intermittent emissions from an affected facility as defined in § 60.560-1(a)(1) by meeting one of the control requirements specified in paragraphs (a)(2) (i) and (ii) of this section. If a vent stream that emits intermittent emissions is controlled in an existing flare, incinerator, boiler, or process heater, the requirements of this paragraph are waived until such time the control device is reconstructed or replaced or is modified in its operating conditions as a result of State or local regulation, including changes in the operating permit. This paragraph does not apply to emergency vent streams exempted by § 60.560(h) and as defined in § 60.561.


(i) Combust the emissions in a flare that is:


(A) Designed for and operated with no visible emissions, except for periods not to exceed a total of 5 minutes during any 2 consecutive hours,


(B) Operated with a flame present at all times, and


(C) Designed to maintain a stable flame.


(ii) Combust the emissions in an incinerator, boiler, or process heater. Such emissions shall be introduced into the flame zone of a boiler or process heater.


(b) Polystyrene. Each owner or operator of a polystyrene process line containing process sections subject to the provisions of this subpart shall comply with the provisions in this section on and after the date on which the initial performance test required by § 60.8 is completed, but not later than 60 days after achieving the maximum production rate at which the affected facility will be operated, or 180 days after initial startup, whichever comes first. Each owner or operator of a polystyrene process line using a continuous process shall:


(1) Limit the continuous TOC emissions from the material recovery section by complying with one of the following:


(i) Not allow continuous TOC emissions to be greater than 0.0036 kg TOC/Mg (0.0072 lb TOC/ton) product; or


(ii) Not allow the outlet gas stream temperature from each final condenser in the material recovery section to exceed −25 °C (−13 °F). For purposes of this standard, temperature excursions above this limit shall not be considered a violation when such excursions occur during periods of startup, shutdown, or malfunction; or


(iii) Comply with § 60.562-1(a)(1)(i) (A), (B), or (C).


(2) If continuous TOC emissions from the material recovery section are routed through an existing emergency vapor recovery system, then compliance with these standards is required when the emergency vapor recovery system undergoes modification, reconstruction, or replacement. In such instances, compliance with these standards shall be achieved no later than 180 days after completion of the modification, reconstruction, or replacement.


(c) Poly(ethylene terephthalate). Each owner or operator of a poly(ethylene terephthalate) process line containing process sections subject to the provisions of this subpart shall comply with the provisions in this section on and after the date on which the initial performance test required by § 60.8 is completed, but not later than 60 days after achieving the maximum production rate at which the affected facility will be operated, or 180 days after initial startup, whichever comes first.


(1) Each owner or operator of a PET process line using a dimethyl terephthalate process shall:


(i) Limit the continuous TOC emissions from the material recovery section (i.e., methanol recovery) by complying with one of the following:


(A) Not allow the continuous TOC emissions to be greater than 0.018 kg TOC/Mg (0.036 lb TOC/ton) product; or


(B) Not allow the outlet gas stream temperature from each final condenser in the material recovery section (i.e., methanol recovery) to exceed +3 °C (+37 °F). For purposes of this standard, temperature excursions above this limit shall not be considered a violation when such excursions occur during periods of startup, shutdown, or malfunction.


(ii) Limit the continuous TOC emissions and, if steam-jet ejectors are used to provide vacuum to the polymerization reactors, the ethylene glycol concentration from the polymerization reaction section by complying with the appropriate standard set forth below. The ethylene glycol concentration limits specified in paragraphs (c)(1)(ii) (B) and (C) of this section shall be determined by the procedures specified in § 60.564(j).


(A) Not allow continuous TOC emissions from the polymerization reaction section (including emissions from any equipment used to further recover the ethylene glycol, but excluding those emissions from the cooling tower) to be greater than 0.02 kg TOC/Mg (0.04 lb TOC/ton) product; and


(B) If steam-jet ejectors are used as vacuum producers and a low viscosity product is being produced using single or multiple end finishers or a high viscosity product is being produced using a single end finisher, maintain the concentration of ethylene glycol in the liquid effluent exiting the vacuum system servicing the polymerization reaction section at or below 0.35 percent by weight, averaged on a daily basis over a rolling 14-day period of operating days; or


(C) If steam-jet ejectors are used as vacuum producers and a high viscosity product is being produced using multiple end finishers, maintain an ethylene glycol concentration in the cooling tower at or below 6.0 percent by weight, averaged on a daily basis over a rolling 14-day period of operating days.


(2) Each owner or operator of a PET process line using a terephthalic acid process shall:


(i) Not allow the continuous TOC emissions from the esterification vessels in the raw materials preparation section to be greater than 0.04 kg TOC/Mg (0.08 lb TOC/ton) product.


(ii) Limit the continuous TOC emissions and, if steam-jet ejectors are used to provide vaccum to the polymerization reactors, the ethylene glycol concentration from the polymerization reaction section by complying with the appropriate standard set forth below. The ethylene glycol concentration limits specified in paragraphs (c)(2)(ii) (B) and (C) of this section shall be determined by the procedures specified in § 60.564(j).


(A) Not allow continuous TOC emissions from the polymerization reaction section (including emissions from any equipment used to further recover the ethylene glycol, but excluding those emissions from the cooling tower) to be greater than 0.02 kg TOC/Mg (0.04 lb TOC/ton) product; and


(B) If steam-jet ejectors are used as vacuum producers and a low viscosity product is being produced using single or multiple end finishers or a high viscosity product is being produced using a single end finisher, maintain the concentration of ethylene glycol in the liquid effluent exiting the vacuum system servicing the polymerization reaction section at or below 0.35 percent by weight, averaged on a daily basis over a rolling 14-day period of operating days; or


(C) If steam-jet ejectors are used as vacuum producers and a high viscosity product is being produced using multiple end finishers, maintain an ethylene glycol concentration in the cooling tower at or below 6.0 percent by weight, averaged on a daily basis over a rolling 14-day period of operating days.


(d) Closed vent systems and control devices used to comply with this subpart shall be operated at all times when emissions may be vented to them.


(e) Vent systems that contain valves that could divert a vent stream from a control device shall have car-sealed opened all valves in the vent system from the emission source to the control device and car-sealed closed all valves in vent system that would lead the vent stream to the atmosphere, either directly or indirectly, bypassing the control device.


[55 FR 51035, Dec. 11, 1990; 56 FR 9178, Mar. 5, 1991, as amended at 56 FR 12299, Mar. 22, 1991; 65 FR 61767, Oct. 17, 2000]


§ 60.562-2 Standards: Equipment leaks of VOC.

(a) Each owner or operator of an affected facility subject to the provisions of this subpart shall comply with the requirements specified in §§ 60.482-1 through 60.482-10 as soon as practicable, but no later than 180 days after initial startup, except that indications of liquids dripping from bleed ports in existing pumps in light liquid service are not considered to be a leak as defined in § 60.482-2(b)(2). For purposes of this standard, a “bleed port” is a technologically-required feature of the pump whereby polymer fluid used to provide lubrication and/or cooling of the pump shaft exits the pump, thereby resulting in a visible leak of fluid. This exemption expires when the existing pump is replaced or reconstructed.


(b) An owner or operator may elect to comply with the requirements specified in §§ 60.483-1 and 60.483-2.


(c) An owner or operator may apply to the Administrator for a determination of equivalency for any means of emission limitation that achieves a reduction in emissions of VOC at least equivalent to the reduction in emissions of VOC achieved by the controls required in this subpart. In doing so, the owner or operator shall comply with requirements specified in § 60.484.


(d) Each owner or operator subject to the provisions of this subpart shall comply with the provisions specified in § 60.485 except an owner or operator may use the following provision in addition to § 60.485(e): Equipment is in light liquid service if the percent evaporated is greater than 10 percent at 150 °C (302 °F) as determined by ASTM Method D86-78, 82, 90, 95, or 96 (incorporated by reference as specified in § 60.17).


(e) Each owner or operator subject to the provisions of this subpart shall comply with §§ 60.486 and 60.487.


[55 FR 51035, Dec. 11, 1990; 56 FR 12299, Mar. 22, 1991, as amended at 65 FR 61767, Oct. 17, 2000]


§ 60.563 Monitoring requirements.

(a) Whenever a particular item of monitoring equipment is specified in this section to be installed, the owner or operator shall install, calibrate, maintain, and operate according to manufacturer’s specifications that item as follows:


(1) A temperature monitoring device to measure and record continuously the operating temperature to within 1 percent (relative to degrees Celsius) or ±0.5 °C (±0.9 °F), whichever is greater.


(2) A flame monitoring device, such as a thermocouple, an ultraviolet sensor, an infrared beam sensor, or similar device to indicate and record continuously whether a flare or pilot light flame is present, as specified.


(3) A flow monitoring indicator to indicate and record whether or not flow exists at least once every fifteen minutes.


(4) An organic monitoring device (based on a detection principle such as infrared, photoionization, or thermal conductivity) to indicate and record continuously the concentration level of organic compounds.


(5) A specific gravity monitoring device to measure and record continuously to within 0.02 specific gravity unit.


(b) The owner or operator shall install, as applicable, the monitoring equipment for the control means used to comply with § 60.562-1, except § 60.562-1(a)(1)(i)(D), as follows:


(1) If the control equipment is an incinerator:


(i) For a noncatalytic incinerator, a temperature monitoring device shall be installed in the firebox.


(ii) For a catalytic incinerator, temperature monitoring devices shall be installed in the gas stream immediately before and after the catalytic bed.


(2) If a flare is used:


(i) A flame monitoring device shall be installed to indicate the presence of a flare flame or a flame for each pilot light, if the flare is used to comply with § 60.562-1(a)(1), including those flares controlling both continuous and intermittent emissions.


(ii) A thermocouple or equivalent monitoring device to indicate the presence of a flame at each pilot light, if used to comply with § 60.562-1(a)(2).


(3) If a boiler or process heater is used:


(i) If the boiler or process heater has a heat input design capacity of less than 150 million Btu/hr, a temperature monitoring device shall be installed between the radiant section and the convection zone for watertube boilers and between the furnace (combustion zone) and the firetubes for firetube boilers.


(ii) If the boiler or process heater has a heat input design capacity of 150 million Btu/hr or greater, such records to indicate the periods of operation of the boiler or process heater shall be maintained. The records must be readily available for inspection.


(4) If an absorber is the final unit in a system:


(i) A temperature monitoring device and a specific gravity monitoring device for the scrubber liquid shall be installed, or


(ii) An organic monitoring device shall be installed at the outlet of the absorber.


(5) If a condenser is the final unit in a system:


(i) A temperature monitoring device shall be installed at the condenser exit (product side), or


(ii) An organic monitoring device shall be installed at the outlet of the condenser.


(6) If a carbon adsorber is the final unit in a system, an organic monitoring device shall be installed at the outlet of the carbon bed.


(c) Owners or operators of control devices used to comply with the provisions of this subpart, except § 60.562-1(a)(1)(i)(D), shall monitor these control devices to ensure that they are operated and maintained in conformance with their designs.


(d) Owners or operators using a vent system that contains valves that could divert a vent stream from a control device used to comply with the provisions of this subpart shall do one or a combination of the following:


(1) Install a flow indicator immediately downstream of each valve that if opened would allow a vent stream to bypass the control device and be emitted, either directly or indirectly, to the atmosphere. The flow indicator shall be capable of recording flow at least once every fifteen minutes.


(2) Monitor the valves once a month, checking the position of the valves and the condition of the car seal, and identify all times when the car seals have been broken and the valve position has been changed (i.e., from opened to closed for valves in the vent piping to the control device and from closed to open for valves that allow the stream to be vented directly or indirectly to the atmosphere).


(e) An owner or operator complying with the standards specified under § 60.562-1, except § 60.562-1(a)(1)(i)(D), with control devices other than an incinerator, boiler, process heater, flare, absorber, condenser, or carbon adsorber or by any other means shall provide to the Administrator information describing the operation of the control device and the process parameter(s) which would indicate proper operation and maintenance of the device. The Administrator may request further information and will specify appropriate monitoring procedures or requirements.


[55 FR 51035, Dec. 11, 1990; 56 FR 12299, Mar. 22, 1991]


§ 60.564 Test methods and procedures.

(a) In conducting the performance tests required in § 60.8, the owner or operator shall use as reference methods and procedures the test methods in appendix A of this part or other methods and procedures specified in this section, except as provided under § 60.8(b). Owners or operators complying with § 60.562-1(a)(1)(i)(D) need not perform a performance test on the control device, provided the control device is not used to comply with any other requirement of § 60.562-1(a).


(1) Whenever changes are made in production capacity, feedstock type or catalyst type, or whenever there is replacement, removal, or addition of a control device, each owner or operator shall conduct a performance test according to the procedures in this section as appropriate, in order to determine compliance with § 60.562-1.


(2) Where a boiler or process heater with a design heat input capacity of 150 million Btu/hour or greater is used, the requirement for an initial performance test is waived, in accordance with § 60.8(b). However, the Administrator reserves the option to require testing at such other times as may be required, as provided for in § 114 of the Act.


(3) The owner or operator shall determine the average organic concentration for each performance test run using the equipment described in § 60.563(a)(4). The average organic concentration shall be determined from measurements taken at least every 15 minutes during each performance test run. The average of the three runs shall be the base value for the monitoring program.


(4) When an absorber is the final unit in the system, the owner or operator shall determine the average specific gravity for each performance test run using specific gravity monitoring equipment described in § 60.563(a)(5). An average specific gravity shall be determined from measurements taken at least every 15 minutes during each performance test run. The average of the three runs shall be the base value for the monitoring program.


(5) When a condenser is the final unit in the system, the owner or operator shall determine the average outlet temperature for each performance test run using the temperature monitoring equipment described in § 60.563(a)(1). An average temperature shall be determined from measurements taken at least every 15 minutes during each performance test run while the vent stream is normally routed and constituted. The average of the three runs shall be the base value for the monitoring program.


(b) The owner or operator shall determine compliance with the emission concentration standard in § 60.562-1 (a)(1)(i)(A) or (b)(1)(iii) if applicable [if not, see paragraph (c) of this section] as follows:


(1) The TOC concentration is the sum of the individual components and shall be computed for each run using the following equation:




where:

CTOC = Concentration of TOC (minus methane and ethane), dry basis, ppmv.

Cj = the concentration of sample component j, ppm.

n = Number of components in the sample.

(i) Method 18 shall be used to determine the concentration of each individual organic component (Cj) in the gas stream. Method 1 or 1A, as appropriate, shall be used to determine the sampling site at the outlet of the control device. Method 4 shall be used to determine the moisture content, if necessary.


(ii) The sampling time for each run shall be 1 hour in which either an integrated sample or four grab samples shall be taken. If grab sampling is used, then the samples shall be taken at 15 minute intervals.


(2) If supplemental combustion air is used, the TOC concentration shall be corrected to 3 percent oxygen and shall be computed using the following equation:




where:

CCORR = Concentration of TOC corrected to 3 percent oxygen, dry basis, ppm by volume.

CMEAS = Concentration of TOC (minus methane and ethane), dry basis, ppm by volume, as calculated in paragraph (b)(1) of this section.

%O2d = Concentration of O2, dry basis, percent by volume.

The emission rate correction factor, integrated sampling and analysis procedure of Method 3 shall be used to determine the oxygen concentration (%O2d). The sampling site shall be the same as that of the TOC sample and the samples shall be taken during the same time that the TOC samples are taken.

(c) If paragraph (b) of this section is not applicable, then the owner or operator shall determine compliance with the percent emission reduction standard in § 60.562-1 (a)(1)(i)(A) or (b)(1)(iii) as follows:


(1) The emission reduction of TOC (minus methane and ethane) shall be determined using the following equation:




where:

P = Percent emission reduction, by weight.

Einlet = Mass rate of TOC entering the control device, kg TOC/hr (lb TOC/hr).

Eoutlet = Mass rate of TOC, discharged to the atmosphere, kg TOC/hr (lb TOC/hr).

(2) The mass rates of TOC (Ei, Eo) shall be computed using the following equations:





where:

Cij,Coj = Concentration of sample component “j” of the gas stream at the inlet and outlet of the control device, respectively, dry basis, ppmv.

Mij,Moj = Molecular weight of sample component “j” of the gas stream at the inlet and outlet of the control device respectively, g/g-mole (lb/lb-mole).

Qi,Qo = Flow rate of the gas stream at the inlet and outlet of the control device, respectively, dscm/hr (dscf/hr).

K1 = 4.157 × 10−8 [(kg)/g-mole)] / [(g)(ppm)(dscm)] {5.711 × 10−15 [(lb)/(lb-mole)] / (lb)(ppm)(dscf)]}

(i) Method 18 shall be used to determine the concentration of each individual organic component (Cij, Coj) in the gas stream. Method 1 or 1A, as appropriate, shall be used to determine the inlet and outlet sampling sites. The inlet site shall be before the inlet of the control device and after all product recovery units.


(ii) Method 2, 2A, 2C, or 2D, as appropriate, shall be used to determine the volumetric flow rates (Qi, Qo). If necessary, Method 4 shall be used to determine the moisture content. Both determinations shall be compatible with the Method 18 determinations.


(iii) Inlet and outlet samples shall be taken simultaneously. The sampling time for each run shall be 1 hour in which either an integrated sample or four grab samples shall be taken. If grab sampling is used, then the samples shall be taken at 15 minute intervals.


(d) An owner or operator shall determine compliance with the individual stream exemptions in § 60.560(g) and the procedures specified in table 3 for compliance with § 60.562-1(a)(1) as identified in paragraphs (d)(1) and (2) of this section. An owner or operator using the procedures specified in § 60.562-1(a)(1) for determining which continuous process emissions are to be controlled may use calculations demonstrated to be sufficiently accurate as to preclude the necessity of actual testing for purposes of calculating the uncontrolled annual emissions and weight percent of TOC. Owners or operators seeking to exempt streams under § 60.560(g) must use the appropriate test procedures specified in this section.


(1) The uncontrolled annual emissions of the individual vent stream shall be determined using the following equation:





Where:

Eunc = uncontrolled annual emissions, Mg/yr (ton/yr)

Cj = concentration of sample component j of the gas stream, dry basis, ppmv

Mj = molecular weight of sample component j of the gas stream, g/g-mole (lb/lb-mole)

Q = flow rate of the gas stream, dscm/hr (dscf/hr)

K2 = 4.157 × 10−11 [(Mg)(g-mole)]/[(g)(ppm)(dscm)] (metric units)

= 1.298 × 10−12 [(ton)(lb-mole)]/[(lb)(ppm)(dscf)] (English units)

8,600 = operating hours per year

(i) Method 18 shall be used to determine the concentration of each individual organic component (Cj) in the gas stream. Method 1 or 1A, as appropriate, shall be used to determine the sampling site. If the gas stream is controlled in an existing control device, the sampling site shall be before the inlet of the control device and after all product recovery units.


(ii) Method 2, 2A, 2C, or 2D, as appropriate, shall be used to determine the volumetric flow rate (Q). If necessary, Method 4 shall be used to determine the moisture content. Both determinations shall be compatible with the Method 18 determinations.


(iii) The sampling time for each run shall be 1 hour in which either an integrated sample or four grab samples shall be taken. If grab sampling is used, then the samples shall be taken at 15 minute intervals.


(2) The weight percent VOC of the uncontrolled individual vent stream shall be determined using the following equation:




where:

Cj = concentration of sample TOC component “j” of the gas stream, dry basis, ppmv.

Mj = Molecular weight of sample TOC component “j” of the gas stream, g/g-mole (1b/1b-mole).

MWgas = Average molecular weight of the entire gas stream, g/g-mole (1b/1b-mole).

(i) Method 18 shall be used to determine the concentration of each individual organic component (Cj) in the gas stream. Method 1 or 1A, as appropriate, shall be used to determine the sampling site. If the gas stream is controlled in an existing control device, the sampling site shall be before the inlet of the control device and after all product recovery units. If necessary, Method 4 shall be used to determine the moisture content. This determination shall be compatible with the Method 18 determinations.


(ii) The average molecular weight of the gas stream shall be determined using methods approved by the Administrator. If the carrier component of the gas stream is nitrogen, then an average molecular weight of 28 g/g-mole (lb/lb-mole) may be used in lieu of testing. If the carrier component of the gas stream is air, then an average molecular weight of 29 g/g-mole (lb/lb-mole) may be used in lieu of testing.


(iii) The sampling time for each run shall be 1 hour in which either an integrated sample or four grab samples shall be taken. If grab sampling is used, then the samples shall be taken at 15 minute intervals.


(e) The owner or operator shall determine compliance of flares with the visible emission and flare provisions in § 60.562-1 as follows:


(1) Method 22 shall be used to determine visible emissions. The observation period for each run shall be 2 hours.


(2) The monitoring device of § 60.563(b)(2) shall be used to determine whether a flame is present.


(f) The owner or operator shall determine compliance with the net heating value provisions in § 60.18 as referenced by § 60.562-1(a)(1)(i)(C). The net heating value of the process vent stream being combusted in a flare shall be computed as follows:





Where:

HT = Vent stream net heating value, MJ/scm (Btu/scf), where the net enthalpy per mole of offgas is based on combustion at 25 °C and 760 mm Hg (68 °F and 30 in. Hg), but the standard temperature for determining the volume corresponding to one mole is 20 °C (68 °F).

K3 = 1.74 × 10−7 (1/ppm)(g-mole/scm)(MJ/kcal) (metric units), where standard temperature for (g-mole/scm) is 20 °C.

= 4.67 × 10−6 (1/ppm)(lb-mole/scf)(Btu/kcal) (English units) where standard temperature for (lb/mole/scf) is 68 °F.

Cj = Concentration on a wet basis of compound j in ppm.

Hj = Net heat of combustion of compound j, kcal/(g-mole) (kcal/(lb-mole)), based on combustion at 25 °C and 760 mm Hg (77 °F and 30 in. Hg).

(1) Method 18 shall be used to determine the concentration of each individual organic component (Cj) in the gas stream. Method 1 or 1A, as appropriate, shall be used to determine the sampling site to the inlet of the flare. Using this same sample, ASTM D1946-77 or 90 (Reapproved 1994) (incorporated by reference—see § 60.17) shall be used to determine the hydrogen and carbon monoxide content.


(2) The sampling time for each run shall be 1 hour in which either an integrated sample or four grab samples shall be taken. If grab sampling is used, then the samples shall be taken at 15 minute intervals.


(3) Published or calculated values shall be used for the net heats of combustion of the sample components. If values are not published or cannot be calculated, ASTM D2382-76 or 88 or D4809-95 (incorporated by reference—see § 60.17) may be used to determine the net heat of combustion of component “j.”


(g) The owner or operator shall determine compliance with the exit velocity provisions in § 60.18 as referenced by § 60.562-1(a)(1)(i)(C) as follows:


(1) If applicable, the net heating value (HT) of the process vent shall be determined according to the procedures in paragraph (f) of this section to determine the applicable velocity requirements.


(2) If applicable, the maximum permitted velocity (Vmax) for steam-assisted and nonassisted flares shall be computed using the following equation:





Where:

Vmax = Maximum permitted velocity, m/sec (ft/sec)

K4 = 28.8 (metric units), 1212 (English units)

K5 = 31.7 (metric units), 850.8 (English units)

HT = The net heating value as determined in paragraph (f) of this section, MJ/scm (Btu/scf).

(3) The maximum permitted velocity, Vmax, for air-assisted flares shall be determined by the following equation:





Where:

Vmax = Maximum permitted velocity, m/sec (ft/sec).

K6 = 8.706 m/sec (metric units)

= 28.56 ft/sec (English units)

K7 = 0.7084 [(m/sec)/MJ/scm)] (metric units)

= 0.00245 [(ft/sec)/Btu/scf)] (English units)

HT = The net heating value as determined in paragraph (f) of this section, MJ/scm (Btu/scf).

(4) The actual exit velocity of a flare shall be determined by dividing the volumetric flow rate (in units of standard temperature and pressure), as determined by Method 2, 2A, 2C, or 2D as appropriate, by the unobstructed (free) cross sectional area of the flare tip.


(h) The owner or operator shall determine compliance with the mass emission per mass product standards in §§ 60.560(d) and (e) and in §§ 60.562-1(b)(1)(i), (c)(1)(i)(A), (c)(1)(ii)(A), (c)(2)(i), and (c)(2)(ii)(A).


(1) The emission rate of TOC shall be computed using the following equation:





Where:

ERTOC = Emission rate of total organic compounds (minus methane and ethane), kg TOC/Mg (lb TOC/ton) product

ETOC = Emission rate of total organic compounds (minus methane and ethane) in the sample, kg/hr (lb/hr)

Pp = The rate of polymer production, kg/hr (lb/hr)

K5 = 1,000 kg/Mg (metric units)

= 2,000 lb/ton (English units)

(2) The mass rate of TOC, ETOC, shall be determined according to the procedures, as appropriate, in paragraph (c)(2) of this section. The sampling site for determining compliance with §§ 60.560 (d) and (e) shall be before any add-on control devices and after all product recovery devices. Otherwise, the sampling site shall be at the outlet of the control device.


(3) The rate of polymer production, Pp, shall be determined by dividing the weight of polymer pulled (in kg (lb)) from the process line during the performance test by the number of hours taken to perform the performance test. The weight of polymer pulled shall be determined by direct measurement or, subject to prior approval by the Administrator, computed from materials balance by good engineering practice.


(i) The owner or operator shall determine continuous compliance with the temperature requirements in §§ 60.562-1(b)(1)(ii) and 60.562-1(c)(1)(i)(B) by using the temperature monitoring equipment described in § 60.563(a)(1). An average temperature shall be determined from measurements taken at least every 15 minutes every three hours while the vent stream is normally routed and constituted. Each three-hour period constitutes a performance test.


(j) For purposes of determining compliance with § 60.562-1(c) (1)(ii)(B), (1)(ii)(C), (2)(ii)(B), or (2)(ii)(C), the ethylene glycol concentration in either the cooling tower or the liquid effluent from steam-jet ejectors used to produce a vacuum in the polymerization reactors, whichever is applicable, shall be determined:


(1) Using procedures that conform to the methods described in ASTM D2908-74 or 91, “Standard Practice for Measuring Volatile Organic Matter in Water by Aqueous-Injection Gas Chromatography” (incorporated by reference—see § 60.17), except as provided in paragraph (j)(2) of this section:


(i) At least one sample per operating day shall be collected using the grab sampling procedures of ASTM D3370-76 or 96a, “Standard Practices for Sampling Water” (incorporated by reference—see § 60.17). An average ethylene glycol concentration by weight shall be calculated on a daily basis over a rolling 14-day period of operating days, except as provided in paragraphs (j)(1) (ii) and (iii) of this section. Each daily average ethylene glycol concentration so calculated constitutes a performance test. Exceedance of the standard during the reduced testing program specified in paragraphs (j)(1) (ii) and (iii) of this section is a violation of these standards.


(ii) For those determining compliance with § 60.562-1(c) (1)(ii)(B) or (2)(ii)(B), the owner or operator may elect to reduce the sampling program to any 14 consecutive day period once every two calendar months, if at least seventeen consecutive 14-day rolling average concentrations immediately preceding the reduced sampling program are each less than 0.10 weight percent ethylene glycol. If the average concentration obtained over the 14 day sampling during the reduced testing period exceeds the upper 95 percent confidence interval calculated from the most recent test results in which no one 14-day average exceeded 0.10 weight percent ethylene glycol, then the owner or operator shall reinstitute a daily sampling program. A reduced sampling program can be reinstituted if the requirements specified in this paragraph are met.


(iii) For those determining compliance with § 60.562-1(c)(1)(ii)(C) or (c)(2)(ii)(C), the owner or operator may elect to reduce the sampling program to any 14 consecutive day period once every two calendar months, if at least seventeen consecutive 14-day rolling average concentrations immediately preceding the reduced sampling program are each less than 1.8 weight percent ethylene glycol. If the average concentration obtained over the 14 day sampling during the reduced test period exceeds the upper 95 percent confidence interval calculated from the most recent test results in which no one 14-day average exceeded 1.8 weight percent ethylene glycol, then the owner or operator shall reinstitute a daily sampling program. A reduced program can be reinstituted if the requirements specified in this paragraph are met.


(iv) The upper 95 percent confidence interval shall be calculated using the equation:





Where:

Xi = daily ethylene glycol concentration for each day used to calculate the 14-day rolling average used in test results to justify implementing the reduced testing program.

n = number of ethylene glycol concentrations.

(2) Measuring an alternative parameter, such as carbon oxygen demand or biological oxygen demand, that is demonstrated to be directly proportional to the ethylene glycol concentration. Such parameter shall be measured during the initial 14-day performance test during which the facility is shown to be in compliance with the ethylene glycol concentration standard whereby the ethylene glycol concentration is determined using the procedures described in paragraph (j)(1) of this section. The alternative parameter shall be measured on a daily basis and the average value of the alternative parameter shall be calculated on a daily basis over a rolling 14-day period of operating days. Each daily average value of the alternative parameter constitutes a performance test.


[55 FR 51035, Dec. 11, 1990; 56 FR 9178, Mar. 5, 1991, as amended at 56 FR 12299, Mar. 22, 1991; 64 FR 11541, Mar. 9, 1999; 65 FR 61767, Oct. 17, 2000]


§ 60.565 Reporting and recordkeeping requirements.

(a) Each owner or operator subject to the provisions of this subpart shall keep an up-to-date, readily-accessible record of the following information measured during each performance test, and shall include the following information in the report of the initial performance test in addition to the written results of such performance tests as required under § 60.8. Where a control device is used to comply with § 60.562-1(a)(1)(i)(D) only, a report containing performance test data need not be submitted, but a report containing the information in § 60.565(a)(11) is required. Where a boiler or process heater with a design heat input capacity of 150 million Btu/hour or greater is used to comply with § 60.562-1(a), a report containing performance test data need not be submitted, but a report containing the information in § 60.565(a)(2)(i) is required. The same information specified in this section shall be submitted in the reports of all subsequently required performance tests where either the emission control efficiency of a combustion device or the outlet concentration of TOC (minus methane and ethane) is determined.


(1) When an incinerator is used to demonstrate compliance with § 60.562-1, except § 60.562-1(a)(2):


(i) The average firebox temperature of the incinerator (or the average temperature upstream and downstream of the catalyst bed), measured at least every 15 minutes and averaged over the performance test period, and


(ii) The percent reduction of TOC (minus methane and ethane) achieved by the incinerator, the concentration of TOC (minus methane and ethane) (ppmv, by compound) at the outlet of the control device on a dry basis, or the emission rate in terms of kg TOC (minus methane and ethane) per Mg (lb TOC/ton) of product at the outlet of the control device, whichever is appropriate. If supplemental combustion air is used, the TOC concentration corrected to 3 percent oxygen shall be recorded and reported.


(2) When a boiler or process heater is used to demonstrate compliance with § 60.562-1, except § 60.562-1(a)(2):


(i) A description of the location at which the vent stream is introduced into the boiler or process heater, and


(ii) For boilers or process heaters with a design heat input capacity of less than 150 million Btu/hr, all 3-hour periods of operation during which the average combustion temperature was more than 28 °C (50 °F) below the average combustion temperature during the most recent performance test at which compliance was determined.


(3) When a flare is used to demonstrate compliance with § 60.562-1, except § 60.562-1(a)(2):


(i) All visible emission readings, heat content determinations, flow rate measurements, and exit velocity determinations made during the performance test,


(ii) Continuous records of the pilot flame heat-sensing monitoring, and


(iii) Records of all periods of operations during which the pilot flame is absent.


(4) When an incinerator, boiler, or process heater is used to demonstrate compliance with § 60.562-1(a)(2), a description of the location at which the vent stream is introduced into the incinerator, boiler, or process heater.


(5) When a flare is used to demonstrate compliance with § 60.562-1(a)(2):


(i) All visible emission readings made during the performance test,


(ii) Continuous records of the pilot flame heat-sensing monitoring, and


(iii) Records of all periods of operation during which the pilot flame is absent.


(6) When an absorber is the final unit in a system to demonstrate compliance with § 60.562-1, except § 60.562-1(a)(2), the specific gravity (or alternative parameter that is a measure of the degree of absorbing liquid saturation, if approved by the Administrator), and average temperature, measured at least every 15 minutes and averaged over the performance test period, of the absorbing liquid (both measured while the vent stream is normally routed and constituted).


(7) When a condenser is the final unit in a system to demonstrate compliance with § 60.562-1, except § 60.562-1(a)(2), the average exit (product side) temperature, measured at least every 15 minutes and averaged over the performance test period while the vent stream is normally routed and constituted.


(8) Daily measurement and daily average 14-day rolling average of the ethylene glycol concentration in the liquid effluent exiting the vacuum system servicing the polymerization reaction section, if an owner or operator is subject to § 60.562-1(c) (1)(ii)(B) or (2)(ii)(B), or of the ethylene glycol concentration in the cooling water in the cooling tower, if subject to § 60.562-1(c) (2)(ii)(C) or (2)(iii)(C).


(9) When a carbon adsorber is the final unit in a system to demonstrate compliance with § 60.562-1, except § 60.562-1(a)(2): the concentration level or reading indicated by the organics monitoring device at the outlet of the adsorber, measured at least every 15 minutes and averaged over the performance test period while the vent stream is normally routed and constituted.


(10) When an owner or operator seeks to comply with the requirements of this subpart by complying with the uncontrolled threshold emission rate cutoff provision in §§ 60.560 (d) and (e) or with the individual stream exemptions in § 60.560(g), each process operation variable (e.g., pressure, temperature, type of catalyst) that may result in an increase in the uncontrolled emission rate, if § 60.560(d) or (e) is applicable, or in an increase in the uncontrolled annual emissions or the VOC weight percent, as appropriate, if § 60.560(g) is applicable, should such operating variable be changed.


(11) When an owner or operator uses a control device to comply with § 60.562-1(a)(1)(i)(D) alone: all periods when the control device is not operating.


(b)(1) Each owner or operator subject to the provisions of this subpart shall submit with the initial performance test or, if complying with § 60.562-1(a)(1)(i)(D), as a separate report, an engineering report describing in detail the vent system used to vent each affected vent stream to a control device. This report shall include all valves and vent pipes that could vent the stream to the atmosphere, thereby bypassing the control device, and identify which valves are car-sealed opened and which valves are car-sealed closed.


(2) If a vent system containing valves that could divert the emission stream away from the control device is used, each owner or operator subject to the provisions of this subpart shall keep for at least two years up-to-date, readily accessible continuous records of:


(i) All periods when flow is indicated if flow indicators are installed under § 69.563(d)(1).


(ii) All times when maintenance is performed on car-sealed valves, when the car seal is broken, and when the valve position is changed (i.e., from open to closed for valves in the vent piping to the control device and from closed to open for valves that vent the stream directly or indirectly to the atmosphere bypassing the control device).


(c) Where an incinerator is used to comply with § 60.562-1, except §§ 60.562(a)(1)(i)(D) and (a)(2), each owner or operator subject to the provisions of this subpart shall keep for at least 2 years up-to-date, readily accessible continuous records of:


(1) The temperature measurements specified under § 60.563(b)(1).


(2) Records of periods of operation during which the parameter boundaries established during the most recent performance test are exceeded. Periods of operation during which the parameter boundaries established during the most recent performance test are exceeded are defined as follows:


(i) For noncatalytic incinerators, all 3-hour periods of operation during which the average combustion temperature was more than 28 °C (50 °F) below the average combustion temperature during the most recent performance test at which compliance was demonstrated.


(ii) For catalytic incinerators, all 3-hour periods of operation during which the average temperature of the vent stream immediately before the catalyst bed is more than 28 °C (50 °F) below the average temperature of the vent stream during the most recent performance test at which compliance was demonstrated. The owner or operator also shall record all 3-hour periods of operation during which the average temperature difference across the catalyst bed is less than 80 percent of the average temperature difference across the catalyst bed during the most recent performance test at which compliance was demonstrated.


(d) Where a boiler or process heater is used to comply with § 60.562-1, except §§ 60.562-1 (a)(1)(i)(D) and (a)(2), each owner or operator subject to the provisions of this subpart shall keep for at least 2 years up-to-date, readily accessible continuous records of:


(1) Where a boiler or process heater with a heat input design capacity of 150 million Btu/hr or greater is used, all periods of operation of the boiler or process heater. (Examples of such records could include records of steam use, fuel use, or monitoring data collected pursuant to other State or Federal regulatory requirements), and


(2) Where a boiler or process heater with a heat input design capacity of less than 150 million Btu/hr is used, all periods of operation during which the parameter boundaries established during the most recent performance test are exceeded. Periods of operation during which the parameter boundaries established during the most recent performance test are exceeded are defined as all 3-hour periods of operation during which the average combustion temperature was more than 28 °C (50 °F) below the average combustion temperature during the most recent performance test at which compliance was demonstrated.


(e) Where a flare is used to comply with § 60.562-1, except § 60.562-1(a)(1)(i)(D), each owner or operator subject to the provisions of this subpart shall keep for at least 2 years up-to-date, readily accessible continuous records of:


(1) The flare or pilot light flame heat sensing monitoring specified under § 60.563(b)(2), and


(2) All periods of operation in which the flare or pilot flame, as appropriate, is absent.


(f) Where an adsorber, condenser, absorber, or a control device other than a flare, incinerator, boiler, or process heater is used to comply with § 60.562-1, except § 60.562-1(a)(1)(i)(D), each owner or operator subject to the provisions of this subpart shall keep for at least 2 years up-to-date, readily-accessible continuous records of the periods of operation during which the parameter boundaries established during the most recent performance test are exceeded. Where an owner or operator seeks to comply with § 60.562-1, periods of operation during which the parameter boundaries established during the most recent performance tests are exceeded are defined as follows:


(1) Where an absorber is the final unit in a system:


(i) All 3-hour periods of operation during which the average absorbing liquid temperature was more than 11 °C (20 °F) above the average absorbing liquid temperature during the most recent performance test at which compliance was demonstrated, and


(ii) All 3-hour periods of operation during which the average absorbing liquid specific gravity was more than 0.1 unit above, or more than 0.1 unit below, the average absorbing liquid specific gravity during the most recent performance test at which compliance was demonstrated (unless monitoring of an alternative parameter that is a measure of the degree of absorbing liquid saturation is approved by the Administrator, in which case he or she will define appropriate parameter boundaries and periods of operation during which they are exceeded).


(2) Where a condenser is the final unit in a system, all 3-hour periods of operation during which the average condenser operating temperature was more than 6 °C (10 °F) above the average operating temperature during the most recent performance test at which compliance was demonstrated.


(3) Where a carbon adsorber is the final unit in a system, all 3-hour periods of operation during which the average organic concentration level in the carbon adsorber gases is more than 20 percent greater than the exhaust gas concentration level or reading measured by the organics monitoring system during the most recent performance test at which compliance was demonstrated.


(g) Each owner or operator of an affected facility subject to the provisions of this subpart and seeking to demonstrate compliance with § 60.560(j) or § 60.562-1 shall keep up-to-date, readily accessible records of:


(1) Any changes in production capacity, feedstock type, or catalyst type, or of any replacement, removal or addition of product recovery equipment; and


(2) The results of any performance test performed pursuant to the procedures specified by § 60.564.


(h) Each owner or operator of an affected facility that seeks to comply with the requirements of this subpart by complying with the uncontrolled threshold emission rate cutoff provision in §§ 60.560 (d) and (e) or with the individual stream exemptions in § 60.560(g) shall keep for at least 2 years up-to-date, readily accessible records of any change in process operation that increases the uncontrolled emission rate of the process line in which the affected facility is located, if § 60.560 (d) or (e) is applicable, or that increases the uncontrolled annual emissions or the VOC weight percent of the individual stream, if § 60.560(g) is applicable.


(i) Each owner and operator subject to the provisions of this subpart is exempt from § 60.7(c) of the General Provisions.


(j) The Administrator will specify appropriate reporting and recordkeeping requirements where the owner or operator of an affected facility complies with the standards specified under § 60.562-1 other than as provided under § 60.565 (a) through (e).


(k) Each owner or operator that seeks to comply with the requirements of this subpart by complying with the uncontrolled threshold emission rate cutoff provision of §§ 60.560 (d) and (e), the individual stream exemptions of § 60.560(g), or the requirements of § 60.562-1 shall submit to the Administrator semiannual reports of the following recorded information, as applicable. The initial report shall be submitted within 6 months after the initial start-up date.


(1) Exceedances of monitored parameters recorded under §§ 60.565 (c), (d)(2), and (f).


(2) All periods recorded under § 60.565(b) when the vent stream has been diverted from the control device.


(3) All periods recorded under § 60.565(d) when the boiler or process heater was not operating.


(4) All periods recorded under § 60.565(e) in which the flare or pilot flame was absent.


(5) All periods recorded under § 60.565(a)(8) when the 14-day rolling average exceeded the standard specified in § 60.562-1(c) (1)(ii)(B), (1)(ii)(C), (2)(ii)(B), or (2)(ii)(C), as applicable.


(6) Any change in process operations that increases the uncontrolled emission rate of the process line in which the affected facility is located, as recorded in § 60.565(h).


(7) Any change in process operations that increases the uncontrolled annual emissions or the VOC weight percent of the individual stream, as recorded in § 60.565(h).


(l) Each owner or operator subject to the provisions of this subpart shall notify the Administrator of the specific provisions of § 60.562, § 60.560(d), or § 60.560(e), as applicable, with which the owner or operator has elected to comply. Notification shall be submitted with the notification of initial startup required by § 60.7(a)(3). If an owner or operator elects at a later date to use an alternative provision of § 60.562 with which he or she will comply or becomes subject to § 60.562 for the first time (i.e., the owner or operator can no longer meet the requirements of this subpart by complying with the uncontrolled threshold emission rate cutoff provision in § 60.560 (d) or (e)), then the owner or operator shall notify the Administrator 90 days before implementing a change and, upon implementing a change, a performance test shall be performed as specified in § 60.564.


(m) The requirements of this subsection remain in force until and unless EPA, in delegating enforcement authority to a State under section 111(c) of the Act, approves alternative reporting requirements or means of compliance surveillance adopted by such State. In that event, affected sources within the State will be relieved of the obligation to comply with this subsection, provided that they comply with the requirements established by the State.


[55 FR 51035, Dec. 11, 1990; 56 FR 9178, Mar. 5, 1991, as amended at 56 FR 12299, Mar. 22, 1991; 65 FR 61768, Oct. 17, 2000; 65 FR 78278, Dec. 14, 2000]


§ 60.566 Delegation of authority.

(a) In delegating implementation and enforcement authority to a State under section 111(c) of the Act, the authority contained in paragraph (b) of this section shall be retained by the Administrator and not transferred to a State.


(b) Authority which will not be delegated to States: § 60.562-2(c).


Subpart EEE [Reserved]

Subpart FFF—Standards of Performance for Flexible Vinyl and Urethane Coating and Printing


Source:49 FR 26892, June 29, 1984, unless otherwise noted.

§ 60.580 Applicability and designation of affected facility.

(a) The affected facility to which the provisions of this subpart apply is each rotogravure printing line used to print or coat flexible vinyl or urethane products.


(b) This subpart applies to any affected facility which begins construction, modification, or reconstruction after January 18, 1983.


(c) For facilities controlled by a solvent recovery emission control device, the provisions of § 60.584(a) requiring monitoring of operations will not apply until EPA has promulgated performance specifications under appendix B for the continuous monitoring system. After the promulgation of performance specifications, these provisions will apply to each affected facility under paragraph (b) of this section. Facilities controlled by a solvent recovery emission control device that become subject to the standard prior to promulgation of performance specifications must conduct performance tests in accordance with § 60.13(b) after performance specifications are promulgated.


§ 60.581 Definitions and symbols.

(a) All terms used in this subpart, not defined below, are given the same meaning as in the Act or in subpart A of this part.


Emission control device means any solvent recovery or solvent destruction device used to control volatile organic compounds (VOC) emissions from flexible vinyl and urethane rotogravure printing lines.


Emission control system means the combination of an emission control device and a vapor capture system for the purpose of reducing VOC emissions from flexible vinyl and urethane rotogravure printing lines.


Flexible vinyl and urethane products mean those products, except for resilient floor coverings (1977 Standard Industry Code 3996) and flexible packaging, that are more than 50 micrometers (0.002 inches) thick, and that consist of or contain a vinyl or urethane sheet or a vinyl or urethane coated web.


Gravure cylinder means a plated cylinder with a printing image consisting of minute cells or indentations, specifically engraved or etched into the cylinder’s surface to hold ink when continuously revolved through a fountain of ink.


Ink means any mixture of ink, coating solids, organic solvents including dilution solvent, and water that is applied to the web of flexible vinyl or urethane on a rotogravure printing line.


Ink solids means the solids content of an ink as determined by Method 24, ink manufacturer’s formulation data, or plant blending records.


Inventory system means a method of physically accounting for the quantity of ink, solvent, and solids used at one or more affected facilities during a time period. The system is based on plant purchase or inventory records.


Plant blending records means those records which document the weight fraction of organic solvents and solids used in the formulation or preparation of inks at the vinyl or urethane printing plant where they are used.


Rotogravure print station means any device designed to print or coat inks on one side of a continuous web or substrate using the intaglio printing process with a gravure cylinder.


Rotogravure printing line means any number of rotogravure print stations and associated dryers capable of printing or coating simultaneously on the same continuous vinyl or urethane web or substrate, which is fed from a continuous roll.


Vapor capture system means any device or combination of devices designed to contain, collect, and route organic solvent vapors emitted from the flexible vinyl or urethane rotogravure printing line.


(b) All symbols used in this subpart not defined below are given the same meaning as in the Act or in subpart A of this part.



a = the gas stream vents exiting the emission control device.

bthe gas stream vents entering the emission control device.

fthe gas stream vents which are not directed to an emission control device.

Caj = the concentration of VOC in each gas stream (j) for the time period exiting the emission control device, in parts per million by volume.

Cbi = the concentration of VOC in each gas stream (i) for the time period entering the emission control device, in parts per million by volume.

Cfk = the concentration of VOC in each gas stream (k) for the time period which is not directed to an emission control device, in parts per million by volume.

Gthe weighted average mass of VOC per mass of ink solids applied, in kilograms per kilogram.

Mci = the total mass of each ink (i) applied in the time period as determined from plant records, in kilograms.

Mdj = the total mass of each dilution solvent (j) added at the print line in the time period determined from plant records, in kilograms.

Qaj = the volumetric flow rate of each effluent gas stream (j) exiting the emission control device, in standard cubic meters per hour.

Qbi = the volumetric flow rate of each effluent gas stream (i) entering the emission control device, in standard cubic meters per hour.

Qfk = the volumetric flow rate of each effluent gas stream (k) not directed to an emission control device, in standard cubic meters per hour.

Ethe VOC emission reduction efficiency (as a fraction) of the emission control device during performance testing.

Fthe VOC emission capture efficiency (as a fraction) of the vapor capture system during performance testing.

Woi = the weight fraction of VOC in each ink (i) used in the time period as determined from Method 24, manufacturer’s formulation data, or plant blending records, in kilograms per kilogram.

Wsi”means the weight fraction of solids in each ink (i) used in the time period as determined from Method 24, manufacturer’s formulation data, or plant blending records, in kilograms per kilogram.

Woj = the weight fraction of VOC in each dilution solvent (j) added at the print line in the time period determined from Method 24, manufacturer’s formulation data, or plant blending records, in kilograms per kilogram.

[49 FR 26892, June 29, 1984; 49 FR 32848, Aug. 17, 1984, as amended at 65 FR 61768, Oct. 17, 2000]


§ 60.582 Standard for volatile organic compounds.

(a) On and after the date on which the performance test required by § 60.8 has been completed, each owner or operator subject to this subpart shall either:


(1) Use inks with a weighted average VOC content less than 1.0 kilogram VOC per kilogram ink solids at each affected facility, or


(2) Reduce VOC emissions to the atmosphere by 85 percent from each affected facility.


(b) [Reserved]


§ 60.583 Test methods and procedures.

(a) Methods in appendix A of this part, except as provided under § 60.8(b), shall be used to determine compliance with § 60.582(a) as follows:


(1) Method 24 for analysis of inks. If nonphotochemically reactive solvents are used in the inks, standard gas chromatographic techniques may be used to identify and quantify these solvents. The results of Method 24 may be adjusted to subtract these solvents from the measured VOC content.


(2) Method 25A for VOC concentration (the calibration gas shall be propane);


(3) Method 1 for sample and velocity traverses;


(4) Method 2 for velocity and volumetric flow rates;


(5) Method 3 for gas analysis;


(6) Method 4 for stack gas moisture.


(b) To demonstrate compliance with § 60.582(a)(1), the owner or operator of an affected facility shall determine the weighted average VOC content of the inks according to the following procedures:


(1) Determine and record the VOC content and amount of each ink used at the print head, including the VOC content and amount of diluent solvent, for any time periods when VOC emission control equipment is not used.


(2) Compute the weighted average VOC content by the following equation:




(3) The weighted average VOC content of the inks shall be calculated over a period that does not exceed one calendar month, or four consecutive weeks. A facility that uses an accounting system based on quarters consisting of two 28 calendar day periods and one 35 calendar day period may use an averaging period of 35 calendar days four times per year, provided the use of such an accounting system is documented in the initial performance test.


(4) Each determination of the weighted average VOC content shall constitute a performance test for any period when VOC emission control equipment is not used. Results of the initial performance test must be reported to the Administrator. Method 24 or ink manufacturers’ formulation data along with plant blending records (if plant blending is done) may be used to determine VOC content. The Administrator may require the use of Method 24 if there is a question concerning the accuracy of the ink manufacturer’s data or plant blending records.


(5) If, during the time periods when emission control equipment is not used, all inks used contain less than 1.0 kilogram VOC per kilogram ink solids, the owner or operator is not required to calculate the weighted average VOC content, but must verify and record the VOC content of each ink (including any added dilution solvent) used as determined by Method 24, ink manufacturers’ formulation data, or plant blending records.


(c) To demonstrate compliance with § 60.582(a)(1), the owner or operator may determine the weighted average VOC content using an inventory system.


(1) The inventory system shall accurately account to the nearest kilogram for the VOC content of all inks and dilution solvent used, recycled, and discarded for each affected facility during the averaging period. Separate records must be kept for each affected facility.


(2) To determine VOC content of inks and dilution solvent used or recycled, Method 24 or ink manufacturers’ formulation data must be used in combination with plant blending records (if plant blending is done) or inventory records or purchase records for new inks or dilution solvent.


(3) For inks to be discarded, only Method 24 shall be used to determine the VOC content. Inks to be discarded may be combined prior to measurement of volume or weight and testing by Method 24.


(4) The Administrator may require the use of Method 24 if there is a question concerning the accuracy of the ink manufacturer’s data or plant records.


(5) The Administrator shall approve the inventory system of accounting for VOC content prior to the initial performance test.


(d) To demonstrate compliance with § 60.582(a)(2), the owner or operator of an affected facility controlled by a solvent recovery emission control device or an incineration control device shall conduct a performance test to determine overall VOC emission control efficiency according to the following procedures:


(1) The performance test shall consist of three runs. Each test run must last a minimum of 30 minutes and shall continue until the printing operation is interrupted or until 180 minutes of continuous operation occurs. During each test run, the print line shall be printing continuously and operating normally. The VOC emission reduction efficiency achieved for each test run is averaged over the entire test run period.


(2) VOC concentration values at each site shall be measured simultaneously.


(3) The volumetric flow rate shall be determined from one Method 2 measurement for each test run conducted immediately prior to, during, or after that test run. Volumetric flow rates at each site do not need to be measured simultaneously.


(4) In order to determine capture efficiency from an affected facility, all fugitive VOC emissions from the affected facility shall be captured and vented through stacks suitable for measurement. During a performance test, the owner or operator of an affected facility located in an area with other sources of VOC shall isolate the affected facility from other sources of VOC. These two requirements shall be accomplished using one of the following methods:


(i) Build a permanent enclosure around the affected facility;


(ii) Build a temporary enclosure around the affected facility and duplicate, to an extent that is reasonably feasible, the ventilation conditions that are in effect when the affected facility is not enclosed (one way to do this is to divide the room exhaust rate by the volume of the room and then duplicate that quotient or 20 air changes per hour, whichever is smaller, in the temporary enclosure); or


(iii) Shut down all other sources of VOC and continue to exhaust fugitive emissions from the affected facility through any building ventilation system and other room exhausts such as print line ovens and embossers.


(5) For each affected facility, compliance with § 60.582(a)(2) has been demonstrated if the average value of the overall control efficiency (EF) for the three runs is equal to or greater than 85 percent. An overall control efficiency is calculated for each run as follows:


(i) For efficiency of the emission control device,




(ii) For efficiency of the vapor capture system,




[49 FR 26892, June 29, 1984; 49 FR 32848, Aug. 17, 1984, as amended at 65 FR 61768, Oct. 17, 2000]


§ 60.584 Monitoring of operations and recordkeeping requirements.

(a) The owner or operator of an affected facility controlled by a solvent recovery emission control device shall install, calibrate, operate, and maintain a monitoring system which continuously measures and records the VOC concentration of the exhaust vent stream from the control device and shall comply with the following requirements:


(1) The continuous monitoring system shall be installed in a location that is representative of the VOC concentration in the exhaust vent, at least two equivalent stack diameters from the exhaust point, and protected from interferences due to wind, weather, or other processes.


(2) During the performance test, the owner or operator shall determine and record the average exhaust vent VOC concentration in parts per million by volume. After the performance test, the owner or operator shall determine and, in addition to the record made by the continuous monitoring device, record the average exhaust vent VOC concentration for each 3-hour clock period of printing operation when the average concentration is greater than 50 ppm and more than 20 percent greater than the average concentration value demonstrated during the most recent performance test.


(b) The owner or operator of an affected facility controlled by a thermal incineration emission control device shall install, calibrate, operate, and maintain a monitoring device that continuously measures and records the temperature of the control device exhaust gases and shall comply with the following requirements:


(1) The continuous monitoring device shall be calibrated annually and have an accuracy of ±0.75 percent of the temperature being measured, expressed in degrees Celsius, or ±2.5 °C, whichever is greater.


(2) During the performance test, the owner or operator shall determine and record the average temperature of the control device exhaust gases. After the performance test, the owner or operator shall determine and record, in addition to the record made by the continuous monitoring device, the average temperature for each 3-hour clock period of printing operation when the average temperature of the exhaust gases is more than 28 °C (50 °F) below the average temperature demonstrated during the most recent performance test.


(c) The owner or operator of an affected facility controlled by a catalytic incineration emission control device shall install, calibrate, operate, and maintain monitoring devices that continuously measure and record the gas temperatures both upstream and downstream of the catalyst bed and shall comply with the following requirements:


(1) Each continuous monitoring device shall be calibrated annually and have an accuracy of ±0.75 percent of the temperature being measured, expressed in degrees Celsius, or ±2.5 °C, whichever is greater.


(2) During the performance test, the owner or operator shall determine and record the average gas temperature both upstream and downstream of the catalyst bed. After the performance test, the owner or operator shall determine and record, in addition to the record made by the continuous monitoring device, the average temperatures for each 3-hour clock period of printing operation when the average temperature of the gas stream before the catalyst bed is more than 28 °C below the average temperature demonstrated during the most recent performance test or the average temperature difference across the catalyst bed is less than 80 percent of the average temperature difference of the device during the most recent performance test.


(d) The owner or operator of an affected facility shall record time periods of operation when an emission control device is not in use.


[49 FR 26892, June 29, 1984, as amended at 65 FR 61768, Oct. 17, 2000]


§ 60.585 Reporting requirements.

(a) For all affected facilities subject to compliance with § 60.582, the performance test data and results from the performance test shall be submitted to the Administrator as specified in § 60.8(a).


(b) The owner or operator of each affected facility shall submit semiannual reports to the Administrator of occurrences of the following:


(1) Exceedances of the weighted average VOC content specified in § 60.582(a)(1);


(2) Exceedances of the average value of the exhaust vent VOC concentration as defined under § 60.584(a)(2);


(3) Drops in the incinerator temperature as defined under § 60.584(b)(2); and


(4) Drops in the average temperature of the gas stream immediately before the catalyst bed or drops in the average temperature across the catalyst bed as defined under § 60.584(c)(2).


(c) The reports required under paragraph (b) shall be postmarked within 30 days following the end of the second and fourth calendar quarters.


(d) The requirements of this subsection remain in force until and unless the Agency, in delegating enforcement authority to a State under section 111(c) of the Act, approves reporting requirements or an alternative means of compliance surveillance adopted by such States. In that event, affected sources within the State will be relieved of the obligation to comply with this subsection, provided that they comply with requirements established by the State.


Subpart GGG—Standards of Performance for Equipment Leaks of VOC in Petroleum Refineries for which Construction, Reconstruction, or Modification Commenced After January 4, 1983, and on or Before November 7, 2006


Source:49 FR 22606, May 30, 1984, unless otherwise noted.

§ 60.590 Applicability and designation of affected facility.

(a)(1) The provisions of this subpart apply to affected facilities in petroleum refineries.


(2) A compressor is an affected facility.


(3) The group of all the equipment (defined in § 60.591) within a process unit is an affected facility.


(b) Any affected facility under paragraph (a) of this section that commences construction, reconstruction, or modification after January 4, 1983, and on or before November 7, 2006, is subject to the requirements of this subpart.


(c) Addition or replacement of equipment (defined in § 60.591) for the purpose of process improvement which is accomplished without a capital expenditure shall not by itself be considered a modification under this subpart.


(d) Facilities subject to subpart VV, subpart VVa, or subpart KKK of this part are excluded from this subpart.


(e) Stay of standards. Owners or operators are not required to comply with the definition of “process unit” in § 60.590 of this subpart until the EPA takes final action to require compliance and publishes a document in the Federal Register. While the definition of “process unit” is stayed, owners or operators should use the following definition:


Process unit means components assembled to produce intermediate or final products from petroleum, unfinished petroleum derivatives, or other intermediates; a process unit can operate independently if supplied with sufficient feed or raw materials and sufficient storage facilities for the product.


[49 FR 22606, May 30, 1984, as amended at 72 FR 64895, Nov. 16, 2007; 73 FR 31376, June 2, 2008]


§ 60.591 Definitions.

As used in this subpart, all terms not defined herein shall have the meaning given them in the act, in subpart A of part 60, or in subpart VV of part 60, and the following terms shall have the specific meanings given them.


Alaskan North Slope means the approximately 69,000 square mile area extending from the Brooks Range to the Arctic Ocean.


Asphalt (also known as Bitumen) is a black or dark brown solid or semi-solid thermo-plastic material possessing waterproofing and adhesive properties. It is a complex combination of higher molecular weight organic compounds containing a relatively high proportion of hydrocarbons having carbon numbers greater than C25 with a high carbon to hydrogen ratio. It is essentially non-volatile at ambient temperatures with closed cup flash point of 445 °F (230 °C) or greater.


Equipment means each valve, pump, pressure relief device, sampling connection system, open-ended valve or line, and flange or other connector in VOC service. For the purposes of recordkeeping and reporting only, compressors are considered equipment.


In hydrogen service means that a compressor contains a process fluid that meets the conditions specified in § 60.593(b).


In light liquid service means that the piece of equipment contains a liquid that meets the conditions specified in § 60.593(c).


Petroleum means the crude oil removed from the earth and the oils derived from tar sands, shale, and coal.


Petroleum refinery means any facility engaged in producing gasoline, kerosene, distillate fuel oils, residual fuel oils, lubricants, or other products through the distillation of petroleum, or through the redistillation, cracking, or reforming of unfinished petroleum derivatives.


Process unit means the components assembled and connected by pipes or ducts to process raw materials and to produce intermediate or final products from petroleum, unfinished petroleum derivatives, or other intermediates. A process unit can operate independently if supplied with sufficient feed or raw materials and sufficient storage facilities for the product. For the purpose of this subpart, process unit includes any feed, intermediate and final product storage vessels (except as specified in § 60.482-1(g)), product transfer racks, and connected ducts and piping. A process unit includes all equipment as defined in this subpart.


[49 FR 22606, May 30, 1984, as amended at 72 FR 64895, Nov. 16, 2007]


Effective Date Note:At 73 FR 31376, June 2, 2008, § 60.591, the definition of “process unit” was stayed until further notice.

§ 60.592 Standards.

(a) Each owner or operator subject to the provisions of this subpart shall comply with the requirements of §§ 60.482-1 to 60.482-10 as soon as practicable, but no later than 180 days after initial startup.


(b) For a given process unit, an owner or operator may elect to comply with the requirements of paragraphs (b)(1), (2), or (3) of this section as an alternative to the requirements in § 60.482-7.


(1) Comply with § 60.483-1.


(2) Comply with § 60.483-2.


(3) Comply with the Phase III provisions in 40 CFR 63.168, except an owner or operator may elect to follow the provisions in § 60.482-7(f) instead of 40 CFR 63.168 for any valve that is designated as being leakless.


(c) An owner or operator may apply to the Administrator for a determination of equivalency for any means of emission limitation that achieves a reduction in emissions of VOC at least equivalent to the reduction in emissions of VOC achieved by the controls required in this subpart. In doing so, the owner or operator shall comply with requirements of § 60.484.


(d) Each owner or operator subject to the provisions of this subpart shall comply with the provisions of § 60.485 except as provided in § 60.593.


(e) Each owner or operator subject to the provisions of this subpart shall comply with the provisions of §§ 60.486 and 60.487.


[49 FR 22606, May 30, 1984, as amended at 72 FR 64896, Nov. 16, 2007]


§ 60.593 Exceptions.

(a) Each owner or operator subject to the provisions of this subpart may comply with the following exceptions to the provisions of subpart VV.


(b)(1) Compressors in hydrogen service are exempt from the requirements of § 60.592 if an owner or operator demonstrates that a compressor is in hydrogen service.


(2) Each compressor is presumed not to be in hydrogen service unless an owner or operator demonstrates that the piece of equipment is in hydrogen service. For a piece of equipment to be considered in hydrogen service, it must be determined that the percent hydrogen content can be reasonably expected always to exceed 50 percent by volume. For purposes of determining the percent hydrogen content in the process fluid that is contained in or contacts a compressor, procedures that conform to the general method described in ASTM E260-73, 91, or 96, E168-67, 77, or 92, or E169-63, 77, or 93 (incorporated by reference as specified in § 60.17) shall be used.


(3)(i) An owner or operator may use engineering judgment rather than procedures in paragraph (b)(2) of this section to demonstrate that the percent content exceeds 50 percent by volume, provided the engineering judgment demonstrates that the content clearly exceeds 50 percent by volume. When an owner or operator and the Administrator do not agree on whether a piece of equipment is in hydrogen service, however, the procedures in paragraph (b)(2) shall be used to resolve the disagreement.


(ii) If an owner or operator determines that a piece of equipment is in hydrogen service, the determination can be revised only after following the procedures in paragraph (b)(2).


(c) Any existing reciprocating compressor that becomes an affected facility under provisions of § 60.14 or § 60.15 is exempt from § 60.482-3(a), (b), (c), (d), (e), and (h) provided the owner or operator demonstrates that recasting the distance piece or replacing the compressor are the only options available to bring the compressor into compliance with the provisions of § 60.482-3(a), (b), (c), (d), (e), and (h).


(d) An owner or operator may use the following provision in addition to § 60.485(e): Equipment is in light liquid service if the percent evaporated is greater than 10 percent at 150 °C as determined by ASTM Method D86-78, 82, 90, 95, or 96 (incorporated by reference as specified in § 60.17).


(e) Pumps in light liquid service and valves in gas/vapor and light liquid service within a process unit that is located in the Alaskan North Slope are exempt from the requirements of §§ 60.482-2 and 60.482-7.


(f) Open-ended valves or lines containing asphalt as defined in § 60.591 are exempt from the requirements of § 60.482-6(a) through (c).


[49 FR 22606, May 30, 1984, as amended at 65 FR 61768, Oct. 17, 2000; 72 FR 64896, Nov. 16, 2007]


Subpart GGGa—Standards of Performance for Equipment Leaks of VOC in Petroleum Refineries for Which Construction, Reconstruction, or Modification Commenced After November 7, 2006


Source:72 FR 64896, Nov. 16, 2007, unless otherwise noted.

§ 60.590a Applicability and designation of affected facility.

(a)(1) The provisions of this subpart apply to affected facilities in petroleum refineries.


(2) A compressor is an affected facility.


(3) The group of all the equipment (defined in § 60.591a) within a process unit is an affected facility.


(b) Any affected facility under paragraph (a) of this section that commences construction, reconstruction, or modification after November 7, 2006, is subject to the requirements of this subpart.


(c) Addition or replacement of equipment (defined in § 60.591a) for the purpose of process improvement which is accomplished without a capital expenditure shall not by itself be considered a modification under this subpart.


(d) Facilities subject to subpart VV, subpart VVa, subpart GGG, or subpart KKK of this part are excluded from this subpart.


(e) Stay of standards. Owners or operators are not required to comply with the definition of “process unit” in § 60.590 of this subpart until the EPA takes final action to require compliance and publishes a document in the Federal Register. While the definition of “process unit” is stayed, owners or operators should use the following definition:


Process unit means components assembled to produce intermediate or final products from petroleum, unfinished petroleum derivatives, or other intermediates; a process unit can operate independently if supplied with sufficient feed or raw materials and sufficient storage facilities for the product.


[49 FR 22606, May 30, 1984, as amended at 73 FR 31376, June 2, 2008]


§ 60.591a Definitions.

As used in this subpart, all terms not defined herein shall have the meaning given them in the Clean Air Act, in subpart A of part 60, or in subpart VVa of this part, and the following terms shall have the specific meanings given them.


Alaskan North Slope means the approximately 69,000 square mile area extending from the Brooks Range to the Arctic Ocean.


Asphalt (also known as Bitumen) is a black or dark brown solid or semi-solid thermo-plastic material possessing waterproofing and adhesive properties. It is a complex combination of higher molecular weight organic compounds containing a relatively high proportion of hydrocarbons having carbon numbers greater than C25 with a high carbon to hydrogen ratio. It is essentially non-volatile at ambient temperatures with closed cup flash point of 445 °F (230 °C) or greater.


Equipment means each valve, pump, pressure relief device, sampling connection system, open-ended valve or line, and flange or other connector in VOC service. For the purposes of recordkeeping and reporting only, compressors are considered equipment.


In hydrogen service means that a compressor contains a process fluid that meets the conditions specified in § 60.593a(b).


In light liquid service means that the piece of equipment contains a liquid that meets the conditions specified in § 60.593a(c).


Petroleum means the crude oil removed from the earth and the oils derived from tar sands, shale, and coal.


Petroleum refinery means any facility engaged in producing gasoline, kerosene, distillate fuel oils, residual fuel oils, lubricants, or other products through the distillation of petroleum, or through the redistillation, cracking, or reforming of unfinished petroleum derivatives.


Process unit means the components assembled and connected by pipes or ducts to process raw materials and to produce intermediate or final products from petroleum, unfinished petroleum derivatives, or other intermediates. A process unit can operate independently if supplied with sufficient feed or raw materials and sufficient storage facilities for the product. For the purpose of this subpart, process unit includes any feed, intermediate and final product storage vessels (except as specified in § 60.482-1a(g)), product transfer racks, and connected ducts and piping. A process unit includes all equipment as defined in this subpart.



Effective Date Note:At 73 FR 31376, June 2, 2008, § 60.591a, the definition of “process unit” was stayed until further notice.

§ 60.592a Standards.

(a) Each owner or operator subject to the provisions of this subpart shall comply with the requirements of §§ 60.482-1a to 60.482-10a as soon as practicable, but no later than 180 days after initial startup.


(b) For a given process unit, an owner or operator may elect to comply with the requirements of paragraphs (b)(1), (2), or (3) of this section as an alternative to the requirements in § 60.482-7a.


(1) Comply with § 60.483-1a.


(2) Comply with § 60.483-2a.


(3) Comply with the Phase III provisions in § 63.168, except an owner or operator may elect to follow the provisions in § 60.482-7a(f) instead of § 63.168 for any valve that is designated as being leakless.


(c) An owner or operator may apply to the Administrator for a determination of equivalency for any means of emission limitation that achieves a reduction in emissions of VOC at least equivalent to the reduction in emissions of VOC achieved by the controls required in this subpart. In doing so, the owner or operator shall comply with requirements of § 60.484a.


(d) Each owner or operator subject to the provisions of this subpart shall comply with the provisions of § 60.485a except as provided in § 60.593a.


(e) Each owner or operator subject to the provisions of this subpart shall comply with the provisions of §§ 60.486a and 60.487a.


§ 60.593a Exceptions.

(a) Each owner or operator subject to the provisions of this subpart may comply with the following exceptions to the provisions of subpart VVa of this part.


(b)(1) Compressors in hydrogen service are exempt from the requirements of § 60.592a if an owner or operator demonstrates that a compressor is in hydrogen service.


(2) Each compressor is presumed not to be in hydrogen service unless an owner or operator demonstrates that the piece of equipment is in hydrogen service. For a piece of equipment to be considered in hydrogen service, it must be determined that the percent hydrogen content can be reasonably expected always to exceed 50 percent by volume. For purposes of determining the percent hydrogen content in the process fluid that is contained in or contacts a compressor, procedures that conform to the general method described in ASTM E260-73, 91, or 96, E168-67, 77, or 92, or E169-63, 77, or 93 (incorporated by reference as specified in § 60.17) shall be used.


(3)(i) An owner or operator may use engineering judgment rather than procedures in paragraph (b)(2) of this section to demonstrate that the percent content exceeds 50 percent by volume, provided the engineering judgment demonstrates that the content clearly exceeds 50 percent by volume. When an owner or operator and the Administrator do not agree on whether a piece of equipment is in hydrogen service, however, the procedures in paragraph (b)(2) of this section shall be used to resolve the disagreement.


(ii) If an owner or operator determines that a piece of equipment is in hydrogen service, the determination can be revised only after following the procedures in paragraph (b)(2).


(c) Any existing reciprocating compressor that becomes an affected facility under provisions of § 60.14 or § 60.15 is exempt from § 60.482-3a(a), (b), (c), (d), (e), and (h) provided the owner or operator demonstrates that recasting the distance piece or replacing the compressor are the only options available to bring the compressor into compliance with the provisions of § 60.482-3a(a), (b), (c), (d), (e), and (h).


(d) An owner or operator may use the following provision in addition to § 60.485a(e): Equipment is in light liquid service if the percent evaporated is greater than 10 percent at 150 °C as determined by ASTM Method D86-78, 82, 90, 93, 95, or 96 (incorporated by reference as specified in § 60.17).


(e) Pumps in light liquid service and valves in gas/vapor and light liquid service within a process unit that is located in the Alaskan North Slope are exempt from the requirements of §§ 60.482-2a and 60.482-7a.


(f) Open-ended valves or lines containing asphalt as defined in § 60.591a are exempt from the requirements of § 60.482-6a(a) through (c).


(g) Connectors in gas/vapor or light liquid service are exempt from the requirements in § 60.482-11a, provided the owner or operator complies with § 60.482-8a for all connectors, not just those in heavy liquid service.


Subpart HHH—Standards of Performance for Synthetic Fiber Production Facilities


Source:49 FR 13651, Apr. 5, 1984, unless otherwise noted.

§ 60.600 Applicability and designation of affected facility.

(a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, the affected facility to which the provisions of this subpart apply is each solvent-spun synthetic fiber process that produces more than 500 Mg (551 ton) of fiber per year.


(b) The provisions of this subpart do not apply to any facility that uses the reaction spinning process to produce spandex fiber or the viscose process to produce rayon fiber.


(c) The provisions of this subpart apply to each facility as identified in paragraph (a) of this section and that commences construction or reconstruction after November 23, 1982. The provisions of this subpart do not apply to facilities that commence modification but not reconstruction after November 23, 1982.


[49 FR 22606, May 30, 1984, as amended at 65 FR 61768, Oct. 17, 2000]


§ 60.601 Definitions.

All terms that are used in this subpart and are not defined below are given the same meaning as in the Act and in subpart A of this part.


Acrylic fiber means a manufactured synthetic fiber in which the fiber-forming substance is any long-chain synthetic polymer composed of at least 85 percent by weight of acrylonitrile units.


Makeup solvent means the solvent introduced into the affected facility that compensates for solvent lost from the affected facility during the manufacturing process.


Nongaseous losses means the solvent that is not volatilized during fiber production, and that escapes the process and is unavailable for recovery, or is in a form or concentration unsuitable for economical recovery.


Polymer means any of the natural or synthetic compounds of usually high molecular weight that consist of many repeated links, each link being a relatively light and simple molecule.


Precipitation bath means the water, solvent, or other chemical bath into which the polymer or prepolymer (partially reacted material) solution is extruded, and that causes physical or chemical changes to occur in the extruded solution to result in a semihardened polymeric fiber.


Rayon fiber means a manufactured fiber composed of regenerated cellulose, as well as manufactured fibers composed of regenerated cellulose in which substituents have replaced not more than 15 percent of the hydrogens of the hydroxyl groups.


Reaction spinning process means the fiber-forming process where a prepolymer is extruded into a fluid medium and solidification takes place by chemical reaction to form the final polymeric material.


Recovered solvent means the solvent captured from liquid and gaseous process streams that is concentrated in a control device and that may be purified for reuse.


Solvent feed means the solvent introduced into the spinning solution preparation system or precipitation bath. This feed stream includes the combination of recovered solvent and makeup solvent.


Solvent inventory variation means the normal changes in the total amount of solvent contained in the affected facility.


Solvent recovery system means the equipment associated with capture, transportation, collection, concentration, and purification of organic solvents. It may include enclosures, hoods, ducting, piping, scrubbers, condensers, carbon adsorbers, distillation equipment, and associated storage vessels.


Solvent-spun synthetic fiber means any synthetic fiber produced by a process that uses an organic solvent in the spinning solution, the precipitation bath, or processing of the sun fiber.


Solvent-spun synthetic fiber process means the total of all equipment having a common spinning solution preparation system or a common solvent recovery system, and that is used in the manufacture of solvent-spun synthetic fiber. It includes spinning solution preparation, spinning, fiber processing and solvent recovery, but does not include the polymer production equipment.


Spandex fiber means a manufactured fiber in which the fiber-forming substance is a long chain synthetic polymer comprised of at least 85 percent of a segmented polyurethane.


Spinning solution means the mixture of polymer, prepolymer, or copolymer and additives dissolved in solvent. The solution is prepared at a viscosity and solvent-to-polymer ratio that is suitable for extrusion into fibers.


Spinning solution preparation system means the equipment used to prepare spinning solutions; the system includes equipment for mixing, filtering, blending, and storage of the spinning solutions.


Synthetic fiber means any fiber composed partially or entirely of materials made by chemical synthesis, or made partially or entirely from chemically-modified naturally-occurring materials.


Viscose process means the fiber forming process where cellulose and concentrated caustic soda are reacted to form soda or alkali cellulose. This reacts with carbon disulfide to form sodium cellulose xanthate, which is then dissolved in a solution of caustic soda. After ripening, the solution is spun into an acid coagulating bath. This precipitates the cellulose in the form of a regenerated cellulose filament.


[49 FR 13651, Apr. 5, 1984; 49 FR 18096, Apr. 27, 1984]


§ 60.602 Standard for volatile organic compounds.

On and after the date on which the initial performance test required to be conducted by § 60.8 is completed, no owner or operator subject to the provisions of this subpart shall cause the discharge into the atmosphere from any affected facility that produces acrylic fibers, VOC emissions that exceed 10 kg/Mg (20 lb/ton) solvent feed to the spinning solution preparation system or precipitation bath. VOC emissions from affected facilities that produce both acrylic and nonacrylic fiber types shall not exceed 10 kg/Mg (20 lb/ton) solvent feed. VOC emissions from affected facilities that produce only nonacrylic fiber types shall not exceed 17 kg/Mg (34 lb/ton) solvent feed. Compliance with the emission limitations is determined on a 6-month rolling average basis as described in § 60.603.


[49 FR 22606, May 30, 1984, as amended at 65 FR 61768, Oct. 17, 2000]


§ 60.603 Performance test and compliance provisions.

(a) Section 60.8(f) does not apply to the performance test procedures required by this subpart.


(b) Each owner or operator of an affected facility shall determine compliance with the applicable standard in § 60.602(a) by determining and recording monthly the VOC emissions per unit mass solvent feed from each affected facility for the current and preceding 5 consecutive calendar months and using these values to calculate the 6-month average emissions. Each calculation is considered a performance test. The owner or operator of an affected facility shall use the following procedure to determine VOC emissions for each calendar month;


(1) Install, calibrate, maintain, and operate monitoring devices that continuously measure and permanently record for each calendar month the amount of makeup solvent and solvent feed. These values shall be used in calculating VOC emissions according to paragraph (b)(2) of this section. All monitoring devices, meters, and peripheral equipment shall be calibrated and any error recorded. Total compounded error of the flow measuring and recording devices shall not exceed 1 percent accuracy over the operating range. As an alternative to measuring solvent feed, the owner or operator may:


(i) Measure the amount of recovered solvent returned to the solvent feed storage tanks, and use the following equation to determine the amount of solvent feed:



Solvent Feed = Makeup Solvent + Recovered

Solvent + Change in the Amount of Solvent

Contained in the Solvent Feed Holding Tank.

(ii) Measure and record the amount of polymer introduced into the affected facility and the solvent-to-polymer ratio of the spinning solutions, and use the following equation to determine the amount of solvent feed:




where subscript “i” denotes each particular spinning solution used during the test period; values of “i” vary from one to the total number of spinning solutions, “n,” used during the calendar month.

(2) VOC emissions shall be determined each calendar month by use of the following equations:




where all values are for the calendar month only and where

E = VOC Emissions, in kg/Mg (lb/ton) solvent;

SV = Measured or calculated volume of solvent feed, in liters (gallons);

SW = Weight of solvent feed, in Mg (ton);

MV = Measured volume of makeup solvent, in liters (gallons);

MW = Weight of makeup, in kg (lb);

N = Allowance for nongaseous losses, 13 kg/Mg (26 lb/ton) solvent feed;

SP = Fraction of measured volume that is actual solvent (excludes water);

D = Density of the solvent, in kg/liter (lb/gallon);

K = Conversion factor, 1,000 kg/Mg (2,000 lb/ton);

I = Allowance for solvent inventory variation or changes in the amount of solvent contained in the affected facility, in kg/Mg (lb/ton) solvent feed (may be positive or negative);

IS = Amount of solvent contained in the affected facility at the beginning of the test period, as determined by the owner or operator, in kg (lb);

IE = Amount of solvent contained in the affected facility at the close of the test period, as determined by the owner or operator, in kg (lb).

(3) N, as used in the equation in paragraph (b)(2) of this section, equals 13 kg/Mg (26 lb/ton) solvent feed to the spinning solution preparation system and precipitation bath. This value shall be used in all cases unless an owner or operator demonstrates to the satisfaction of the Administrator that greater nongaseous losses occur at the affected facility. In this case, the greater value may be substituted in the equation.


[49 FR 13651, Apr. 5, 1984; 49 FR 18096, Apr. 27, 1984, as amended at 65 FR 61769, Oct. 17, 2000]


§ 60.604 Reporting requirements.

(a) The owner or operator of an affected facility shall submit a written report to the Administrator of the following:


(1) The results of the initial performance test; and


(2) The results of subsequent performance tests that indicate that VOC emissions exceed the standards in § 60.602. These reports shall be submitted quarterly at 3-month intervals after the initial performance test. If no exceedances occur during a particular quarter, a report stating this shall be submitted to the Administrator semiannually.


(b) Solvent-spun synthetic fiber producing facilities exempted from these standards in § 60.600(a) (those producing less than 500 Mg (551 ton) annually) shall report to the Administrator within 30 days whenever extruded fiber for the preceding 12 calendar months exceeds 500 Mg (551 ton).


(c) The requirements of this section remain in force until and unless EPA, in delegating enforcement authority to a State under section 111(c) of the Act, approves reporting requirements or an alternate means of compliance surveillance adopted by such State. In that event, affected sources within the State will be relieved of the obligation to comply with this section, provided that they comply with the requirements established by the State.


[49 FR 13651, Apr. 5, 1984, as amended at 55 FR 51384, Dec. 13, 1990; 59 FR 32341, June 23, 1994; 65 FR 61769, Oct. 17, 2000]


Subpart III—Standards of Performance for Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Emissions From the Synthetic Organic Chemical Manufacturing Industry (SOCMI) Air Oxidation Unit Processes After October 21, 1983, and on or Before April 25, 2023


Source:55 FR 26922, June 29, 1990, unless otherwise noted.

§ 60.610 Applicability and designation of affected facility.

(a) The provisions of this subpart apply to each affected facility designated in paragraph (b) of this section that produces any of the chemicals listed in § 60.617 as a product, co-product, by-product, or intermediate, except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section.


(b) The affected facility is any of the following for which construction, modification, or reconstruction commenced after October 21, 1983, and on or before April 25, 2023:


(1) Each air oxidation reactor not discharging its vent stream into a recovery system.


(2) Each combination of an air oxidation reactor and the recovery system into which its vent stream is discharged.


(3) Each combination of two or more air oxidation reactors and the common recovery system into which their vent streams are discharged.


(c) Each affected facility that has a total resource effectiveness (TRE) index value greater than 4.0 is exempt from all provisions of this subpart except for §§ 60.612, 60.614(f), 60.615(h), and 60.615(l).


(d) Alternative means of compliance—(1) Option to comply with part 65. Owners or operators of process vents that are subject to this subpart may choose to comply with the provisions of 40 CFR part 65, subpart D, to satisfy the requirements of §§ 60.612 through 60.615 and 60.618. The provisions of 40 CFR part 65 also satisfy the criteria of paragraph (c) of this section. Other provisions applying to an owner or operator who chooses to comply with 40 CFR part 65 are provided in 40 CFR 65.1.


(2) Part 60, subpart A. Owners or operators who choose to comply with 40 CFR part 65, subpart D, must also comply with §§ 60.1, 60.2, 60.5, 60.6, 60.7(a)(1) and (4), 60.14, 60.15, and 60.16 for those process vents. All sections and paragraphs of subpart A of this part that are not mentioned in this paragraph (d)(2) do not apply to owners or operators of process vents complying with 40 CFR part 65, subpart D, except that provisions required to be met prior to implementing 40 CFR part 65 still apply. Owners and operators who choose to comply with 40 CFR part 65, subpart D, must comply with 40 CFR part 65, subpart A.


(3) Compliance date. Owners or operators who choose to comply with 40 CFR part 65, subpart D, at initial startup shall comply with paragraphs (d)(1) and (2) of this section for each vent stream on and after the date on which the initial performance test is completed, but not later than 60 days after achieving the maximum production rate at which the affected facility will be operated, or 180 days after the initial startup, whichever date comes first.


(4) Initial startup notification. Each owner or operator subject to the provisions of this subpart that chooses to comply with 40 CFR part 65, subpart D, at initial startup shall notify the Administrator of the specific provisions of 40 CFR 65.63(a)(1), (2), or (3) with which the owner or operator has elected to comply. Notification shall be submitted with the notifications of initial startup required by 40 CFR 65.5(b).



Note:

The intent of these standards is to minimize the emissions of VOC through the application of BDT. The numerical emission limits in these standards are expressed in terms of total organic compounds (TOC), measured as TOC minus methane and ethane. This emission limit reflects the performance of BDT.


(e) Owners and operators of flares that are subject to the flare related requirements of this subpart and flare related requirements of any other regulation in this part or 40 CFR part 61 or 63, may elect to comply with the requirements in § 60.619a in lieu of all flare related requirements in any other regulation in this part or 40 CFR part 61 or 63.


[55 FR 26922, June 29, 1990, as amended at 65 FR 78278, Dec. 14, 2000; 89 FR 43086, May 16, 2024]


§ 60.611 Definitions.

As used in this subpart, all terms not defined here shall have the meaning given them in the Act and in subpart A of part 60, and the following terms shall have the specific meanings given them.


Air Oxidation Reactor means any device or process vessel in which one or more organic reactants are combined with air, or a combination of air and oxygen, to produce one or more organic compounds. Ammoxidation and oxychlorination reactions are included in this definition.


Air Oxidation Reactor Recovery Train means an individual recovery system receiving the vent stream from at least one air oxidation reactor, along with all air oxidation reactors feeding vent streams into this system.


Air Oxidation Unit Process means a unit process, including ammoxidation and oxychlorination unit process, that uses air, or a combination of air and oxygen, as an oxygen source in combination with one or more organic reactants to produce one or more organic compounds.


Boilers means any enclosed combustion device that extracts useful energy in the form of steam.


By Compound means by individual stream components, not carbon equivalents.


Continuous recorder means a data recording device recording an instantaneous data value at least once every 15 minutes.


Flame zone means the portion of the combustion chamber in a boiler or process heater occupied by the flame envelope.


Flow indicator means a device which indicates whether gas flow is present in a vent stream.


Halogenated Vent Stream means any vent stream determined to have a total concentration (by volume) of compounds containing halogens of 20 ppmv (by compound) or greater.


Incinerator means any enclosed combustion device that is used for destroying organic compounds and does not extract energy in the form of steam or process heat.


Process Heater means a device that transfers heat liberated by burning fuel to fluids contained in tubes, including all fluids except water that is heated to produce steam.


Process Unit means equipment assembled and connected by pipes or ducts to produce, as intermediates or final products, one or more of the chemicals in § 60.617. A process unit can operate independently if supplied with sufficient fuel or raw materials and sufficient product storage facilities.


Product means any compound or chemical listed in § 60.617 that is produced for sale as a final product as that chemical or is produced for use in a process that needs that chemical for the production of other chemicals in another facility. By-products, co-products, and intermediates are considered to be products.


Recovery Device means an individual unit of equipment, such as an absorber, condenser, and carbon adsorber, capable of and used to recover chemicals for use, reuse or sale.


Recovery System means an individual recovery device or series of such devices applied to the same process stream.


Total organic compounds (TOC) means those compounds measured according to the procedures in § 60.614(b)(4). For the purposes of measuring molar composition as required in § 60.614(d)(2)(i), hourly emissions rate as required in § 60.614(d)(5) and § 60.614(e) and TOC concentration as required in § 60.615(b)(4) and § 60.615(g)(4), those compounds which the Administrator has determined do not contribute appreciably to the formation of ozone are to be excluded. The compounds to be excluded are identified in Environmental Protection Agency’s statements on ozone abatement policy for SIP revisions (42 FR 35314; 44 FR 32042; 45 FR 32424; 45 FR 48942).


Total resource effectiveness (TRE) Index Value means a measure of the supplemental total resource requirement per unit reduction of TOC associated with an individual air oxidation vent stream, based on vent stream flow rate, emission rate of TOC, net heating value, and corrosion properties (whether or not the vent stream is halogenated), as quantified by the equation given under § 60.614(e).


Vent Stream means any gas stream, containing nitrogen which was introduced as air to the air oxidation reactor, released to the atmosphere directly from any air oxidation reactor recovery train or indirectly, after diversion through other process equipment. The vent stream excludes equipment leaks and relief valve discharges including, but not limited to, pumps, compressors, and valves.


[55 FR 26922, June 29, 1990; 55 FR 36932, Sept. 7, 1990, as amended at 89 FR 43086, May 16, 2024]


§ 60.612 Standards.

Each owner or operator of any affected facility shall comply with paragraph (a), (b), or (c) of this section for each vent stream on and after the date on which the initial performance test required by §§ 60.8 and 60.614 is completed, but not later than 60 days after achieving the maximum production rate at which the affected facility will be operated, or 180 days after the initial start-up, whichever date comes first. Each owner or operator shall either:


(a) Reduce emissions of TOC (minus methane and ethane) by 98 weight-percent, or to a TOC (minus methane and ethane) concentration of 20 ppmv on a dry basis corrected to 3 percent oxygen, whichever is less stringent. If a boiler or process heater is used to comply with this paragraph, then the vent stream shall be introduced into the flame zone of the boiler or process heater; or


(b) Combust the emissions in a flare that meets the requirements of § 60.18; or


(c) Maintain a TRE index value greater than 1.0 without use of VOC emission control devices.


§ 60.613 Monitoring of emissions and operations.

(a) The owner or operator of an affected facility that uses an incinerator to seek to comply with the TOC emission limit specified under § 60.612(a) shall install, calibrate, maintain, and operate according to manufacturer’s specifications the following equipment:


(1) A temperature monitoring device equipped with a continuous recorder and having an accuracy of ±1 percent of the temperature being monitored expressed in degrees Celsius or ±0.5 °C, whichever is greater.


(i) Where an incinerator other than a catalytic incinerator is used, a temperature monitoring device shall be installed in the firebox.


(ii) Where a catalytic incinerator is used, temperature monitoring devices shall be installed in the gas stream immediately before and after the catalyst bed.


(2) A flow indicator that provides a record of vent stream flow to the incinerator at least once every hour for each affected facility. The flow indicator shall be installed in the vent stream from each affected facility at a point closest to the inlet of each incinerator and before being joined with any other vent stream.


(b) The owner or operator of an affected facility that uses a flare to seek to comply with § 60.612(b) shall install, calibrate, maintain, and operate according to manufacturer’s specifications the following equipment:


(1) A heat sensing device, such as an ultra-violet sensor or thermocouple, at the pilot light to indicate the continuous presence of a flame.


(2) A flow indicator that provides a record of vent stream flow to the flare at least once every hour for each affected facility. The flow indicator shall be installed in the vent stream from each affected facility at a point closest to the flare and before being joined with any other vent stream.


(c) The owner or operator of an affected facility that uses a boiler or process heater to seek to comply with § 60.612(a) shall install, calibrate, maintain and operate according to the manufacturer’s specifications the following equipment:


(1) A flow indicator that provides a record of vent stream flow to the boiler or process heater at least once every hour for each affected facility. The flow indicator shall be installed in the vent stream from each air oxidation reactor within an affected facility at a point closest to the inlet of each boiler or process heater and before being joined with any other vent stream.


(2) A temperature monitoring device in the firebox equipped with a continuous recorder and having an accuracy of ±1 percent of the temperature being measured expressed in degrees Celsius or ±0.5 °C, whichever is greater, for boilers or process heaters of less than 44 MW (150 million Btu/hr) heat input design capacity.


(d) Monitor and record the periods of operation of the boiler or process heater if the design input capacity of the boiler is 44 MW (150 million Btu/hr) or greater. The records must be readily available for inspection.


(e) The owner or operator of an affected facility that seeks to demonstrate compliance with the TRE index value limit specified under § 60.612(c) shall install, calibrate, maintain, and operate according to manufacturer’s specifications the following equipment, unless alternative monitoring procedures or requirements are approved for that facility by the Administrator:


(1) Where an absorber is the final recovery device in a recovery system:


(i) A scrubbing liquid temperature monitoring device having an accuracy of ±1 percent of the temperature being monitored expressed in degrees Celsius or 0.5 °C, whichever is greater, and a specific gravity monitoring device having an accuracy of 0.02 specific gravity units, each equipped with a continuous recorder; or


(ii) An organic monitoring device used to indicate the concentration level of organic compounds exiting the recovery device based on a detection principle such as infra-red, photoionization, or thermal conductivity, each equipped with a continuous recorder.


(2) Where a condenser is the final recovery device in a recovery system:


(i) A condenser exit (product side) temperature monitoring device equipped with a continuous recorder and having an accuracy of ±1 percent of the temperature being monitored expressed in degrees Celsius or 0.5 °C, whichever is greater; or


(ii) An organic monitoring device used to indicate the concentration level of organic compounds exiting the recovery device based on a detection principle such as infra-red, photoionization, or thermal conductivity, each equipped with a continuous recorder.


(3) Where a carbon adsorber is the final recovery device in a recovery system:


(i) An integrating steam flow monitoring device having an accuracy of 10 percent, and a carbon bed temperature monitoring device having an accuracy of ±1 percent of the temperature being monitored expressed in degrees Celsius or ±0.5 °C, whichever is greater, both equipped with a continuous recorder; or


(ii) An organic monitoring device used to indicate the concentration level of organic compounds exiting the recovery device based on a detection principle such as infra-red, photoionization, or thermal conductivity, each equipped with a continuous recorder.


(f) An owner or operator of an affected facility seeking to demonstrate compliance with the standards specified under § 60.612 with control devices other than an incinerator, boiler, process heater, or flare; or recovery devices other than an absorber, condenser, or carbon adsorber shall provide to the Administrator information describing the operation of the control device or recovery device and the process parameter(s) which would indicate proper operation and maintenance of the device. The Administrator may request further information and will specify appropriate monitoring procedures or requirements.


[55 FR 26922, June 29, 1990, as amended at 65 FR 61769, Oct. 17, 2000; 89 FR 43086, May 16, 2024]


§ 60.614 Test methods and procedures.

(a) For the purpose of demonstrating compliance with § 60.612, all affected facilities shall be run at full operating conditions and flow rates during any performance test.


(b) The following methods in appendix A to this part, except as provided under § 60.8(b) shall be used as reference methods to determine compliance with the emission limit or percent reduction efficiency specified under § 60.612(a).


(1) Method 1 or 1A, as appropriate, for selection of the sampling sites. The control device inlet sampling site for determination of vent stream molar composition or TOC (less methane and ethane) reduction efficiency shall be prior to the inlet of the control device and after the recovery system.


(2) Method 2, 2A, 2C, or 2D, as appropriate, for determination of the volumetric flow rates.


(3) The emission rate correction factor, integrated sampling and analysis procedure of Method 3 shall be used to determine the oxygen concentration (%O2d) for the purposes of determining compliance with the 20 ppmv limit. The sampling site shall be the same as that of the TOC samples and the samples shall be taken during the same time that the TOC samples are taken. The TOC concentration corrected to 3 percent O2 (Cc) shall be computed using the following equation:




where:

Cc = Concentration of TOC corrected to 3 percent 02, dry basis, ppm by volume.

CTOC = Concentration of TOC (minus methane and ethane), dry basis, ppm by volume.

%O2d = Concentration of O2, dry basis, percent by volume.

(4) Method 18 of appendix A-6 to this part to determine concentration of TOC in the control device outlet and the concentration of TOC in the inlet when the reduction efficiency of the control device is to be determined. ASTM D6420-18 (incorporated by reference, see § 60.17) may be used in lieu of Method 18, if the target compounds are all known and are all listed in Section 1.1 of ASTM D6420-18 as measurable; ASTM D6420-18 may not be used for methane and ethane; and ASTM D6420-18 may not be used as a total VOC method.


(i) The sampling time for each run shall be 1 hour in which either an integrated sample or four grab samples shall be taken. If grab sampling is used then the samples shall be taken at 15-minute intervals.


(ii) The emission reduction (R) of TOC (minus methane and ethane) shall be determined using the following equation:




where:

R = Emission reduction, percent by weight.

Ei = Mass rate of TOC entering the control device, kg/hr (lb/hr).

Eo = Mass rate of TOC discharged to the atmosphere, kg/hr (lb/hr).

(iii) The mass rates of TOC (Ei, Eo) shall be computed using the following equations:




Where:

Cij, Coj = Concentration of sample component “j” of the gas stream at the inlet and outlet of the control device, respectively, dry basis ppm by volume.

Mij, Moj = Molecular weight of sample component “j“ of the gas stream at the inlet and outlet of the control device, respectively, g/g-mole (lb/lb-mole).

Qi, Qo = Flow rate of gas stream at the inlet and outlet of the control device, respectively, dscm/min (dscf/min).

K2 = 2.494 × 10−6 (1/ppm)(g-mole/scm)(kg/g)(min/hr) (metric units), where standard temperature for (g-mole/scm) is 20 °C.

= 1.557 × 10−7 (1/ppm)(lb-mole/scf)(min/hr) (English units), where standard temperature for (lb-mole/scf) is 68 °F.

(iv) The TOC concentration (CTOC) is the sum of the individual components and shall be computed for each run using the following equation:




where:

CTOC = Concentration of TOC (minus methane and ethane), dry basis, ppm by volume.

Cj = Concentration of sample components in the sample.

n = Number of components in the sample.

(c) When a boiler or process heater with a design heat input capacity of 44 MW (150 million Btu/hour) or greater is used to seek to comply with § 60.612(a), the requirement for an initial performance test is waived, in accordance with § 60.8(b). However, the Administrator reserves the option to require testing at such other times as may be required, as provided for in section 114 of the Act.


(d) When a flare is used to seek to comply with § 60.612(b), the flare shall comply with the requirements of § 60.18.


(e) The following test methods, except as provided under § 60.8(b), shall be used for determining the net heating value of the gas combusted to determine compliance under § 60.612(b) and for determining the process vent stream TRE index value to determine compliance under § 60.612(c).


(1)(i) Method 1 or 1A of appendix A-1 to this part, as appropriate, for selection of the sampling site. The sampling site for the vent stream flow rate and molar composition determination prescribed in § 60.614(e)(2) and (3) shall be, except for the situations outlined in paragraph (e)(1)(ii) of this section, prior to the inlet of any control device, prior to any post-reactor dilution of the stream with air, and prior to any post-reactor introduction of halogenated compounds into the vent stream. No transverse site selection method is needed for vents smaller than 10 centimeters (4 inches) in diameter.


(ii) If any gas stream other than the air oxidation vent stream from the affected facility is normally conducted through the final recovery device.


(A) The sampling site for vent stream flow rate and molar composition shall be prior to the final recovery device and prior to the point at which the nonair oxidation stream is introduced.


(B) The efficiency of the final recovery device is determined by measuring the TOC concentration using Method 18 of appendix A-6 to this part, or ASTM D6420-18 (incorporated by reference, see § 60.17) as specified in paragraph (b)(4) of this section, at the inlet to the final recovery device after the introduction of any nonair oxidation vent stream and at the outlet of the final recovery device.


(C) This efficiency is applied to the TOC concentration measured prior to the final recovery device and prior to the introduction of the nonair oxidation stream to determine the concentration of TOC in the air oxidation stream from the final recovery device. This concentration of TOC is then used to perform the calculations outlined in § 60.614(e)(4) and (5).


(2) The molar composition of the process vent stream shall be determined as follows:


(i) Method 18 of appendix A-6 to this part, or ASTM D6420-18 (incorporated by reference, see § 60.17) as specified in paragraph (b)(4) of this section, to measure the concentration of TOC including those containing halogens.


(ii) D1946-77 or 90 (Reapproved 1994) (incorporation by reference, see § 60.17) to measure the concentration of carbon monoxide and hydrogen.


(iii) Method 4 of appendix A to this part to measure the content of water vapor.


(3) The volumetric flow rate shall be determined using Method 2, 2A, 2C, or 2D of appendix A-1 to this part, as appropriate.


(4) The net heating value of the vent stream shall be calculated using the following equation:


Equation 6 to Paragraph (e)(4)



Where:

HT = Net heating value of the sample, MJ/scm (Btu/scf), where the net enthalpy per mole of vent stream is based on combustion at 25 °C and 760 mm Hg (77 °F and 30 in. Hg), but the standard temperature for determining the volume corresponding to one mole is 20 °C (68 °F).

K1 = 1.74 × 10−7 (1/ppm)(g-mole/scm)(MJ/kcal) (metric units), where standard temperature for (g-mole/scm) is 20 °C.

= 1.03 × 10−11 (1/ppm)(lb-mole/scf)(Btu/kcal) (English units) where standard temperature for (lb/mole/scf) is 68 °F.

Cj = Concentration on a wet basis of compound j in ppm, as measured for organics by Method 18 of appendix A-6 to this part, or ASTM D6420-18 (incorporated by reference, see § 60.17) as specified in paragraph (b)(4) of this section, and measured for hydrogen and carbon monoxide by ASTM D1946-77, 90, or 94 (incorporation by reference, see § 60.17) as indicated in paragraph (e)(2) of this section.

Hj = Net heat of combustion of compound j, kcal/(g-mole) [kcal/(lb-mole)], based on combustion at 25 °C and 760 mm Hg (77 °F and 30 in. Hg).

(5) The emission rate of TOC in the process vent stream shall be calculated using the following equation:


Equation 7 to Paragraph (e)(5)



Where:

ETOC = Measured emission rate of TOC, kg/hr (lb/hr).

K2 = 2.494 × 10−6 (1/ppm)(g-mole/scm)(kg/g)(min/hr) (metric units), where standard temperature for (g-mole/scm) is 20 °C.

= 1.557 × 10−7 (1/ppm)(lb-mole/scf)(min/hr) (English units), where standard temperature for (lb-mole/scf) is 68 °F.

Cj = Concentration on a wet basis of compound j in ppm, as measured by Method 18 of appendix A-6 to this part, or ASTM D6420-18 (incorporated by reference, see § 60.17) as specified in paragraph (b)(4) of this section, as indicated in paragraph (e)(2) of this section.

Mj = Molecular weight of sample j, g/g-mole (lb/lb-mole).

Qs = Vent stream flow rate, scm/hr (scf/hr), at a temperature of 20 °C (68 °F).

(6) The total process vent stream concentration (by volume) of compounds containing halogens (ppmv, by compound) shall be summed from the individual concentrations of compounds containing halogens which were measured by Method 18 of appendix A-6 to this part, or ASTM D6420-18 (incorporated by reference, see § 60.17) as specified in paragraph (b)(4) of this section.


(f) For purposes of complying with § 60.612(c), the owner or operator of a facility affected by this subpart shall calculate the TRE index value of the vent stream using the equation for incineration in paragraph (e)(1) of this section for halogenated vent streams. The owner or operator of an affected facility with a nonhalogenated vent stream shall determine the TRE index value by calculating values using both the incinerator equation in paragraph (e)(1) of this section and the flare equation in paragraph (e)(2) of this section and selecting the lower of the two values.


(1) The TRE index value of the vent stream controlled by an incinerator shall be calculated using the following equation:



(i) Where for a vent stream flow rate that is greater than or equal to 14.2 scm/min (501 scf/min) at a standard temperature of 20 °C (68 °F):



TRE = TRE index value.

Qs = Vent stream flow rate, scm/min (scf/min), at a temperature of 20 °C (68 °F).

HT = Vent stream net heating value, MJ/scm (Btu/scf), where the net enthalpy per mole of vent stream is based on combustion at 25 °C and 760 mm Hg (68 °F and 30 in. Hg), but the standard temperature for determining the volume corresponding to one mole is 20 °C (68 °F) as in the definition of Qs.

Ys = Qs for all vent stream categories listed in table 1 except for Category E vent streams where Ys = QsHT/3.6.

ETOC = Hourly emissions of TOC, kg/hr (lb/hr). a, b, c, d, e, and f are coefficients.

The set of coefficients which apply to a vent stream shall be obtained from table 1.





(ii) Where for a vent stream flow rate that is less than 14.2 scm/min (501 scf/min) at a standard temperature of 20 °C (68 °F):



TRE = TRE index value.

Qs = 14.2 scm/min (501 scf/min).

HT = (FLOW)(HVAL)/Qs.

Where the following inputs are used:

FLOW = Vent stream flow rate, scm/min (scf/min), at a temperature of 20 °C (68 °F).

HVAL = Vent stream net heating value, MJ/scm (Btu/scf), where the net enthalpy per mole of vent stream is based on combustion at 25 °C and 760 mm Hg (68 °F and 30 in. Hg), but the standard temperature for determining the volume corresponding to one mole is 20 °C (68 °F) as in the definition of Qs.

Ys = Qs for all vent stream categories listed in table 1 except for Category E vent streams where Ys = QsHT/3.6.

ETOC = Hourly emissions of TOC, kg/hr (lb/hr).

a, b, c, d, e, and f are coefficients.


The set of coefficients that apply to a vent stream can be obtained from table 1.


(2) The equation for calculating the TRE index value of a vent stream controlled by a flare is as follows:




where:

TRE = TRE index value.

ETOC = Hourly emissions of TOC, kg/hr (lb/hr).

Qs = Vent stream flow rate, scm/min (scf/min), at a standard temperature of 20 °C (68 °F).

HT = Vent stream net heating value, MJ/scm (Btu/scf), where the net enthalpy per mole of vent stream is based on combustion at 25 °C and 760 mm Hg (68 °F and 30 in. Hg), but the standard temperature for determining the volume corresponding to one mole is 20 °C (68 °F) as in the definition of Qs.

a, b, c, d, and e are coefficients.


The set of coefficients that apply to a vent stream shall be obtained from table 2.


Table 2—Air Oxidation Processes NSPS TRE Coefficients for Vent Streams Controlled by a Flare


a
b
c
d
e
HT 2.250.288−0.193(−0.00512.08
(HT (0.140)(0.0367)(−0.000448)(−0.0051)(4.59)
HT ≥ 11.2 MJ/scm0.3090.0619−0.0043−0.00342.08
HT ≥ 301 Btu/scf)(0.0193)(0.00788)(−0.000010)(−0.0034)(4.59)

(g) Each owner or operator of an affected facility seeking to comply with § 60.610(c) or § 60.612(c) shall recalculate the TRE index value for that affected facility whenever process changes are made. Some examples of process changes are changes in production capacity, feedstock type, or catalyst type, or whenever there is replacement, removal, or addition of recovery equipment. The TRE index value shall be recalculated based on test data, or on best engineering estimates of the effects of the change to the recovery system.


(1) Where the recalculated TRE index value is less than or equal to 1.0, the owner or operator shall notify the Administrator within 1 week of the recalculation and shall conduct a performance test according to the methods and procedures required by § 60.614 to determine compliance with § 60.612(a). Performance tests must be conducted as soon as possible after the process change but no later than 180 days from the time of the process change.


(2) Where the initial TRE index value is greater than 4.0 and the recalculated TRE index value is less than or equal to 4.0, but greater than 1.0, the owner or operator shall conduct a performance test in accordance with §§ 60.8 and 60.614 and shall comply with §§ 60.613, 60.614, and 60.615. Performance tests must be conducted as soon as possible after the process change but no later than 180 days from the time of the process change.


[55 FR 26922, June 29, 1990; 55 FR 36932, Sept. 7, 1990, as amended at 65 FR 61769, Oct. 17, 2000; 89 FR 43086, May 16, 2024]


§ 60.615 Reporting and recordkeeping requirements.

(a) Each owner or operator subject to § 60.612 shall notify the Administrator of the specific provisions of § 60.612 (§ 60.612 (a) (b), or (c)) with which the owner or operator has elected to comply. Notification shall be submitted with the notification of initial start-up required by § 60.7(a)(3). If an owner or operator elects at a later date to use an alternative provision of § 60.612 with which he or she will comply, then the Administrator shall be notified by the owner or operator 90 days before implementing a change and, upon implementing the change, a performance test shall be performed as specified by § 60.614 within 180 days.


(b) Each owner or operator subject to the provisions of this subpart shall keep up-to-date, readily accessible records of the following data measured during each performance test, and also include the following data in the report of the initial performance test required under § 60.8. Where a boiler or process heater with a design heat input capacity of 44 MW (150 million Btu/hour) or greater is used to comply with § 60.612(a), a report containing performance test data need not be submitted, but a report containing the information of § 60.615(b)(2)(i) is required. The same data specified in this section shall be submitted in the reports of all subsequently required performance tests where either the emission control efficiency of a control device, outlet concentration of TOC, or the TRE index value of a vent stream from a recovery system is determined. Beginning on July 15, 2024, owners and operators must submit the performance test report following the procedures specified in paragraph (m) of this section. Data collected using test methods that are supported by the EPA’s Electronic Reporting Tool (ERT) as listed on the EPA’s ERT website (https://www.epa.gov/electronic-reporting-air-emissions/electronic-reporting-tool-ert) at the time of the test must be submitted in a file format generated using the EPA’s ERT. Alternatively, the owner or operator may submit an electronic file consistent with the extensible markup language (XML) schema listed on the EPA’s ERT website. Data collected using test methods that are not supported by the EPA’s ERT as listed on the EPA’s ERT website at the time of the test must be included as an attachment in the ERT or an alternate electronic file.


(1) Where an owner or operator subject to this subpart seeks to demonstrate compliance with § 60.612(a) through use of either a thermal or catalytic incinerator:


(i) The average firebox temperature of the incinerator (or the average temperature upstream and downstream of the catalyst bed for a catalytic incinerator), measured at least every 15 minutes and averaged over the same time period of the performance testing, and


(ii) The percent reduction of TOC determined as specified in § 60.614(b) achieved by the incinerator, or the concentration of TOC (ppmv, by compound) determined as specified in § 60.614(b) at the outlet of the control device on a dry basis corrected to 3 percent oxygen.


(2) Where an owner or operator subject to the provisions of this subpart seeks to demonstrate compliance with § 60.612(a) through use of a boiler or process heater:


(i) A description of the location at which the vent stream is introduced into the boiler or process heater, and


(ii) The average combustion temperature of the boiler or process heater with a design heat input capacity of less than 44 MW (150 million Btu/hr) measured at least every 15 minutes and averaged over the same time period of the performance testing.


(3) Where an owner or operator subject to the provisions of this subpart seeks to comply with § 60.612(b) through the use of a smokeless flare, flare design (i.e., steam-assisted, air-assisted, or nonassisted), all visible emission readings, heat content determinations, flow rate measurements, and exit velocity determinations made during the performance test, continuous records of the flare pilot flame monitoring, and records of all periods of operations during which the pilot flame is absent.


(4) Where an owner or operator seeks to demonstrate compliance with § 60.612(c):


(i) Where an absorber is the final recovery device in a recovery system, the exit specific gravity (or alternative parameter which is a measure of the degree of absorbing liquid saturation, if approved by the Administrator), and average exit temperature of the absorbing liquid, measured at least every 15 minutes and averaged over the same time period of the performance testing (both measured while the vent stream is normally routed and constituted), or


(ii) Where a condenser is the final recovery device in a recovery system, the average exit (product side) temperature, measured at least every 15 minutes and average over the same time period of the performance testing while the vent stream is normally routed and constituted.


(iii) Where a carbon adsorber is the final recovery device in a recovery system, the total steam mass flow measured at least every 15 minutes and averaged over the same time period of the performance test (full carbon bed cycle), temperature of the carbon bed after regeneration (and within 15 minutes of completion of any cooling cycle(s), and duration of the carbon bed steaming cycle (all measured while the vent stream is normally routed and constituted), or


(iv) As an alternative to § 60.615(b)(4)(i), (ii) or (iii), the concentration level or reading indicated by the organic monitoring device at the outlet of the absorber, condenser, or carbon adsorber measured at least every 15 minutes and averaged over the same time period of the performance testing while the vent stream is normally routed and constituted.


(v) All measurements and calculations performed to determine the TRE index value of the vent stream.


(c) Each owner or operator subject to the provisions of this subpart shall keep up-to-date, readily accessible continuous records of the equipment operating parameters specified to be monitored under § 60.613(a) and (c) as well as up-to-date, readily accessible records of periods of operation during which the parameter boundaries established during the most recent performance test are exceeded. The Administrator may at any time require a report of these data. Where a combustion device is used by an owner or operator seeking to demonstrate compliance with § 60.612(a) or (c), periods of operation during which the parameter boundaries established during the most recent performance tests are exceeded are defined as follows:


(1) For thermal incinerators, all 3-hour periods of operation during which the average combustion temperature was more than 28 °C (50 °F) below the average combustion temperature during the most recent performance test at which compliance with § 60.612(a) was determined.


(2) For catalytic incinerators, all 3-hour periods of operation during which the average temperature of the vent stream immediately before the catalyst bed is more than 28 °C (50 °F) below the average temperature of the vent stream during the most recent performance test at which compliance with § 60.612(a) was determined. The owner or operator also shall record all 3-hour periods of operation during which the average temperature difference across the catalyst bed is less than 80 percent of the average temperature difference of the device during the most recent performance test at which compliance with § 60.612(a) was determined.


(3) All 3-hour periods of operation during which the average combustion temperature was more than 28 °C (50 °F) below the average combustion temperature during the most recent performance test at which compliance with § 60.612(a) was determined for boilers or process heaters with a design heat input capacity of less than 44 MW (150 million Btu/hr).


(4) For boilers or process heaters, whenever there is a change in the location at which the vent stream is introduced into the flame zone as required under § 60.612(a).


(d) Each owner or operator subject to the provisions of this subpart shall keep up-to-date, readily accessible continuous records of the flow indication specified under § 60.613(a)(2), § 60.613(b)(2), and § 60.613(c)(1), as well as up-to-date, readily accessible records of all periods when the vent stream is diverted from the control device or has no flow rate.


(e) Each owner or operator subject to the provisions of this subpart who uses a boiler or process heater with a design heat input capacity of 44 MW (150 million Btu/hour) or greater to comply with § 60.612(a) shall keep an up-to-date, readily accessible record of all periods of operation of the boiler or process heater. (Examples of such records could include records of steam use, fuel use, or monitoring data collected pursuant to other State or Federal regulatory requirements).


(f) Each owner or operator subject to the provisions of this subpart shall keep up-to-date, readily accessible continuous records of the flare pilot flame monitoring specified in § 60.613(b), as well as up-to-date, readily accessible records of all periods of operations in which the pilot flame is absent.


(g) Each owner or operator subject to the provisions of this subpart shall keep up-to-date, readily accessible continuous records of the equipment operating parameters specified to be monitored under § 60.613(e) as well as up-to-date, readily accessible records of periods of operation during which the parameter boundaries established during the most recent performance test are exceeded. The Administrator may at any time require a report of these data. Where the owner or operator seeks to demonstrate compliance with § 60.612(c), periods of operation during which the parameter boundaries established during the most recent performance tests are exceeded are defined as follows:


(1) Where an absorber is the final recovery device in a recovery system, and where an organic monitoring device is not used:


(i) All 3-hour periods of operation during which the average absorbing liquid temperature was more than 11 °C (20 °F) above the average absorbing liquid temperature during the most recent performance test, or


(ii) All 3-hour periods of operation during which the average absorbing liquid specific gravity was more than 0.1 unit above, or more than 0.1 unit below, the average absorbing liquid specific gravity during the most recent performance test (unless monitoring of an alternative parameter, which is a measure of the degree of absorbing liquid saturation, is approved by the Administrator, in which case he or she will define appropriate parameter boundaries and periods of operation during which they are exceeded).


(2) When a condenser is the final recovery device in a recovery system, and where an organic monitoring device is not used, all 3-hour periods of operation during which the average exit (product side) condenser operating temperature was more than 6 °C (11 °F) above the average exit (product side) operating temperature during the most recent performance test.


(3) Where a carbon adsorber is the final recovery device in a recovery system and where an organic monitoring device is not used:


(i) All carbon bed regeneration cycles during which the total mass steam flow was more than 10 percent below the total mass steam flow during the most recent performance test, or


(ii) All carbon bed regeneration cycles during which the temperature of the carbon bed after regeneration (and after completion of any cooling cycle(s)) was more than 10 percent greater than the carbon bed temperature (in degrees Celsius) during the most recent performance test.


(4) Where an absorber, condenser, or carbon adsorber is the final recovery device in the recovery system and an organic monitoring device approved by the Administrator is used, all 3-hour periods of operation during which the average concentration level or reading of organic compounds in the exhaust gases is more than 20 percent greater than the exhaust gas organic compound concentration level or reading measured by the monitoring device during the most recent performance test.


(h) Each owner or operator subject to the provisions of this subpart and seeking to demonstrate compliance with § 60.612(c) shall keep up-to-date, readily accessible records of:


(1) Any changes in production capacity, feedstock type, or catalyst type, or of any replacement, removal or addition of recovery equipment or air oxidation reactors;


(2) Any recalculation of the TRE index value performed pursuant to § 60.614(f);


(3) The results of any performance test performed pursuant to the methods and procedures required by § 60.614(d).


(i) Each owner and operator subject to the provisions of this subpart is exempt from the quarterly reporting requirements contained in § 60.7(c) of the General Provisions.


(j) Each owner or operator that seeks to comply with the requirements of this subpart by complying with the requirements of § 60.612 shall submit to the Administrator semiannual reports of the following information. The initial report shall be submitted within 6 months after the initial start-up-date. On and after July 15, 2025 or once the report template for this subpart has been available on the Compliance and Emissions Data Reporting Interface (CEDRI) website (https://www.epa.gov/electronic-reporting-air-emissions/cedri) for 1 year, whichever date is later, owners and operators must submit all subsequent reports using the appropriate electronic report template on the CEDRI website for this subpart and following the procedure specified in paragraph (m) of this section. The date report templates become available will be listed on the CEDRI website. Unless the Administrator or delegated state agency or other authority has approved a different schedule for submission of reports, the report must be submitted by the deadline specified in this subpart, regardless of the method in which the report is submitted.


(1) Exceedances of monitored parameters recorded under § 60.615(c) and (g).


(2) All periods recorded under § 60.615(d) when the vent stream is diverted from the control device or has no flow rate.


(3) All periods recorded under § 60.615(e) when the boiler or process heater was not operating.


(4) All periods recorded under § 60.615(f) in which the pilot flame of the flare was absent.


(5) Any recalculation of the TRE index value, as recorded under § 60.615(h).


(k) The requirements of § 60.615(j) remain in force until and unless EPA, in delegating enforcement authority to a State under section 111(c) of the Act, approves reporting requirements or an alternative means of compliance surveillance adopted by such State. In that event, affected sources within the State will be relieved of the obligation to comply with § 60.615(j), provided that they comply with the requirements established by the State. The EPA will not approve a waiver of electronic reporting to the EPA in delegating enforcement authority. Thus, electronic reporting to the EPA cannot be waived, and as such, the provisions of this paragraph cannot be used to relieve owners or operators of affected facilities of the requirement to submit the electronic reports required in this section to the EPA.


(l) The Administrator will specify appropriate reporting and recordkeeping requirements where the owner or operator of an affected facility seeks to demonstrate compliance with the standards specified under § 60.612 other than as provided under § 60.613(a), (b), (c), and (d).


(m) If an owner or operator is required to submit notifications or reports following the procedure specified in this paragraph (m), the owner or operator must submit notifications or reports to the EPA via CEDRI, which can be accessed through the EPA’s Central Data Exchange (CDX) (https://cdx.epa.gov/). The EPA will make all the information submitted through CEDRI available to the public without further notice to the owner or operator. Do not use CEDRI to submit information the owner or operator claims as CBI. Although the EPA does not expect persons to assert a claim of CBI, if an owner or operator wishes to assert a CBI claim for some of the information in the report or notification, the owner or operator must submit a complete file in the format specified in this subpart, including information claimed to be CBI, to the EPA following the procedures in paragraphs (m)(1) and (2) of this section. Clearly mark the part or all of the information claimed to be CBI. Information not marked as CBI may be authorized for public release without prior notice. Information marked as CBI will not be disclosed except in accordance with procedures set forth in 40 CFR part 2. All CBI claims must be asserted at the time of submission. Anything submitted using CEDRI cannot later be claimed CBI. Furthermore, under CAA section 114(c), emissions data is not entitled to confidential treatment, and the EPA is required to make emissions data available to the public. Thus, emissions data will not be protected as CBI and will be made publicly available. The owner or operator must submit the same file submitted to the CBI office with the CBI omitted to the EPA via the EPA’s CDX as described earlier in this paragraph (m).


(1) The preferred method to receive CBI is for it to be transmitted electronically using email attachments, File Transfer Protocol, or other online file sharing services. Electronic submissions must be transmitted directly to the OAQPS CBI Office at the email address [email protected], and as described above, should include clear CBI markings. ERT files should be flagged to the attention of the Group Leader, Measurement Policy Group; all other files should be flagged to the attention of the SOCMI NSPS Sector Lead. Owners and operators who do not have their own file sharing service and who require assistance with submitting large electronic files that exceed the file size limit for email attachments should email [email protected] to request a file transfer link.


(2) If an owner or operator cannot transmit the file electronically, the owner or operator may send CBI information through the postal service to the following address: OAQPS Document Control Officer (C404-02), OAQPS, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 109 T.W. Alexander Drive, P.O. Box 12055, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27711. ERT files should be sent to the attention of the Group Leader, Measurement Policy Group, and all other files should be sent to the attention of the SOCMI NSPS Sector Lead. The mailed CBI material should be double wrapped and clearly marked. Any CBI markings should not show through the outer envelope.


(n) Owners and operators required to electronically submit notifications or reports through CEDRI in the EPA’s CDX may assert a claim of EPA system outage for failure to timely comply with the electronic submittal requirement. To assert a claim of EPA system outage, owners and operators must meet the requirements outlined in paragraphs (n)(1) through (7) of this section.


(1) The owner or operator must have been or will be precluded from accessing CEDRI and submitting a required report within the time prescribed due to an outage of either the EPA’s CEDRI or CDX systems.


(2) The outage must have occurred within the period of time beginning five business days prior to the date that the submission is due.


(3) The outage may be planned or unplanned.


(4) The owner or operator must submit notification to the Administrator in writing as soon as possible following the date the owner or operator first knew, or through due diligence should have known, that the event may cause or has caused a delay in reporting.


(5) The owner or operator must provide to the Administrator a written description identifying:


(i) The date(s) and time(s) when CDX or CEDRI was accessed and the system was unavailable;


(ii) A rationale for attributing the delay in reporting beyond the regulatory deadline to EPA system outage;


(iii) A description of measures taken or to be taken to minimize the delay in reporting; and


(iv) The date by which the owner or operator proposes to report, or if the owner or operator has already met the reporting requirement at the time of the notification, the date the report was submitted.


(6) The decision to accept the claim of EPA system outage and allow an extension to the reporting deadline is solely within the discretion of the Administrator.


(7) In any circumstance, the report must be submitted electronically as soon as possible after the outage is resolved.


(o) Owners and operators required to electronically submit notifications or reports through CEDRI in the EPA’s CDX, owners and operators may assert a claim of force majeure for failure to timely comply with the electronic submittal requirement. To assert a claim of force majeure, you must meet the requirements outlined in paragraphs (o)(1) through (5) of this section.


(1) An owner or operator may submit a claim if a force majeure event is about to occur, occurs, or has occurred or there are lingering effects from such an event within the period of time beginning five business days prior to the date the submission is due. For the purposes of this section, a force majeure event is defined as an event that will be or has been caused by circumstances beyond the control of the affected facility, its contractors, or any entity controlled by the affected facility that prevents the owner or operator from complying with the requirement to submit a report electronically within the time period prescribed. Examples of such events are acts of nature (e.g., hurricanes, earthquakes, or floods), acts of war or terrorism, or equipment failure or safety hazard beyond the control of the affected facility (e.g., large scale power outage).


(2) The owner or operator must submit notification to the Administrator in writing as soon as possible following the date the owner or operator first knew, or through due diligence should have known, that the event may cause or has caused a delay in reporting.


(3) The owner or operator must provide to the Administrator:


(i) A written description of the force majeure event;


(ii) A rationale for attributing the delay in reporting beyond the regulatory deadline to the force majeure event;


(iii) A description of measures taken or to be taken to minimize the delay in reporting; and


(iv) The date by which the owner or operator proposes to report, or if the owner or operator has already met the reporting requirement at the time of the notification, the date the report was submitted.


(4) The decision to accept the claim of force majeure and allow an extension to the reporting deadline is solely within the discretion of the Administrator.


(5) In any circumstance, the reporting must occur as soon as possible after the force majeure event occurs.


[55 FR 26922, June 29, 1990; 55 FR 36932, Sept. 7, 1990, as amended at 65 FR 61773, Oct. 17, 2000; 89 FR 43088, May 16, 2024]


§ 60.616 Reconstruction.

For purposes of this subpart “fixed capital cost of the new components,” as used in § 60.15, includes the fixed capital cost of all depreciable components which are or will be replaced pursuant to all continuous programs of component replacement which are commenced within any 2-year period following October 21, 1983. For purposes of this paragraph, “commenced” means that an owner or operator has undertaken a continuous program of component replacement or that an owner or operator has entered into a contractual obligation to undertake and complete, within a reasonable time, a continuous program of component replacement.


§ 60.617 Chemicals affected by subpart III.

Chemical name
CAS No.*
Acetaldehyde75-07-0
Acetic acid64-19-7
Acetone67-64-1
Acetonitrile75-05-8
Acetophenone98-86-2
Acrolein107-02-8
Acrylic acid79-10-7
Acrylonitrile107-13-1
Anthraquinone84-65-1
Benzaldehyde100-52-7
Benzoic acid, tech65-85-0
1,3-Butadiene106-99-0
p-t-Butyl benzoic acid98-73-7
N-Butyric acid107-92-6
Crotonic acid3724-65-0
Cumene hydroperoxide80-15-9
Cyclohexanol108-93-0
Cyclohexanone108-94-1
Dimethyl terephthalate120-61-6
Ethylene dichloride107-06-2
Ethylene oxide75-21-8
Formaldehyde50-00-0
Formic acid64-18-6
Glyoxal107-22-2
Hydrogen cyanide74-90-8
Isobutyric acid79-31-2
Isophthalic acid121-91-5
Maleic anhydride108-31-6
Methyl ethyl ketone78-93-3
a-Methyl styrene98-83-9
Phenol108-95-2
Phthalic anhydride85-44-9
Propionic acid79-09-4
Propylene oxide75-56-9
Styrene100-42-5
Terephthalic acid100-21-0

*CAS numbers refer to the Chemical Abstracts Registry numbers assigned to specific chemicals, isomers, or mixtures of chemicals. Some isomers or mixtures that are covered by the standards do not have CAS numbers assigned to them. The standards apply to all of the chemicals listed, whether CAS numbers have been assigned or not.


§ 60.618 Delegation of authority.

(a) In delegating implementation and enforcement authority to a State under section 111(c) of the Act, the authorities contained in paragraph (b) of this section shall be retained by the Administrator and not transferred to a State.


(b) Authorities which will not be delegated to States: § 60.613(e) and approval of an alternative to any electronic reporting to the EPA required by this subpart.


[55 FR 26922, June 29, 1990, as amended at 89 FR 43089, May 16, 2024]


Subpart IIIa—Standards of Performance for Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Emissions From the Synthetic Organic Chemical Manufacturing Industry (SOCMI) Air Oxidation Unit Processes for Which Construction, Reconstruction, or Modification Commenced After April 25, 2023


Source:89 FR 43089, May 16, 2024, unless otherwise noted.

§ 60.610a Am I subject to this subpart?

(a) You are subject to this subpart if you operate an affected facility designated in paragraph (b) of this section that produces any of the chemicals listed in § 60.617a as a product, co-product, by-product, or intermediate, except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section.


(b) The affected facility is any of the following for which construction, modification, or reconstruction commenced after April 25, 2023:


(1) Each air oxidation reactor not discharging its vent stream into a recovery system.


(2) Each combination of an air oxidation reactor and the recovery system into which its vent stream is discharged.


(3) Each combination of two or more air oxidation reactors and the common recovery system into which their vent streams are discharged.


(c) Exemptions from the provisions of paragraph (a) of this section are as follows:


(1) Each affected facility operated with a vent stream flow rate less than 0.001 pound per hour (lb/hr) of TOC is exempt from all provisions of this subpart except for the test method and procedure and the recordkeeping and reporting requirements in § 60.614a(e) and § 60.615a(h), (i)(8), and (n).


(2) A vent stream going to a fuel gas system as defined in § 63.611a.


§ 60.611a What definitions must I know?

As used in this subpart, all terms not defined herein have the meaning given them in the Clean Air Act and subpart A of this part.


Air Oxidation Reactor means any device or process vessel in which one or more organic reactants are combined with air, or a combination of air and oxygen, to produce one or more organic compounds. Ammoxidation and oxychlorination reactions are included in this definition.


Air Oxidation Reactor Recovery Train means an individual recovery system receiving the vent stream from at least one air oxidation reactor, along with all air oxidation reactors feeding vent streams into this system.


Air Oxidation Unit Process means a unit process, including ammoxidation and oxychlorination unit process, that uses air, or a combination of air and oxygen, as an oxygen source in combination with one or more organic reactants to produce one or more organic compounds.


Boilers means any enclosed combustion device that extracts useful energy in the form of steam.


Breakthrough means the time when the level of TOC, measured at the outlet of the first bed, has been detected is at the highest concentration allowed to be discharged from the adsorber system and indicates that the adsorber bed should be replaced.


By Compound means by individual stream components, not carbon equivalents.


Closed vent system means a system that is not open to the atmosphere and is composed of piping, ductwork, connections, and, if necessary, flow inducing devices that transport gas or vapor from an emission point to a control device.


Continuous recorder means a data recording device recording an instantaneous data value at least once every 15 minutes.


Flame zone means the portion of the combustion chamber in a boiler or process heater occupied by the flame envelope.


Flow indicator means a device which indicates whether gas flow is present in a vent stream.


Fuel gas means gases that are combusted to derive useful work or heat.


Fuel gas system means the offsite and onsite piping and flow and pressure control system that gathers gaseous stream(s) generated by onsite operations, may blend them with other sources of gas, and transports the gaseous stream for use as fuel gas in combustion devices or in in-process combustion equipment such as furnaces and gas turbines either singly or in combination.


Halogenated vent stream means any vent stream determined to have a total concentration (by volume) of compounds containing halogens of 20 ppmv (by compound) or greater.


Incinerator means any enclosed combustion device that is used for destroying organic compounds and does not extract energy in the form of steam or process heat.


Pressure-assisted multi-point flare means a flare system consisting of multiple flare burners in staged arrays whereby the vent stream pressure is used to promote mixing and smokeless operation at the flare burner tips. Pressure-assisted multi-point flares are designed for smokeless operation at velocities up to Mach = 1 conditions (i.e., sonic conditions), can be elevated or at ground level, and typically use cross-lighting for flame propagation to combust any flare vent gases sent to a particular stage of flare burners.


Primary fuel means the fuel fired through a burner or a number of similar burners. The primary fuel provides the principal heat input to the device, and the amount of fuel is sufficient to sustain operation without the addition of other fuels.


Process heater means a device that transfers heat liberated by burning fuel to fluids contained in tubes, including all fluids except water that is heated to produce steam.


Process unit means equipment assembled and connected by pipes or ducts to produce, as intermediates or final products, one or more of the chemicals in § 60.617a. A process unit can operate independently if supplied with sufficient fuel or raw materials and sufficient product storage facilities.


Product means any compound or chemical listed in § 60.617a that is produced for sale as a final product as that chemical or is produced for use in a process that needs that chemical for the production of other chemicals in another facility. By-products, co-products, and intermediates are considered to be products.


Recovery device means an individual unit of equipment, such as an absorber, condenser, and carbon adsorber, capable of and used to recover chemicals for use, reuse, or sale.


Recovery system means an individual recovery device or series of such devices applied to the same process stream.


Relief valve means a valve used only to release an unplanned, nonroutine discharge. A relief valve discharge results from an operator error, a malfunction such as a power failure or equipment failure, or other unexpected cause that requires immediate venting of gas from process equipment in order to avoid safety hazards or equipment damage.


Total organic compounds (TOC) means those compounds measured according to the procedures of Method 18 of appendix A-6 to this part or ASTM D6420-18 (incorporated by reference, see § 60.17) as specified in § 60.614a(b)(4) or the concentration of organic compounds measured according to the procedures in Method 21 or Method 25A of appendix A-7 to this part.


Vent stream means any gas stream, containing nitrogen which was introduced as air to the air oxidation reactor, released to the atmosphere directly from any air oxidation reactor recovery train or indirectly, after diversion through other process equipment. The vent stream excludes equipment leaks including, but not limited to, pumps, compressors, and valves.


§ 60.612a What standards and associated requirements must I meet?

(a) You must comply with the emission limits and standards specified in Table 1 to this subpart and the requirements specified paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section for each vent stream on and after the date on which the initial performance test required by §§ 60.8 and 60.614a is completed, but not later than 60 days after achieving the maximum production rate at which the affected facility will be operated, or 180 days after the initial start-up, whichever date comes first. The standards in this section apply at all times, including periods of startup, shutdown and malfunction. As provided in § 60.11(f), this provision supersedes the exemptions for periods of startup, shutdown and malfunction in the general provisions in subpart A of this part.


(b) The following release events from an affected facility are a violation of the emission limits and standards specified in table 1 to this subpart.


(1) Any relief valve discharge to the atmosphere of a vent stream.


(2) The use of a bypass line at any time on a closed vent system to divert emissions to the atmosphere, or to a control device or recovery device not meeting the requirements specified in § 60.613a.


(c) You may designate a vent stream as a maintenance vent if the vent is only used as a result of startup, shutdown, maintenance, or inspection of equipment where equipment is emptied, depressurized, degassed, or placed into service. You must comply with the applicable requirements in paragraphs (c)(1) through (3) of this section for each maintenance vent. Any vent stream designated as a maintenance vent is only subject to the maintenance vent provisions in this paragraph (c) and the associated recordkeeping and reporting requirements in § 60.615a(g), respectively.


(1) Prior to venting to the atmosphere, remove process liquids from the equipment as much as practical and depressurize the equipment to either: A flare meeting the requirements of § 60.619a, as applicable, or using any combination of a non-flare control device or recovery device meeting the requirements in Table 1 to this subpart until one of the following conditions, as applicable, is met.


(i) The vapor in the equipment served by the maintenance vent has a lower explosive limit (LEL) of less than 10 percent.


(ii) If there is no ability to measure the LEL of the vapor in the equipment based on the design of the equipment, the pressure in the equipment served by the maintenance vent is reduced to 5 pounds per square inch gauge (psig) or less. Upon opening the maintenance vent, active purging of the equipment cannot be used until the LEL of the vapors in the maintenance vent (or inside the equipment if the maintenance is a hatch or similar type of opening) is less than 10 percent.


(iii) The equipment served by the maintenance vent contains less than 50 pounds of total VOC.


(iv) If, after applying best practices to isolate and purge equipment served by a maintenance vent, none of the applicable criterion in paragraphs (c)(1)(i) through (iii) of this section can be met prior to installing or removing a blind flange or similar equipment blind, then the pressure in the equipment served by the maintenance vent must be reduced to 2 psig or less before installing or removing the equipment blind. During installation or removal of the equipment blind, active purging of the equipment may be used provided the equipment pressure at the location where purge gas is introduced remains at 2 psig or less.


(2) Except for maintenance vents complying with the alternative in paragraph (c)(1)(iii) of this section, you must determine the LEL or, if applicable, equipment pressure using process instrumentation or portable measurement devices and follow procedures for calibration and maintenance according to manufacturer’s specifications.


(3) For maintenance vents complying with the alternative in paragraph (c)(1)(iii) of this section, you must determine mass of VOC in the equipment served by the maintenance vent based on the equipment size and contents after considering any contents drained or purged from the equipment. Equipment size may be determined from equipment design specifications. Equipment contents may be determined using process knowledge.


§ 60.613a What are my monitoring, installation, operation, and maintenance requirements?

(a) Except as specified in paragraphs (a)(5) through (7) of this section, if you use a non-flare control device or recovery system to comply with the TOC emission limit specified in Table 1 to this subpart, then you must comply with paragraphs (a)(1) through (4), (b), and (c) of this section.


(1) Install a continuous parameter monitoring system(s) (CPMS) and monitor the operating parameter(s) applicable to the control device or recovery system as specified in Table 2 to this subpart or established according to paragraph (c) of this section.


(2) Establish the applicable minimum, maximum, or range for the operating parameter limit as specified in Table 3 to this subpart or established according to paragraph (c) of this section by calculating the value(s) as the arithmetic average of operating parameter measurements recorded during the three test runs conducted for the most recent performance test. You may operate outside of the established operating parameter limit(s) during subsequent performance tests in order to establish new operating limits. You must include the updated operating limits with the performance test results submitted to the Administrator pursuant to § 60.615a(b). Upon establishment of a new operating limit, you must thereafter operate under the new operating limit. If the Administrator determines that you did not conduct the performance test in accordance with the applicable requirements or that the operating limit established during the performance test does not correspond to the conditions specified in § 60.614a(a), then you must conduct a new performance test and establish a new operating limit.


(3) Monitor, record, and demonstrate continuous compliance using the minimum frequencies specified in Table 3 to this subpart or established according to paragraph (c) of this section.


(4) Comply with the calibration and quality control requirements as specified in Table 4 to this subpart or established according to paragraph (c) of this section that are applicable to the CPMS used.


(5) Any vent stream introduced with primary fuel into a boiler or process heater is exempt from the requirements specified in paragraphs (a)(1) through (4) of this section.


(6) If you vent emissions through a closed vent system to an adsorber(s) that cannot be regenerated or a regenerative adsorber(s) that is regenerated offsite, then you must install a system of two or more adsorber units in series and comply with the requirements specified in paragraphs (a)(6)(i) through (iii) of this section in addition to the requirements specified in paragraphs (a)(1) through (4) of this section.


(i) Conduct an initial performance test or design evaluation of the adsorber and establish the breakthrough limit and adsorber bed life.


(ii) Monitor the TOC concentration through a sample port at the outlet of the first adsorber bed in series according to the schedule in paragraph (a)(6)(iii)(B) of this section. You must measure the concentration of TOC using either a portable analyzer, in accordance with Method 21 of appendix A-7 of this part using methane, propane, or isobutylene as the calibration gas or Method 25A of appendix A-7 of this part using methane or propane as the calibration gas.


(iii) Comply with paragraph (a)(6)(iii)(A) of this section, and comply with the monitoring frequency according to paragraph (a)(6)(iii)(B) of this section.


(A) The first adsorber in series must be replaced immediately when breakthrough, as defined in § 60.611a, is detected between the first and second adsorber. The original second adsorber (or a fresh canister) will become the new first adsorber and a fresh adsorber will become the second adsorber. For purposes of this paragraph (a)(6)(iii)(A), “immediately” means within 8 hours of the detection of a breakthrough for adsorbers of 55 gallons or less, and within 24 hours of the detection of a breakthrough for adsorbers greater than 55 gallons. You must monitor at the outlet of the first adsorber within 3 days of replacement to confirm it is performing properly.


(B) Based on the adsorber bed life established according to paragraph (a)(6)(i) of this section and the date the adsorbent was last replaced, conduct monitoring to detect breakthrough at least monthly if the adsorbent has more than 2 months of life remaining, at least weekly if the adsorbent has between 2 months and 2 weeks of life remaining, and at least daily if the adsorbent has 2 weeks or less of life remaining.


(7) If you install a continuous emissions monitoring system (CEMS) to demonstrate compliance with the TOC standard in Table 1 of this subpart, you must comply with the requirements specified in § 60.614a(f) in lieu of the requirements specified in paragraphs (a)(1) through (4) and (c) of this section.


(b) If you vent emissions through a closed vent system to a boiler or process heater, then the vent stream must be introduced into the flame zone of the boiler or process heater.


(c) If you seek to demonstrate compliance with the standards specified under § 60.612a with control devices other than an incinerator, boiler, process heater, or flare; or recovery devices other than an absorber, condenser, or carbon adsorber, you shall provide to the Administrator prior to conducting the initial performance test information describing the operation of the control device or recovery device and the parameter(s) which would indicate proper operation and maintenance of the device and how the parameter(s) are indicative of control of TOC emissions. The Administrator may request further information and will specify appropriate monitoring procedures or requirements, including operating parameters to be monitored, averaging times for determining compliance with the operating parameter limits, and ongoing calibration and quality control requirements.


§ 60.614a What test methods and procedures must I use to determine compliance with the standards?

(a) For the purpose of demonstrating compliance with the emission limits and standards specified in table 1 to this subpart, all affected facilities must be run at full operating conditions and flow rates during any performance test. Performance tests are not required if you determine compliance using a CEMS that meets the requirements outlined in paragraph (f) of this section.


(1) Conduct initial performance tests no later than the date required by § 60.8(a).


(2) Conduct subsequent performance tests no later than 60 calendar months after the previous performance test.


(b) The following methods, except as provided in § 60.8(b) must be used as reference methods to determine compliance with the emission limit or percent reduction efficiency specified in table 1 to this subpart for non-flare control devices and/or recovery systems.


(1) Method 1 or 1A of appendix A-1 to this part, as appropriate, for selection of the sampling sites. The inlet sampling site for determination of vent stream molar composition or TOC (less methane and ethane) reduction efficiency shall be prior to the inlet of the control device or, if equipped with a recovery system, then prior to the inlet of the first recovery device in the recovery system.


(2) Method 2, 2A, 2C, or 2D of appendix A-1 to this part, as appropriate, for determination of the volumetric flow rates.


(3) Method 3A of appendix A-2 to this part or the manual method in ANSI/ASME PTC 19.10-1981 (incorporated by reference, see § 60.17) must be used to determine the oxygen concentration (%O2d) for the purposes of determining compliance with the 20 ppmv limit. The sampling site must be the same as that of the TOC samples and the samples must be taken during the same time that the TOC samples are taken. The TOC concentration corrected to 3 percent O2 (Cc) must be computed using the following equation:


Equation 1 to Paragraph (b)(3)



Where:

Cc = Concentration of TOC corrected to 3 percent O2, dry basis, ppm by volume.

CTOC = Concentration of TOC (minus methane and ethane), dry basis, ppm by volume.

%O2d = Concentration of O2, dry basis, percent by volume.

(4) Method 18 of appendix A-6 to this part to determine concentration of TOC in the control device outlet or in the outlet of the final recovery device in a recovery system, and to determine the concentration of TOC in the inlet when the reduction efficiency of the control device or recovery system is to be determined. ASTM D6420-18 (incorporated by reference, see § 60.17) may be used in lieu of Method 18, if the target compounds are all known and are all listed in Section 1.1 of ASTM D6420-18 as measurable; ASTM D6420-18 must not be used for methane and ethane; and ASTM D6420-18 may not be used as a total VOC method.


(i) The sampling time for each run must be 1 hour in which either an integrated sample or at least four grab samples must be taken. If grab sampling is used then the samples must be taken at 15-minute intervals.


(ii) The emission reduction (R) of TOC (minus methane and ethane) must be determined using the following equation:


Equation 2 to Paragraph (b)(4)(ii)



Where:

R = Emission reduction, percent by weight.

Ei = Mass rate of TOC entering the control device or recovery system, kg/hr (lb/hr).

Eo = Mass rate of TOC discharged to the atmosphere, kg/hr (lb/hr).

(iii) The mass rates of TOC (Ei, Eo) must be computed using the following equations:


Equations 3 and 4 to Paragraph (b)(4)(iii)



Where:

Cij, Coj = Concentration of sample component “j” of the gas stream at the inlet and outlet of the control device or recovery system, respectively, dry basis ppm by volume.

Mij, Moj = Molecular weight of sample component “j” of the gas stream at the inlet and outlet of the control device or recovery system, respectively, g/g-mole (lb/lb-mole).

Qi, Qo = Flow rate of gas stream at the inlet and outlet of the control device or recovery system, respectively, dscm/min (dscf/min).

K2 = 2.494 × 10−6 (1/ppm)(g-mole/scm)(kg/g)(min/hr) (metric units), where standard temperature for (g-mole/scm) is 20 °C.

= 1.557 × 10−7 (1/ppm)(lb-mole/scf)(min/hr) (English units), where standard temperature for (lb-mole/scf) is 68 °F.

(iv) The TOC concentration (CTOC) is the sum of the individual components and must be computed for each run using the following equation:


Equation 5 to Paragraph (b)(4)(iv)



Where:

CTOC = Concentration of TOC (minus methane and ethane), dry basis, ppm by volume.

Cj = Concentration of sample components in the sample.

n = Number of components in the sample.

(c) The requirement for initial and subsequent performance tests are waived, in accordance with § 60.8(b), for the following:


(1) When a boiler or process heater with a design heat input capacity of 44 MW (150 million Btu/hour) or greater is used to seek compliance with the emission limit or percent reduction efficiency specified in table 1 to this subpart.


(2) When a vent stream is introduced into a boiler or process heater with the primary fuel.


(3) When a boiler or process heater burning hazardous waste is used for which the owner or operator:


(i) Has been issued a final permit under 40 CFR part 270 and complies with the requirements of 40 CFR part 266, subpart H;


(ii) Has certified compliance with the interim status requirements of 40 CFR part 266, subpart H;


(iii) Has submitted a Notification of Compliance under 40 CFR 63.1207(j) and complies with the requirements of 40 CFR part 63, subpart EEE; or


(iv) Complies with 40 CFR part 63, subpart EEE and will submit a Notification of Compliance under 40 CFR 63.1207(j) by the date the owner or operator would have been required to submit the initial performance test report for this subpart.


(4) The Administrator reserves the option to require testing at such other times as may be required, as provided for in section 114 of the Act.


(d) For purposes of complying with the 98 weight-percent reduction in § 60.612a(a), if the vent stream entering a boiler or process heater with a design capacity less than 44 MW (150 million Btu/hour) is introduced with the combustion air or as secondary fuel, the weight-percent reduction of TOC (minus methane and ethane) across the combustion device shall be determined by comparing the TOC (minus methane and ethane) in all combusted vent streams, primary fuels, and secondary fuels with the TOC (minus methane and ethane) exiting the combustion device.


(e) Any owner or operator subject to the provisions of this subpart seeking to demonstrate compliance with § 60.610a(c)(1) must use the following methods:


(1) Method 1 or 1A of appendix A-1 to this part, as appropriate.


(2) Method 2, 2A, 2C, or 2D of appendix A-1 to this part, as appropriate, for determination of the gas volumetric flow rates.


(3) Method 18 of appendix A-6 to this part to determine the concentration of TOC. ASTM D6420-18 (incorporated by reference, see § 60.17) may be used in lieu of Method 18, if the target compounds are all known and are all listed in Section 1.1 of ASTM D6420-18 as measurable; ASTM D6420-18 may not be used for methane and ethane; and ASTM D6420-18 must not be used as a total VOC method.


(i) The sampling site must be at a location that provides a representative sample of the vent stream.


(ii) Perform three test runs. The sampling time for each run must be 1 hour in which either an integrated sample or at least four grab samples must be taken. If grab sampling is used then the samples must be taken at 15-minute intervals.


(iii) The mass rate of TOC (E) must be computed using the following equation:


Equation 6 to Paragraph (e)(3)(ii)



Where:

Cj = Concentration of sample component “j” of the gas stream at the representative sampling location, dry basis, ppm by volume.

Mj = Molecular weight of sample component “j” of the gas stream at the representative sampling location, g/g-mole (lb/lb-mole).

Q = Flow rate of gas stream at the representative sampling location, dscm/min (dscf/min).

K = 2.494 × 10−6 (1/ppm)(g-mole/scm) (kg/g) (min/hr) (metric units), where standard temperature for (g-mole/scm) is 20 °C.

= 1.557 × 107 (1/ppm) (lb-mole/scf) (min/hr) (English units), where standard temperature for (lb-mole/scf) is 68 °F.

(f) If you use a CEMS to demonstrate initial and continuous compliance with the TOC standard in table 1 of this subpart, each CEMS must be installed, operated and maintained according to the requirements in § 60.13 and paragraphs (f)(1) through (5) of this section.


(1) You must use a CEMS that is capable of measuring the target analyte(s) as demonstrated using either process knowledge of the control device inlet stream or the screening procedures of Method 18 of appendix A-6 to this part on the control device inlet stream. If your CEMS is located after a combustion device and inlet stream to that device includes methanol or formaldehyde, you must use a CEMS which meets the requirements in Performance Specification 9 or 15 of appendix B to this part.


(2) Each CEMS must be installed, operated, and maintained according to the applicable performance specification of appendix B to this part and the applicable quality assurance procedures of appendix F to this part. Locate the sampling probe or other interface at a measurement location such that you obtain representative measurements of emissions from the affected facility.


(3) Conduct a performance evaluation of each CEMS within 180 days of installation of the monitoring system. Conduct subsequent performance evaluations of the CEMS no later than 12 calendar months after the previous performance evaluation. The results each performance evaluation must be submitted in accordance with § 60.615a(b)(1).


(4) You must determine TOC concentration according to one of the following options. The span value of the TOC CEMS must be approximately 2 times the emission standard specified in table 1 of this subpart.


(i) For CEMS meeting the requirements of Performance Specification 15 of appendix B to this part, determine the target analyte(s) for calibration using either process knowledge of the control device inlet stream or the screening procedures of Method 18 of appendix A-6 to this part on the control device inlet stream. The individual analytes used to quantify TOC must represent 98 percent of the expected mass of TOC present in the stream. Report the results of TOC as equivalent to carbon (C1).


(ii) For CEMS meeting the requirements of Performance Specification 9 of appendix B to this part, determine the target analyte(s) for calibration using either process knowledge of the control device inlet stream or the screening procedures of Method 18 of appendix A-6 to this part on the control device inlet stream. The individual analytes used to quantify TOC must represent 98 percent of the expected mass of TOC present in the stream. Report the results of TOC as equivalent to carbon (C1).


(iii) For CEMS meeting the requirements of Performance Specification 8 of appendix B to this part used to monitor performance of a combustion device, calibrate the instrument on the predominant organic HAP and report the results as carbon (C1), and use Method 25A of appendix A-7 to this part as the reference method for the relative accuracy tests. You must also comply with procedure 1 of appendix F to this part.


(iv) For CEMS meeting the requirements of Performance Specification 8 of appendix B to this part used to monitor performance of a noncombustion device, determine the predominant organic compound using either process knowledge or the screening procedures of Method 18 of appendix A-6 to this part on the control device inlet stream. Calibrate the monitor on the predominant organic compound and report the results as C1. Use Method 25A of appendix A-7 to this part as the reference method for the relative accuracy tests. You must also comply with procedure 1 of appendix F to this part.


(5) You must determine stack oxygen concentration at the same location where you monitor TOC concentration with a CEMS that meets the requirements of Performance Specification 3 of appendix B to this part. The span value of the oxygen CEMS must be approximately 25 percent oxygen. Use Method 3A of appendix A-2 to this part as the reference method for the relative accuracy tests.


(6) You must maintain written procedures for your CEMS. At a minimum, the procedures must include the information in paragraphs (f)(6)(i) through (vi) of this section:


(i) Description of CEMS installation location.


(ii) Description of the monitoring equipment, including the manufacturer and model number for all monitoring equipment components and the span of the analyzer.


(iii) Routine quality control and assurance procedures.


(iv) Conditions that would trigger a CEMS performance evaluation, which must include, at a minimum, a newly installed CEMS; a process change that is expected to affect the performance of the CEMS; and the Administrator’s request for a performance evaluation under section 114 of the Clean Air Act.


(v) Ongoing operation and maintenance procedures.


(vi) Ongoing recordkeeping and reporting procedures.


§ 60.615a What records must I keep and what reports must I submit?

(a) You must notify the Administrator of the specific provisions of table 1 to this subpart or § 60.612a(c) with which you have elected to comply. Notification must be submitted with the notification of initial start-up required by § 60.7(a)(3). If you elect at a later date to use an alternative provision of table 1 to this subpart with which you will comply, then you must notify the Administrator 90 days before implementing a change and, upon implementing the change, you must conduct a performance test as specified by § 60.614a within 180 days.


(b) If you use a non-flare control device or recovery system to comply with the TOC emission limit specified in table 1 to this subpart, then you must keep up-to-date, readily accessible records of the data measured during each performance test to show compliance with the TOC emission limit. You must also include all of the data you use to comply with § 60.613a(a)(2). The same data specified in this paragraph must also be submitted in the initial performance test required in § 60.8 and the reports of all subsequently required performance tests where either the emission reduction efficiency of a control device or recovery system or outlet concentration of TOC is determined. Alternatively, you must keep records of each CEMS performance evaluation.


(1) Within 60 days after the date of completing each performance test or CEMS performance evaluation required by this subpart, you must submit the results of the performance test or performance evaluation following the procedures specified in paragraph (j) of this section. Data collected using test methods and performance evaluations of CEMS measuring relative accuracy test audit (RATA) pollutants supported by the EPA’s Electronic Reporting Tool (ERT) as listed on the EPA’s ERT website (https://www.epa.gov/electronic-reporting-air-emissions/electronic-reporting-tool-ert) at the time of the test or performance evaluation must be submitted in a file format generated through the use of the EPA’s ERT. Alternatively, owners and operators may submit an electronic file consistent with the extensible markup language (XML) schema listed on the EPA’s ERT website. Data collected using test methods and performance evaluations of CEMS measuring RATA pollutants that are not supported by the EPA’s ERT as listed on the EPA’s ERT website at the time of the test must be included as an attachment in the ERT or alternate electronic file.


(2) If you use a boiler or process heater with a design heat input capacity of 44 MW (150 million Btu/hour) or greater to comply with the TOC emission limit specified in Table 1 to this subpart, then you are not required to submit a report containing performance test data; however, you must submit a description of the location at which the vent stream is introduced into the boiler or process heater.


(c) If you use a non-flare control device or recovery system to comply with the TOC emission limit specified in table 1 to this subpart, then you must keep up-to-date, readily accessible records of periods of operation during which the operating parameter limits established during the most recent performance test are exceeded or periods of operation where the TOC CEMS, averaged on a 3-hour block basis, indicate an exceedance of the emission standard in table 1 of this subpart. Additionally, you must record all periods when the TOC CEMS is inoperable. The Administrator may at any time require a report of these data. Periods of operation during which the operating parameter limits established during the most recent performance tests are exceeded are defined as follows:


(1) For absorbers:


(i) All 3-hour periods of operation during which the average absorbing liquid temperature was above the maximum absorbing liquid temperature established during the most recent performance test.


(ii) All 3-hour periods of operation during which the average absorbing liquid specific gravity was outside the exit specific gravity range (i.e., more than 0.1 unit above, or more than 0.1 unit below, the average absorbing liquid specific gravity) established during the most recent performance test.


(2) For boilers or process heaters:


(i) Whenever there is a change in the location at which the vent stream is introduced into the flame zone as required under § 60.613a(b).


(ii) If the boiler or process heater has a design heat input capacity of less than 44 MW (150 million Btu/hr), then all 3-hour periods of operation during which the average firebox temperature was below the minimum firebox temperature during the most recent performance test.


(3) For catalytic incinerators:


(i) All 3-hour periods of operation during which the average temperature of the vent stream immediately before the catalyst bed is below the minimum temperature of the vent stream established during the most recent performance test.


(ii) All 3-hour periods of operation during which the average temperature difference across the catalyst bed is less than the average temperature difference of the device established during the most recent performance test.


(4) For carbon adsorbers:


(i) All carbon bed regeneration cycles during which the total mass stream flow or the total volumetric stream flow was below the minimum flow established during the most recent performance test.


(ii) All carbon bed regeneration cycles during which the temperature of the carbon bed after regeneration (and after completion of any cooling cycle(s)) was greater than the maximum carbon bed temperature (in degrees Celsius) established during the most recent performance test.


(5) For condensers, all 3-hour periods of operation during which the average exit (product side) condenser operating temperature was above the maximum exit (product side) operating temperature established during the most recent performance test.


(6) For scrubbers used to control halogenated vent streams:


(i) All 3-hour periods of operation during which the average pH of the scrubber effluent is below the minimum pH of the scrubber effluent established during the most recent performance test.


(ii) All 3-hour periods of operation during which the average influent liquid flow to the scrubber is below the minimum influent liquid flow to the scrubber established during the most recent performance test.


(iii) All 3-hour periods of operation during which the average liquid-to-gas ratio flow of the scrubber is below the minimum liquid-to-gas ratio of the scrubber established during the most recent performance test.


(7) For thermal incinerators, all 3-hour periods of operation during which the average firebox temperature was below the minimum firebox temperature established during the most recent performance test.


(8) For all other control devices, all periods (for the averaging time specified by the Administrator) when the operating parameter(s) established under § 60.613a(c) exceeded the operating limit established during the most recent performance test.


(d) You must keep up-to-date, readily accessible continuous records of the flow indication specified in Table 2 to this subpart, as well as up-to-date, readily accessible records of all periods when the vent stream is diverted from the control device or recovery device or has no flow rate, including the records as specified in paragraphs (d)(1) and (2) of this section.


(1) For each flow event from a relief valve discharge subject to the requirements in § 60.612a(b)(1), you must include an estimate of the volume of gas, the concentration of TOC in the gas and the resulting emissions of TOC that released to the atmosphere using process knowledge and engineering estimates.


(2) For each flow event from a bypass line subject to the requirements in §§ 60.612a(b)(2) and 60.620a(e), you must maintain records sufficient to determine whether or not the detected flow included flow requiring control. For each flow event from a bypass line requiring control that is released either directly to the atmosphere or to a control device or recovery device not meeting the requirements in this subpart, you must include an estimate of the volume of gas, the concentration of TOC in the gas and the resulting emissions of TOC that bypassed the control device or recovery device using process knowledge and engineering estimates.


(e) If you use a boiler or process heater with a design heat input capacity of 44 MW (150 million Btu/hour) or greater to comply with the TOC emission limit specified in Table 1 to this subpart, then you must keep an up-to-date, readily accessible record of all periods of operation of the boiler or process heater. (Examples of such records could include records of steam use, fuel use, or monitoring data collected pursuant to other State or Federal regulatory requirements).


(f) If you use a flare to comply with the TOC emission standard specified in Table 1 to this subpart, then you must keep up-to-date, readily accessible records of all visible emission readings, heat content determinations, flow rate measurements, and exit velocity determinations made during the initial visible emissions demonstration required by § 63.670(h) of this chapter, as applicable; and all periods during the compliance determination when the pilot flame or flare flame is absent.


(g) For each maintenance vent opening subject to the requirements of § 60.612a(c), you must keep the applicable records specified in paragraphs (g)(1) through (5) of this section.


(1) You must maintain standard site procedures used to deinventory equipment for safety purposes (e.g., hot work or vessel entry procedures) to document the procedures used to meet the requirements in § 60.612a(c). The current copy of the procedures must be retained and available on-site at all times. Previous versions of the standard site procedures, as applicable, must be retained for five years.


(2) If complying with the requirements of § 60.612a(c)(1)(i), and the lower explosive limit at the time of the vessel opening exceeds 10 percent, identification of the maintenance vent, the process units or equipment associated with the maintenance vent, the date of maintenance vent opening, and the lower explosive limit at the time of the vessel opening.


(3) If complying with the requirements of § 60.612a(c)(1)(ii), and either the vessel pressure at the time of the vessel opening exceeds 5 psig or the lower explosive limit at the time of the active purging was initiated exceeds 10 percent, identification of the maintenance vent, the process units or equipment associated with the maintenance vent, the date of maintenance vent opening, the pressure of the vessel or equipment at the time of discharge to the atmosphere and, if applicable, the lower explosive limit of the vapors in the equipment when active purging was initiated.


(4) If complying with the requirements of § 60.612a(c)(1)(iii), records of the estimating procedures used to determine the total quantity of VOC in the equipment and the type and size limits of equipment that contain less than 50 pounds of VOC at the time of maintenance vent opening. For each maintenance vent opening that contains greater than 50 pounds of VOC for which the deinventory procedures specified in paragraph (g)(1) of this section are not followed or for which the equipment opened exceeds the type and size limits established in the records specified in this paragraph (g)(4), records that identify the maintenance vent, the process units or equipment associated with the maintenance vent, the date of maintenance vent opening, and records used to estimate the total quantity of VOC in the equipment at the time the maintenance vent was opened to the atmosphere.


(5) If complying with the requirements of § 60.612a(c)(1)(iv), identification of the maintenance vent, the process units or equipment associated with the maintenance vent, records documenting actions taken to comply with other applicable alternatives and why utilization of this alternative was required, the date of maintenance vent opening, the equipment pressure and lower explosive limit of the vapors in the equipment at the time of discharge, an indication of whether active purging was performed and the pressure of the equipment during the installation or removal of the blind if active purging was used, the duration the maintenance vent was open during the blind installation or removal process, and records used to estimate the total quantity of VOC in the equipment at the time the maintenance vent was opened to the atmosphere for each applicable maintenance vent opening.


(h) If you seek to comply with the requirements of this subpart by complying with the flow rate cutoff in § 60.610a(c)(1) you must keep up-to-date, readily accessible records to indicate that the vent stream flow rate is less than 0.001 lb/hr, and of any change in equipment or process operation that increases the operating vent stream flow rate, including a measurement of the new vent stream flow rate.


(i) You must submit to the Administrator semiannual reports of the information specified in paragraphs (i)(1) through (7) of this section. You are exempt from the reporting requirements specified in § 60.7(c). If there are no exceedances, periods, or events specified in paragraphs (i)(1) through (7) of this section that occurred during the reporting period, then you must include a statement in your report that no exceedances, periods, and events specified in paragraphs (i)(1) through (7) of this section occurred during the reporting period. The initial report must be submitted within 6 months after the initial start-up-date. On and after July 15, 2024 or once the report template for this subpart has been available on the Compliance and Emissions Data Reporting Interface (CEDRI) website (https://www.epa.gov/electronic-reporting-air-emissions/cedri) for 1 year, whichever date is later, you must submit all subsequent reports using the appropriate electronic report template on the CEDRI website for this subpart and following the procedure specified in paragraph (j) of this section. The date report templates become available will be listed on the CEDRI website. Unless the Administrator or delegated state agency or other authority has approved a different schedule for submission of reports, the report must be submitted by the deadline specified in this subpart, regardless of the method in which the report is submitted. All semiannual reports must include the following general information: company name, address (including county), and beginning and ending dates of the reporting period.


(1) Exceedances of monitored parameters recorded under paragraph (c) of this section. For each exceedance, the report must include a list of the affected facilities or equipment, the monitored parameter that was exceeded, the start date and time of the exceedance, the duration (in hours) of the exceedance, an estimate of the quantity in pounds of each regulated pollutant emitted over any emission limit, a description of the method used to estimate the emissions, the cause of the exceedance (including unknown cause, if applicable), as applicable, and the corrective action taken.


(2) All periods recorded under paragraph (d) of this section when the vent stream is diverted from the control device or recovery device, or has no flow rate, including the information specified in paragraphs (i)(2)(i) through (iii) of this section.


(i) For periods when the flow indicator is not operating, the identification of the flow indicator and report the start date, start time, and duration in hours.


(ii) For each flow event from a relief valve discharge subject to the requirements in § 60.612a(b)(1), the semiannual report must include the identification of the relief valve, the start date, start time, duration in hours, estimate of the volume of gas in standard cubic feet, the concentration of TOC in the gas in parts per million by volume and the resulting mass emissions of TOC in pounds that released to the atmosphere.


(iii) For each flow event from a bypass line subject to the requirements in § 60.612a(b)(2) and § 620a(e)(2), the semiannual report must include the identification of the bypass line, the start date, start time, duration in hours, estimate of the volume of gas in standard cubic feet, the concentration of TOC in the gas in parts per million by volume and the resulting mass emissions of TOC in pounds that bypass a control device or recovery device.


(3) All periods when a boiler or process heater was not operating (considering the records recorded under paragraph (e) of this section), including the start date, start time, and duration in hours of each period.


(4) For each flare subject to the requirements in § 60.619a, the semiannual report must include an identification of the flare and the items specified in § 60.619a(l)(2).


(5) For each closed vent system subject to the requirements in § 60.620a, the semiannual report must include an identification of the closed vent system and the items specified in § 60.620a(i).


(6) Exceedances of the emission standard in table 1 to this subpart as indicated by a 3-hour average of the TOC CEMS and recorded under paragraph (c) of this section. For each exceedance, the report must include a list of the affected facilities or equipment, the start date and time of the exceedance, the duration (in hours) of the exceedance, an estimate of the quantity in pounds of each regulated pollutant emitted over the emission limit, a description of the method used to estimate the emissions, the cause of the exceedance (including unknown cause, if applicable), as applicable, and the corrective action taken.


(7) Periods when the TOC CEMS was inoperative. For each period, the report must include a list of the affected facilities or equipment, the start date and time of the period, the duration (in hours) of the period, the cause of the inoperability (including unknown cause, if applicable), as applicable, and the corrective action taken.


(8) Any change in equipment or process operation that increases the operating vent stream flow rate above the low flow exemption level in § 60.610a(c)(1), including a measurement of the new vent stream flow rate, as recorded under paragraph (h) of this section. These must be reported as soon as possible after the change and no later than 180 days after the change. These reports may be submitted either in conjunction with semiannual reports or as a single separate report. A performance test must be completed with the same time period to verify the recalculated flow value. The performance test is subject to the requirements of § 60.8 of the General Provisions and must be submitted according to paragraph (b)(1) of this section. Unless the facility qualifies for an exemption under § 60.610a(c), the facility must begin compliance with the requirements set forth in § 60.612a.


(j) If you are required to submit notifications or reports following the procedure specified in this paragraph (j), you must submit notifications or reports to the EPA via the CEDRI, which can be accessed through the EPA’s Central Data Exchange (CDX) (https://cdx.epa.gov/). The EPA will make all the information submitted through CEDRI available to the public without further notice to you. Do not use CEDRI to submit information you claim as CBI. Although we do not expect persons to assert a claim of CBI, if you wish to assert a CBI claim for some of the information in the report or notification, you must submit a complete file in the format specified in this subpart, including information claimed to be CBI, to the EPA following the procedures in paragraphs (j)(1) and (2) of this section. Clearly mark the part or all of the information that you claim to be CBI. Information not marked as CBI may be authorized for public release without prior notice. Information marked as CBI will not be disclosed except in accordance with procedures set forth in 40 CFR part 2. All CBI claims must be asserted at the time of submission. Anything submitted using CEDRI cannot later be claimed CBI. Furthermore, under CAA section 114(c), emissions data is not entitled to confidential treatment, and the EPA is required to make emissions data available to the public. Thus, emissions data will not be protected as CBI and will be made publicly available. You must submit the same file submitted to the CBI office with the CBI omitted to the EPA via the EPA’s CDX as described earlier in this paragraph (j).


(1) The preferred method to receive CBI is for it to be transmitted electronically using email attachments, File Transfer Protocol, or other online file sharing services. Electronic submissions must be transmitted directly to the OAQPS CBI Office at the email address [email protected], and as described above, should include clear CBI markings. ERT files should be flagged to the attention of the Group Leader, Measurement Policy Group; all other files should be flagged to the attention of the SOCMI NSPS Sector Lead. If assistance is needed with submitting large electronic files that exceed the file size limit for email attachments, and if you do not have your own file sharing service, please email [email protected] to request a file transfer link.


(2) If you cannot transmit the file electronically, you may send CBI information through the postal service to the following address: OAQPS Document Control Officer (C404-02), OAQPS, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 109 T.W. Alexander Drive, P.O. Box 12055, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27711. ERT files should be sent to the attention of the Group Leader, Measurement Policy Group, and all other files should be sent to the attention of the SOCMI NSPS Sector Lead. The mailed CBI material should be double wrapped and clearly marked. Any CBI markings should not show through the outer envelope.


(k) If you are required to electronically submit notifications or reports through CEDRI in the EPA’s CDX, you may assert a claim of EPA system outage for failure to timely comply with the electronic submittal requirement. To assert a claim of EPA system outage, you must meet the requirements outlined in paragraphs (k)(1) through (7) of this section.


(1) You must have been or will be precluded from accessing CEDRI and submitting a required report within the time prescribed due to an outage of either the EPA’s CEDRI or CDX systems.


(2) The outage must have occurred within the period of time beginning five business days prior to the date that the submission is due.


(3) The outage may be planned or unplanned.


(4) You must submit notification to the Administrator in writing as soon as possible following the date you first knew, or through due diligence should have known, that the event may cause or has caused a delay in reporting.


(5) You must provide to the Administrator a written description identifying:


(i) The date(s) and time(s) when CDX or CEDRI was accessed and the system was unavailable;


(ii) A rationale for attributing the delay in reporting beyond the regulatory deadline to EPA system outage;


(iii) A description of measures taken or to be taken to minimize the delay in reporting; and


(iv) The date by which you propose to report, or if you have already met the reporting requirement at the time of the notification, the date you reported.


(6) The decision to accept the claim of EPA system outage and allow an extension to the reporting deadline is solely within the discretion of the Administrator.


(7) In any circumstance, the report must be submitted electronically as soon as possible after the outage is resolved.


(l) If you are required to electronically submit notifications or reports through CEDRI in the EPA’s CDX, you may assert a claim of force majeure for failure to timely comply with the electronic submittal requirement. To assert a claim of force majeure, you must meet the requirements outlined in paragraphs (l)(1) through (5) of this section.


(1) You may submit a claim if a force majeure event is about to occur, occurs, or has occurred or there are lingering effects from such an event within the period of time beginning five business days prior to the date the submission is due. For the purposes of this section, a force majeure event is defined as an event that will be or has been caused by circumstances beyond the control of the affected facility, its contractors, or any entity controlled by the affected facility that prevents you from complying with the requirement to submit a report electronically within the time period prescribed. Examples of such events are acts of nature (e.g., hurricanes, earthquakes, or floods), acts of war or terrorism, or equipment failure or safety hazard beyond the control of the affected facility (e.g., large scale power outage).


(2) You must submit notification to the Administrator in writing as soon as possible following the date you first knew, or through due diligence should have known, that the event may cause or has caused a delay in reporting.


(3) You must provide to the Administrator:


(i) A written description of the force majeure event;


(ii) A rationale for attributing the delay in reporting beyond the regulatory deadline to the force majeure event;


(iii) A description of measures taken or to be taken to minimize the delay in reporting; and


(iv) The date by which you propose to report, or if you have already met the reporting requirement at the time of the notification, the date you reported.


(4) The decision to accept the claim of force majeure and allow an extension to the reporting deadline is solely within the discretion of the Administrator.


(5) In any circumstance, the reporting must occur as soon as possible after the force majeure event occurs.


(m) The requirements of paragraph (i) of this section remain in force until and unless EPA, in delegating enforcement authority to a State under section 111(c) of the Act, approves reporting requirements or an alternative means of compliance surveillance adopted by such State. In that event, affected sources within the State will be relieved of the obligation to comply with paragraph (i) of this section, provided that they comply with the requirements established by the State. The EPA will not approve a waiver of electronic reporting to the EPA in delegating enforcement authority. Thus, electronic reporting to the EPA cannot be waived, and as such, the provisions of this paragraph cannot be used to relieve owners or operators of affected facilities of the requirement to submit the electronic reports required in this section to the EPA.


(n) If you seek to demonstrate compliance with § 60.610(c)(1), then you must submit to the Administrator, following the procedures in paragraph (b)(1) of this section, an initial report including a flow rate measurement using the test methods specified in § 60.614a.


(o) The Administrator will specify appropriate reporting and recordkeeping requirements where the owner or operator of an affected facility seeks to demonstrate compliance with the standards specified under § 60.612a other than as provided under § 60.613a.


(p) Any records required to be maintained by this subpart that are submitted electronically via the EPA’s CEDRI may be maintained in electronic format. This ability to maintain electronic copies does not affect the requirement for facilities to make records, data, and reports available upon request to a delegated air agency or the EPA as part of an on-site compliance evaluation.


§ 60.616a What do the terms associated with reconstruction mean for this subpart?

For purposes of this subpart “fixed capital cost of the new components,” as used in § 60.15, includes the fixed capital cost of all depreciable components which are or will be replaced pursuant to all continuous programs of component replacement which are commenced within any 2-year period following April 25, 2023. For purposes of this section, “commenced” means that you have undertaken a continuous program of component replacement or that you have entered into a contractual obligation to undertake and complete, within a reasonable time, a continuous program of component replacement.


§ 60.617a What are the chemicals that I must produce to be affected by subpart IIIa?

Chemical name
CAS No.*
Acetaldehyde75-07-0
Acetic acid64-19-7
Acetone67-64-1
Acetonitrile75-05-8
Acetophenone98-86-2
Acrolein107-02-8
Acrylic acid79-10-7
Acrylonitrile107-13-1
Anthraquinone84-65-1
Benzaldehyde100-52-7
Benzoic acid, tech65-85-0
1,3-Butadiene106-99-0
p-t-Butyl benzoic acid98-73-7
N-Butyric acid107-92-6
Crotonic acid3724-65-0
Cumene hydroperoxide80-15-9
Cyclohexanol108-93-0
Cyclohexanone108-94-1
Dimethyl terephthalate120-61-6
Ethylene dichloride107-06-2
Ethylene oxide75-21-8
Formaldehyde50-00-0
Formic acid64-18-6
Glyoxal107-22-2
Hydrogen cyanide74-90-8
Isobutyric acid79-31-2
Isophthalic acid121-91-5
Maleic anhydride108-31-6
Methyl ethyl ketone78-93-3
a-Methyl styrene98-83-9
Phenol108-95-2
Phthalic anhydride85-44-9
Propionic acid79-09-4
Propylene oxide75-56-9
Styrene100-42-5
Terephthalic acid100-21-0

* CAS numbers refer to the Chemical Abstracts Registry numbers assigned to specific chemicals, isomers, or mixtures of chemicals. Some isomers or mixtures that are covered by the standards do not have CAS numbers assigned to them. The standards apply to all of the chemicals listed, whether CAS numbers have been assigned or not.


§ 60.618a [Reserved]

§ 60.619a What are my requirements if I use a flare to comply with this subpart?

(a) If you use a flare to comply with the TOC emission standard specified in Table 1 to this subpart, then you must meet the applicable requirements for flares as specified in §§ 63.670 and 63.671 of this chapter, including the provisions in tables 12 and 13 to part 63, subpart CC, of this chapter, except as specified in paragraphs (b) through (o) of this section. This requirement also applies to any flare using fuel gas from a fuel gas system, of which 50 percent or more of the fuel gas is derived from an affected facility, as determined on an annual average basis. For purposes of compliance with this paragraph (a), the following terms are defined in § 63.641 of this chapter: Assist air, assist steam, center steam, combustion zone, combustion zone gas, flare, flare purge gas, flare supplemental gas, flare sweep gas, flare vent gas, lower steam, net heating value, perimeter assist air, pilot gas, premix assist air, total steam, and upper steam.


(b) When determining compliance with the pilot flame requirements specified in § 63.670(b) and (g) of this chapter, substitute “pilot flame or flare flame” for each occurrence of “pilot flame.”


(c) When determining compliance with the flare tip velocity and combustion zone operating limits specified in § 63.670(d) and (e) of this chapter, the requirement effectively applies starting with the 15-minute block that includes a full 15 minutes of the flaring event. You are required to demonstrate compliance with the velocity and NHVcz requirements starting with the block that contains the fifteenth minute of a flaring event. You are not required to demonstrate compliance for the previous 15-minute block in which the event started and contained only a fraction of flow.


(d) Instead of complying with § 63.670(o)(2)(i) of this chapter, you must develop and implement the flare management plan no later than startup for a new flare that commenced construction on or after April 25, 2023.


(e) Instead of complying with § 63.670(o)(2)(iii) of this chapter, if required to develop a flare management plan and submit it to the Administrator, then you must also submit all versions of the plan in portable document format (PDF) following the procedures specified in § 60.615a(j).


(f) Section 63.670(o)(3)(ii) of this chapter and all references to it do not apply. Instead, you must comply with the maximum flare tip velocity operating limit at all times.


(g) Substitute “affected facility” for each occurrence of “petroleum refinery.”


(h) Each occurrence of “refinery” does not apply.


(i) If a pressure-assisted multi-point flare is used as a control device, then you must meet the following conditions:


(1) You are not required to comply with the flare tip velocity requirements in of § 63.670(d) and (k) of this chapter;


(2) The NHVcz for pressure-assisted mulit-point flares is 800 Btu/scf;


(3) You must determine the 15-minute block average NHVvg using only the direct calculation method specified in in § 63.670 (l)(5)(ii) of this chapter;


(4) Instead of complying with § 63.670(b) and (g) of this chapter, if a pressure-assisted multi-point flare uses cross-lighting on a stage of burners rather than having an individual pilot flame on each burner, then you must operate each stage of the pressure-assisted multi-point flare with a flame present at all times when regulated material is routed to that stage of burners. Each stage of burners that cross-lights in the pressure-assisted multi-point flare must have at least two pilots with at least one continuously lit and capable of igniting all regulated material that is routed to that stage of burners. Each 15-minute block during which there is at least one minute where no pilot flame is present on a stage of burners when regulated material is routed to the flare is a deviation of the standard. Deviations in different 15-minute blocks from the same event are considered separate deviations. The pilot flame(s) on each stage of burners that use cross-lighting must be continuously monitored by a thermocouple or any other equivalent device used to detect the presence of a flame;


(5) Unless you choose to conduct a cross-light performance demonstration as specified in this paragraph (i)(5), you must ensure that if a stage of burners on the flare uses cross-lighting, that the distance between any two burners in series on that stage is no more than 6 feet when measured from the center of one burner to the next burner. A distance greater than 6 feet between any two burners in series may be used provided you conduct a performance demonstration that confirms the pressure-assisted multi-point flare will cross-light a minimum of three burners and the spacing between the burners and location of the pilot flame must be representative of the projected installation. The compliance demonstration must be approved by the permitting authority and a copy of this approval must be maintained onsite. The compliance demonstration report must include: a protocol describing the test methodology used, associated test method QA/QC parameters, the waste gas composition and NHVcz of the gas tested, the velocity of the waste gas tested, the pressure-assisted multi-point flare burner tip pressure, the time, length, and duration of the test, records of whether a successful cross-light was observed over all of the burners and the length of time it took for the burners to cross-light, records of maintaining a stable flame after a successful cross-light and the duration for which this was observed, records of any smoking events during the cross-light, waste gas temperature, meteorological conditions (e.g., ambient temperature, barometric pressure, wind speed and direction, and relative humidity), and whether there were any observed flare flameouts; and


(6) You must install and operate pressure monitor(s) on the main flare header, as well as a valve position indicator monitoring system for each staging valve to ensure that the flare operates within the proper range of conditions as specified by the manufacturer. The pressure monitor must meet the requirements in table 13 to part 63, subpart CC of this chapter.


(7) If a pressure-assisted multi-point flare is operating under the requirements of an approved alternative means of emission limitations, you must either continue to comply with the terms of the alternative means of emission limitations or comply with the provisions in paragraphs (i)(1) through (6) of this section.


(j) If you choose to determine compositional analysis for net heating value with a continuous process mass spectrometer, then you must comply with the requirements specified in paragraphs (j)(1) through (7) of this section.


(1) You must meet the requirements in § 63.671(e)(2) of this chapter. You may augment the minimum list of calibration gas components found in § 63.671(e)(2) with compounds found during a pre-survey or known to be in the gas through process knowledge.


(2) Calibration gas cylinders must be certified to an accuracy of 2 percent and traceable to National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) standards.


(3) For unknown gas components that have similar analytical mass fragments to calibration compounds, you may report the unknowns as an increase in the overlapped calibration gas compound. For unknown compounds that produce mass fragments that do not overlap calibration compounds, you may use the response factor for the nearest molecular weight hydrocarbon in the calibration mix to quantify the unknown component’s NHVvg.


(4) You may use the response factor for n-pentane to quantify any unknown components detected with a higher molecular weight than n-pentane.


(5) You must perform an initial calibration to identify mass fragment overlap and response factors for the target compounds.


(6) You must meet applicable requirements in Performance Specification 9 of appendix B of this part, for continuous monitoring system acceptance including, but not limited to, performing an initial multi-point calibration check at three concentrations following the procedure in section 10.1 and performing the periodic calibration requirements listed for gas chromatographs in table 13 to part 63, subpart CC of this chapter, for the process mass spectrometer. You may use the alternative sampling line temperature allowed under Net Heating Value by Gas Chromatograph in table 13 to part 63, subpart CC.


(7) The average instrument calibration error (CE) for each calibration compound at any calibration concentration must not differ by more than 10 percent from the certified cylinder gas value. The CE for each component in the calibration blend must be calculated using equation 1 to this paragraph (j)(7).


Equation 1 to Paragraph (j)(7)



Where:

Cm = Average instrument response (ppm)

Ca = Certified cylinder gas value (ppm)

(k) If you use a gas chromatograph or mass spectrometer for compositional analysis for net heating value, then you may choose to use the CE of NHVmeasured versus the cylinder tag value NHV as the measure of agreement for daily calibration and quarterly audits in lieu of determining the compound-specific CE. The CE for NHV at any calibration level must not differ by more than 10 percent from the certified cylinder gas value. The CE must be calculated using equation 2 to this paragraph (k).


Equation 2 to Paragraph (k)



Where:

NHVmeasured = Average instrument response (Btu/scf)

NHVa = Certified cylinder gas value (Btu/scf)

(l) Instead of complying with § 63.670(q) of this chapter, you must comply with the reporting requirements specified in paragraphs (l)(1) and (2) of this section.


(1) The notification requirements specified in § 60.615a(a).


(2) The semiannual report specified in § 60.615a(i)(4) must include the items specified in paragraphs (l)(2)(i) through (vi) of this section.


(i) Records as specified in paragraph (m)(1) of this section for each 15-minute block during which there was at least one minute when regulated material is routed to a flare and no pilot flame or flare flame is present. Include the start and stop time and date of each 15-minute block.


(ii) Visible emission records as specified in paragraph (m)(2)(iv) of this section for each period of 2 consecutive hours during which visible emissions exceeded a total of 5 minutes.


(iii) The periods specified in paragraph (m)(6) of this section. Indicate the date and start and end times for each period, and the net heating value operating parameter(s) determined following the methods in § 63.670(k) through (n) of part 63, subpart CC of this chapter as applicable.


(iv) For flaring events meeting the criteria in § 63.670(o)(3) of this chapter and paragraph (f) of this section:


(A) The start and stop time and date of the flaring event.


(B) The length of time in minutes for which emissions were visible from the flare during the event.


(C) For steam-assisted, air-assisted, and non-assisted flares, the start date, start time, and duration in minutes for periods of time that the flare tip velocity exceeds the maximum flare tip velocity determined using the methods in § 63.670(d)(2) of this chapter and the maximum 15-minute block average flare tip velocity in ft/sec recorded during the event.


(D) Results of the root cause and corrective actions analysis completed during the reporting period, including the corrective actions implemented during the reporting period and, if applicable, the implementation schedule for planned corrective actions to be implemented subsequent to the reporting period.


(v) For pressure-assisted multi-point flares, the periods of time when the pressure monitor(s) on the main flare header show the burners operating outside the range of the manufacturer’s specifications. Indicate the date and start and end times for each period.


(vi) For pressure-assisted multi-point flares, the periods of time when the staging valve position indicator monitoring system indicates a stage should not be in operation and is or when a stage should be in operation and is not. Indicate the date and start and end times for each period.


(m) Instead of complying with § 63.670(p) of this chapter, you must keep the flare monitoring records specified in paragraphs (m)(1) through (14) of this section.


(1) Retain records of the output of the monitoring device used to detect the presence of a pilot flame or flare flame as required in § 63.670(b) of this chapter and the presence of a pilot flame as required in paragraph (i)(4) of this section for a minimum of 2 years. Retain records of each 15-minute block during which there was at least one minute that no pilot flame or flare flame is present when regulated material is routed to a flare for a minimum of 5 years. For a pressure-assisted multi-point flare that uses cross-lighting, retain records of each 15-minute block during which there was at least one minute that no pilot flame is present on each stage when regulated material is routed to a flare for a minimum of 5 years. You may reduce the collected minute-by-minute data to a 15-minute block basis with an indication of whether there was at least one minute where no pilot flame or flare flame was present.


(2) Retain records of daily visible emissions observations as specified in paragraphs (m)(2)(i) through (iv) of this section, as applicable, for a minimum of 3 years.


(i) To determine when visible emissions observations are required, the record must identify all periods when regulated material is vented to the flare.


(ii) If visible emissions observations are performed using Method 22 of appendix A-7 of this part, then the record must identify whether the visible emissions observation was performed, the results of each observation, total duration of observed visible emissions, and whether it was a 5-minute or 2-hour observation. Record the date and start time of each visible emissions observation.


(iii) If a video surveillance camera is used pursuant to § 63.670(h)(2) of this chapter, then the record must include all video surveillance images recorded, with time and date stamps.


(iv) For each 2-hour period for which visible emissions are observed for more than 5 minutes in 2 consecutive hours, then the record must include the date and start and end time of the 2-hour period and an estimate of the cumulative number of minutes in the 2 hour period for which emissions were visible.


(3) The 15-minute block average cumulative flows for flare vent gas and, if applicable, total steam, perimeter assist air, and premix assist air specified to be monitored under § 63.670(i) of this chapter, along with the date and time interval for the 15-minute block. If multiple monitoring locations are used to determine cumulative vent gas flow, total steam, perimeter assist air, and premix assist air, then retain records of the 15-minute block average flows for each monitoring location for a minimum of 2 years and retain the 15-minute block average cumulative flows that are used in subsequent calculations for a minimum of 5 years. If pressure and temperature monitoring is used, then retain records of the 15-minute block average temperature, pressure, and molecular weight of the flare vent gas or assist gas stream for each measurement location used to determine the 15-minute block average cumulative flows for a minimum of 2 years, and retain the 15-minute block average cumulative flows that are used in subsequent calculations for a minimum of 5 years.


(4) The flare vent gas compositions specified to be monitored under § 63.670(j) of this chapter. Retain records of individual component concentrations from each compositional analysis for a minimum of 2 years. If an NHVvg analyzer is used, retain records of the 15-minute block average values for a minimum of 5 years.


(5) Each 15-minute block average operating parameter calculated following the methods specified in § 63.670(k) through (n) of this chapter, as applicable.


(6) All periods during which operating values are outside of the applicable operating limits specified in § 63.670(d) through (f) of this chapter and paragraph (i) of this section when regulated material is being routed to the flare.


(7) All periods during which you do not perform flare monitoring according to the procedures in § 63.670(g) through (j) of this chapter.


(8) For pressure-assisted multi-point flares, if a stage of burners on the flare uses cross-lighting, then a record of any changes made to the distance between burners.


(9) For pressure-assisted multi-point flares, all periods when the pressure monitor(s) on the main flare header show burners are operating outside the range of the manufacturer’s specifications. Indicate the date and time for each period, the pressure measurement, the stage(s) and number of burners affected, and the range of manufacturer’s specifications.


(10) For pressure-assisted multi-point flares, all periods when the staging valve position indicator monitoring system indicates a stage of the pressure-assisted multi-point flare should not be in operation and when a stage of the pressure-assisted multi-point flare should be in operation and is not. Indicate the date and time for each period, whether the stage was supposed to be open, but was closed or vice versa, and the stage(s) and number of burners affected.


(11) Records of periods when there is flow of vent gas to the flare, but when there is no flow of regulated material to the flare, including the start and stop time and dates of periods of no regulated material flow.


(12) Records when the flow of vent gas exceeds the smokeless capacity of the flare, including start and stop time and dates of the flaring event.


(13) Records of the root cause analysis and corrective action analysis conducted as required in § 63.670(o)(3) of this chapter and paragraph (f) of this section, including an identification of the affected flare, the date and duration of the event, a statement noting whether the event resulted from the same root cause(s) identified in a previous analysis and either a description of the recommended corrective action(s) or an explanation of why corrective action is not necessary under § 63.670(o)(5)(i) of this chapter.


(14) For any corrective action analysis for which implementation of corrective actions are required in § 63.670(o)(5) of this chapter, a description of the corrective action(s) completed within the first 45 days following the discharge and, for action(s) not already completed, a schedule for implementation, including proposed commencement and completion dates.


(n) You may elect to comply with the alternative means of emissions limitation requirements specified in paragraph (r) of § 63.670 of this chapter in lieu of the requirements in § 63.670(d) through (f) of this chapter, as applicable. However, instead of complying with § 63.670(r)(3)(iii) of this chapter, you must also submit the alternative means of emissions limitation request to the following address: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards, Sector Policies and Programs Division, U.S. EPA Mailroom (C404-02), Attention: SOCMI NSPS Sector Lead, 4930 Old Page Rd., Durham, NC 27703.


(o) The referenced provisions specified in paragraphs (o)(1) through (4) of this section do not apply when demonstrating compliance with this section.


(1) Section 63.670(o)(4)(iv) of this chapter.


(2) The last sentence of § 63.670(o)(6) of this chapter.


(3) The phrase “that were not caused by a force majeure event” in § 63.670(o)(7)(ii) of this chapter.


(4) The phrase “that were not caused by a force majeure event” in § 63.670(o)(7)(iv) of this chapter.


§ 60.620a What are my requirements for closed vent systems?

(a) Except as provided in paragraphs (f) and (g) of this section, you must inspect each closed vent system according to the procedures and schedule specified in paragraphs (a)(1) through (3) of this section.


(1) Conduct an initial inspection according to the procedures in paragraph (b) of this section unless the closed vent system is operated and maintained under negative pressure,


(2) Conduct annual inspections according to the procedures in paragraph (b) of this section unless the closed vent system is operated and maintained under negative pressure, and


(3) Conduct annual inspections for visible, audible, or olfactory indications of leaks.


(b) You must inspect each closed vent system according to the procedures specified in paragraphs (b)(1) through (6) of this section.


(1) Inspections must be conducted in accordance with Method 21 of appendix A of this part.


(2)(i) Except as provided in paragraph (b)(2)(ii) of this section, the detection instrument must meet the performance criteria of Method 21 of appendix A of this part, except the instrument response factor criteria in section 3.1.2(a) of Method 21 must be for the average composition of the process fluid not each individual volatile organic compound in the stream. For process streams that contain nitrogen, air, or other inerts which are not organic hazardous air pollutants or volatile organic compounds, the average stream response factor must be calculated on an inert-free basis.


(ii) If no instrument is available at the plant site that will meet the performance criteria specified in paragraph (b)(2)(i) of this section, the instrument readings may be adjusted by multiplying by the average response factor of the process fluid, calculated on an inert-free basis as described in paragraph (b)(2)(i) of this section.


(3) The detection instrument must be calibrated before use on each day of its use by the procedures specified in Method 21 of appendix A of this part.


(4) Calibration gases must be as follows:


(i) Zero air (less than 10 parts per million hydrocarbon in air); and


(ii) Mixtures of methane in air at a concentration less than 2,000 parts per million. A calibration gas other than methane in air may be used if the instrument does not respond to methane or if the instrument does not meet the performance criteria specified in paragraph (b)(2)(i) of this section. In such cases, the calibration gas may be a mixture of one or more of the compounds to be measured in air.


(5) You may elect to adjust or not adjust instrument readings for background. If you elect to not adjust readings for background, all such instrument readings must be compared directly to the applicable leak definition to determine whether there is a leak.


(6) If you elect to adjust instrument readings for background, you must determine the background concentration using Method 21 of appendix A of this part. After monitoring each potential leak interface, subtract the background reading from the maximum concentration indicated by the instrument. The arithmetic difference between the maximum concentration indicated by the instrument and the background level must be compared with 500 parts per million for determining compliance.


(c) Leaks, as indicated by an instrument reading greater than 500 parts per million above background or by visual, audio, or olfactory inspections, must be repaired as soon as practicable, except as provided in paragraph (d) of this section.


(1) A first attempt at repair must be made no later than 5 calendar days after the leak is detected.


(2) Repair must be completed no later than 15 calendar days after the leak is detected.


(d) Delay of repair of a closed vent system for which leaks have been detected is allowed if the repair is technically infeasible without a shutdown, as defined in § 60.2, or if you determine that emissions resulting from immediate repair would be greater than the fugitive emissions likely to result from delay of repair. Repair of such equipment must be complete by the end of the next shutdown.


(e) For each closed vent system that contains bypass lines that could divert a vent stream away from the control device and to the atmosphere, you must comply with the provisions of either paragraph (e)(1) or (2), except as specified in paragraph (e)(3) of this section.


(1) Install, calibrate, maintain, and operate a flow indicator that determines whether vent stream flow is present at least once every 15 minutes. You must keep hourly records of whether the flow indicator was operating and whether a diversion was detected at any time during the hour, as well as records of the times and durations of all periods when the vent stream is diverted to the atmosphere or the flow indicator is not operating. The flow indicator must be installed at the entrance to any bypass line; or


(2) Secure the bypass line valve in the closed position with a car-seal or a lock-and-key type configuration. A visual inspection of the seal or closure mechanism must be performed at least once every month to ensure the valve is maintained in the closed position and the vent stream is not diverted through the bypass line.


(3) Open-ended valves or lines that use a cap, blind flange, plug, or second valve and follow the requirements specified in § 60.482-6(a)(2), (b), and (c) or follow requirements codified in another regulation that are the same as § 60.482-6(a)(2), (b), and (c) are not subject to this paragraph (e).


(f) Any parts of the closed vent system that are designated, as described in paragraph (h)(1) of this section, as unsafe to inspect are exempt from the inspection requirements of paragraphs (a)(1) and (2) of this section if:


(1) You determine that the equipment is unsafe to inspect because inspecting personnel would be exposed to an imminent or potential danger as a consequence of complying with paragraphs (a)(1) and (2) of this section; and


(2) You have a written plan that requires inspection of the equipment as frequently as practicable during safe-to-inspect times.


(g) Any parts of the closed vent system are designated, as described in paragraph (h)(2) of this section, as difficult to inspect are exempt from the inspection requirements of paragraphs (a)(1) and (2) of this section if:


(1) You determine that the equipment cannot be inspected without elevating the inspecting personnel more than 2 meters above a support surface; and


(2) You have a written plan that requires inspection of the equipment at least once every 5 years.


(h) You must record the information specified in paragraphs (h)(1) through (5) of this section.


(1) Identification of all parts of the closed vent system that are designated as unsafe to inspect, an explanation of why the equipment is unsafe to inspect, and the plan for inspecting the equipment.


(2) Identification of all parts of the closed vent system that are designated as difficult to inspect, an explanation of why the equipment is difficult to inspect, and the plan for inspecting the equipment.


(3) For each closed vent system that contains bypass lines that could divert a vent stream away from the control device and to the atmosphere, you must keep a record of the information specified in either paragraph (h)(3)(i) or (ii) of this section in addition to the information specified in paragraph (h)(3)(iii) of this section.


(i) Hourly records of whether the flow indicator specified under paragraph (e)(1) of this section was operating and whether a diversion was detected at any time during the hour, as well as records of the times of all periods when the vent stream is diverted from the control device or the flow indicator is not operating.


(ii) Where a seal mechanism is used to comply with paragraph (e)(2) of this section, hourly records of flow are not required. In such cases, you must record whether the monthly visual inspection of the seals or closure mechanisms has been done, and you must record the occurrence of all periods when the seal mechanism is broken, the bypass line valve position has changed, or the key for a lock-and-key type configuration has been checked out, and records of any car-seal that has broken.


(iii) For each flow event from a bypass line subject to the requirements in paragraph (e) of this section, you must maintain records sufficient to determine whether or not the detected flow included flow requiring control. For each flow event from a bypass line requiring control that is released either directly to the atmosphere or to a control device not meeting the requirements in this subpart, you must include an estimate of the volume of gas, the concentration of VOC in the gas and the resulting emissions of VOC that bypassed the control device using process knowledge and engineering estimates.


(4) For each inspection during which a leak is detected, a record of the information specified in paragraphs (h)(4)(i) through (viii) of this section.


(i) The instrument identification numbers; operator name or initials; and identification of the equipment.


(ii) The date the leak was detected and the date of the first attempt to repair the leak.


(iii) Maximum instrument reading measured by the method specified in paragraph (c) of this section after the leak is successfully repaired or determined to be nonrepairable.


(iv) “Repair delayed” and the reason for the delay if a leak is not repaired within 15 calendar days after discovery of the leak.


(v) The name, initials, or other form of identification of the owner or operator (or designee) whose decision it was that repair could not be effected without a shutdown.


(vi) The expected date of successful repair of the leak if a leak is not repaired within 15 calendar days.


(vii) Dates of shutdowns that occur while the equipment is unrepaired.


(viii) The date of successful repair of the leak.


(5) For each inspection conducted in accordance with paragraph (b) of this section during which no leaks are detected, a record that the inspection was performed, the date of the inspection, and a statement that no leaks were detected.


(6) For each inspection conducted in accordance with paragraph (a)(3) of this section during which no leaks are detected, a record that the inspection was performed, the date of the inspection, and a statement that no leaks were detected.


(i) The semiannual report specified in § 60.615a(i)(5) must include the items specified in paragraphs (i)(1) through (3) of this section.


(1) Reports of the times of all periods recorded under paragraph (h)(3)(i) of this section when the vent stream is diverted from the control device through a bypass line. Include the start date, start time, and duration in hours of each period.


(2) Reports of all periods recorded under paragraph (h)(3)(ii) of this section in which the seal mechanism is broken, the bypass line valve position has changed, or the key to unlock the bypass line valve was checked out. Include the start date, start time, and duration in hours of each period.


(3) For bypass lines subject to the requirements in paragraph (e) of this section, the semiannual reports must include the start date, start time, duration in hours, estimate of the volume of gas in standard cubic feet, the concentration of VOC in the gas in parts per million by volume and the resulting mass emissions of VOC in pounds that bypass a control device. For periods when the flow indicator is not operating, report the start date, start time, and duration in hours.


Table 1 to Subpart IIIa of Part 60—Emission Limits and Standards for Vent Streams

For each. . .
You must. . .
1. Vent streama. Reduce emissions of TOC (minus methane and ethane) by 98 weight-percent, or to a TOC (minus methane and ethane) concentration of 20 ppmv on a dry basis corrected to 3 percent oxygen by venting emissions through a closed vent system to any combination of non-flare control devices and/or recovery system and meet the requirements specified in § 60.613a and § 60.620a; or
b. Reduce emissions of TOC (minus methane and ethane) by venting emissions through a closed vent system to a flare and meet the requirements specified in § 60.619a and § 60.620a.

Table 2 to Subpart IIIa of Part 60—Monitoring Requirements for Complying With 98 Weight-Percent Reduction of Total Organic Compounds Emissions or a Limit of 20 Parts Per Million by Volume

Non-flare control device or recovery device
Parameters to be monitored
1. All control and recovery devicesa. Presence of flow diverted to the atmosphere from the control and recovery device; or
b. Monthly inspections of sealed valves.
2. Absorbera. Exit temperature of the absorbing liquid; and
b. Exit specific gravity.
3. Boiler or process heater with a design heat input capacity less than 44 megawatts and vent stream is not introduced with or as the primary fuelFirebox temperature.
a
4. Catalytic incineratorTemperature upstream and downstream of the catalyst bed.
5. Carbon adsorber, regenerativea. Total regeneration stream mass or volumetric flow during carbon bed regeneration cycle(s); and
b. Temperature of the carbon bed after regeneration [and within 15 minutes of completing any cooling cycle(s)].
6. Carbon adsorber, non-regenerative or regenerated offsiteBreakthrough.
7. CondenserExit (product side) temperature.
8. Scrubber for halogenated vent streamsa. pH of scrubber effluent; and
b. Scrubber liquid and gas flow rates.
9. Thermal incineratorFirebox temperature.
a
10. Control devices other than an incinerator, boiler, process heater, or flare; or recovery devices other than an absorber, condenser, or carbon adsorberAs specified by the Administrator.


a Monitor may be installed in the firebox or in the ductwork immediately downstream of the firebox before any substantial heat exchange is encountered.


Table 3 to Subpart IIIa of Part 60—Operating Parameters, Operating Parameter Limits and Data Monitoring, Recordkeeping and Compliance Frequencies

For the operating parameter applicable to you, as specified in Table 2. . .
You must establish the following operating parameter limit. . .
And you must monitor, record, and demonstrate continuous compliance using these minimum frequencies. . .
Data measurement
Data recording
Data averaging period for compliance
Absorbers
1. Exit temperature of the absorbing liquidMaximum temperatureContinuousEvery 15 minutes3-hour block average.
2. Exit specific gravityExit specific gravity rangeContinuousEvery 15 minutes3-hour block average.
Boilers or process heaters
(with a design heat input capacity
3. Firebox temperatureMinimum firebox temperatureContinuousEvery 15 minutes3-hour block average.
Catalytic incinerators
4. Temperature in gas stream immediately before the catalyst bedMinimum temperatureContinuousEvery 15 minutes3-hour block average.
5. Temperature difference between the catalyst bed inlet and the catalyst bed outletMinimum temperature differenceContinuousEvery 15 minutes3-hour block average.
Carbon adsorbers
6. Total regeneration stream mass flow during carbon bed regeneration cycle(s)Minimum mass flow during carbon bed regeneration cycle(s)Continuously during regenerationEvery 15 minutes during regeneration cycleTotal flow for each regeneration cycle.
7. Total regeneration stream volumetric flow during carbon bed regeneration cycle(s)Minimum volumetric flow during carbon bed regeneration cycle(s)Continuously during regenerationEvery 15 minutes during regeneration cycleTotal flow for each regeneration cycle.
8. Temperature of the carbon bed after regeneration [and within 15 minutes of completing any cooling cycle(s)]Maximum temperature of the carbon bed after regenerationContinuously during regeneration and for 15 minutes after completing any cooling cycle(s)Every 15 minutes during regeneration cycle (including any cooling cycle)Average of regeneration cycle.
9. BreakthroughAs defined in § 60.611aAs required by § 60.613a(a)(6)(iii)(B)Each monitoring eventN/A
Condensers
10. Exit (product side) temperatureMaximum temperatureContinuousEvery 15 minutes3-hour block average.
Scrubbers for halogenated vent streams
11. pH of scrubber effluentMinimum pHContinuousEvery 15 minutes3-hour block average.
12. Influent liquid flowMinimum inlet liquid flowContinuousEvery 15 minutes3-hour block average.
13. Influent liquid flow rate and gas stream flow rateMinimum influent liquid-to-gas ratioContinuousEvery 15 minutes3-hour block average.
Thermal incinerators
14. Firebox temperatureMinimum firebox temperatureContinuousEvery 15 minutes3-hour block average.
Control devices other than an incinerator, boiler, process heater, or flare; or recovery devices other than an absorber, condenser, or carbon adsorber
15. As specified by the AdministratorAs specified by the AdministratorAs specified by the AdministratorAs specified by the AdministratorAs specified by the Administrator.

Table 4 to Subpart IIIa of Part 60—Calibration and Quality Control Requirements for Continuous Parameter Monitoring System (CPMS)

If you monitor this parameter. . .
Your accuracy requirements are. . .
And your calibration requirements are. . .
1. Temperaturea. ±1 percent over the normal range of temperature measured or 2.8 degrees Celsius (5 degrees Fahrenheit), whichever is greater, for non-cryogenic temperature ranges

b. ±2.5 percent over the normal range of temperature measured or 2.8 degrees Celsius (5 degrees Fahrenheit), whichever is greater, for cryogenic temperature ranges

c. Performance evaluation annually and following any period of more than 24 hours throughout which the temperature exceeded the maximum rated temperature of the sensor, or the data recorder was off scale.

d. Visual inspections and checks of CPMS operation every 3 months, unless the CPMS has a redundant temperature sensor.

e. Selection of a representative measurement location.

2. Flow Ratea. ±5 percent over the normal range of flow measured or 1.9 liters per minute (0.5 gallons per minute), whichever is greater, for liquid flow rate

b. ±5 percent over the normal range of flow measured or 280 liters per minute (10 cubic feet per minute), whichever is greater, for gas flow rate

c. ±5 percent over the normal range measured for mass flow rate

d. Performance evaluation annually and following any period of more than 24 hours throughout which the flow rate exceeded the maximum rated flow rate of the sensor, or the data recorder was off scale.

e. Checks of all mechanical connections for leakage monthly.

f. Visual inspections and checks of CPMS operation every 3 months, unless the CPMS has a redundant flow sensor.

g. Selection of a representative measurement location where swirling flow or abnormal velocity distributions due to upstream and downstream disturbances at the point of measurement are minimized.

3. pHa. ±0.2 pH unitsb. Performance evaluation annually. Conduct a two-point calibration with one of the two buffer solutions having a pH within 1 of the pH of the operating limit.

c. Visual inspections and checks of CPMS operation every 3 months, unless the CPMS has a redundant pH sensor.

d. Select a measurement location that provides a representative sample of scrubber effluent and that ensures the fluid is properly mixed.

4. Specific Gravitya. ±0.02 specific gravity unitsb. Performance evaluation annually.

c. Visual inspections and checks of CPMS operation every 3 months, unless the CPMS has a redundant specific gravity sensor.

d. Select a measurement location that provides a representative sample of specific gravity of the absorbing liquid effluent and that ensures the fluid is properly mixed.


Subpart JJJ—Standards of Performance for Petroleum Dry Cleaners


Source:49 FR 37331, Sept. 21, 1984, unless otherwise noted.

§ 60.620 Applicability and designation of affected facility.

(a) The provisions of this subpart are applicable to the following affected facilities located at a petroleum dry cleaning plant with a total manufacturers’ rated dryer capacity equal to or greater than 38 kilograms (84 pounds): Petroleum solvent dry cleaning dryers, washers, filters, stills, and settling tanks.


(1) When the affected facility is installed in an existing plant that is not expanding the manufacturers’ rated capacity of its petroleum solvent dryer(s), the total manufacturers’ rated dryer capacity is the summation of the manufacturers’ rated capacity for each existing petroleum solvent dryer.


(2) When the affected facility is installed in a plant that is expanding the manufacturers’ rated capacity of its petroleum solvent dryers, the total manufacturers’ rated dryer capacity is the summation of the manufacturers’ rated dryer capacity for each existing and proposed new petroleum solvent dryer.


(3) When the affected facilty is installed in a new plant, the total manufacturers’ rated dryer capacity is the summation of the manufacturers’ rated dryer capacity for each proposed new petroleum solvent dryer.


(4) The petroleum solvent dryers considered in the determination of the total manufacturers’ rated dryer capacity are those new and existing dryers in the plant that will be in service at any time after the proposed new source or modification commences operation.


(b) Any facility under paragraph (a) of this section that commences construction or modification after December 14, 1982, is subject to the requirements of this subpart with the following exception. A dryer installed between December 14, 1982, and September 21, 1984, in a plant with an annual solvent consumption level of less than 17,791 liters (4,700 gallons), is exempt from the requirements of this subpart.


[49 FR 37331, Sept. 21, 1984, as amended at 50 FR 49026, Nov. 27, 1985; 65 FR 61773, Oct. 17, 2000]


§ 60.621 Definitions.

As used in this subpart, all terms not defined herein shall have the same meaning given them in the Act and in subpart A of this part.


Cartridge filter means a discrete filter unit containing both filter paper and activated carbon that traps and removes contaminants from petroleum solvent, together with the piping and ductwork used in the installation of this device.


Dryer means a machine used to remove petroleum solvent from articles of clothing or other textile or leather goods, after washing and removing of excess petroleum solvent, together with the piping and ductwork used in the installation of this device.


Manufacturers’ rated dryer capacity means the dryer’s rated capacity of articles, in pounds or kilograms of clothing articles per load, dry basis, that is typically found on each dryer on the manufacturer’s name-plate or in the manufacturer’s equipment specifications.


Perceptible leaks means any petroleum solvent vapor or liquid leaks that are conspicuous from visual observation or that bubble after application of a soap solution, such as pools or droplets of liquid, open containers or solvent, or solvent laden waste standing open to the atmosphere.


Petroleum dry cleaner means a dry cleaning facility that uses petroleum solvent in a combination of washers, dryers, filters, stills, and settling tanks.


Settling tank means a container that gravimetrically separates oils, grease, and dirt from petroleum solvent, together with the piping and ductwork used in the installation of this device.


Solvent filter means a discrete solvent filter unit containing a porous medium that traps and removes contaminants from petroleum solvent, together with the piping and ductwork used in the installation of this device.


Solvent recovery dryer means a class of dry cleaning dryers that employs a condenser to condense and recover solvent vapors evaporated in a closed-loop stream of heated air, together with the piping and ductwork used in the installation of this device.


Still means a device used to volatilize, separate, and recover petroleum solvent from contaminated solvent, together with the piping and ductwork used in the installation of this device.


Washer means a machine which agitates fabric articles in a petroleum solvent bath and spins the articles to remove the solvent, together with the piping and ductwork used in the installation of this device.


§ 60.622 Standards for volatile organic compounds.

(a) Each affected petroleum solvent dry cleaning dryer that is installed at a petroleum dry cleaning plant after December 14, 1982, shall be a solvent recovery dryer. The solvent recovery dryer(s) shall be properly installed, operated, and maintained.


(b) Each affected petroleum solvent filter that is installed at a petroleum dry cleaning plant after December 14, 1982, shall be a cartridge filter. Cartridge filters shall be drained in their sealed housings for at least 8 hours prior to their removal


(c) Each manufacturer of an affected petroleum solvent dryer shall include leak inspection and leak repair cycle information in the operating manual and on a clearly visible label posted on each affected facility. Such information should state:



To protect against fire hazards, loss of valuable solvents, and emissions of solvent to the atmosphere, periodic inspection of this equipment for evidence of leaks and prompt repair of any leaks is recommended. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency recommends that the equipment be inspected every 15 days and all vapor or liquid leaks be repaired within the subsequent 15 day period.


[49 FR 37331, Sept. 21, 1984, as amended at 50 FR 49026, Nov. 27, 1985]


§ 60.623 Equivalent equipment and procedures.

(a) Upon written application from any person, the Administrator may approve the use of equipment or procedures that have been demonstrated to his satisfaction to be equivalent, in terms of reducing VOC emissions to the atmosphere, to those prescribed for compliance within a specified paragraph of this subpart. The application must contain a complete description of the equipment or procedure; the testing method; the date, time and location of the test; and a description of the test results. Written applications shall be submitted to the Administrator, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 1200 Pennsylvania Ave., NW., Washington, DC 20460.


(b) The Administrator will make a preliminary determination of whether or not the application for equivalency is approvable and will publish a notice of these findings in the Federal Register. After notice and opportunity for public hearing, the Administrator will publish the final determination in the Federal Register.


§ 60.624 Test methods and procedures.

Each owner or operator of an affected facility subject to the provisions of § 60.622(a) shall perform an initial test to verify that the flow rate of recovered solvent from the solvent recovery dryer at the termination of the recovery cycle is no greater than 0.05 liters per minute. This test shall be conducted for a duration of no less than 2 weeks during which no less than 50 percent of the dryer loads shall be monitored for their final recovered solvent flow rate. The suggested point for measuring the flow rate of recovered solvent is the outlet of the solvent-water separator. Near the end of the recovery cycle, the entire flow of recovered solvent should be diverted to a graduated cylinder. As the recovered solvent collects in the graduated cylinder, the elapsed time is monitored and recorded in periods of greater than or equal to 1 minute. At the same time, the volume of solvent in the graduated cylinder is monitored and recorded to determine the volume of recovered solvent that is collected during each time period. The recovered solvent flow rate is calculated by dividing the volume of solvent collected per period by the length of time elapsed during the period and converting the result with appropriate factors into units of liters per minute. The recovery cycle and the monitoring procedure should continue until the flow rate of solvent is less than or equal to 0.05 liter per minute. The type of articles cleaned and the total length of the cycle should then be recorded.


[49 FR 37331, Sept. 21, 1984, as amended at 65 FR 61773, Oct. 17, 2000]


§ 60.625 Recordkeeping requirements.

Each owner or operator of an affected facility subject to the provisions of this subpart shall maintain a record of the performance test required under § 60.624.


Subpart KKK—Standards of Performance for Equipment Leaks of VOC From Onshore Natural Gas Processing Plants for Which Construction, Reconstruction, or Modification Commenced After January 20, 1984, and on or Before August 23, 2011


Source:50 FR 26124, June 24, 1985, unless otherwise noted.

§ 60.630 Applicability and designation of affected facility.

(a)(1) The provisions of this subpart apply to affected facilities in onshore natural gas processing plants.


(2) A compressor in VOC service or in wet gas service is an affected facility.


(3) The group of all equipment except compressors (definied in § 60.631) within a process unit is an affected facility.


(b) Any affected facility under paragraph (a) of this section that commences construction, reconstruction, or modification after January 20, 1984, and on or before August 23, 2011, is subject to the requirements of this subpart.


(c) Addition or replacement of equipment (defined in § 60.631) for the purpose of process improvement that is accomplished without a capital expenditure shall not by itself be considered a modification under this subpart.


(d) Facilities covered by subpart VV or subpart GGG of 40 CFR part 60 are excluded from this subpart.


(e) A compressor station, dehydration unit, sweetening unit, underground storage tank, field gas gathering system, or liquefied natural gas unit is covered by this subpart if it is located at an onshore natural gas processing plant. If the unit is not located at the plant site, then it is exempt from the provisions of this subpart.


(f) An affected facility must continue to comply with the requirements of this subpart until it begins complying with a more stringent requirement, that applies to the same affected facility, in an approved, and effective, State or Federal plan that implements subpart OOOOc of this part, or modifies or reconstructs after December 6, 2022, and thus becomes subject to subpart OOOOb of this part.


[50 FR 26124, June 24, 1985, as amended at 77 FR 49542, Aug. 16, 2012; 89 FR 17034, Mar. 8, 2024]


§ 60.631 Definitions.

As used in this subpart, all terms not defined herein shall have the meaning given them in the Act, in subpart A or subpart VV of part 60; and the following terms shall have the specific meanings given them.


Alaskan North Slope means the approximately 69,000 square-mile area extending from the Brooks Range to the Arctic Ocean.


Equipment means each pump, pressure relief device, open-ended valve or line, valve, compressor, and flange or other connector that is in VOC service or in wet gas service, and any device or system required by this subpart.


Field gas means feedstock gas entering the natural gas processing plant.


In light liquid service means that the piece of equipment contains a liquid that meets the conditions specified in § 60.485(e) or § 60.633(h)(2).


In wet gas service means that a piece of equipment contains or contacts the field gas before the extraction step in the process.


Natural gas liquids means the hydrocarbons, such as ethane, propane, butane, and pentane, that are extracted from field gas.


Natural gas processing plant (gas plant) means any processing site engaged in the extraction of natural gas liquids from field gas, fractionation of mixed natural gas liquids to natural gas products, or both.


Nonfractionating plant means any gas plant that does not fractionate mixed natural gas liquids into natural gas products.


Onshore means all facilities except those that are located in the territorial seas or on the outer continental shelf.


Process unit means equipment assembled for the extraction of natural gas liquids from field gas, the fractionation of the liquids into natural gas products, or other operations associated with the processing of natural gas products. A process unit can operate independently if supplied with sufficient feed or raw