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Title 41 – Public Contracts and Property Management–Volume 3

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Title 41 – Public Contracts and Property Management–Volume 3



SUBTITLE C – Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued)

Part


chapter 102 – Federal Management Regulation

102-2


chapters 103-104 [Reserved]


chapter 105 – General Services Administration

105-1


chapter 109 – Department of Energy Property Management Regulations

109-1


chapter 114 – Department of the Interior

114-51


chapter 115 – Environmental Protection Agency

115-1


chapter 128 – Department of Justice

128-1


chapters 129-200 [Reserved]


Subtitle C – Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued)

CHAPTER 102 – FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION

SUBCHAPTERS H-Z [RESERVED]

SUBCHAPTER A – GENERAL

PART 102 – GENERAL [RESERVED]

PART 102-2 – FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION SYSTEM


Authority:40 U.S.C. 486(c).


Source:64 FR 39085, July 21, 1999, unless otherwise noted.

Subpart A – Regulation System

General

§ 102-2.5 What is the Federal Management Regulation (FMR)?

The Federal Management Regulation (FMR) is the successor regulation to the Federal Property Management Regulations (FPMR). It contains updated regulatory policies originally found in the FPMR. However, it does not contain FPMR material that described how to do business with the General Services Administration (GSA). “How to” materials on this and other subjects are available in customer service guides, handbooks, brochures and Internet websites provided by GSA. (See § 102-2.125.)


§ 102-2.10 What is the FMR’s purpose?

The FMR prescribes policies concerning property management and related administrative activities. GSA issues the FMR to carry out the Administrator of General Services’ functional responsibilities, as established by statutes, Executive orders, Presidential memoranda, Circulars and bulletins issued by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), and other policy directives.


§ 102-2.15 What is the authority for the FMR system?

The Administrator of General Services prescribes and issues the FMR under the authority of the Federal Property and Administrative Services Act of 1949, as amended, 40 U.S.C. 486(c), as well as other applicable Federal laws and authorities.


§ 102-2.20 Which agencies are subject to the FMR?

The FMR applies to executive agencies unless otherwise extended to Federal agencies in various parts of this chapter. The difference between the two terms is that Federal agencies include executive agencies plus establishments in the legislative or judicial branch of the Government. See paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section for the definitions of each term.


(a) What is an executive agency? An executive agency is any executive department or independent establishment in the executive branch of the Government, including any wholly-owned Government corporation. (See 40 U.S.C. 472(a).)


(b) What is a Federal agency? A Federal agency is any executive agency or any establishment in the legislative or judicial branch of the Government (except the Senate, the House of Representatives, and the Architect of the Capitol and any activities under that person’s direction). (See 40 U.S.C. 472(b).)


§ 102-2.25 When are other agencies involved in developing the FMR?

Normally, GSA will ask agencies to collaborate in developing parts of the FMR.


§ 102-2.30 Where and in what formats is the FMR published?

Proposed rules are published in the Federal Register. FMR bulletins are published in looseleaf format. FMR interim and final rules are published in the following formats –


(a) Federal Register under the “Rules and Regulations” section.


(b) Loose-leaf. (See § 102-2.35.)


(c) Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), which is an annual codification of the general and permanent rules published in the Federal Register. The CFR is available on line and in a bound-volume format.


(d) Electronically on the Internet.


§ 102-2.35 How is the FMR distributed?

(a) A liaison appointed by each agency provides GSA with their agency’s distribution requirements of the looseleaf version of the FMR. Agencies must submit GSA Form 2053, Agency Consolidated Requirements for GSA Regulations and Other External Issuances, to – General Services Administration, Office of Communications (X), 1800 F Street, NW., Washington, DC 20405.


(b) Order Federal Register and Code of Federal Regulations copies of FMR material through your agency’s authorizing officer.


§ 102-2.40 May an agency issue implementing and supplementing regulations for the FMR?

Yes, an agency may issue implementing regulations (see § 102-2.50) to expand upon related FMR material and supplementing regulations (see § 102-2.55) to address subject material not covered in the FMR. The Office of the Federal Register assigns chapters in Title 41 of the Code of Federal Regulations for agency publication of implementing and supplementing regulations.


Numbering

§ 102-2.45 How is the FMR numbered?

(a) All FMR sections are designated by three numbers. The following example illustrates the chapter (it’s always 102), part, and section designations:



(b) In the looseleaf version, the month, year, and number of FMR amendments appear at the bottom of each page.


§ 102-2.50 How do I number my agency’s implementing regulations?

The first three-digit number represents the chapter number assigned to your agency in Title 41 of the CFR. The part and section numbers correspond to FMR material. For example, if your agency is assigned Chapter 130 in Title 41 of the CFR and you are implementing § 102-2.60 of the FMR, your implementing section would be numbered § 130-2.60.


§ 102-2.55 How do I number my agency’s supplementing regulations?

Since there is no corresponding FMR material, number the supplementing material “601” or higher. For example, your agency’s supplementing regulations governing special services to states might start with § 130-601.5.


Deviations

§ 102-2.60 What is a deviation from the FMR?

A deviation from the FMR is an agency action or policy that is inconsistent with the regulation. (The deviation policy for the FPMR is in 41 CFR part 101-1.)


§ 102-2.65 When may agencies deviate from the FMR?

Because, it consists primarily of set policies and mandatory requirements, deviation from the FMR should occur infrequently. However, to address unique circumstances or to test the effectiveness of potential policy changes, agencies may be able to deviate from the FMR after following the steps described in § 102-2.80.


§ 102-2.70 What are individual and class deviations?

An individual deviation is intended to affect only one action. A class deviation is intended to affect more than one action (e.g., multiple actions, the actions of more than one agency, or individual agency actions that are expected to recur).


§ 102-2.75 What timeframes apply to deviations?

Timeframes vary based on the nature of the deviation. However, deviations cannot be open-ended. When consulting with GSA about using an individual or class deviation, you must set a timeframe for the deviation’s duration.


§ 102-2.80 What steps must an agency take to deviate from the FMR?

(a) Consult informally with appropriate GSA program personnel to learn more about how your agency can work within the FMR’s requirements instead of deviating from them. The consultation process may also highlight reasons why an agency would not be permitted to deviate from the FMR; e.g., statutory constraints.


(b) Formally request a deviation, if consultations indicate that your agency needs one. The head of your agency or a designated official should write to GSA’s Regulatory Secretariat to the attention of a GSA official in the program office that is likely to consider the deviation. (See the FMR bulletin that lists contacts in GSA’s program offices and § 102-2.90.) The written request must fully explain the reasons for the deviation, including the benefits that the agency expects to achieve.


§ 102-2.85 What are the reasons for writing to GSA about FMR deviations?

The reasons for writing are to:


(a) Explain your agency’s rationale for the deviation. Before it can adequately comment on a potential deviation from the FMR, GSA must know why it is needed. GSA will compare your need against the applicable policies and regulations.


(b) Obtain clarification from GSA as to whether statutes, Executive orders, or other controlling policies, which may not be evident in the regulation, preclude deviating from the FMR for the reasons stated.


(c) Establish a timeframe for using a deviation.


(d) Identify potential changes to the FMR.


(e) Identify the benefits and other results that the agency expects to achieve.


§ 102-2.90 Where should my agency send its correspondence on an FMR deviation?

Send correspondence to: General Services Administration, Regulatory Secretariat (MVRS), Office of Governmentwide Policy, 1800 F Street, NW, Washington, DC 20405.


§ 102-2.95 What information must agencies include in their deviation letters to GSA?

Agencies must include:


(a) The title and citation of the FMR provision from which the agency wishes to deviate;


(b) The name and telephone number of an agency contact who can discuss the reason for the deviation;


(c) The reason for the deviation;


(d) A statement about the expected benefits of using the deviation (to the extent possible, expected benefits should be stated in measurable terms);


(e) A statement about possible use of the deviation in other agencies or Governmentwide; and


(f) The duration of the deviation.


§ 102-2.100 Must agencies provide GSA with a follow-up analysis of their experience in deviating from the FMR?

Yes, agencies that deviate from the FMR must also write to the relevant GSA program office at the Regulatory Secretariat’s address (see § 102-2.90) to describe their experiences in using a deviation.


§ 102-2.105 What information must agencies include in their follow-up analysis?

In your follow-up analysis, provide information that may include, but should not be limited to, specific actions taken or not taken as a result of the deviation, outcomes, impacts, anticipated versus actual results, and the advantages and disadvantages of taking an alternative course of action.


§ 102-2.110 When must agencies provide their follow-up letters?

(a) For an individual deviation, once the action is complete.


(b) For a class deviation, at the end of each twelve-month period from the time you first took the deviation and at the end of the deviation period.


Non-Regulatory Material

§ 102-2.115 What kinds of non-regulatory material does GSA publish outside of the FMR?

As GSA converts the FPMR to the FMR, non-regulatory materials in the FPMR, such as guidance, procedures, standards, and information, that describe how to do business with GSA, will become available in separate documents. These documents may include customer service guides, handbooks, brochures, Internet websites, and FMR bulletins. GSA will eliminate non-regulatory material that is no longer needed.


§ 102-2.120 How do I know whom to contact to discuss the regulatory requirements of programs addressed in the FMR?

Periodically, GSA will issue for your reference an FMR bulletin that lists program contacts with whom agencies can discuss regulatory requirements. At a minimum, the list will contain organization names and telephone numbers for each program addressed in the FMR.


§ 102-2.125 What source of information can my agency use to identify materials that describe how to do business with GSA?

The FMR establishes policy; it does not specify procedures for the acquisition of GSA services. However, as a service to users during the transition from the FPMR to the FMR and as needed thereafter, GSA will issue FMR bulletins to identify where to find information on how to do business with GSA. References include customer service guides, handbooks, brochures, Internet websites, etc.


Subpart B – Forms

§ 102-2.130 Where are FMR forms prescribed?

In any of its parts, the FMR may prescribe forms and the requirements for using them.


§ 102-2.135 How do agencies obtain forms prescribed by the FMR?

For copies of the forms prescribed by in the FMR, do any of the following:


(a) Write to us at: General Services Administration, National Forms and Publications Center (7CPN), Warehouse 4, Dock No. 1, 501 West Felix Street, Fort Worth, TX 76115.


(b) Send e-mail messages to: [email protected]


(c) Visit our web site at: www.gsa.gov/forms/forms.htm.


Subpart C – Plain Language Regulatory Style

§ 102-2.140 What elements of plain language appear in the FMR?

The FMR is written in a “plain language” regulatory style. This style is easy to read and uses a question and answer format directed at the reader, active voice, shorter sentences, and, where appropriate, personal pronouns.


§ 102-2.145 To what do pronouns refer when used in the FMR?

Throughout its text, the FMR may contain pronouns such as, but not limited to, we, you, and I. When pronouns are used, each subchapter of the FMR will indicate whether they refer to the reader, an agency, GSA, or some other entity. In general, pronouns refer to who or what must perform a required action.


PART 102-3 – FEDERAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE MANAGEMENT


Authority:Sec. 205(c), 63 Stat. 390 (40 U.S.C. 486(c)); sec. 7, 5 U.S.C., App.; and E.O. 12024, 3 CFR, 1977 Comp., p. 158.


Source:At 66 FR 37733, July 19, 2001, unless otherwise noted.

Subpart A – What Policies Apply to Advisory Committees Established Within the Executive Branch?

§ 102-3.5 What does this subpart cover and how does it apply?

This subpart provides the policy framework that must be used by agency heads in applying the Federal Advisory Committee Act (FACA), as amended (or “the Act”), 5 U.S.C., App., to advisory committees they establish and operate. In addition to listing key definitions underlying the interpretation of the Act, this subpart establishes the scope and applicability of the Act, and outlines specific exclusions from its coverage.


§ 102-3.10 What is the purpose of the Federal Advisory Committee Act?

FACA governs the establishment, operation, and termination of advisory committees within the executive branch of the Federal Government. The Act defines what constitutes a Federal advisory committee and provides general procedures for the executive branch to follow for the operation of these advisory committees. In addition, the Act is designed to assure that the Congress and the public are kept informed with respect to the number, purpose, membership, activities, and cost of advisory committees.


§ 102-3.15 Who are the intended users of this part?

(a) The primary users of this Federal Advisory Committee Management part are:


(1) Executive branch officials and others outside Government currently involved with an established advisory committee;


(2) Executive branch officials who seek to establish or utilize an advisory committee;


(3) Executive branch officials and others outside Government who have decided to pursue, or who are already engaged in, a form of public involvement or consultation and want to avoid inadvertently violating the Act; and


(4) Field personnel of Federal agencies who are increasingly involved with the public as part of their efforts to increase collaboration and improve customer service.


(b) Other types of end-users of this part include individuals and organizations outside of the executive branch who seek to understand and interpret the Act, or are seeking additional guidance.


§ 102-3.20 How does this part meet the needs of its audience?

This Federal Advisory Committee Management part meets the general and specific needs of its audience by addressing the following issues and related topics:


(a) Scope and applicability. This part provides guidance on the threshold issue of what constitutes an advisory committee and clarifies the limits of coverage by the Act for the benefit of the intended users of this part.


(b) Policies and guidelines. This part defines the policies, establishes minimum requirements, and provides guidance to Federal officers and agencies for the establishment, operation, administration, and duration of advisory committees subject to the Act. This includes reporting requirements that keep Congress and the public informed of the number, purpose, membership, activities, benefits, and costs of these advisory committees. These requirements form the basis for implementing the Act at both the agency and Governmentwide levels.


(c) Examples and principles. This part provides summary-level key points and principles at the end of each subpart that provide more clarification on the role of Federal advisory committees in the larger context of public involvement in Federal decisions and activities. This includes a discussion of the applicability of the Act to different decisionmaking scenarios.


§ 102-3.25 What definitions apply to this part?

The following definitions apply to this Federal Advisory Committee Management part:


Act means the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended, 5 U.S.C., App.


Administrator means the Administrator of General Services.


Advisory committee subject to the Act, except as specifically exempted by the Act or by other statutes, or as not covered by this part, means any committee, board, commission, council, conference, panel, task force, or other similar group, which is established by statute, or established or utilized by the President or by an agency official, for the purpose of obtaining advice or recommendations for the President or on issues or policies within the scope of an agency official’s responsibilities.


Agency has the same meaning as in 5 U.S.C. 551(1).


Committee Management Officer (“CMO”), means the individual designated by the agency head to implement the provisions of section 8(b) of the Act and any delegated responsibilities of the agency head under the Act.


Committee Management Secretariat (“Secretariat”), means the organization established pursuant to section 7(a) of the Act, which is responsible for all matters relating to advisory committees, and carries out the responsibilities of the Administrator under the Act and Executive Order 12024 (3 CFR, 1977 Comp., p. 158).


Committee meeting means any gathering of advisory committee members (whether in person or through electronic means) held with the approval of an agency for the purpose of deliberating on the substantive matters upon which the advisory committee provides advice or recommendations.


Committee member means an individual who serves by appointment or invitation on an advisory committee or subcommittee.


Committee staff means any Federal employee, private individual, or other party (whether under contract or not) who is not a committee member, and who serves in a support capacity to an advisory committee or subcommittee.


Designated Federal Officer (“DFO”), means an individual designated by the agency head, for each advisory committee for which the agency head is responsible, to implement the provisions of sections 10(e) and (f) of the Act and any advisory committee procedures of the agency under the control and supervision of the CMO.


Discretionary advisory committee means any advisory committee that is established under the authority of an agency head or authorized by statute. An advisory committee referenced in general (non-specific) authorizing language or Congressional committee report language is discretionary, and its establishment or termination is within the legal discretion of an agency head.


Independent Presidential advisory committee means any Presidential advisory committee not assigned by the Congress in law, or by President or the President’s delegate, to an agency for administrative and other support.


Non-discretionary advisory committee means any advisory committee either required by statute or by Presidential directive. A non-discretionary advisory committee required by statute generally is identified specifically in a statute by name, purpose, or functions, and its establishment or termination is beyond the legal discretion of an agency head.


Presidential advisory committee means any advisory committee authorized by the Congress or directed by the President to advise the President.


Subcommittee means a group, generally not subject to the Act, that reports to an advisory committee and not directly to a Federal officer or agency, whether or not its members are drawn in whole or in part from the parent advisory committee.


Utilized for the purposes of the Act, does not have its ordinary meaning. A committee that is not established by the Federal Government is utilized within the meaning of the Act when the President or a Federal office or agency exercises actual management or control over its operation.


§ 102-3.30 What policies govern the use of advisory committees?

The policies to be followed by Federal departments and agencies in establishing and operating advisory committees consistent with the Act are as follows:


(a) Determination of need in the public interest. A discretionary advisory committee may be established only when it is essential to the conduct of agency business and when the information to be obtained is not already available through another advisory committee or source within the Federal Government. Reasons for deciding that an advisory committee is needed may include whether:


(1) Advisory committee deliberations will result in the creation or elimination of (or change in) regulations, policies, or guidelines affecting agency business;


(2) The advisory committee will make recommendations resulting in significant improvements in service or reductions in cost; or


(3) The advisory committee’s recommendations will provide an important additional perspective or viewpoint affecting agency operations.


(b) Termination. An advisory committee must be terminated when:


(1) The stated objectives of the committee have been accomplished;


(2) The subject matter or work of the committee has become obsolete by the passing of time or the assumption of the committee’s functions by another entity;


(3) The agency determines that the cost of operation is excessive in relation to the benefits accruing to the Federal Government;


(4) In the case of a discretionary advisory committee, upon the expiration of a period not to exceed two years, unless renewed;


(5) In the case of a non-discretionary advisory committee required by Presidential directive, upon the expiration of a period not to exceed two years, unless renewed by authority of the President; or


(6) In the case of a non-discretionary advisory committee required by statute, upon the expiration of the time explicitly specified in the statute, or implied by operation of the statute.


(c) Balanced membership. An advisory committee must be fairly balanced in its membership in terms of the points of view represented and the functions to be performed.


(d) Open meetings. Advisory committee meetings must be open to the public except where a closed or partially-closed meeting has been determined proper and consistent with the exemption(s) of the Government in the Sunshine Act, 5 U.S.C. 552b(c), as the basis for closure.


(e) Advisory functions only. The function of advisory committees is advisory only, unless specifically provided by statute or Presidential directive.


§ 102-3.35 What policies govern the use of subcommittees?

(a) In general, the requirements of the Act and the policies of this Federal Advisory Committee Management part do not apply to subcommittees of advisory committees that report to a parent advisory committee and not directly to a Federal officer or agency. However, this section does not preclude an agency from applying any provision of the Act and this part to any subcommittee of an advisory committee in any particular instance.


(b) The creation and operation of subcommittees must be approved by the agency establishing the parent advisory committee.


§ 102-3.40 What types of committees or groups are not covered by the Act and this part?

The following are examples of committees or groups that are not covered by the Act or this Federal Advisory Committee Management part:


(a) Committees created by the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) or the National Academy of Public Administration (NAPA). Any committee created by NAS or NAPA in accordance with section 15 of the Act, except as otherwise covered by subpart E of this part;


(b) Advisory committees of the Central Intelligence Agency and the Federal Reserve System. Any advisory committee established or utilized by the Central Intelligence Agency or the Federal Reserve System;


(c) Committees exempted by statute. Any committee specifically exempted from the Act by law;


(d) Committees not actually managed or controlled by the executive branch. Any committee or group created by non-Federal entities (such as a contractor or private organization), provided that these committees or groups are not actually managed or controlled by the executive branch;


(e) Groups assembled to provide individual advice. Any group that meets with a Federal official(s), including a public meeting, where advice is sought from the attendees on an individual basis and not from the group as a whole;


(f) Groups assembled to exchange facts or information. Any group that meets with a Federal official(s) for the purpose of exchanging facts or information;


(g) Intergovernmental committees. Any committee composed wholly of full-time or permanent part-time officers or employees of the Federal Government and elected officers of State, local and tribal governments (or their designated employees with authority to act on their behalf), acting in their official capacities. However, the purpose of such a committee must be solely to exchange views, information, or advice relating to the management or implementation of Federal programs established pursuant to statute, that explicitly or inherently share intergovernmental responsibilities or administration (see guidelines issued by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) on section 204(b) of the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act of 1995, 2 U.S.C. 1534(b), OMB Memorandum M-95-20, dated September 21, 1995, available from the Committee Management Secretariat (MC), General Services Administration, 1800 F Street, NW., Washington, DC 20405-0002);


(h) Intragovernmental committees. Any committee composed wholly of full-time or permanent part-time officers or employees of the Federal Government;


(i) Local civic groups. Any local civic group whose primary function is that of rendering a public service with respect to a Federal program;


(j) Groups established to advise State or local officials. Any State or local committee, council, board, commission, or similar group established to advise or make recommendations to State or local officials or agencies; and


(k) Operational committees. Any committee established to perform primarily operational as opposed to advisory functions. Operational functions are those specifically authorized by statute or Presidential directive, such as making or implementing Government decisions or policy. A committee designated operational may be covered by the Act if it becomes primarily advisory in nature. It is the responsibility of the administering agency to determine whether a committee is primarily operational. If so, it does not fall under the requirements of the Act and this part.


Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 102-3 – Key Points and Principles

This appendix provides additional guidance in the form of answers to frequently asked questions and identifies key points and principles that may be applied to situations not covered elsewhere in this subpart. The guidance follows:


Key points and principles
Section(s)
Question(s)
Guidance
I. FACA applies to advisory committees that are either “established” or “utilized” by an agency102-3.25, 102-3.40(d), 102-3.40(f)1. A local citizens group wants to meet with a Federal official(s) to help improve the condition of a forest’s trails and quality of concessions. May the Government meet with the group without chartering the group under the Act?

2. May an agency official attend meetings of external groups where advice may be offered to the Government during the course of discussions?

3. May an agency official participate in meetings of groups or organizations as a member without chartering the group under the Act?

4. Is the Act applicable to meetings between agency officials and their contractors, licensees, or other “private sector program partners?”
A. The answer to questions 1, 2, and 3 is yes, if the agency does not either “establish” or “utilize” (exercise “actual management or control” over) the group. (i) Although there is no precise legal definition of “actual management or control,” the following factors may be used by an agency to determine whether or not a group is “utilized” within the meaning of the Act: (a) Does the agency manage or control the group’s membership or otherwise determine its composition? (b) Does the agency manage or control the group’s agenda? (c) Does the agency fund the group’s activities? (ii) Answering “yes” to any or all of questions 1, 2, or 3 does not automatically mean the group is “utilized” within the meaning of the Act. However, an agency may need to reconsider the status of the group under the Act if the relationship in question essentially is indistinguishable from an advisory committee established by the agency.

B. The answer to question 4 is no. Agencies often meet with contractors and licensees, individually and as a group, to discuss specific matters involving a contract’s solicitation, issuance, and implementation, or an agency’s efforts to ensure compliance with its regulations. Such interactions are not subject to the Act because these groups are not “established” or “utilized” for the purpose of obtaining advice or recommendations.
II. The development of consensus among all or some of the attendees at a public meeting or similar forum does not automatically invoke FACA102-3.25, 102-3.40(d), 102-3.40(f)1. If, during a public meeting of the “town hall” type called by an agency, it appears that the audience is achieving consensus, or a common point of view, is this an indication that the meeting is subject to the Act and must be stopped?A. No, the public meeting need not be stopped. (i) A group must either be “established” or “utilized” by the executive branch in order for the Act to apply. (ii) Public meetings represent a chance for individuals to voice their opinions and/or share information. In that sense, agencies do not either “establish” the assemblage of individuals as an advisory committee or “utilize” the attendees as an advisory committee because there are no elements of either “management” or “control” present or intended.
III. Meetings between a Federal official(s) and a collection of individuals where advice is sought from the attendees on an individual basis are not subject to the Act102-3.40(e)1. May an agency official meet with a number of persons collectively to obtain their individual views without violating the Act?

2. Does the concept of an “individual” apply only to “natural persons?”
A. The answer to questions 1 and 2 is yes. The Act applies only where a group is established or utilized to provide advice or recommendations “as a group.” (i) A mere assemblage or collection of individuals where the attendees are providing individual advice is not acting “as a group” under the Act. (ii) In this respect, “individual” is not limited to “natural persons.” Where the group consists of representatives of various existing organizations, each representative individually may provide advice on behalf of that person’s organization without violating the Act, if those organizations themselves are not “managed or controlled” by the agency.
IV. Meetings between Federal, State, local, and tribal elected officials are not subject to the Act102-3.40(g)1. Is the exclusion from the Act covering elected officials of State, local, and tribal governments acting in their official capacities also applicable to associations of State officials?A. Yes. The scope of activities covered by the exclusion from the Act for intergovernmental activities should be construed broadly to facilitate Federal/State/local/tribal discussions on shared intergovernmental program responsibilities or administration. Pursuant to a Presidential delegation, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) issued guidelines for this exemption, authorized by section 204(b) of the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act of 1995, 2 U.S.C. 1534(b). (See OMB Memorandum M-95-20, dated September 21, 1995, published at 60 FR 50651 (September 29, 1995), and which is available from the Committee Management Secretariat (MC), General Services Administration, 1800 F Street, NW, Washington, DC 20405-0002).
V. Advisory committees established under the Act may perform advisory functions only, unless authorized to perform “operational” duties by the Congress or by Presidential directive102-3.30(e), 102-3.40(k)1. Are “operational committees” subject to the Act, even if they may engage in some advisory activities?A. No, so long as the operational functions performed by the committee constitute the “primary” mission of the committee. Only committees established or utilized by the executive branch in the interest of obtaining advice or recommendations are subject to the Act. However, without specific authorization by the Congress or direction by the President, Federal functions (decisionmaking or operations) cannot be delegated to, or assumed by, non-Federal individuals or entities.
VI. Committees authorized by the Congress in law or by Presidential directive to perform primarily “operational” functions are not subject to the Act102-3.40(k)1. What characteristics are common to “operational committees?”

2. A committee created by the Congress by statute is responsible, for example, for developing plans and events to commemorate the contributions of wildlife to the enjoyment of the Nation’s parks. Part of the committee’s role includes providing advice to certain Federal agencies as may be necessary to coordinate these events. Is this committee subject to FACA?
A. In answer to question 1, non-advisory, or “operational” committees generally have the following characteristics: (i) Specific functions and/or authorities provided by the Congress in law or by Presidential directive; (ii) The ability to make and implement traditionally Governmental decisions; and (iii) The authority to perform specific tasks to implement a Federal program.

B. Agencies are responsible for determining whether or not a committee primarily provides advice or recommendations and is, therefore, subject to the Act, or is primarily “operational” and not covered by FACA.

C. The answer to question 2 is no. The committee is not subject to the Act because: (i) Its functions are to plan and implement specific tasks; (ii) The committee has been granted the express authority by the Congress to perform its statutorily required functions; and (iii) Its incidental role of providing advice to other Federal agencies is secondary to its primarily operational role of planning and implementing specific tasks and performing statutory functions.

Subpart B – How Are Advisory Committees Established, Renewed, Reestablished, and Terminated?

§ 102-3.45 What does this subpart cover and how does it apply?

Requirements for establishing and terminating advisory committees vary depending on the establishing entity and the source of authority for the advisory committee. This subpart covers the procedures associated with the establishment, renewal, reestablishment, and termination of advisory committees. These procedures include consulting with the Secretariat, preparing and filing an advisory committee charter, publishing notice in the Federal Register, and amending an advisory committee charter.


§ 102-3.50 What are the authorities for establishing advisory committees?

FACA identifies four sources of authority for establishing an advisory committee:


(a) Required by statute. By law where the Congress establishes an advisory committee, or specifically directs the President or an agency to establish it (non-discretionary);


(b) Presidential authority. By Executive order of the President or other Presidential directive (non-discretionary);


(c) Authorized by statute. By law where the Congress authorizes, but does not direct the President or an agency to establish it (discretionary); or


(d) Agency authority. By an agency under general authority in title 5 of the United States Code or under other general agency-authorizing statutes (discretionary).


§ 102-3.55 What rules apply to the duration of an advisory committee?

(a) An advisory committee automatically terminates two years after its date of establishment unless:


(1) The statutory authority used to establish the advisory committee provides a different duration;


(2) The President or agency head determines that the advisory committee has fulfilled the purpose for which it was established and terminates the advisory committee earlier;


(3) The President or agency head determines that the advisory committee is no longer carrying out the purpose for which it was established and terminates the advisory committee earlier; or


(4) The President or agency head renews the committee not later than two years after its date of establishment in accordance with § 102-3.60. If an advisory committee needed by the President or an agency terminates because it was not renewed in a timely manner, or if the advisory committee has been terminated under the provisions of § 102-3.30(b), it can be reestablished in accordance with § 102-3.60.


(b) When an advisory committee terminates, the agency shall notify the Secretariat of the effective date of the termination.


§ 102-3.60 What procedures are required to establish, renew, or reestablish a discretionary advisory committee?

(a) Consult with the Secretariat. Before establishing, renewing, or reestablishing a discretionary advisory committee and filing the charter as addressed later in § 102-3.70, the agency head must consult with the Secretariat. As part of this consultation, agency heads are encouraged to engage in constructive dialogue with the Secretariat. With a full understanding of the background and purpose behind the proposed advisory committee, the Secretariat may share its knowledge and experience with the agency on how best to make use of the proposed advisory committee, suggest alternate methods of attaining its purpose that the agency may wish to consider, or inform the agency of a pre-existing advisory committee performing similar functions.


(b) Include required information in the consultation. Consultations covering the establishment, renewal, and reestablishment of advisory committees must, as a minimum, contain the following information:


(1) Explanation of need. An explanation stating why the advisory committee is essential to the conduct of agency business and in the public interest;


(2) Lack of duplication of resources. An explanation stating why the advisory committee’s functions cannot be performed by the agency, another existing committee, or other means such as a public hearing; and


(3) Fairly balanced membership. A description of the agency’s plan to attain fairly balanced membership. The plan will ensure that, in the selection of members for the advisory committee, the agency will consider a cross-section of those directly affected, interested, and qualified, as appropriate to the nature and functions of the advisory committee. Advisory committees requiring technical expertise should include persons with demonstrated professional or personal qualifications and experience relevant to the functions and tasks to be performed.


§ 102-3.65 What are the public notification requirements for discretionary advisory committees?

A notice to the public in the Federal Register is required when a discretionary advisory committee is established, renewed, or reestablished.


(a) Procedure. Upon receiving notice from the Secretariat that its review is complete in accordance with § 102-3.60(a), the agency must publish a notice in the Federal Register announcing that the advisory committee is being established, renewed, or reestablished. For the establishment of a new advisory committee, the notice also must describe the nature and purpose of the advisory committee and affirm that the advisory committee is necessary and in the public interest.


(b) Time required for notices. Notices of establishment and reestablishment of advisory committees must appear at least 15 calendar days before the charter is filed, except that the Secretariat may approve less than 15 calendar days when requested by the agency for good cause. This requirement for advance notice does not apply to advisory committee renewals, notices of which may be published concurrently with the filing of the charter.


§ 102-3.70 What are the charter filing requirements?

No advisory committee may meet or take any action until a charter has been filed by the Committee Management Officer (CMO) designated in accordance with section 8(b) of the Act, or by another agency official designated by the agency head.


(a) Requirement for discretionary advisory committees. To establish, renew, or reestablish a discretionary advisory committee, a charter must be filed with:


(1) The agency head;


(2) The standing committees of the Senate and the House of Representatives having legislative jurisdiction of the agency, the date of filing with which constitutes the official date of establishment for the advisory committee;


(3) The Library of Congress, Anglo-American Acquisitions Division, Government Documents Section, Federal Advisory Committee Desk, 101 Independence Avenue, SE., Washington, DC 20540-4172; and


(4) The Secretariat, indicating the date the charter was filed in accordance with paragraph (a)(2) of this section.


(b) Requirement for non-discretionary advisory committees. Charter filing requirements for non-discretionary advisory committees are the same as those in paragraph (a) of this section, except the date of establishment for a Presidential advisory committee is the date the charter is filed with the Secretariat.


(c) Requirement for subcommittees that report directly to the Government. Subcommittees that report directly to a Federal officer or agency must comply with this subpart and include in a charter the information required by § 102-3.75.


§ 102-3.75 What information must be included in the charter of an advisory committee?

(a) Purpose and contents of an advisory committee charter. An advisory committee charter is intended to provide a description of an advisory committee’s mission, goals, and objectives. It also provides a basis for evaluating an advisory committee’s progress and effectiveness. The charter must contain the following information:


(1) The advisory committee’s official designation;


(2) The objectives and the scope of the advisory committee’s activity;


(3) The period of time necessary to carry out the advisory committee’s purpose(s);


(4) The agency or Federal officer to whom the advisory committee reports;


(5) The agency responsible for providing the necessary support to the advisory committee;


(6) A description of the duties for which the advisory committee is responsible and specification of the authority for any non-advisory functions;


(7) The estimated annual costs to operate the advisory committee in dollars and person years;


(8) The estimated number and frequency of the advisory committee’s meetings;


(9) The planned termination date, if less than two years from the date of establishment of the advisory committee;


(10) The name of the President’s delegate, agency, or organization responsible for fulfilling the reporting requirements of section 6(b) of the Act, if appropriate; and


(11) The date the charter is filed in accordance with § 102-3.70.


(b) The provisions of paragraphs (a)(1) through (11) of this section apply to all subcommittees that report directly to a Federal officer or agency.


§ 102-3.80 How are minor charter amendments accomplished?

(a) Responsibility and limitation. The agency head is responsible for amending the charter of an advisory committee. Amendments may be either minor or major. The procedures for making changes and filing amended charters will depend upon the authority basis for the advisory committee. Amending any existing advisory committee charter does not constitute renewal of the advisory committee under § 102-3.60.


(b) Procedures for minor amendments. To make a minor amendment to an advisory committee charter, such as changing the name of the advisory committee or modifying the estimated number or frequency of meetings, the following procedures must be followed:


(1) Non-discretionary advisory committees. The agency head must ensure that any minor technical changes made to current charters are consistent with the relevant authority. When the Congress by law, or the President by Executive order, changes the authorizing language that has been the basis for establishing an advisory committee, the agency head or the chairperson of an independent Presidential advisory committee must amend those sections of the current charter affected by the new statute or Executive order, and file the amended charter as specified in § 102-3.70.


(2) Discretionary advisory committees. The charter of a discretionary advisory committee may be amended when an agency head determines that technical provisions of a filed charter are inaccurate, or specific provisions have changed or become obsolete with the passing of time, and that these amendments will not alter the advisory committee’s objectives and scope substantially. The agency must amend the charter language as necessary and file the amended charter as specified in § 102-3.70.


§ 102-3.85 How are major charter amendments accomplished?

Procedures for making major amendments to advisory committee charters, such as substantial changes in objectives and scope, duties, and estimated costs, are the same as in § 102-3.80, except that for discretionary advisory committees an agency must:


(a) Consult with the Secretariat on the amended language, and explain the purpose of the changes and why they are necessary; and


(b) File the amended charter as specified in § 102-3.70.


Appendix A to Subpart B of Part 102-3 – Key Points and Principles

This appendix provides additional guidance in the form of answers to frequently asked questions and identifies key points and principles that may be applied to situations not covered elsewhere in this subpart. The guidance follows:


Key points and principles
Section(s)
Question(s)
Guidance
I. Agency heads must consult with the Secretariat prior to establishing a discretionary advisory committee.102-3.60, 102-3.1151. Can an agency head delegate to the Committee Management Officer (CMO) responsibility for consulting with the Secretariat regarding the establishment, renewal, or reestablishment of discretionary advisory committees?A. Yes. Many administrative functions performed to implement the Act may be delegated. However, those functions related to approving the final establishment, renewal, or reestablishment of discretionary advisory committees are reserved for the agency head. Each agency CMO should assure that their internal processes for managing advisory committees include appropriate certifications by the agency head.
II. Agency heads are responsible for complying with the Act, including determining which discretionary advisory committees should be established and renewed.102-3.60(a), 102-3.1051. Who retains final authority for establishing or renewing a discretionary advisory committee?A. Although agency heads retain final authority for establishing or renewing discretionary advisory committees, these decisions should be consistent with § 102-3.105(e) and reflect consultation with the Secretariat under § 102-3.60(a).
III. An advisory committee must be fairly balanced in its membership in terms of the points of view represented and the functions to be performed.102-3.30(c), 102-3.60(b)(3)1. What factors should be considered in achieving a “balanced” advisory committee membership?A. The composition of an advisory committee’s membership will depend upon several factors, including: (i) The advisory committee’s mission; (ii) The geographic, ethnic, social, economic, or scientific impact of the advisory committee’s recommendations; (iii) The types of specific perspectives required, for example, such as those of consumers, technical experts, the public at-large, academia, business, or other sectors; (iv) The need to obtain divergent points of view on the issues before the advisory committee; and (v) The relevance of State, local, or tribal governments to the development of the advisory committee’s recommendations.
IV. Charters for advisory committees required by statute must be filed every two years regardless of the duration provided in the statute.102-3.70(b)1. If an advisory committee’s duration exceeds two years, must a charter be filed with the Congress and GSA every two years?A. Yes. Section 14(b)(2) of the Act provides that: Any advisory committee established by an Act of Congress shall file a charter upon the expiration of each successive two-year period following the date of enactment of the Act establishing such advisory committee.

Subpart C – How Are Advisory Committees Managed?

§ 102-3.90 What does this subpart cover and how does it apply?

This subpart outlines specific responsibilities and functions to be carried out by the General Services Administration (GSA), the agency head, the Committee Management Officer (CMO), and the Designated Federal Officer (DFO) under the Act.


§ 102-3.95 What principles apply to the management of advisory committees?

Agencies are encouraged to apply the following principles to the management of their advisory committees:


(a) Provide adequate support. Before establishing an advisory committee, agencies should identify requirements and assure that adequate resources are available to support anticipated activities. Considerations related to support include office space, necessary supplies and equipment, Federal staff support, and access to key decisionmakers.


(b) Focus on mission. Advisory committee members and staff should be fully aware of the advisory committee’s mission, limitations, if any, on its duties, and the agency’s goals and objectives. In general, the more specific an advisory committee’s tasks and the more focused its activities are, the higher the likelihood will be that the advisory committee will fulfill its mission.


(c) Follow plans and procedures. Advisory committee members and their agency sponsors should work together to assure that a plan and necessary procedures covering implementation are in place to support an advisory committee’s mission. In particular, agencies should be clear regarding what functions an advisory committee can perform legally and those that it cannot perform.


(d) Practice openness. In addition to achieving the minimum standards of public access established by the Act and this part, agencies should seek to be as inclusive as possible. For example, agencies may wish to explore the use of the Internet to post advisory committee information and seek broader input from the public.


(e) Seek feedback. Agencies continually should seek feedback from advisory committee members and the public regarding the effectiveness of the advisory committee’s activities. At regular intervals, agencies should communicate to the members how their advice has affected agency programs and decisionmaking.


§ 102-3.100 What are the responsibilities and functions of GSA?

(a) Under section 7 of the Act, the General Services Administration (GSA) prepares regulations on Federal advisory committees to be prescribed by the Administrator of General Services, issues other administrative guidelines and management controls for advisory committees, and assists other agencies in implementing and interpreting the Act. Responsibility for these activities has been delegated by the Administrator to the GSA Committee Management Secretariat.


(b) The Secretariat carries out its responsibilities by:


(1) Conducting an annual comprehensive review of Governmentwide advisory committee accomplishments, costs, benefits, and other indicators to measure performance;


(2) Developing and distributing Governmentwide training regarding the Act and related statutes and principles;


(3) Supporting the Interagency Committee on Federal Advisory Committee Management in its efforts to improve compliance with the Act;


(4) Designing and maintaining a Governmentwide shared Internet-based system to facilitate collection and use of information required by the Act;


(5) Identifying performance measures that may be used to evaluate advisory committee accomplishments; and


(6) Providing recommendations for transmittal by the Administrator to the Congress and the President regarding proposals to improve accomplishment of the objectives of the Act.


§ 102-3.105 What are the responsibilities of an agency head?

The head of each agency that establishes or utilizes one or more advisory committees must:


(a) Comply with the Act and this Federal Advisory Committee Management part;


(b) Issue administrative guidelines and management controls that apply to all of the agency’s advisory committees subject to the Act;


(c) Designate a Committee Management Officer (CMO);


(d) Provide a written determination stating the reasons for closing any advisory committee meeting to the public, in whole or in part, in accordance with the exemption(s) of the Government in the Sunshine Act, 5 U.S.C. 552b(c), as the basis for closure;


(e) Review, at least annually, the need to continue each existing advisory committee, consistent with the public interest and the purpose or functions of each advisory committee;


(f) Determine that rates of compensation for members (if they are paid for their services) and staff of, and experts and consultants to advisory committees are justified and that levels of agency support are adequate;


(g) Develop procedures to assure that the advice or recommendations of advisory committees will not be inappropriately influenced by the appointing authority or by any special interest, but will instead be the result of the advisory committee’s independent judgment;


(h) Assure that the interests and affiliations of advisory committee members are reviewed for conformance with applicable conflict of interest statutes, regulations issued by the U.S. Office of Government Ethics (OGE) including any supplemental agency requirements, and other Federal ethics rules;


(i) Designate a Designated Federal Officer (DFO) for each advisory committee and its subcommittees; and


(j) Provide the opportunity for reasonable participation by the public in advisory committee activities, subject to § 102-3.140 and the agency’s guidelines.


§ 102-3.110 What are the responsibilities of a chairperson of an independent Presidential advisory committee?

The chairperson of an independent Presidential advisory committee must:


(a) Comply with the Act and this Federal Advisory Committee Management part;


(b) Consult with the Secretariat concerning the designation of a Committee Management Officer (CMO) and Designated Federal Officer (DFO); and


(c) Consult with the Secretariat in advance regarding any proposal to close any meeting in whole or in part.


§ 102-3.115 What are the responsibilities and functions of an agency Committee Management Officer (CMO)?

In addition to implementing the provisions of section 8(b) of the Act, the CMO will carry out all responsibilities delegated by the agency head. The CMO also should ensure that sections 10(b), 12(a), and 13 of the Act are implemented by the agency to provide for appropriate recordkeeping. Records to be kept by the CMO include, but are not limited to:


(a) Charter and membership documentation. A set of filed charters for each advisory committee and membership lists for each advisory committee and subcommittee;


(b) Annual comprehensive review. Copies of the information provided as the agency’s portion of the annual comprehensive review of Federal advisory committees, prepared according to § 102-3.175(b);


(c) Agency guidelines. Agency guidelines maintained and updated on committee management operations and procedures; and


(d) Closed meeting determinations. Agency determinations to close or partially close advisory committee meetings required by § 102-3.105.


§ 102-3.120 What are the responsibilities and functions of a Designated Federal Officer (DFO)?

The agency head or, in the case of an independent Presidential advisory committee, the Secretariat, must designate a Federal officer or employee who must be either full-time or permanent part-time, to be the DFO for each advisory committee and its subcommittees, who must:


(a) Approve or call the meeting of the advisory committee or subcommittee;


(b) Approve the agenda, except that this requirement does not apply to a Presidential advisory committee;


(c) Attend the meetings;


(d) Adjourn any meeting when he or she determines it to be in the public interest; and


(e) Chair the meeting when so directed by the agency head.


§ 102-3.125 How should agencies consider the roles of advisory committee members and staff?

FACA does not assign any specific responsibilities to members of advisory committees and staff, although both perform critical roles in achieving the goals and objectives assigned to advisory committees. Agency heads, Committee Management Officers (CMOs), and Designated Federal Officers (DFOs) should consider the distinctions between these roles and how they relate to each other in the development of agency guidelines implementing the Act and this Federal Advisory Committee Management part. In general, these guidelines should reflect:


(a) Clear operating procedures. Clear operating procedures should provide for the conduct of advisory committee meetings and other activities, and specify the relationship among the advisory committee members, the DFO, and advisory committee or agency staff;


(b) Agency operating policies. In addition to compliance with the Act, advisory committee members and staff may be required to adhere to additional agency operating policies; and


(c) Other applicable statutes. Other agency-specific statutes and regulations may affect the agency’s advisory committees directly or indirectly. Agencies should ensure that advisory committee members and staff understand these requirements.


§ 102-3.130 What policies apply to the appointment, and compensation or reimbursement of advisory committee members, staff, and experts and consultants?

In developing guidelines to implement the Act and this Federal Advisory Committee Management part at the agency level, agency heads must address the following issues concerning advisory committee member and staff appointments, and considerations with respect to uniform fair rates of compensation for comparable services, or expense reimbursement of members, staff, and experts and consultants:


(a) Appointment and terms of advisory committee members. Unless otherwise provided by statute, Presidential directive, or other establishment authority, advisory committee members serve at the pleasure of the appointing or inviting authority. Membership terms are at the sole discretion of the appointing or inviting authority.


(b) Compensation guidelines. Each agency head must establish uniform compensation guidelines for members and staff of, and experts and consultants to an advisory committee.


(c) Compensation of advisory committee members not required. Nothing in this subpart requires an agency head to provide compensation to any member of an advisory committee, unless otherwise required by a specific statute.


(d) Compensation of advisory committee members. When an agency has authority to set pay administratively for advisory committee members, it may establish appropriate rates of pay (including any applicable locality pay authorized by the President’s Pay Agent under 5 U.S.C. 5304(h)), not to exceed the rate for level IV of the Executive Schedule under 5 U.S.C. 5315, unless a higher rate expressly is allowed by another statute. However, the agency head personally must authorize a rate of basic pay in excess of the maximum rate of basic pay established for the General Schedule under 5 U.S.C. 5332, or alternative similar agency compensation system. This maximum rate includes any applicable locality payment under 5 U.S.C. 5304. The agency may pay advisory committee members on either an hourly or a daily rate basis. The agency may not provide additional compensation in any form, such as bonuses or premium pay.


(e) Compensation of staff. When an agency has authority to set pay administratively for advisory committee staff, it may establish appropriate rates of pay (including any applicable locality pay authorized by the President’s Pay Agent under 5 U.S.C. 5304(h)), not to exceed the rate for level IV of the Executive Schedule under 5 U.S.C. 5315, unless a higher rate expressly is allowed by another statute. However, the agency head personally must authorize a rate of basic pay in excess of the maximum rate of basic pay established for the General Schedule under 5 U.S.C. 5332, or alternative similar agency compensation system. This maximum rate includes any applicable locality payment under 5 U.S.C. 5304. The agency must pay advisory committee staff on an hourly rate basis. The agency may provide additional compensation, such as bonuses or premium pay, so long as aggregate compensation paid in a calendar year does not exceed the rate for level IV of the Executive Schedule, with appropriate proration for a partial calendar year.


(f) Other compensation considerations. In establishing rates of pay for advisory committee members and staff, the agency must comply with any applicable statutes, Executive orders, regulations, or administrative guidelines. In determining an appropriate rate of basic pay for advisory committee members and staff, an agency must give consideration to the significance, scope, and technical complexity of the matters with which the advisory committee is concerned, and the qualifications required for the work involved. The agency also should take into account the rates of pay applicable to Federal employees who have duties that are similar in terms of difficulty and responsibility. An agency may establish rates of pay for advisory committee staff based on the pay these persons would receive if they were covered by the General Schedule in 5 U.S.C. Chapter 51 and Chapter 53, subchapter III, or by an alternative similar agency compensation system.


(g) Compensation of experts and consultants. Whether or not an agency has other authority to appoint and compensate advisory committee members or staff, it also may employ experts and consultants under 5 U.S.C. 3109 to perform work for an advisory committee. Compensation of experts and consultants may not exceed the maximum rate of basic pay established for the General Schedule under 5 U.S.C. 5332 (that is, the GS-15, step 10 rate, excluding locality pay or any other supplement), unless a higher rate expressly is allowed by another statute. The appointment and compensation of experts and consultants by an agency must be in conformance with applicable regulations issued by the U. S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM) (See 5 CFR part 304.).


(h) Federal employees assigned to an advisory committee. Any advisory committee member or staff person who is a Federal employee when assigned duties to an advisory committee remains covered during the assignment by the compensation system that currently applies to that employee, unless that person’s current Federal appointment is terminated. Any staff person who is a Federal employee must serve with the knowledge of the Designated Federal Officer (DFO) for the advisory committee to which that person is assigned duties, and the approval of the employee’s direct supervisor.


(i) Other appointment considerations. An individual who is appointed as an advisory committee member or staff person immediately following termination of another Federal appointment with a full-time work schedule may receive compensation at the rate applicable to the former appointment, if otherwise allowed by applicable law (without regard to the limitations on pay established in paragraphs (d) and (e) of this section). Any advisory committee staff person who is not a current Federal employee serving under an assignment must be appointed in accordance with applicable agency procedures, and in consultation with the DFO and the members of the advisory committee involved.


(j) Gratuitous services. In the absence of any special limitations applicable to a specific agency, nothing in this subpart prevents an agency from accepting the gratuitous services of an advisory committee member or staff person who is not a Federal employee, or expert or consultant, who agrees in advance and in writing to serve without compensation.


(k) Travel expenses. Advisory committee members and staff, while engaged in the performance of their duties away from their homes or regular places of business, may be allowed reimbursement for travel expenses, including per diem in lieu of subsistence, as authorized by 5 U.S.C. 5703, for persons employed intermittently in the Government service.


(l) Services for advisory committee members with disabilities. While performing advisory committee duties, an advisory committee member with disabilities may be provided services by a personal assistant for employees with disabilities, if the member qualifies as an individual with disabilities as provided in section 501 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, 29 U.S.C. 791, and does not otherwise qualify for assistance under 5 U.S.C. 3102 by reason of being a Federal employee.


Appendix A to Subpart C of Part 102-3 – Key Points and Principles

This appendix provides additional guidance in the form of answers to frequently asked questions and identifies key points and principles that may be applied to situations not covered elsewhere in this subpart. The guidance follows:


Key points and principles
Section
Question(s)
Guidance
I. FACA does not specify the manner in which advisory committee members and staff must be appointed102-3.105, 102-3.130(a)1. Does the appointment of an advisory committee member necessarily result in a lengthy process?A. No. Each agency head may specify those policies and procedures, consistent with the Act and this part, or other specific authorizing statute, governing the appointment of advisory committee members and staff.
B. Some factors that affect how long the appointment process takes include: (i) Solicitation of nominations; (ii) Conflict of interest clearances; (iii) Security or background evaluations; (iv) Availability of candidates; and (v) Other statutory or administrative requirements.
C. In addition, the extent to which agency heads have delegated responsibility for selecting members varies from agency to agency and may become an important factor in the time it takes to finalize the advisory committee’s membership.
II. Agency heads retain the final authority for selecting advisory committee members, unless otherwise provided for by a specific statute or Presidential directive102-3.130(a)1. Can an agency head select for membership on an advisory committee from among nominations submitted by an organization?A. The answer to question 1 is yes. Organizations may propose for membership individuals to represent them on an advisory committee. However, the agency head establishing the advisory committee, or other appointing authority, retains the final authority for selecting all members.
2. If so, can different persons represent the organization at different meetings?B. The answer to question 2 also is yes. Alternates may represent an appointed member with the approval of the establishing agency, where the agency head is the appointing authority.
III. An agency may compensate advisory committee members and staff, and also employ experts and consultants102-3.130(d), 102-3.130(e), 102-3.130(g)1. May members and staff be compensated for their service or duties on an advisory committee?

2. Are the guidelines the same for compensating both members and staff?

3. May experts and consultants be employed to perform other advisory committee work?
A. The answer to question 1 is yes. (i) However, FACA limits compensation for advisory committee members and staff to the rate for level IV of the Executive Schedule, unless higher rates expressly are allowed by other statutes. (ii) Although FACA provides for compensation guidelines, the Act does not require an agency to compensate its advisory committee members.
B. The answer to question 2 is no. The guidelines for compensating members and staff are similar, but not identical. For example, the differences are that: (i) An agency “may” pay members on either an hourly or a daily rate basis, and “may not” provide additional compensation in any form, such as bonuses or premium pay; while (ii) An agency “must” pay staff on an hourly rate basis only, and “may” provide additional compensation, so long as aggregate compensation paid in a calendar year does not exceed the rate for level IV of the Executive Schedule, with appropriate proration for a partial calendar year.
C. The answer to question 3 is yes. Other work not part of the duties of advisory committee members or staff may be performed by experts and consultants. For additional guidance on the employment of experts and consultants, agencies should consult the applicable regulations issued by the U. S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM). (See 5 CFR part 304.)
IV. Agency heads are responsible for ensuring that the interests and affiliations of advisory committee members are reviewed for conformance with applicable conflict of interest statutes and other Federal ethics rules.102-3.105(h)1. Are all advisory committee members subject to conflict of interest statutes and other Federal ethics rules?

2. Who should be consulted for guidance on the proper application of Federal ethics rules to advisory committee members?
A. The answer to question 1 is no. Whether an advisory committee member is subject to Federal ethics rules is dependent on the member’s status. The determination of a member’s status on an advisory committee is largely a personnel classification matter for the appointing agency. Most advisory committee members will serve either as a “representative” or a “special Government employee” (SGE), based on the role the member will play. In general, SGEs are covered by regulations issued by the U. S. Office of Government Ethics (OGE) and certain conflict of interest statutes, while representatives are not subject to these ethics requirements.
B. The answer to question 2 is the agency’s Designated Agency Ethics Official (DAEO), who should be consulted prior to appointing members to an advisory committee in order to apply Federal ethics rules properly.
V. An agency head may delegate responsibility for appointing a Committee Management Officer (CMO) or Designated Federal Officer (DFO); however, there may be only one CMO for each agency.102-3.105(c), 102-3.105(i)1. Must an agency’s CMO and each advisory committee DFO be appointed by the agency head?A. The answer to question 1 is no. The agency head may delegate responsibility for appointing the CMO and DFOs. However, these appointments, including alternate selections, should be documented consistent with the agency’s policies and procedures.
2. May an agency have more than one CMO?B. The answer to question 2 also is no. The functions of the CMO are specified in the Act and include oversight responsibility for all advisory committees within the agency. Accordingly, only one CMO may be appointed to perform these functions. The agency may, however, create additional positions, including those in its subcomponents, which are subordinate to the CMO’s agencywide responsibilities and functions.
VI. FACA is the principal statute pertaining to advisory committees. However, other statutes may impact their use and operations.102-3.125(c)1. Do other statutes or regulations affect the way an agency carries out its advisory committee management program?A. Yes. While the Act provides a general framework for managing advisory committees Governmentwide, other factors may affect how advisory committees are managed. These include: (i) The statutory or Presidential authority used to establish an advisory committee; (ii) A statutory limitation placed on an agency regarding its annual expenditures for advisory committees; (iii) Presidential or agency management directives; (iv) The applicability of conflict of interest statutes and other Federal ethics rules; (v) Agency regulations affecting advisory committees; and (vi) Other requirements imposed by statute or regulation on an agency or its programs, such as those governing the employment of experts and consultants or the management of Federal records.

Subpart D – Advisory Committee Meeting and Recordkeeping Procedures

§ 102-3.135 What does this subpart cover and how does it apply?

This subpart establishes policies and procedures relating to meetings and other activities undertaken by advisory committees and their subcommittees. This subpart also outlines what records must be kept by Federal agencies and what other documentation, including advisory committee minutes and reports, must be prepared and made available to the public.


§ 102-3.140 What policies apply to advisory committee meetings?

The agency head, or the chairperson of an independent Presidential advisory committee, must ensure that:


(a) Each advisory committee meeting is held at a reasonable time and in a manner or place reasonably accessible to the public, to include facilities that are readily accessible to and usable by persons with disabilities, consistent with the goals of section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, 29 U.S.C. 794;


(b) The meeting room or other forum selected is sufficient to accommodate advisory committee members, advisory committee or agency staff, and a reasonable number of interested members of the public;


(c) Any member of the public is permitted to file a written statement with the advisory committee;


(d) Any member of the public may speak to or otherwise address the advisory committee if the agency’s guidelines so permit; and


(e) Any advisory committee meeting conducted in whole or part by a teleconference, videoconference, the Internet, or other electronic medium meets the requirements of this subpart.


§ 102-3.145 What policies apply to subcommittee meetings?

If a subcommittee makes recommendations directly to a Federal officer or agency, or if its recommendations will be adopted by the parent advisory committee without further deliberations by the parent advisory committee, then the subcommittee’s meetings must be conducted in accordance with all openness requirements of this subpart.


§ 102-3.150 How are advisory committee meetings announced to the public?

(a) A notice in the Federal Register must be published at least 15 calendar days prior to an advisory committee meeting, which includes:


(1) The name of the advisory committee (or subcommittee, if applicable);


(2) The time, date, place, and purpose of the meeting;


(3) A summary of the agenda, and/or topics to be discussed;


(4) A statement whether all or part of the meeting is open to the public or closed; if the meeting is closed state the reasons why, citing the specific exemption(s) of the Government in the Sunshine Act, 5 U.S.C. 552b(c), as the basis for closure; and


(5) The name and telephone number of the Designated Federal Officer (DFO) or other responsible agency official who may be contacted for additional information concerning the meeting.


(b) In exceptional circumstances, the agency or an independent Presidential advisory committee may give less than 15 calendar days notice, provided that the reasons for doing so are included in the advisory committee meeting notice published in the Federal Register.


§ 102-3.155 How are advisory committee meetings closed to the public?

To close all or part of an advisory committee meeting, the Designated Federal Officer (DFO) must:


(a) Obtain prior approval. Submit a request to the agency head, or in the case of an independent Presidential advisory committee, the Secretariat, citing the specific exemption(s) of the Government in the Sunshine Act, 5 U.S.C. 552b(c), that justify the closure. The request must provide the agency head or the Secretariat sufficient time (generally, 30 calendar days) to review the matter in order to make a determination before publication of the meeting notice required by § 102-3.150.


(b) Seek General Counsel review. The General Counsel of the agency or, in the case of an independent Presidential advisory committee, the General Counsel of GSA should review all requests to close meetings.


(c) Obtain agency determination. If the agency head, or in the case of an independent Presidential advisory committee, the Secretariat, finds that the request is consistent with the provisions in the Government in the Sunshine Act and FACA, the appropriate agency official must issue a determination that all or part of the meeting be closed.


(d) Assure public access to determination. The agency head or the chairperson of an independent Presidential advisory committee must make a copy of the determination available to the public upon request.


§ 102-3.160 What activities of an advisory committee are not subject to the notice and open meeting requirements of the Act?

The following activities of an advisory committee are excluded from the procedural requirements contained in this subpart:


(a) Preparatory work. Meetings of two or more advisory committee or subcommittee members convened solely to gather information, conduct research, or analyze relevant issues and facts in preparation for a meeting of the advisory committee, or to draft position papers for deliberation by the advisory committee; and


(b) Administrative work. Meetings of two or more advisory committee or subcommittee members convened solely to discuss administrative matters of the advisory committee or to receive administrative information from a Federal officer or agency.


§ 102-3.165 How are advisory committee meetings documented?

(a) The agency head or, in the case of an independent Presidential advisory committee, the chairperson must ensure that detailed minutes of each advisory committee meeting, including one that is closed or partially closed to the public, are kept. The chairperson of each advisory committee must certify the accuracy of all minutes of advisory committee meetings.


(b) The minutes must include:


(1) The time, date, and place of the advisory committee meeting;


(2) A list of the persons who were present at the meeting, including advisory committee members and staff, agency employees, and members of the public who presented oral or written statements;


(3) An accurate description of each matter discussed and the resolution, if any, made by the advisory committee regarding such matter; and


(4) Copies of each report or other document received, issued, or approved by the advisory committee at the meeting.


(c) The Designated Federal Officer (DFO) must ensure that minutes are certified within 90 calendar days of the meeting to which they relate.


§ 102-3.170 How does an interested party obtain access to advisory committee records?

Timely access to advisory committee records is an important element of the public access requirements of the Act. Section 10(b) of the Act provides for the contemporaneous availability of advisory committee records that, when taken in conjunction with the ability to attend committee meetings, provide a meaningful opportunity to comprehend fully the work undertaken by the advisory committee. Although advisory committee records may be withheld under the provisions of the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), as amended, if there is a reasonable expectation that the records sought fall within the exemptions contained in section 552(b) of FOIA, agencies may not require members of the public or other interested parties to file requests for non-exempt advisory committee records under the request and review process established by section 552(a)(3) of FOIA.


§ 102-3.175 What are the reporting and recordkeeping requirements for an advisory committee?

(a) Presidential advisory committee follow-up report. Within one year after a Presidential advisory committee has submitted a public report to the President, a follow-up report required by section 6(b) of the Act must be prepared and transmitted to the Congress detailing the disposition of the advisory committee’s recommendations. The Secretariat shall assure that these reports are prepared and transmitted to the Congress as directed by the President, either by the President’s delegate, by the agency responsible for providing support to a Presidential advisory committee, or by the responsible agency or organization designated in the charter of the Presidential advisory committee pursuant to § 102-3.75(a)(10). In performing this function, GSA may solicit the assistance of the President’s delegate, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), or the responsible agency Committee Management Officer (CMO), as appropriate. Reports shall be consistent with specific guidance provided periodically by the Secretariat.


(b) Annual comprehensive review of Federal advisory committees. To conduct an annual comprehensive review of each advisory committee as specified in section 7(b) of the Act, GSA requires Federal agencies to report information on each advisory committee for which a charter has been filed in accordance with § 102-3.70, and which is in existence during any part of a Federal fiscal year. Committee Management Officers (CMOs), Designated Federal Officers (DFOs), and other responsible agency officials will provide this information by data filed electronically with GSA on a fiscal year basis, using a Governmentwide shared Internet-based system that GSA maintains. This information shall be consistent with specific guidance provided periodically by the Secretariat. The preparation of these electronic submissions by agencies has been assigned interagency report control number (IRCN) 0304-GSA-AN.


(c) Annual report of closed or partially-closed meetings. In accordance with section 10(d) of the Act, advisory committees holding closed or partially-closed meetings must issue reports at least annually, setting forth a summary of activities and such related matters as would be informative to the public consistent with the policy of 5 U.S.C. 552(b).


(d) Advisory committee reports. Subject to 5 U.S.C. 552, 8 copies of each report made by an advisory committee, including any report of closed or partially-closed meetings as specified in paragraph (c) of this section and, where appropriate, background papers prepared by experts or consultants, must be filed with the Library of Congress as required by section 13 of the Act for public inspection and use at the location specified § 102-3.70(a)(3).


(e) Advisory committee records. Official records generated by or for an advisory committee must be retained for the duration of the advisory committee. Upon termination of the advisory committee, the records must be processed in accordance with the Federal Records Act (FRA), 44 U.S.C. Chapters 21, 29-33, and regulations issued by the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) (see 36 CFR parts 1220, 1222, 1228, and 1234), or in accordance with the Presidential Records Act (PRA), 44 U.S.C. Chapter 22.


Appendix A to Subpart D of Part 102-3 – Key Points and Principles

This appendix provides additional guidance in the form of answers to frequently asked questions and identifies key points and principles that may be applied to situations not covered elsewhere in this subpart. The guidance follows:


Key points and principles
Section(s)
Question(s)
Guidance
I. With some exceptions, advisory committee meetings are open to the public102-3.140, 102-3.145(a), 102-3.1551. Must all advisory committee and subcommittee meetings be open to the public?A. No. Advisory committee meetings may be closed when appropriate, in accordance with the exemption(s) for closure contained in the Government in the Sunshine Act, 5 U.S.C. 552b(c). (i) Subcommittees that report to a parent advisory committee, and not directly to a Federal officer or agency, are not required to open their meetings to the public or comply with the procedures in the Act for announcing meetings. (ii) However, agencies are cautioned to avoid excluding the public from attending any meeting where a subcommittee develops advice or recommendations that are not expected to be reviewed and considered by the parent advisory committee before being submitted to a Federal officer or agency. These exclusions may run counter to the provisions of the Act requiring contemporaneous access to the advisory committee deliberative process.
II. Notices must be published in the Federal Register announcing advisory committee meetings102-3.1501. Can agencies publish a single Federal Register notice announcing multiple advisory committee meetings?A. Yes, agencies may publish a single notice announcing multiple meetings so long as these notices contain all of the information required by § 102-3.150. (i) “Blanket notices” should not announce meetings so far in advance as to prevent the public from adequately being informed of an advisory committee’s schedule. (ii) An agency’s Office of General Counsel should be consulted where these notices include meetings that are either closed or partially closed to the public.
III. Although certain advisory committee records may be withheld under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), as amended, 5 U.S.C. 552, agencies may not require the use of FOIA procedures for records available under section 10(b) of FACA102-3.1701. May an agency require the use of its internal FOIA procedures for access to advisory committee records that are not exempt from release under FOIA?A. No. Section 10(b) of FACA provides that: Subject to section 552 of title 5, United States Code, the records, reports, transcripts, minutes, appendixes, working papers, drafts, studies, agenda, or other documents which were made available to or prepared for or by each advisory committee shall be available for public inspection and copying at a single location in the offices of the advisory committee or the agency to which the advisory committee reports until the advisory committee ceases to exist. (i) The purpose of section 10(b) of the Act is to provide for the contemporaneous availability of advisory committee records that, when taken in conjunction with the ability to attend advisory committee meetings, provide a meaningful opportunity to comprehend fully the work undertaken by the advisory committee. (ii) Although advisory committee records may be withheld under the provisions of FOIA if there is a reasonable expectation that the records sought fall within the exemptions contained in section 552(b) of FOIA, agencies may not require members of the public or other interested parties to file requests for non-exempt advisory committee records under the request and review process established by section 552(a)(3) of FOIA. (iii) Records covered by the exemptions set forth in section 552(b) of FOIA may be withheld. An opinion of the Office of Legal Counsel (OLC), U.S. Department of Justice concludes that: FACA requires disclosure of written advisory committee documents, including predecisional materials such as drafts, working papers, and studies. The disclosure exemption available to agencies under exemption 5 of FOIA for predecisional documents and other privileged materials is narrowly limited in the context of FACA to privileged “inter-agency or intra-agency” documents prepared by an agency and transmitted to an advisory committee. The language of the FACA statute and its legislative history support this restrictive application of exemption 5 to requests for public access to advisory committee documents. Moreover, since an advisory committee is not itself an agency, this construction is supported by the express language of exemption 5 which applies only to inter-agency or intra-agency materials. (iv) Agencies first should determine, however, whether or not records being sought by the public fall within the scope of FACA in general, and section 10(b) of the Act in particular, prior to applying the available exemptions under FOIA. (See OLC Opinion 12 Op. O.L.C. 73, dated April 29, 1988, which is available from the Committee Management Secretariat (MC), General Services Administration, 1800 F Street, NW., Washington, DC 20405-0002.)
IV. Advisory committee records must be managed in accordance with the Federal Records Act (FRA), 44 U.S.C. Chapters 21, 29-33, and regulations issued by the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) (see 36 CFR parts 1220, 1222, 1228, and 1234), or the Presidential Records Act (PRA), 44 U.S.C. Chapter 22102-175(e)1. How must advisory committee records be treated and preserved?A. In order to ensure proper records management, the Committee Management Officer (CMO), Designated Federal Officer (DFO), or other representative of the advisory committee, in coordination with the agency’s Records Management Officer, should clarify upon the establishment of the advisory committee whether its records will be managed in accordance with the FRA or the PRA.

B. Official records generated by or for an advisory committee must be retained for the duration of the advisory committee. Responsible agency officials are encouraged to contact their agency’s Records Management Officer or NARA as soon as possible after the establishment of the advisory committee to receive guidance on how to establish effective records management practices. Upon termination of the advisory committee, the records must be processed in accordance with the FRA and regulations issued by NARA, or in accordance with the PRA.
C. The CMO, DFO, or other representative of an advisory committee governed by the FRA, in coordination with the agency’s Records Management Officer, must contact NARA in sufficient time to review the process for submitting any necessary disposition schedules of the advisory committee’s records upon termination. In order to ensure the proper disposition of the advisory committee’s records, disposition schedules need to be submitted to NARA no later than 6 months before the termination of the advisory committee.
D. For Presidential advisory committees governed by the PRA, the CMO, DFO, or other representative of the advisory committee should consult with the White House Counsel on the preservation of any records subject to the PRA, and may also confer with NARA officials.

Subpart E – How Does This Subpart Apply to Advice or Recommendations Provided to Agencies by the National Academy of Sciences or the National Academy of Public Administration?

§ 102-3.180 What does this subpart cover and how does it apply?

This subpart provides guidance to agencies on compliance with section 15 of the Act. Section 15 establishes requirements that apply only in connection with a funding or other written agreement involving an agency’s use of advice or recommendations provided to the agency by the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) or the National Academy of Public Administration (NAPA), if such advice or recommendations were developed by use of a committee created by either academy. For purposes of this subpart, NAS also includes the National Academy of Engineering, the Institute of Medicine, and the National Research Council. Except with respect to NAS committees that were the subject of judicial actions filed before December 17, 1997, no part of the Act other than section 15 applies to any committee created by NAS or NAPA.


§ 102-3.185 What does this subpart require agencies to do?

(a) Section 15 requirements. An agency may not use any advice or recommendation provided to an agency by the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) or the National Academy of Public Administration (NAPA) under an agreement between the agency and an academy, if such advice or recommendation was developed by use of a committee created by either academy, unless:


(1) The committee was not subject to any actual management or control by an agency or officer of the Federal Government; and


(2) In the case of NAS, the academy certifies that it has complied substantially with the requirements of section 15(b) of the Act; or


(3) In the case of NAPA, the academy certifies that it has complied substantially with the requirements of sections 15(b) (1), (2), and (5) of the Act.


(b) No agency management or control. Agencies must not manage or control the specific procedures adopted by each academy to comply with the requirements of section 15 of the Act that are applicable to that academy. In addition, however, any committee created and used by an academy in the development of any advice or recommendation to be provided by the academy to an agency must be subject to both actual management and control by that academy and not by the agency.


(c) Funding agreements. Agencies may enter into contracts, grants, and cooperative agreements with NAS or NAPA that are consistent with the requirements of this subpart to obtain advice or recommendations from such academy. These funding agreements require, and agencies may rely upon, a written certification by an authorized representative of the academy provided to the agency upon delivery to the agency of each report containing advice or recommendations required under the agreement that:


(1) The academy has adopted policies and procedures that comply with the applicable requirements of section 15 of the Act; and


(2) To the best of the authorized representative’s knowledge and belief, these policies and procedures substantially have been complied with in performing the work required under the agreement.


Appendix A to Subpart E of Part 102-3 – Key Points and Principles

This appendix provides additional guidance in the form of answers to frequently asked questions and identifies key points and principles that may be applied to situations not covered elsewhere in this subpart. The guidance follows:


Key points and principles
Section(s)
Question(s)
Guidance
I. Section 15 of the Act allows the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) and the National Academy of Public Administration (NAPA) to adopt separate procedures for complying with FACA102-3.185(a)1. May agencies rely upon an academy certification regarding compliance with section 15 of the Act if different policies and procedures are adopted by NAS and NAPA?A. Yes. NAS and NAPA are completely separate organizations. Each is independently chartered by the Congress for different purposes, and Congress has recognized that the two organizations are structured and operate differently. Agencies should defer to the discretion of each academy to adopt policies and procedures that will enable it to comply substantially with the provisions of section 15 of the Act that apply to that academy.
II. Section 15 of the Act allows agencies to enter into funding agreements with NAS and NAPA without the academies’ committees being “managed” or “controlled”102-3.185(c)1. Can an agency enter into a funding agreement with an academy which provides for the preparation of one or more academy reports containing advice or recommendations to the agency, to be developed by the academy by use of a committee created by the academy, without subjecting an academy to “actual management or control” by the agency?A. Yes, if the members of the committee are selected by the academy and if the committee’s meetings, deliberations, and the preparation of reports are all controlled by the academy. Under these circumstances, neither the existence of the funding agreement nor the fact that it contemplates use by the academy of an academy committee would constitute actual management or control of the committee by the agency.

PART 102-4 – NONDISCRIMINATION IN FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS [RESERVED]

PART 102-5 – HOME-TO-WORK TRANSPORTATION


Authority:40 U.S.C. 121(c); 31 U.S.C. 1344(e)(1).


Source:65 FR 54966, Sept. 12, 2000, unless otherwise noted.

Subpart A – General

§ 102-5.5 Preamble.

(a) The questions and associated answers in this part are regulatory in effect. Thus compliance with the written text of this part is required by all to whom it applies.


(b) The terms “we,” “I,” “our,” “you,” and “your,” when used in this part, mean you as a Federal agency, an agency head, or an employee, as appropriate.


§ 102-5.10 What does this part cover?

This part covers the use of Government passenger carriers to transport employees between their homes and places of work.


§ 102-5.15 Who is covered by this part?

This part covers Federal agency employees in the executive, judicial, and legislative branches of the Government, with the exception of employees of the Senate, House of Representatives, Architect of the Capitol, and government of the District of Columbia.


§ 102-5.20 Who is not covered by this part?

This part does not cover:


(a) Employees who use a passenger carrier in conjunction with official travel, including temporary duty (TDY) or relocation;


(b) Employees who are essential for the safe and efficient performance of intelligence, counterintelligence, protective services, or criminal law enforcement duties when designated in writing as such by their agency head; or


(c) Employees who use a passenger carrier for transportation between places of employment and mass transit facilities (see, e.g., 41 CFR 102-34.210).


[65 FR 54966, Sept. 12, 2000, as amended at 75 FR 41995, July 20, 2010]


§ 102-5.25 What additional guidance concerning home-to-work transportation should Federal agencies issue?

Each Federal agency using Government passenger carriers to provide home-to-work transportation for employees who are essential for the safe and efficient performance of intelligence, counterintelligence, protective services, or criminal law enforcement duties should issue guidance concerning such use.


§ 102-5.30 What definitions apply to this part?

The following definitions apply to this part:


Agency head means the highest official of a Federal agency.


Clear and present danger means highly unusual circumstances that present a threat to the physical safety of the employee or their property when the danger is:


(1) Real; and


(2) Immediate or imminent, not merely potential; and


(3) The use of a Government passenger carrier would provide protection not otherwise available.


Compelling operational considerations means those circumstances where home-to-work transportation is essential to the conduct of official business or would substantially increase a Federal agency’s efficiency and economy.


Emergency means circumstances that exist whenever there is an immediate, unforeseeable, temporary need to provide home-to-work transportation for those employees necessary to the uninterrupted performance of the agency’s mission. (An emergency may occur where there is a major disruption of available means of transportation to or from a work site, an essential Government service must be provided, and there is no other way to transport those employees.)


Employee means a Federal officer or employee of a Federal agency, including an officer or enlisted member of the Armed Forces.


Federal agency means:


(1) A department (as defined in section 18 of the Act of August 2, 1946 (41 U.S.C. 5a));


(2) An executive department (as defined in 5 U.S.C. 101);


(3) A military department (as defined in 5 U.S.C. 102);


(4) A Government corporation (as defined in 5 U.S.C. 103(1));


(5) A Government controlled corporation (as defined in 5 U.S.C. 103(2));


(6) A mixed-ownership Government corporation (as defined in 31 U.S.C. 9101(2));


(7) Any establishment in the executive branch of the Government (including the Executive Office of the President);


(8) Any independent regulatory agency (including an independent regulatory agency specified in 44 U.S.C. 3502(10));


(9) The Smithsonian Institution;


(10) Any nonappropriated fund instrumentality of the United States; and


(11) The United States Postal Service.


Field work means official work requiring the employee’s presence at various locations other than his/her regular place of work. (Multiple stops (itinerant-type travel) within the accepted local commuting area, limited use beyond the local commuting area, or transportation to remote locations that are only accessible by Government-provided transportation are examples of field work.)


Home means the primary place where an employee resides and from which the employee commutes to his/her place of work.


Home-to-work transportation means the use of a Government passenger carrier to transport an employee between his/her home and place of work.


Passenger carrier means a motor vehicle, aircraft, boat, ship, or other similar means of transportation that is owned (including those that have come into the possession of the Government by forfeiture or donation), leased, or rented (non-TDY) by the United States Government.


Work means any place within the accepted commuting area, as determined by the Federal agency for the locality involved, where an employee performs his/her official duties.


Subpart B – Authorizing Home-to-Work Transportation

§ 102-5.35 Who is authorized home-to-work transportation?

By statute, certain Federal officials are authorized home-to-work transportation, as are employees who meet certain statutory criteria as determined by their agency head. The Federal officials authorized by statute are the President, the Vice-President, and other principal Federal officials and their designees, as provided in 31 U.S.C. 1344(b)(1) through (b)(7). Those employees engaged in field work, or faced with a clear and present danger, an emergency, or a compelling operational consideration may be authorized home-to-work transportation as determined by their agency head. No other employees are authorized home-to-work transportation.


§ 102-5.40 May the agency head delegate the authority to make home-to-work determinations?

No, the agency head may not delegate the authority to make home-to-work determinations.


§ 102-5.45 Should determinations be completed before an employee is provided with home-to-work transportation?

Yes, determinations should be completed before an employee is provided with home-to-work transportation unless it is impracticable to do so.


§ 102-5.50 May determinations be made in advance for employees who respond to unusual circumstances when they arise?

Yes, determinations may be made in advance when the Federal agency wants to have employees ready to respond to:


(a) A clear and present danger;


(b) An emergency; or


(c) A compelling operational consideration.



Note to § 102-5.50:

Implementation of these determinations is contingent upon one of the three circumstances occurring. Thus, these may be referred to as “contingency determinations.”


§ 102-5.55 How do we prepare determinations?

Determinations must be in writing and include the:


(a) Name and title of the employee (or other identification, if confidential);


(b) Reason for authorizing home-to-work transportation; and


(c) Anticipated duration of the authorization.


§ 102-5.60 How long are initial determinations effective?

Initial determinations are effective for no longer than:


(a) Two years for field work, updated as necessary; and


(b) Fifteen days for other circumstances.


§ 102-5.65 What procedures apply when the need for home-to-work transportation exceeds the initial period?

The agency head may approve unlimited subsequent determinations, when the need for home-to-work transportation exceeds the initial period, for no longer than:


(a) Two years each for field work, updated as necessary; and


(b) Ninety calendar days each for other circumstances.


§ 102-5.70 What considerations apply in making a determination to authorize home-to-work transportation for field work?

Agencies should consider the following when making a determination to authorize home-to-work transportation for field work:


(a) The location of the employee’s home in proximity to his/her work and to the locations where non-TDY travel is required; and


(b) The use of home-to-work transportation for field work should be authorized only to the extent that such transportation will substantially increase the efficiency and economy of the Government.


§ 102-5.75 What circumstances do not establish a basis for authorizing home-to-work transportation for field work?

The following circumstances do not establish a basis for authorizing home-to-work transportation for field work:


(a) When an employee assigned to field work is not actually performing field work.


(b) When the employee’s workday begins at his/her work; or


(c) When the employee normally commutes to a fixed location, however far removed from his/her official duty station (for example, auditors or investigators assigned to a defense contractor plant).



Note to § 102-5.75:

For instances where an employee is authorized home-to-work transportation under the field work provision, but performs field work only on an intermittent basis, the agency shall establish procedures to ensure that a Government passenger carrier is used only when field work is actually being performed. Although some employees’ daily work station is not located in a Government office, these employees are not performing field work. Like all Government employees, employees working in a “field office” are responsible for their own commuting costs.


§ 102-5.80 What are some examples of positions that may involve field work?

Examples of positions that may involve field work include, but are not limited to:


(a) Quality assurance inspectors;


(b) Construction inspectors;


(c) Dairy inspectors;


(d) Mine inspectors;


(e) Meat inspectors; and


(f) Medical officers on outpatient service.



Note to § 102-5.80:

The assignment of an employee to such a position does not, of itself, entitle an employee to receive daily home-to-work transportation.


§ 102-5.85 What information should our determination for field work include if positions are identified rather than named individuals?

If positions are identified rather than named individuals, your determination for field work should include sufficient information to satisfy an audit, if necessary. This information should include the job title, number, and operational level where the work is to be performed (e.g., five recruiter personnel or, positions at the Detroit Army Recruiting Battalion).



Note to § 102-5.85:

An agency head may elect to designate positions rather than individual names, especially in positions where rapid turnover occurs.


§ 102-5.90 Should an agency consider whether to base a Government passenger carrier at a Government facility near the employee’s home or work rather than authorize the employee home-to-work transportation?

Yes, situations may arise where, for cost or other reasons, it is in the Government’s interest to base a Government passenger carrier at a Government facility located near the employee’s home or work rather than authorize the employee home-to-work transportation.


§ 102-5.95 Is the comfort and/or convenience of an employee considered sufficient justification to authorize home-to-work transportation?

No, the comfort and/or convenience of an employee is not considered sufficient justification to authorize home-to-work transportation.


§ 102-5.100 May we use home-to-work transportation for other than official purposes?

No, you may not use home-to-work transportation for other than official purposes. However, if your agency has prescribed rules for the incidental use of Government vehicles (as provided in 31 U.S.C. note), you may use the vehicle in accordance with those rules in connection with an existing home-to-work authorization.


§ 102-5.105 May others accompany an employee using home-to-work transportation?

Yes, an employee authorized home-to-work transportation may share space in a Government passenger carrier with other individuals, provided that the passenger carrier does not travel additional distances as a result and such sharing is consistent with his/her Federal agency’s policy. When a Federal agency establishes its space sharing policy, the Federal agency should consider its potential liability for and to those individuals. Home-to-work transportation does not extend to the employee’s spouse, other relatives, or friends unless they travel with the employee from the same point of departure to the same destination, and this use is consistent with the Federal agency’s policy.


Subpart C – Documenting and Reporting Determinations

§ 102-5.110 Must we report our determinations outside of our agency?

Yes, you must submit your determinations to the following Congressional Committees:


(a) Chairman, Committee on Governmental Affairs, United States Senate, Suite SD-340, Dirksen Senate Office Building, Washington, DC 20510-6250; and


(b) Chairman, Committee on Governmental Reform, United States House of Representatives, Suite 2157, Rayburn House Office Building, Washington, DC 20515-6143.


§ 102-5.115 When must we report our determinations?

You must report your determinations to Congress no later than 60 calendar days after approval. You may consolidate any subsequent determinations into a single report and submit them quarterly.


§ 102-5.120 What are our responsibilities for documenting use of home-to-work transportation?

Your responsibilities for documenting use of home-to-work transportation are that you must maintain logs or other records necessary to verify that any home-to-work transportation was for official purposes. Each agency may decide the organizational level at which the logs should be maintained and kept. The logs or other records should be easily accessible for audit and should contain:


(a) Name and title of employee (or other identification, if confidential) using the passenger carrier;


(b) Name and title of person authorizing use;


(c) Passenger carrier identification;


(d) Date(s) home-to-work transportation is authorized;


(e) Location of residence;


(f) Duration; and


(g) Circumstances requiring home-to-work transportation.


PARTS 102-6 – 102-30 [RESERVED]

SUBCHAPTER B – PERSONAL PROPERTY

PART 102-31 – GENERAL [RESERVED]

PART 102-32 – MANAGEMENT OF PERSONAL PROPERTY [RESERVED]

PART 102-33 – MANAGEMENT OF GOVERNMENT AIRCRAFT


Authority:40 U.S.C. 121(c); 31 U.S.C. 101 et seq.; Reorganization Plan No. 2 of 1970, 35 FR 7959, 3 CFR, 1066-1970 Comp., p. 1070; Executive Order 11541, 35 FR 10737, 3 CFR, 1966-1970 Comp., p. 939; and OMB Circular No. A-126 (Revised May 22, 1992), 57 FR 22150.


Source:79 FR 77336, Dec. 23, 2014, unless otherwise noted.

Subpart A – How These Rules Apply

General

§ 102-33.5 To whom do these rules apply?

(a) The rules in this part apply to all Federally-funded aviation activities of executive branch agencies of the U.S. Government who use Government aircraft to accomplish their official business, except for the exemptions listed in paragraph (b) of this section.


(b) The rules in this part do not apply to the following:


(1) The Armed Forces, except for:


(i) Section 102-33.25(e) and (g), which concern responsibilities related to the Interagency Committee for Aviation Policy (ICAP); and


(ii) Subpart D of this part, “Disposing of Government Aircraft and Aircraft Parts.”


(2) The President or Vice President and their offices;


(3) Aircraft when an executive agency provides Government-furnished avionics for commercially owned or privately owned aircraft for the purposes of technology demonstration or testing; and


(4) Privately owned aircraft that agency personnel use for official travel (even though such use is Federally-funded).


§ 102-33.6 How are the terms “we,” “you,” “your,” and “our” used in this part?

In this part, “we”, “you”, “your”, and “our” refer to agency aviation managers or an executive agency.


§ 102-33.10 May we request approval to deviate from these rules?

(a) You may request approval to deviate from the rules in this part. See §§ 102-2.60 through 102-2.110 of this chapter for guidance on requesting a deviation. In most cases, GSA will respond to your written request within 30 days;


(b) GSA may not grant deviations from the requirements of OMB Circular A-126, “Improving the Management of Government Aircraft;” and


(c) You should consult with GSA’s Aviation Policy Division before you request a deviation.


§ 102-33.15 How does this part relate to Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations?

This part does not supersede any of the regulations in 14 CFR Chapter I, “Federal Aviation Administration, Department of Transportation.”


§ 102-33.20 What definitions apply to this part?

The following definitions apply to this part:


Acquire means to procure or otherwise obtain personal property, including by lease or rent.


Acquisition date means the date that the acquiring executive agency took responsibility for the aircraft, e.g., received title (through purchase, exchange, or gift), signed a bailment agreement with the Department of Defense (DOD), took physical custody, received a court order, put into operational status an aircraft that is newly manufactured by the agency, or otherwise accepted physical transfer (e.g., in the case of a borrowed aircraft).


Aircraft part means an individual component or an assembly of components that is used on aircraft.


Armed Forces mean the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard, including their regular and Reserve components and members serving without component status. For purposes of this part, the National Guard is also included in the Armed Forces.


Aviation life support equipment (ALSE) means equipment that protects flight crewmembers and others aboard an aircraft, assisting their safe escape, survival, and recovery during an accident or other emergency.


Aviation Policy Division is a division in the Office of Asset and Transportation Management, Office of Government-wide Policy, GSA. Contact the staff via the Aircraft Management Overview page at http://www.gsa.gov/aviationpolicy.


Crewmember means a person assigned to operate or assist in operating an aircraft during flight time. Crewmembers perform duties directly related to the operation of the aircraft (e.g., as pilots, co-pilots, flight engineers, navigators) or duties assisting in operation of the aircraft (e.g., as flight directors, crew chiefs, electronics technicians, mechanics). See also the terms and definitions for “Qualified non-crewmember” and “Passenger” in this section.


Criticality code means a single digit code that DOD assigns to military Flight Safety Critical Aircraft Parts (FSCAP) (see §§ 102-33.115 and 102-33.370).


Data plate means a fireproof plate that is inscribed with certain information required by 14 CFR part 45 (or for military surplus aircraft, as required by Military Specifications), and secured to an aircraft, aircraft engine, or propeller. The information must be marked by etching, stamping, engraving, or other approved method of fireproof marking. The plate must be attached in such a manner that it is not likely to be defaced or removed during normal service or lost or destroyed in an accident. Data plates are required only on certificated aircraft. However, non-certificated aircraft may also have data plates.


Declassify means to remove a lost, destroyed, or non-operational aircraft from the Federal aircraft inventory. Agencies may declassify only non-operational aircraft that they will retain for ground use only. Agencies must declassify an aircraft following the rules in §§ 102-33.415 and 102-33.420.


Disposal date means the date that the disposing executive agency relinquishes responsibility for an aircraft, for example, when the agency transfers title in the case of an exchange/sale; returns the aircraft to the lessor or bailer; declassifies it (for FAIRS, declassification is considered a “disposal” action, even though the agency retains the property); or relinquishes custody to another agency (i.e., in the case of excess (transferred) or surplus (donated or sold) aircraft).


Donated aircraft means an aircraft disposed of as surplus by GSA through donation to a non-Federal government, a tax-exempt nonprofit entity, or other eligible recipient, following the rules in part § 102-37 (some agencies, for example DOD, may have independent donation authority.)


Exchange means to replace personal property by trade or trade-in with the supplier of the replacement property.


Exchange/sale means to exchange or sell non-excess, non-surplus personal property and apply the exchange allowance or proceeds of sale in whole or in part payment for the acquisition of similar property. See 40 U.S.C. 503.


Exclusive use means a condition under which an aircraft is operated for the sole benefit of the U.S. Government.


Executive agency means any executive department or independent establishment in the executive branch of the United States Government, including any wholly owned Government corporation. See 5 U.S.C. 105.


Federal Acquisition Service (FAS) means a component of GSA. FAS is organized by geographical regions. The FAS Property Management Division in GSA’s Pacific Rim Region, 450 Golden Gate Ave., San Francisco, CA 94102-3434, has responsibility for disposing of excess and surplus aircraft.


Federal aircraft means manned or unmanned aircraft that an executive agency owns (i.e., holds title to) or borrows for any length of time. Federal aircraft include –


(1) Bailed aircraft: Federal aircraft that is owned by one executive agency, but is in the custody of and operated by another executive agency under an agreement that may or may not include cost-reimbursement. Bailments are executive agency to executive agency agreements and involve only aircraft, not services;


(2) Borrowed aircraft: Aircraft owned by a non-executive agency and provided to an executive agency for use without compensation. The executive agency operates and maintains the aircraft;


(3) Forfeited aircraft: Aircraft acquired by the Government either by summary process or by order of a court of competent jurisdiction pursuant to any law of the United States;


(4) Loaned aircraft: Federal aircraft owned by an executive agency, but in the custody of a non-executive agency under an agreement that does not include compensation; and


(5) Owned aircraft: An aircraft for which title or rights of title are vested in an executive agency.



Note to definition of Federal aircraft:

When an executive agency loans or bails an aircraft that meets the criteria for Federal aircraft, the loaned or bailed aircraft is still considered a Federal aircraft in the owning agency’s inventory, except when DOD is the owning agency of a bailed aircraft. In that case, the aircraft is recorded in the inventory of the bailee.


Federal Aviation Interactive Reporting System (FAIRS) is a management information system operated by GSA to collect, maintain, analyze, and report information on Federal aircraft inventories and cost and usage of Federal aircraft and CAS aircraft (and related services) (see §§ 102-33.395 through 102-33.440).


Flight Safety Critical Aircraft Part (FSCAP) means any aircraft part, assembly, or installation containing a critical characteristic whose failure, malfunction, or absence could cause a catastrophic failure resulting in loss or serious damage to the aircraft or an uncommanded engine shutdown resulting in an unsafe condition.


Full service contract means a contractual agreement through which an executive agency acquires an aircraft and related aviation services (e.g., pilot, crew, maintenance, catering) for exclusive use. Aircraft hired under full service contracts are commercial aviation services (CAS), not Federal aircraft, regardless of the length of the contract.


Government aircraft means manned or unmanned aircraft operated for the exclusive use of an executive agency. Government aircraft include –


(1) Federal aircraft (see definition for “Federal aircraft” in this section); and


(2) Aircraft hired as commercial aviation services (CAS). CAS include –


(i) Leased aircraft for exclusive use for an agreed upon period of time (The acquiring executive agency operates and maintains the aircraft);


(ii) Capital lease aircraft for which the leasing agency holds an option to take title;


(iii) Charter aircraft for hire under a contractual agreement for one-time exclusive use that specifies performance (The commercial source operates and maintains a charter aircraft);


(iv) Rental aircraft obtained commercially under an agreement in which the executive agency has exclusive use for an agreed upon period of time (The executive agency operates, but does not maintain, a rental aircraft);


(v) Contracting for full services (i.e., aircraft and related aviation services for exclusive use); or


(vi) Obtaining related aviation services (i.e., services but not aircraft) by commercial contract, except those services acquired to support a Federal aircraft.


Governmental function means a Federally-funded activity that an executive agency performs in compliance with its statutory authorities.


Intelligence community means those agencies identified in the National Security Act, 50 U.S.C. 401a(4).


Inter-service support agreement (ISSA) means any agreement between two or more executive agencies (including the Department of Defense) in which one agency consents to perform aviation support services (e.g., providing an aircraft and other aviation services or providing only services) for another agency with or without cost-reimbursement. An executive agency-to-executive agency agreement that involves only the use of an aircraft, not services, is a bailment, not an ISSA.


Life-limited part means any aircraft part that has an established replacement time, inspection interval, or other time-related procedure associated with it. For non-military parts, the FAA specifies life-limited part airworthiness limitations in 14 CFR 21.50, 23.1529, 25.1529, 27.1529, 29.1529, 31.82, 33.4, and 35.5, and on product Type Certificate Data Sheets (TCDS). Letters authorizing Technical Standards Orders (TSO) must also note or reference mandatory replacement or inspection of parts.


Military aircraft part means an aircraft part used on an aircraft that was developed by the Armed Forces (whether or not it carries an FAA airworthiness certificate).


Non-operational aircraft means a Federal aircraft that is not safe for flight and, in the owning executive agency’s determination, cannot economically be made safe for flight. This definition refers to the aircraft’s flight capability, not its mission-support equipment capability. An aircraft that is temporarily out of service for maintenance or repair and can economically be made safe for flight is considered an operational aircraft.


Official Government business in relation to Government aircraft –


(1) Includes, but is not limited to –


(i) Carrying crewmembers, qualified non-crewmembers, and cargo directly required for or associated with performing Governmental functions (including travel-related Governmental functions);


(ii) Carrying passengers authorized to travel on Government aircraft (see OMB Circular A-126); and


(iii) Training pilots and other aviation personnel.


(2) Does not include –


(i) Using Government aircraft for personal or political purposes, except for required use travel and space available travel as defined in OMB Circular A-126; or


(ii) Carrying passengers who are not officially authorized to travel on Government aircraft.


Operational aircraft means a Federal aircraft that is safe for flight or, in the owning executive agency’s determination, can economically be made safe for flight. This definition refers to the aircraft’s flight capability, not its mission-support capability. An aircraft temporarily out of service for maintenance or repair is considered an operational aircraft.


Original equipment manufacturer (OEM) means the person or company who originally designed, engineered, and manufactured, or who currently holds the data rights to manufacture, a specific aircraft or aircraft part. Parts produced under a Parts Manufacturer Approval (PMA) are not considered OEM parts, even though they can be acceptable replacement parts for OEM parts.


Passenger means a person flying onboard a Government aircraft who is officially authorized to travel and who is not a crewmember or qualified non-crewmember.


Performance indicator means a quantitative or qualitative term or value for reporting organizational activities and results, generally with respect to achieving specific goals related to outcomes, outputs, efficiency, and inputs. When applied to aircraft, performance indicators typically measure the effectiveness and efficiency of the processes involved with safely delivering aircraft services.


Production approval holder (PAH) means the person or company who holds a Production Certificate (PC), Approved Production Inspection System (APIS), Parts Manufacturer Approval (PMA), or Technical Standards Orders Authorization (TSOA), issued under provisions of 14 CFR part 21, Certification Procedures for Products and Parts, and who controls the design, manufacture, and quality of a specific aircraft part.


Qualified non-crewmember means an individual, other than a member of the crew, aboard an aircraft –


(1) Operated by an United States Government agency in the intelligence community; or


(2) Whose presence is required to perform or is associated with performing the Governmental function for which the aircraft is being operated (Qualified non-crewmembers are not passengers).


Registration mark means the unique identification mark that is assigned by the FAA and displayed on U.S.-registered Government aircraft (except Armed Forces aircraft). Foreign-registered aircraft hired as CAS will carry their national registration markings. Registration markings are commonly referred to as tail numbers.


Related aviation services contract means a commercial contractual agreement through which an executive agency hires aviation services only (not aircraft), e.g., pilot, crew, maintenance, cleaning, dispatching, or catering.


Required use travel means use of a Government aircraft for the travel of an executive agency officer or employee where the use of the Government aircraft is required because of bona fide communications or security need of the agency or exceptional scheduling requirements. Required use travel must be approved as described in OMB Circular A-126.


Risk analysis and management means a systematic process for –


(1) Identifying risks and hazards associated with alternative courses of action involved in an aviation operation;


(2) Choosing from among these alternatives the course(s) of action that will promote optimum aviation safety;


(3) Assessing the likelihood and predicted severity of an injurious mishap within the various courses of action;


(4) Controlling and mitigating identified risks and hazards within the chosen course(s) of action; and


(5) Periodically reviewing the chosen course(s) of action to identify possible emerging risks and hazards.


Safe for flight means approved for flight and refers to an aircraft, aircraft engine, propeller, appliance, or part that has been inspected and certified to meet the requirements of applicable regulations, specifications, or standards. When applied to an aircraft that an executive agency operates under FAA regulations, safe for flight means “airworthy,” i.e., the aircraft or related parts meet their design specifications and are in a condition, relative to wear and deterioration, for safe operation. When applied to an aircraft that an executive agency uses, but does not operate under the FAA regulations, safe for flight means a state of compliance with military specifications or the executive agency’s own Flight Program Standards, and as approved, inspected, and certified by the agency.


Safety Management System (SMS) means a formal, top-down business-like approach to managing safety risk. It includes systematic procedures, practices, and policies for the management of safety, safety risk management, safety policy, safety assurance, and safety promotion. For more information on SMS, refer to FAA Advisory Circular 120-92, “Safety Management Systems for Aviation Service Providers.”


Senior Aviation Management Official (SAMO) means the person in an executive agency who is the agency’s primary member of the Interagency Committee for Aviation Policy (ICAP). This person must be of appropriate grade and position to represent the agency and promote flight safety and adherence to standards.


Serviceable aircraft part means a part that is safe for flight, can fulfill its operational requirements, and is sufficiently documented to indicate that the part conforms to applicable standards/specifications.


Suspected unapproved part means an aircraft part, component, or material that any person suspects of not meeting the requirements of an “approved part.” Approved parts are those that are produced in compliance with 14 CFR part 21, are maintained in compliance with 14 CFR parts 43 and 91, and meet applicable design standards. A part, component, or material may be suspect because of its questionable finish, size, or color; improper (or lack of) identification; incomplete or altered paperwork; or any other questionable indication. See detailed guidance in FAA Advisory Circular 21-29, “Detecting and Reporting Suspected Unapproved Parts,” available from the FAA at http://www.faa.gov.


Traceable part means an aircraft part whose manufacturer or production approval holder can be identified by documentation, markings/characteristics on the part, or packaging of the part. Non-military parts are traceable if you can establish that the parts were manufactured in accordance with or were previously determined to be airworthy under rules in 14 CFR parts 21 and 43. Possible sources for making a traceability determination could be shipping tickets, bar codes, invoices, parts marking (e.g., PMA, TSO), data plates, serial/part numbers, manufacturing production numbers, maintenance records, work orders, etc.


Training means instruction for all flight program personnel (to include administrative, maintenance and dispatch personnel), which enables them to qualify initially for their positions and to maintain qualification for their positions over time.



Note:

This instruction can apply to either public or civil missions as defined in the latest version of the FAA’s Advisory Circular for Government aircraft operations.


Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) means an unmanned aircraft and its associated elements related to safe operations, which may include but not be limited to control stations, data communications links, support equipment, payloads, flight termination systems, and launch/recovery equipment. The unmanned aircraft (UA) is the flying component of the system, flown by a pilot via a ground control system, or autonomously through the use of an on-board computer, communication links, and any additional equipment necessary for the unmanned aircraft to operate safely. The Federal Aviation Administration issues either an Airworthiness Directive (AD) or a Certificate of Authorization (COA) for the entire system, not just the flying component of the system. Reporting of UAS costs and flight hours is only required if the accumulated costs for acquisition and operations meets the agency’s threshold for capitalization, and the UAS has a useful life of two years or more.


Unsalvageable aircraft part means an aircraft part that cannot be restored to a condition that is safe for flight because of its age, its physical condition, a non-repairable defect, insufficient documentation, or its non-conformance with applicable standards/specifications.


U.S. Government Aircraft Cost Accounting Guide (CAG) means guidance for the accounting of Government aircraft costs published by GSA and is based on the cost guidance within OMB Circular A-126, OMB Circular A-76, FAIRS, and the U.S. Government Standard General Ledger.


Responsibilities

§ 102-33.25 What are our responsibilities under this part?

Under this part, your responsibilities are to –


(a) Acquire, manage, and dispose of Federal aircraft (see the definition of “Federal aircraft” in § 102-33.20) and acquire and manage Commercial Aviation Services (CAS) (see the definition for “CAS” in paragraph (2) of the definition of “Government aircraft” in § 102-33.20) as safely, efficiently, and effectively as possible consistent with the nature of your agency’s aviation missions;


(b) Document and report the –


(1) Types and numbers of your Federal aircraft;


(2) Costs of acquiring and operating Government aircraft;


(3) Amount of time that your agency uses Government aircraft; and


(4) Accidents and incidents involving Government aircraft;


(c) Ensure that your Government aircraft are used only to accomplish your agency’s official Government business;


(d) Ensure that all passengers traveling on your agency’s Government aircraft are authorized to travel on such aircraft (see OMB Circular A-126);


(e) Appoint (by letter to the Deputy Associate Administrator, Office of Asset and Transportation Management, Office of Government-wide Policy, GSA) a Senior Aviation Management Official (SAMO), who will be your agency’s primary member of the ICAP (this paragraph (e) applies to all executive agencies that use aircraft, including the Department of Defense (DOD), the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), and the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB), but excludes executive agencies that only hire aircraft occasionally for a specific flight). It is suggested that an agency’s SAMO have:


(1) Experience as a pilot or crew member; or


(2) Management experience within an aviation operations management/flight program.


(f) Designate an official (by letter to the Deputy Associate Administrator, Office of Asset and Transportation Management, Office of Government-wide Policy, GSA) to certify the accuracy and completeness of information reported by your agency through FAIRS. (Armed Forces agencies, which include the DOD and the U.S. Coast Guard, are not required to report information to FAIRS.);


(g) Appoint representatives of the agency as members of ICAP subcommittees and working groups;


(h) Ensure that your agency’s internal policies and procedures are consistent with the requirements of OMB Circulars A-126, A-76 and A-11, Federal Aviation Administration Advisory Circular 120-92, and this part; and


(i) Ensure that safety and other critical aviation program requirements are satisfied. Executive agencies that only hire aircraft occasionally for specific flights, must either:


(1) Establish an aviation program that complies with the requirements of OMB Circular A-126; or


(2) Hire those aircraft through an agency with a policy-compliant aviation program.


§ 102-33.30 What are the duties of an agency’s Senior Aviation Management Official (SAMO)?

The duties of an agency’s Senior Aviation Management Official (SAMO) are to –


(a) Represent the agency’s views to the ICAP and vote on behalf of the agency as needed;


(b) Contribute technical and operational policy expertise to ICAP deliberations and activities;


(c) Serve as the designated approving official for FAIRS when the agency elects to have one person serve as both the SAMO and the designated official for FAIRS (DOD will not have a designated official for FAIRS); and


(d) Appoint representatives of the agency as members of ICAP subcommittees and working groups.


§ 102-33.35 How can we get help in carrying out our responsibilities?

To get help in carrying out your responsibilities under this part, you may –


(a) Call or write to GSA’s Aviation Policy Division (see definition in § 102-33.20); or


(b) Find additional aviation program management information on the Internet at http://www.gsa.gov/aviationpolicy.


§ 102-33.40 What are some of GSA’s responsibilities for Federal aviation management?

Under OMB Circular A-126, “Improving the Management and Use of Government Aircraft,” (http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb) GSA’s chief responsibilities for Federal aviation management are to maintain –


(a) A single office to carry out Governmentwide responsibilities for Government aircraft management, and publishing that policy;


(b) An interagency committee (i.e., the ICAP), whose members represent the executive agencies that use Government aircraft to conduct their official business (including FAA and NTSB specifically) and advise and consult with GSA on developing policy for managing Government aircraft;


(c) A management information system to collect, analyze, and report information on the inventory, cost, usage, and safety of Government aircraft; and


(d) A set of performance indicators, policy recommendations, and guidance for the procurement, operation, and safety and disposal of Government aircraft.



Note to § 102-33.40:

See OMB Circular A-126 (http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb) for a complete listing of GSA’s responsibilities related to Federal aviation.


Subpart B – Acquiring Government Aircraft and Aircraft Parts

Overview

§ 102-33.50 Under what circumstances may we acquire Government aircraft?

(a) When you meet the requirements for operating an in-house aviation program contained in OMB Circular A-76, “Performance of Commercial Activities” and OMB Circular A-11, “Preparation, Submission, and Execution of the Budget,” Part 2, “Preparation and Submission of Budget Estimates,” Section 25.5, “Summary of Requirements,” Table 1, which refers to the Business Case for Acquisition and Maintenance of Aircraft, and Section 51.18, “Budgeting for the acquisition of capital assets,” subparagraph (d) (Both circulars are available at http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb), you may –


(1) Acquire Federal aircraft when –


(i) Aircraft are the optimum means of supporting your agency’s official business;


(ii) You do not have aircraft that can support your agency’s official business safely (e.g., in compliance with applicable safety standards and regulations) and cost-effectively;


(iii) No commercial or other Governmental source is available to provide aviation services safely (i.e., in compliance with applicable safety standards and regulations) and cost-effectively; and


(iv) Congress has specifically authorized your agency to purchase, lease, or transfer aircraft and to maintain and operate those aircraft (see 31 U.S.C. 1343);


(2) Acquire Commercial Aviation Services (CAS) when –


(i) Aircraft are the optimum means of supporting your agency’s official business; and


(ii) Using commercial aircraft and services is safe (i.e., conforms to applicable laws, safety standards, and regulations) and is more cost effective than using Federal aircraft, aircraft from any other Governmental source, or scheduled air carriers.


(b) When acquiring aircraft, aircraft selection must be based on need, a strong business case, and life-cycle cost analysis, which conform to OMB Circular A-11, “Preparation, Submission, and Execution of the Budget,” Part 2, “Preparation and Submission of Budget Estimates,” Section 25.5, “Summary of Requirements,” Table 1, which refers to the Business Case for Acquisition and Maintenance of Aircraft (available at http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb).


§ 102-33.55 Are there restrictions on acquiring Government aircraft?

Yes, you may not acquire –


(a) More aircraft than you need to carry out your official business;


(b) Aircraft of greater size or capacity than you need to perform your Governmental functions cost-effectively; or


(c) Federal aircraft that Congress has not authorized your agency to acquire or Federal aircraft or commercial aircraft and services for which you have not followed the requirements in OMB Circulars A-76 and A-11 (available at http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb).


§ 102-33.60 What methods may we use to acquire Government aircraft?

Following the requirements of §§ 102-33.50 and 102-33.55, you (or an internal bureau or sub-agency within your agency) may acquire Government aircraft by means including, but not limited to –


(a) Purchase;


(b) Borrowing from a non-Federal source;


(c) Bailment from another executive agency;


(d) Exchange/sale;


(e) Reimbursable transfer from another executive agency (see §§ 102-36.75 and 102-36.80);


(f) Transfer from another executive agency as approved by GSA;


(g) Reassignment from one internal bureau or subagency to another within your agency;


(h) Transfer of previously forfeited aircraft;


(i) Insurance replacement (i.e., receiving a replacement aircraft);


(j) Capital lease;


(k) Rent or charter;


(l) Contract for full services (i.e., aircraft plus crew and related aviation services) from a commercial source; or


(m) Inter-service support agreements with other executive agencies for aircraft and services.


§ 102-33.65 What is the process for acquiring Government aircraft?

Acquiring Government aircraft, as described in §§ 102-33.70 through 102-33.105, generally follows a three-step process:


(a) Planning;


(b) Budgeting; and


(c) Contracting.


Planning To Acquire Government Aircraft

§ 102-33.70 What directives must we follow when planning to acquire Government aircraft?

When planning to acquire Government aircraft, you must follow the requirements in –


(a) 31 U.S.C. 1343, “Buying and Leasing Passenger Motor Vehicles and Aircraft”;


(b) OMB Circular A-126, “Improving the Management and Use of Government Aircraft” (http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb);


(c) OMB Circular A-11, Part 2, Section 25.5, Table 1, Business Case for Acquisition and Maintenance of Aircraft (http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb);


(d) OMB Circular A-76, “Performance of Commercial Activities” (http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb); and


(e) OMB Circular A-94, “Guidelines and Discount Rates for Benefit-Cost Analysis of Federal Programs” (http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb).


§ 102-33.75 What other guidance is available to us in planning to acquire Government aircraft?

You can find guidance for acquisition planning in:


(a) The “Aviation Planning Desk Guide” (available at http://www.gsa.gov/aviationpolicy) and


(b) OMB’s “Capital Programming Guide,” which is a supplement to OMB Circular A-11 (http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb).


OMB Circular A-76

§ 102-33.80 Must we comply with OMB Circular A-76 before we acquire Government aircraft?

Yes, before you acquire Government aircraft, you must comply with OMB Circular A-76 (http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb). If you are acquiring Federal aircraft, you must ensure that the private sector cannot provide Government aircraft or related aviation services more cost-effectively than you can provide Federal aircraft and related services.


The Process for Budgeting To Acquire Government Aircraft

§ 102-33.90 What is the process for budgeting to acquire a Federal aircraft (including a Federal aircraft transferred from another executive agency)?

(a) The process for budgeting to acquire a Federal aircraft or to accept a Federal aircraft transferred from another executive agency requires that you have specific authority from Congress in your appropriation, as called for in 31 U.S.C. 1343, to –


(1) Purchase, capital lease, or lease a Federal aircraft and to operate and maintain it; or


(2) Accept a Federal aircraft transferred from another executive agency and to operate and maintain it.


(b) For complete information on budgeting to own Federal aircraft (i.e., large purchase of a capital asset), see OMB Circular A-11, Part 2, Sections 25.1 and 51.18. Also see §§ 102-33.70 and 102-33.75.


§ 102-33.95 What is the process for budgeting to acquire Commercial Aviation Services (CAS)?

Except for leases and capital leases, for which you must have specific Congressional authorization as required by 31 U.S.C. 1343, you may budget to fund your CAS out of your agency’s operating budget. Also see §§ 102-33.70 and 102-33.75.


Contracting To Acquire Government Aircraft

§ 102-33.100 What are our responsibilities when contracting to purchase or capital lease a Federal aircraft or to award a CAS contract?

In contracting to purchase or capital lease a Federal aircraft or to award a CAS contract, you must follow the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) (48 CFR Chapter 1) unless your agency is exempt from following the FAR.


§ 102-33.105 What minimum requirements must we put into our CAS contracts?

At a minimum, your CAS contracts and agreements must require that any provider of CAS comply with –


(a) Civil standards in 14 CFR that are applicable to the type of operation(s) you are asking the contractor to conduct;


(b) Applicable military standards; or


(c) Your agency’s Flight Program Standards (see §§ 102-33.140 through 102-33.185 for the requirements for Flight Program Standards).


Acquiring Aircraft Parts

§ 102-33.110 What are our responsibilities when acquiring aircraft parts?

When acquiring aircraft parts, you must:


(a) Acquire the parts cost-effectively and acquire only what you need;


(b) Inspect and verify that all incoming parts are documented as safe for flight prior to installation;


(c) Obtain all logbooks (if applicable) and maintenance records (for guidance on maintaining records for non-military parts, see Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Advisory Circular 43-9C, “Maintenance Records,” which is available from the FAA at http://www.faa.gov);


(d) Plan for adequate storage and protection; and


(e) Refer to FAA Advisory Circular 21-29C, Change (2), “Detecting and Reporting Suspected Unapproved Parts” (http://www.faa.gov).


§ 102-33.115 Are there requirements for acquiring military Flight Safety Critical Aircraft Parts (FSCAP)?

Yes, when you acquire military Flight Safety Critical Aircraft Parts (FSCAP), you must –


(a) Accept FSCAP only when it is documented or traceable to its original equipment manufacturer. A part’s DOD FSCAP Criticality Code should be marked or tagged on the part or appear on its invoice/transfer document (see § 102-33.375 for further explanation of the FSCAP Criticality Codes); and


(b) Not install undocumented, but traceable FSCAP until you have the parts inspected and recertified by the original equipment manufacturer or other FAA-approved facility (see § 102-33.370 on FSCAP and AC 20-142).


§ 102-33.120 Are there requirements for acquiring life-limited parts?

Yes, when you acquire new or used life-limited parts, you must –


(a) Identify and inspect the parts, ensuring that they have civil or military-certified documentation; and


(b) Mutilate and dispose of any expired life-limited parts (see § 102-33.370 on handling life-limited parts).


Subpart C – Managing Government Aircraft and Aircraft Parts

Overview

§ 102-33.125 If we use Federal aircraft, what are our management responsibilities?

If you use Federal aircraft, you are responsible for –


(a) Establishing agency-specific Flight Program Standards, as defined in §§ 102-33.140 through 102-33.185;


(b) Accounting for the cost of acquiring, operating, and supporting your aircraft;


(c) Accounting for the use of your aircraft;


(d) Maintaining and accounting for aircraft parts;


(e) Reporting inventory, cost, and utilization data (for reporting requirements, see subpart E of this part); and


(f) Properly disposing of aircraft and parts following §§ 102-33.240 through 102-33.375.


§ 102-33.130 If we hire CAS, what are our management responsibilities?

If you hire CAS, you are responsible for –


(a) Establishing agency-specific Flight Program Standards, as defined in §§ 102-33.140 through 102-33.185, as applicable, and requiring compliance with these standards in your contracts and agreements;


(b) Accounting for the cost of your aircraft and services hired as CAS;


(c) Accounting for the use of your aircraft hired as CAS; and


(d) Reporting the cost and usage data for your CAS hires (for reporting requirements, see subpart E of this part).


§ 102-33.135 Do we have to follow OMB Circular A-123, “Management Accountability and Control,” for establishing management controls for our aviation program?

Yes, you must follow OMB Circular A-123, “Management’s Responsibility for Accountability and Control” (http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb), when establishing management controls for your aviation program. The circular requires that you establish organizations, policies, and procedures to ensure that, among other things, your aviation program achieves its intended results and you use your resources consistently with your agency’s missions.


Establishing Flight Program Standards

§ 102-33.140 What are Flight Program Standards?

Flight Program Standards are the minimum requirements that must be incorporated into your flight programs to ensure that your aircraft are operated safely, effectively, and efficiently. These requirements must:


(a) Be specific to your agency’s aviation operations, including your CAS;


(b) Meet the requirements identified in §§ 102-33.155 through 102-33.185.


(c) Meet or exceed applicable civil or military rules (in particular 49 U.S.C. 40102(a)(37) and 40125), and applicable FAA regulations); and


(d) Incorporate risk management techniques when civil or military rules do not apply.


§ 102-33.145 Why must we establish Flight Program Standards?

You must establish Flight Program Standards because Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) may not cover or address all aspects of your agency’s flight program, such as non-certificated aircraft, high-risk operations, special personnel requirements, etc.


§ 102-33.150 What Federally-funded aviation activities of executive agencies are exempt from establishing Flight Program Standards under this part?

The following Federally-funded activities are exempt from establishing Flight Program Standards under this part:


(a) The Armed Forces (which includes the U.S. Coast Guard);


(b) Agencies in the Intelligence Community; and


(c) Entities outside the executive branch of the Federal Government when using aircraft loaned to them by an executive agency (that is, owned by an executive agency, but operated by and on behalf of the loanee) unless the loanee –


(1) Uses the aircraft to conduct official Government business; or


(2) Is required to follow §§ 102-33.140 through 102-33.185 under a Memorandum of Agreement governing the loan.


§ 102-33.155 How must we establish Flight Program Standards?

To establish Flight Program Standards, you must write, publish (as appropriate), implement, and comply with standards (specific to your agency), which establish or require (contractually, where applicable) policies and procedures for –


(a) Management/administration of your flight program (in this part, “flight program” includes CAS contracts);


(b) Operation of your flight program;


(c) Maintenance of your Government aircraft;


(d) Training for your flight program personnel;


(e) Safety of your flight program;


(f) Accident reporting and investigation as appropriate; and


(g) Reporting to FAIRS as required by this part.


Management/Administration

§ 102-33.160 What standards must we establish or require (contractually, where applicable) for management/administration of our flight program?

For management/administration of your flight program, you must establish or require (contractually, where applicable) –


(a) A management structure responsible for the administration, operation, safety, training, maintenance, and financial needs of your aviation operation (including establishing minimum requirements for these items for any commercial contracts); and


(b) Guidance describing the roles, responsibilities, and authorities of your flight program personnel, e.g., managers, pilots and other crewmembers, flight safety personnel, maintenance personnel, administrative personnel and dispatchers.


Operations

§ 102-33.165 What standards must we establish or require (contractually, where applicable) for operation of our flight program?

For operation of your flight program, you must establish or require (contractually, where applicable) –


(a) Basic qualifications and currency requirements for your pilots and other crewmembers, maintenance personnel, administrative personnel and other mission-related personnel;


(b) Limitations on duty time and flight time for pilots and other crewmembers;


(c) Procedures to record and track flight time, duty time, training of crewmembers, and applicable medical requirements;


(d) Compliance with owning-agency or military safety of flight notices and operational bulletins;


(e) Flight-following procedures to notify management and initiate search and rescue operations for lost or downed aircraft;


(f) Dissemination, as your agency determines appropriate, of a disclosure statement to all crewmembers and qualified non-crewmembers who fly aboard your agency’s Government aircraft (see Appendix A to this part);


(g) Creation of a manifest, at the origin of each flight, that contains the full names of all persons on board for each leg of flight, a point of contact for each person, and phone numbers for the points of contact;


(h) Documentation of any changes in the manifest by leg, and retention of manifests for two years from the time of flight;


(i) Procedures for reconciling flight manifests with persons actually on board and a method to test those procedures periodically;


(j) At the origin of each flight, preparation of a complete weight and balance computation and a cargo-loading manifest, and retention of this computation and manifest for 30 days from the date of flight;


(k) Appropriate emergency procedures and equipment for specific missions;


(l) Procedures to ensure that required Aviation Life Support Equipment (ALSE) is inspected and serviceable; and


(m) Procedures to implement a “risk assessment” before each flight and/or as frequently as necessary that include such items as weather, crew rest, type of flight (low level, Instrument Flight Rules (IFR), night, etc.) crew makeup, etc. This process should be accomplished in accordance with your agency’s operations, flight dispatch, or flight following procedures/program.


Maintenance

§ 102-33.170 What standards must we establish or require (contractually, where applicable) for maintenance of our Government aircraft?

For maintenance of your Government aircraft, you must establish or require (contractually, where applicable) –


(a) Procedures to record and track duty time and training of maintenance personnel;


(b) Aircraft maintenance and inspection programs that comply with whichever is most applicable among –


(1) Programs for ex-military aircraft;


(2) Manufacturers’ programs;


(3) FAA-approved programs (i.e., following the applicable parts of 14 CFR);


(4) FAA-accepted programs (i.e., those following ICAP guides or similar programs that have been accepted by the FAA); or


(5) Your agency’s self-prescribed programs;


(c) Compliance with owning-agency or military safety of flight notices, FAA airworthiness directives, advisory circulars and orders, or mandatory manufacturers’ bulletins applicable to the types of aircraft, engines, propellers, and appliances you operate;


(d) Procedures for operating aircraft with inoperable instruments and equipment (i.e., Minimum Equipment Lists and Configuration Deviation Lists);


(e) Technical support, including appropriate engineering documentation and testing, for aircraft, powerplant, propeller, or appliance repairs, modifications, or equipment installations;


(f) A quality control system for acquiring replacements, ensuring that the parts you acquire are suitable replacement parts and have the documentation needed to determine that they are safe for flight and are inspected and tested, as applicable;


(g) Procedures for recording and tracking maintenance actions; inspections; and the flight hours, cycles, and calendar times of life-limited parts and FSCAP; and


(h) The use of alternative aviation fuels in fleet aircraft to the maximum extent possible consistent with the availability of approved alternative fuels and aircraft operating procedures or manuals for those aircraft.


Training

§ 102-33.175 What standards must we establish or require (contractually, where applicable) to train our flight program personnel?

You must establish or require (contractually, where applicable) the following standards to train your flight program personnel –


(a) An instructional program to train your flight program personnel, initially and on a recurrent basis, in their roles, responsibilities, authorities, and in the operational skills relevant to the types of operations that you conduct. Flight program personnel may include, e.g., managers, pilots and other crewmembers, flight safety personnel, maintenance personnel, administrative personnel and dispatchers; and


(b) An instructional program that meets the specific requirements for safety manager training identified in § 102-33.180(a).


Safety

§ 102-33.180 What standards should we establish or require (contractually, where applicable) for aviation safety management?

You should establish or require (contractually, where applicable) the following aviation safety management standards:


(a) By June 30, 2015, a Safety Management System (SMS) that complies with the FAA’s current Advisory Circular that addresses Safety Management Systems (SMS) or an equivalent internationally recognized SMS standard. The SMS should include:


(1) Policies that define clear roles and responsibilities for implementing an SMS. This includes ensuring that senior level management has the ultimate responsibility for your SMS. It also includes appointing members of management as qualified aviation safety managers and safety officers (i.e., individuals who are responsible for an agency’s aviation safety program, regardless of title), who should be –


(i) Experienced as pilots, crewmembers, maintenance personnel, or have experience in aviation management or aviation maintenance program management; and


(ii) Graduated or certificated from an aviation safety officer course provided by a recognized training provider and authority in aviation safety before appointment or within one year after appointment; and


(2) A program for preventing accidents, which includes –


(i) Measurable accident prevention procedures (e.g., safety reviews, clear roles and responsibilities, operations and maintenance procedures, pilot and mechanic proficiency evaluations, fire drills, hazard analyses);


(ii) A procedure or system for disseminating accident-prevention information;


(iii) Safety training;


(iv) An aviation safety awards program that includes applying for the annual Federal Aviation Awards as appropriate;


(v) An annual review to ensure compliance with the GSA Gold Standard Program; and


(vi) A safety council or committee (applies to Federal aircraft-owning agencies);


(b) Procedures and processes for risk analysis and risk management that identify and mitigate hazards through formal administrative and engineering controls and provide recommendations to senior level managers for managing risk to an optimum level;


(c) Policies that require the use of independent, unbiased inspectors to verify compliance with the standards called for in this;


(d) Procedures for reporting unsafe operations to agency aviation safety officers and senior aviation safety managers without reprisal;


(e) A system to collect and report information on aircraft accidents and incidents (as required by 49 CFR part 830 and 41 CFR 102-33.445 and 102-33.450);


(f) Policies that identify clear standards for acceptable behavior; and


(g) A security program that includes –


(1) A designated security manager;


(2) A threat assessment process;


(3) Procedures for preventing and deterring unlawful acts;


(4) Procedures for responding to threats and unlawful acts;


(5) Security training for personnel; and


(6) Policies and procedures for a mail security plan that meet the mail security requirements contained in FMR 102-192, “Mail Management,” Subpart C, “Security Requirements for All Agencies,” §§ 102-192.70 through 102-192.80. Specifically, section 102-192.80 identifies topics that must be addressed in an agency’s mail security plan, to include a plan to protect staff and all other occupants of agency facilities from hazards that might be delivered in the mail, which would include an agency’s use of aircraft for mail delivery.


§ 102-33.185 What standards must we establish or require (contractually, where applicable) for responding to aircraft accidents and incidents?

You must establish or require (contractually, where applicable) the following standards for responding to aircraft accidents and incidents:


(a) An aircraft accident/incident reporting policy to ensure that you will comply with the National Transportation Safety Board’s (NTSB) regulations (located in 49 CFR parts 830 and 831), including notifying NTSB immediately when you have an aircraft accident or an incident as defined in 49 CFR 830.5. In addition, this policy must contain a method of notifying the U.S. General Services Administration of an accident or incident that was reported to the NTSB. Refer to §§ 102-33.445 and 102-33.450 for further information;


(b) An agency, bureau, or field level accident/incident response plan, modeled on the NTSB’s “Federal Plan for Aviation Accidents Involving Aircraft Operated by or Chartered by Federal Agencies,” and periodic disaster response exercises to test your plan. A copy of the NTSB’s plan is available at http://www.ntsb.gov. The plan should also refer to or incorporate procedures (as outlined in FAA Advisory Circular 120-92) to identify the potential for accidents or incidents;


(c) Procedures (see 49 CFR 831.11) for participation as a party to NTSB accident or incident investigations involving aircraft that your agency either owns or hires, and for conducting parallel investigations, as appropriate;


(d) Training in investigating accidents/incidents for your agency’s personnel who may be asked to participate in NTSB investigations or to conduct a parallel investigation; and


(e) Procedures for disseminating, in the event of an aviation disaster that involves one of your Government aircraft, information about eligibility for benefits contained in the disclosure statement in appendix A of this part to anyone injured, to the injured or deceased persons’ points of contact (listed on the manifest), and to the families of injured or deceased crewmembers and qualified non-crewmembers.



Note to § 102-33.185:

This part does not supersede any of the regulations in 49 CFR parts 830 and 831. For definitions of terms and complete regulatory guidance on notifying the NTSB and reporting aircraft accidents and incidents, see 49 CFR parts 830 and 831.


Accounting for the Costs of Government Aircraft

§ 102-33.190 What are the aircraft operations and ownership costs for which we must account?

You must account for the operations and ownership costs of your Government aircraft, including your Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS), as described in the “U.S. Government Aircraft Cost Accounting Guide” (CAG), available at (http://www.gsa.gov/aviationpolicy), which follows OMB Circular A-126 (http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb). To account for aircraft costs, you must do at least the following:


(a) Justify acquisitions to support the agency’s aviation program;


(b) Justify the use of Government aircraft in lieu of commercially available aircraft, and the use of one Government aircraft in lieu of another;


(c) Develop a variable cost rate for each aircraft or aircraft type (i.e., make and model) in your inventory;


(d) Recover the costs of operating Government aircraft;


(e) Determine the cost effectiveness of various aspects of agency aircraft programs; and


(f) Accumulate aircraft program costs following the procedures defined in the CAG, available at (http://www.gsa.gov/aviationpolicy).


§ 102-33.195 Do we need an automated system to account for aircraft costs?

(a) Yes, if you own Federal aircraft or operate bailed aircraft, you must maintain an automated system to account for aircraft costs by collecting the cost data elements required by FAIRS. The functional specifications and data definitions for a FAIRS-compliant system are described in the “Common Aviation Management Information Standard” (C-AMIS), which is available from the Aviation Policy Division. See §§ 102-33.395, 102-33.405, and 102-33.410 for more information on FAIRS, and §§ 102-33.455 and 102-33.460 for more information on C-AMIS.


(b) Agencies that use only CAS aircraft and do not have Federal aircraft must keep records adequate for reporting information through FAIRS, but are not required to have an automated system. See §§ 102-33.435 and 102-33.440 for the information on CAS that you must report through FAIRS.


§ 102-33.200 Must we periodically justify owning and operating Federal aircraft?

Yes, after you have held a Federal aircraft for five years, you must:


(a) Justify owning and operating the aircraft by reviewing your operations and establishing that you have a continuing need for the aircraft, using the procedures required in OMB Circular A-76 and OMB Circular A-11, Part 7, Appendix B, Budgetary treatment of lease-purchases and leases of capital assets; and


(b) Review the continuing need for each of your aircraft and the cost-effectiveness of your aircraft operations as directed by OMB Circulars A-11 and A-76, every five years.


§ 102-33.205 When we use our aircraft to support other executive agencies, must we recover the operating costs?

Yes, you must recover the following:


(a) Under 31 U.S.C. 1535 and other statutes, you may be required to recover the costs of operating aircraft in support of other agencies. Depending on the statutory authorities under which you acquired and operate your aircraft, you will use either of the following two methods for establishing the rates charged for using your aircraft:


(1) The variable cost recovery rate; or


(2) The full cost recovery rate.


(b) See the U.S. Government Aircraft Cost Accounting Guide (CAG) (http://www.gsa.gov/aviationpolicy), for the definitions of “variable cost recovery rate” and “full cost recovery rate.”


Accounting for the Use of Government Aircraft

§ 102-33.210 How do we account for the use of our Government aircraft?

To account for the use of Government aircraft, including your Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS), you must document all flights and keep this documentation for two years after the date of the flight. For each flight, record the –


(a) Aircraft’s registration mark;


(b) Owner and operator (the owner may not be the operator, as is the case when a CAS aircraft, owned commercially, is operated by U.S. Government personnel);


(c) Purpose of the flight (the Governmental function that the aircraft was dispatched to perform);


(d) Departure and destination points;


(e) Flight date(s) and times;


(f) Manifest (see § 102-33.165(g) and (h)); and


(g) Name(s) of the pilot(s) and crewmembers.


§ 102-33.215 May we use Government aircraft to carry passengers?

Yes, you may use Government aircraft to carry passengers with the following restrictions:


(a) You may carry passengers only on aircraft that you operate or require contractually to be operated in accordance with the rules and requirements in 14 CFR; and


(b) For certain kinds of travel, your agency must justify passengers’ presence on Government aircraft. See OMB Circular A-126 and the Federal Travel Regulation (FTR) §§ 301-10.260 through 301-10.266, and 301-70.800 through 301-70.808, and 301-70.910 (41 CFR 301-10.260 through 301-10.266, 301-70.800 through 301-70.808, and 301-70.910) for complete information on authorizing travel and analyzing costs before authorizing travel on Government aircraft.


§ 102-33.220 What are the responsibilities of our aviation program in justifying the use of a Government aircraft to transport passengers?

After receiving a request from your agency, your aviation program’s responsibilities in justifying the use of a Government aircraft to transport passengers are to your travel approving authority:


(a) Cost estimates to assist in determining whether or not use of a Government aircraft to carry passengers is justified. See OMB Circular A-126 (http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb) for more information on justifying travel on Government aircraft. See also FTR §§ 301-10.260 through 301-10.266, and 301-70.800 through 301-70.808, and 301-70.910 (41 CFR 301-10.260 through 301-10.266, 301-70.800 through 301-70.808, and 301-70.910) for guidance on estimating the cost of using a Government aircraft. The cost of using a Government aircraft is –


(1) The variable cost of using a Federal aircraft;


(2) The amount your agency will be charged by a CAS provider; or


(3) The variable cost of using an aircraft owned by another agency as reported by the owning agency; and


(b) Information to assist in the analysis of alternatives to travel on Government aircraft. The information must include the following:


(1) If no follow-on trip is scheduled, all time required to position the aircraft to begin the trip and to return the aircraft to its normal base of operations;


(2) If a follow-on trip requires repositioning, the cost for the repositioning should be charged to the associated follow-on trip;


(3) If an aircraft supports a multi-leg trip (a series of flights scheduled sequentially), the use of the aircraft for the total trip may be justified by comparing the total variable cost of the entire trip to the commercial aircraft cost (including charter) for all legs of the trip; and


(4) The use of foreign aircraft as CAS is authorized when the agency has determined that an equivalent level of safety exists as compared to U.S. operations of a like kind. The safety of passengers shall be the overriding consideration for the selection of travel mode when comparing foreign sources of scheduled commercial airlines and CAS.


Managing Aircraft Parts

§ 102-33.225 How must we manage aircraft parts?

You must manage your aircraft parts by maintaining proper storage, protection, maintenance procedures, and records for the parts throughout their life cycles.


§ 102-33.230 May we use military FSCAP on non-military FAA-type certificated Government aircraft?

You may use dual-use military FSCAP on non-military aircraft operated under restricted or standard airworthiness certificates if the parts are inspected and approved for such installation by the FAA. See detailed guidance in FAA Advisory Circular 20-142, Change (1), “Eligibility and Evaluation of U.S. Military Surplus Flight Safety Critical Aircraft Parts, Engines, and Propellers” (http://www.faa.gov).


§ 102-33.235 What documentation must we maintain for life-limited parts and FSCAP?

For life-limited parts and FSCAP, you must hold and update the documentation that accompanies these parts for as long as you use or store them. When you dispose of life-limited parts or FSCAP, the up-to-date documentation must accompany the parts. (See § 102-33.370.)


Subpart D – Disposing or Replacing of Government Aircraft and Aircraft Parts

Overview

§ 102-33.240 What must we consider before disposing or replacing aircraft and aircraft parts?

Before disposing of aircraft and aircraft parts, you must first determine if the aircraft or parts are excess to your agency’s mission or, if your aircraft or parts are not excess, if you will need replacements, as follows:


(a) If your aircraft/parts are . . .
And . . .
Then . . .
No longer needed to perform their mission(s) for your agency, i.e., they are excess to your needs,You do not need to replace them,You must report them to GSA as excess property (see 41 CFR 102-36.45(e)).
(b) If your aircraft/parts are . . .And . . .Then . . .
No longer suitable, or capable of performing their mission(s) for your agency,You do need to replace them,You may consider using the exchange/sale authority (see 41 CFR part 102-39).

§ 102-33.245 May we report as excess, or replace (i.e., by exchange/sale), both operational and non-operational aircraft?

Yes, you may report as excess, or replace both operational and non-operational aircraft by following the rules governing excess personal property and exchange/sale (see 41 CFR parts 102-36 and 102-39, respectively).


§ 102-33.250 May we declassify aircraft?

Yes, you may declassify aircraft (See §§ 102-33.415 and 102-33.420).


(a) A declassified aircraft is no longer considered an aircraft, but may be considered as a group of aircraft parts or other property for ground use only.


(b) You must retain documentation and traceability on all parts that are intended for use as replacement parts on other aircraft. You must carry such “aircraft parts or other property” on your property records under the appropriate Federal Supply Classification group(s) (e.g., miscellaneous property).


(c) For disposal of the property remaining after declassification of an aircraft, you must follow the property disposal regulations in 41 CFR parts 102-36, 102-37, 102-38 and 102-39.


§ 102-33.255 Must we document FSCAP or life-limited parts installed on aircraft that we will report as excess or replace?

Yes, you must comply with the documentation procedures described in § 102-33.370 if your aircraft and/or engines contain FSCAP or life-limited parts that you will report as excess or replace.


§ 102-33.260 When we report as excess, or replace, an aircraft (including a declassified aircraft), must we report the change in inventory to the Federal Aviation Interactive Reporting System (FAIRS)?

(a) Yes. When you report as excess or replace an aircraft you must report the change in inventory to FAIRS. For more information see § 102-33.405.


(b) Within 14 calendar days of the date you dispose of the aircraft, you must report –


(1) The disposal method (e.g., reassignment, inter-agency transfer, donation, sale as surplus or scrap, declassification, or exchange/sale);


(2) The disposal date; and


(3) The identity and type of recipient (e.g., State, educational institution, executive agency, commercial vendor).


Reporting Excess Federal Aircraft

§ 102-33.265 What must we do with aircraft that are excess to our needs?

If aircraft are excess to your needs, you must:


(a) Reassign the aircraft within your agency if any of your sub-agencies can use the aircraft; or


(b) Report the aircraft as excess property to GSA (see 41 CFR part 102-36) if none of your sub-agencies can use the aircraft.


§ 102-33.270 What is the process for reporting an excess aircraft?

To report an excess aircraft, you must:


(a) Report electronically to GSA’s Federal Disposal System GSAXcess® (http://gsaxcess.gov). For information on reporting excess property electronically, contact the Federal Acquisition Service (FAS), Pacific Rim Region (Region 9) at (415) 522-2777; and


(b) Submit a Standard Form (SF) 120, Report of Excess Personal Property (see § 102-2.135), to: General Services Administration, Federal Acquisition Service, Pacific Rim Region, 450 Golden Gate Avenue, 4th Floor West, San Francisco, CA, 94102-3434.


Replacing Aircraft Through Exchange/Sale

§ 102-33.275 What should we consider before replacing our aircraft through exchange/sale?

Before an exchange/sale of your aircraft, you should consider whether:


(a) You have a continuing need for similar property and that the property being exchanged or sold is not excess or surplus; and


(b) The exchange/sale meets all other requirements in 41 CFR part 102-39.


§ 102-33.280 What are our options if we need a replacement aircraft?

If you need to replace an aircraft, your options are –


(a) Negotiating and conducting an exchange transaction directly with an aircraft provider and obtaining credit toward the purchase of a replacement aircraft, following the procurement rules applicable to your agency; or


(b) Selling the aircraft and using the proceeds to offset the cost of purchasing a replacement aircraft, following 41 CFR part 102-39. Sales Centers (SC) that are currently authorized to conduct sales, as well as contact information for the GovSales Program Manager, are available on the GovSales Web site at http://www.gsa.gov/portal/content/105020.


§ 102-33.285 Do we need to include any special disclaimers in our exchange/sale agreements for non-certificated aircraft or aircraft that we have operated as public aircraft (i.e., not in compliance with 14 CFR)?

Yes, when you exchange/sell non-certificated aircraft or aircraft maintained as public aircraft, you must ensure that the exchange/sale offerings contain the following statement:


Warning to purchasers/recipients. The aircraft you are purchasing or receiving in an exchange may not be in compliance with applicable Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) requirements. You are solely responsible for bringing the aircraft into compliance with 14 CFR Chapter I, or other applicable standards, by obtaining all necessary FAA inspections or modifications.


The purchaser/recipient agrees that the Government shall not be held liable for personal injuries to, disabilities of, or death of the purchaser/recipient, the purchaser’s/recipient’s employees, or to any other persons arising from or incident to the purchase of this aircraft, its use, or disposition. You will hold the Government harmless from any or all debts, liabilities, judgments, costs, demands, suits, actions, or claims of any nature arising from or incident to the purchase, use, or resale of this item. This aircraft may have been operated outside the limitations of 14 CFR Chapter I, and some type of inspection may be needed to determine its airworthiness prior to being flown. You should be aware of the items below prior to operating this aircraft.


• All civil and public aircraft must have a valid registration issued by the FAA as required by 14 CFR Chapter I.


• Civil aircraft must have a valid airworthiness certificate in order to operate in the U.S. airspace.


• In order for the aircraft to be eligible for a standard airworthiness certificate, the aircraft must conform to its FAA Type Certificate.


• Aircraft not having a valid airworthiness certificate may be eligible for a special FAA one-time flight permit to enable relocating the aircraft. Relocation can be for a number of reasons, including storage, repair, inspection, or public display. Any one-time flight approval is predicated on the aircraft being safe for flight.


• Individuals who purchase a surplus military (foreign or domestic) or foreign aircraft not having any type of FAA Type Certificate may be unable to obtain any type of airworthiness certificate or special flight permit.


• An aircraft with good maintenance and inspection records makes an airworthiness determination easier to ascertain. It is in your best interest to contact the nearest FAA Flight Standards District Office and discuss your responsibilities with respect to gaining an airworthiness determination. The location of your nearest FAA office may be obtained from the FAA’s Web site (http://www.faa.gov/).


• When the aircraft is purchased for spare parts and the airframe is scrapped, you should declassify the aircraft (see § 102-33.420 for more information), complete the back of the aircraft’s registration form and send it to: The FAA Aircraft Registration Branch, P.O. Box 25504, Oklahoma City, OK 73125-0504.”


§ 102-33.295 May we exchange/sell an aircraft through reimbursable transfer to another executive agency or conduct a negotiated sale at fixed price to a State Agency for Surplus Property (SASP)?

Yes, you may exchange/sell an aircraft through reimbursable transfer to another executive agency or conduct a negotiated sale at fixed price to a State Agency for Surplus Property (SASP) (see § 102-39.55 for more information).



Note to § 102-33.295:

Some agencies may also have special congressional authorization to recover costs.


Disposing of Aircraft Parts

§ 102-33.300 What must we consider before disposing of aircraft parts?

Before disposing of aircraft parts, you must first determine if they are excess to your agency’s mission requirements or, if the aircraft parts are not excess, if you will need replacements. The table in § 102-33.240 shows the differences between excess and replacement parts.


§ 102-33.305 May we report as excess, or replace, FSCAP and life-limited parts?

Yes, you may report as excess, or replace, FSCAP and life-limited parts, but they require special handling. See the tables in § 102-33.370.


§ 102-33.310 May we report as excess, or replace, unsalvageable aircraft parts?

No, you may not report unsalvageable aircraft parts as excess or exchange/sale them for replacements. You must mutilate unsalvageable parts. You may sell the mutilated parts only as scrap or report that scrap to GSA for sale.


§ 102-33.315 What are the procedures for mutilating unsalvageable aircraft parts?

When mutilating unsalvageable aircraft parts, you must –


(a) Destroy the data plates, remove the serial/lot/part numbers, and cut, crush, grind, melt, burn, or use other means to prevent the parts from being misidentified or used as serviceable aircraft parts. Call your regional FAA Flight Standards District Office for additional guidance;


(b) Ensure that an authorized official of your agency witnesses and documents the mutilation; and


(c) Retain a signed certification and statement of mutilation.


§ 102-33.320 What must we do if we are unable to perform required mutilation of aircraft parts?

If you are unable to perform the required mutilation of aircraft parts, you must turn the parts in to a Federal or Federally-approved facility for mutilation and proper disposition. Ensure that any contractor follows the provisions of § 102-33.315 for mutilating and disposing of the parts.


§ 102-33.325 What documentation must we furnish with excess, surplus or replaced parts when they are transferred, donated, or exchanged/sold?

When you transfer, donate, or exchange/sell excess, surplus or replaced parts, you must –


(a) Furnish all applicable labels, tags, and historical and modification records for serviceable aircraft parts;


(b) Mark mutilated parts as unsalvageable (mutilated parts may be sold only for scrap; see § 102-33.315); and


(c) Ensure that all available tags, labels, applicable historical data, life-histories, and maintenance records accompany FSCAP and life-limited parts and that FSCAP criticality codes (see § 102-33.375) are perpetuated on documentation (see § 102-33.330 for additional requirements).


Reporting Excess Aircraft Parts

§ 102-33.330 What must we do with aircraft parts that are excess to our needs?

If aircraft parts are excess to your needs, you must:


(a) Reassign the aircraft parts within your agency if any of your sub-agencies can use the parts; or


(b) Report the excess parts to GSA, using Standard Form (SF) 120, “Report of Excess Personal Property” (see § 102-2.135 for information to obtain this form). When reporting excess FSCAP, you must include the manufacturer’s name, date of manufacture, part number, serial number, and the appropriate Criticality Code on the SF 120. For information on reporting excess property, refer to http://gsaxcess.gov. (See 41 CFR part 102-36 regarding disposal of excess property.)


§ 102-33.335 What are the receiving agency’s responsibilities in the transfer of aircraft parts?

An agency that receives transferred aircraft parts must:


(a) Verify that all applicable labels and tags and historical and modification records accompany all serviceable aircraft parts (i.e., parts that are intended for flight use) that you receive. This requirement does not apply to parts for ground use only. See the tables in § 102-33.370.


(b) Mutilate all transferred parts that you discover to be unsalvageable, and dispose of them properly, following the procedures in § 102-33.315.


§ 102-33.340 What are GSA’s responsibilities in disposing of excess and surplus aircraft parts?

In disposing of excess aircraft parts, the GSA FAS office in your region:


(a) Reviews your SF 120, Report of Excess Personal Property (see § 102-2.135 for information to obtain this form) for completeness and accuracy (of status, condition, and FSCAP and demilitarization codes if applicable); and


(b) Ensures that the following certification is included on disposal documents (e.g., transfer orders or purchasers’ receipts):


Because of the critical nature of the failure of aircraft parts and the resulting potential safety threat, recipients of aircraft parts must ensure that any parts installed on an aircraft meet applicable Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) requirements and must obtain required certifications. GSA makes no representation as to a part’s conformance with the FAA requirements.


§ 102-33.345 What are the responsibilities of a State Agency for Surplus Property (SASP) in the donation of Federal Government aircraft parts?

When a SASP accepts surplus Federal Government aircraft parts for donation, the SASP must:


(a) Review donation and transfer documents for completeness and accuracy, and ensure that the certification in § 102-33.340 is included;


(b) Ensure that when the donee determines the part to be unsalvageable, the donee mutilates the part following the procedures in § 102-33.315; and


(c) Ensure that the donee retains, maintains, and perpetuates all documentation for serviceable parts (parts intended for flight use).


Replacing Aircraft Parts Through Exchange/Sale

§ 102-33.350 What do we need to consider for an exchange/sale of our aircraft parts?

(a) When replacing aircraft parts through exchange/sale you –


(1) Do not need approval from GSA; and


(2) Must follow the provisions of this subpart and part 102-39 of this chapter.


(b) Replacement parts do not have to be for the same type or design of aircraft, but you must use the exchange allowance or sales proceeds to purchase aircraft parts to support your aviation program which meet the “similarity” requirement in 41 CFR part 102-39.


§ 102-33.355 May we exchange/sell aircraft parts through a reimbursable transfer to another executive agency or conduct a negotiated sale at fixed price to a State Agency for Surplus Property (SASP)?

Yes, you may exchange/sell aircraft parts through a reimbursable transfer to another executive agency, or conduct a negotiated sale at fixed price to a SASP (see § 102-39.55 for more information).


§ 102-33.360 What is the process for exchanging/selling aircraft parts for replacement?

(a) You or your agent (i.e., another Federal agency or an authorized Sales Center) may transact an exchange/sale directly with a non-Federal source, or do a reimbursable transfer with another executive agency as long as you or your agent –


(1) Follow the provisions in this part and in 41 CFR part 102-39;


(2) Ensure that the applicable labels and tags, historical data and modification records accompany the parts at the time of sale, and that sales offerings on aircraft parts contain the following statement:


“Warning to purchasers/recipients. The aircraft parts you are purchasing or receiving in an exchange may not be in compliance with applicable Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) requirements. You are solely responsible for bringing the aircraft into compliance with 14 CFR Chapter I, or other applicable standards, by obtaining all necessary FAA inspections or modifications.”


(3) Ensure that the following certification is signed by the purchaser/recipient and received by the Government before releasing parts to the purchaser/recipient:


“The purchaser/recipient agrees that the Government shall not be held liable for personal injuries to, disabilities of, or death of the purchaser/recipient, the purchaser’s/recipient’s employees, or to any other persons arising from or incident to the purchase of these aircraft parts, their use, or disposition. The purchaser/recipient shall hold the Government harmless from any or all debts, liabilities, judgments, costs, demands, suits, actions, or claims of any nature arising from or incident to the purchase, use, or resale of these aircraft parts.


These parts may have been used on aircraft that were operated outside the limitations of 14 CFR Chapter I, and some type of inspection may be needed to determine their airworthiness prior to being used on a recipient aircraft.


You should be aware of the following requirements prior to operating an aircraft with parts received from an exchange.


• All civil and public aircraft must have a valid registration issued by the FAA as required by 14 CFR Chapter I.


• Civil aircraft must have a valid airworthiness certificate in order to operate in U.S. airspace.


• In order for the aircraft to be eligible for a standard airworthiness certificate, the aircraft must conform to its FAA Type Certificate.


• Aircraft not having a valid airworthiness certificate may be eligible for a special FAA one-time flight permit to enable relocating the aircraft. Relocation can be for a number of reasons, perhaps including storage, repair, inspection, or public display. Any one-time flight approval is predicated on the aircraft being safe for flight.


• Individuals who purchase a surplus military (foreign or domestic) or foreign aircraft not having any type of FAA Type Certificate may be unable to obtain any type of airworthiness certificate or special flight permit.


• An aircraft with good maintenance and inspection records makes an airworthiness determination easier to ascertain. It is in your best interest to contact the nearest FAA Flight Standards District Office and discuss your responsibilities with respect to gaining an airworthiness determination. The location of your nearest FAA office may be obtained from the FAA’s Web site (http://www.faa.gov/).”


(b) Authorized SCs can conduct sales of aircraft parts for you. SCs that are currently authorized to conduct sales, as well as contact information for the GovSales Program Manager, are available on the GovSales Web site at http://www.gsa.gov/portal/content/105020.


§ 102-33.365 Must we report exchange/sale of parts to FAIRS?

No, you don’t have to report exchange/sale of parts to FAIRS. However, you must report the transactions to GSA as part of your agency’s annual report (see 41 CFR part 102-39 Subpart C – Exchange/Sale Methods and Reports).


Special Requirements for Disposing of Flight Safety Critical Aircraft Parts (FSCAP) and Life-Limited Parts

§ 102-33.370 What must we do to dispose of military FSCAP and/or life-limited parts?

To dispose of military FSCAP and/or life-limited parts, you must use the following tables:


(a) Table 1 for disposing of uninstalled FSCAP and/or life-limited parts follows:


Table 1 for Disposing of Uninstalled FSCAP and/or Life-Limited Parts

(1) If an Uninstalled FSCAP (i.e., not installed in an aircraft or engine) –
(i) Is documented – Then(A) You may exchange/sale it or transfer it to another executive agency under 41 CFR parts 102-36 and 102-39;
(B) GSA may donate it for flight use under 41 CFR part 102-37 of this subchapter; or
(C) GSA may donate it for ground use only, after you mutilate and mark it, “FSCAP – NOT AIRWORTHY” (the State Agency for Surplus Property must certify that the part has been mutilated and marked before donation).
(ii) Is undocumented, but traceable to its original equipment manufacturer (OEM) or production approval holder (PAH) – Then(A) You may exchange/sell it only to the OEM or PAH under 41 CFR part 102-39;

(B) GSA may transfer or donate it for flight use, but only by making it a condition of the transfer or donation agreement that the recipient will have the part inspected, repaired, and certified by the OEM or PAH before putting it into service (Note: You must mark parts individually to ensure that the recipient is aware of the part’s service status); or
(C) GSA may donate it for ground use only, after you mutilate and mark it, “FSCAP – NOT AIRWORTHY” (the State Agency for Surplus Property must certify that the part has been mutilated and marked before donation).
(iii) Is undocumented and untraceable, you must mutilate it, and – Then(A) GSA may transfer or donate it for ground use only, after you mark it, “FSCAP – NOT AIRWORTHY” (the State Agency for Surplus Property must certify that the part has been mutilated and marked before donation); or
(B) You may sell it only for scrap under §§ 102-33.310 and 102-33.315.
(2) If an uninstalled life-limited part (i.e., not installed in an aircraft or engine) –
(i) Is documented with service life remaining – Then(A) You may exchange/sale it or transfer it to another executive agency under 41 CFR parts 102-36 and 102-39;

(B) GSA may donate it for flight use under 41 CFR part 102-37; or
(C) GSA may donate it for ground use only, after you mutilate and mark it, “EXPIRED LIFE-LIMITED – NOT AIRWORTHY” (the State Agency for Surplus Property must certify that the part has been mutilated and marked before donation).
(ii) Is documented with no service life remaining, or undocumented, GSA may not transfer it to another executive agency for flight use – But(A) GSA may transfer or donate it for ground use only, after you mutilate and mark it, “EXPIRED LIFE-LIMITED – NOT AIRWORTHY” (the State Agency for Surplus Property must certify that the part has been mutilated and marked before donation); or

(B) You must mutilate it and may sell it only for scrap.

(b) Table 2 for disposing of installed FSCAP and/or life-limited parts follows:


Table 2 for Disposing of Installed FSCAP and/or Life-Limited Parts

(1) If a FSCAP and/or life-limited part is installed in an aircraft or an engine, and it –
(i) Is documented with service life remaining – Then(A) You may exchange/sale the aircraft or engine, or GSA may transfer the aircraft or engine to another executive agency under 41 CFR parts 102-36 and 102-39;
(B) GSA may donate the aircraft or engine for flight use or ground use.
(ii) Is documented with no service life remaining – Then(A) You must remove and mutilate the part before you exchange/sale the aircraft or engine (see rules for disposing of uninstalled life-limited parts in Table 1 of this section). (Note: If an aircraft or engine is exchanged/sold to its OEM or PAH, you do not have to remove the expired life-limited part);
(B) You must remove and mutilate the part before GSA may transfer or donate the aircraft or engine for flight use (see the rules for disposing of uninstalled FSCAP in Table 1 of this section). (Note: An internal engine part may be left installed, if you identify the part individually to ensure that the receiving agency is aware of the part’s service status and, as a condition of the transfer or donation agreement, the receiving agency agrees to remove and mutilate the part before the engine is put into service. You must certify mutilation for transfers, and the State Agency for Surplus Property must certify that the part has been mutilated for donations); or
(C) GSA may donate the aircraft or engine for ground use only, after you remove the part, mutilate and mark it “EXPIRED LIFE-LIMITED – NOT AIRWORTHY.” (Note: An internal engine part may be left installed, if, as a condition of the donation agreement, the receiving agency agrees to remove and mutilate the part and mark it, and the State Agency for Surplus Property must certify that the part has been mutilated and marked).

§ 102-33.375 What is a FSCAP Criticality Code?

(a) A FSCAP Criticality Code is a code assigned by DOD to indicate the type of FSCAP: Code “F” indicates a standard FSCAP; Code “E” indicates a nuclear-hardened FSCAP.


(b) You must perpetuate a FSCAP Criticality Code on all property records and reports of excess. If the code is not annotated on the transfer document that you received when you acquired the part, you may contact the appropriate military service or query DOD’s Federal Logistics Information System (FLIS) using the National Stock Number (NSN) or the part number (see http://www.dlis.dla.mil/webflis). For assistance in subscribing to the FLIS service, contact the WebFLIS Consumer Support Office, 1-877-352-2255.


Subpart E – Reporting Information on Government Aircraft

Overview

§ 102-33.380 Who must report information to GSA on Government aircraft?

You must report information to GSA on Government aircraft if your agency –


(a) Is an executive agency of the United States Government; and


(b) Owns, bails, borrows, loans, leases, rents, charters, or contracts for (or obtains by ISSA) Government aircraft.


§ 102-33.385 What Federally-funded aviation activities of executive agencies are exempt from the requirement to report information to GSA on Government aircraft?

The following Federally-funded activities are exempt from the requirement to report information to GSA on Government aircraft:


(a) The Armed Forces (which includes the U.S. Coast Guard); and


(b) Agencies in the Intelligence Community.


§ 102-33.390 What information must we report on Government aircraft?

You must report the following information to GSA (for information regarding how to report this information, see: https://gsa.inl.gov/fairs/):


(a) Inventory data on Federal aircraft, including your Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS), through FAIRS;


(b) Cost and utilization data on Federal aircraft, including your Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS), through FAIRS;


(c) Cost and utilization data on CAS aircraft and related aviation services (see definition of “Government aircraft” for more on CAS), through FAIRS;


(d) Accident and incident data (see § 102-33.445); and


(e) The results of standard competition studies in compliance with OMB Circular A-76 to justify purchasing, leasing, modernizing, replacing, or otherwise acquiring aircraft and related aviation services.


Federal Aviation Interactive Reporting System (FAIRS)

§ 102-33.395 What is FAIRS?

FAIRS is a management information system operated by GSA to collect, maintain, analyze, and report information on Federal aircraft inventories and cost and usage of Federal aircraft and CAS aircraft (and related aviation services). Users access FAIRS through a highly-secure Web site. The U.S. Government Aircraft Cost Accounting Guide (CAG) (see http://www.gsa.gov/aviationpolicy) contains the business rules for using the system.


§ 102-33.400 How must we report to FAIRS?

You must report to FAIRS electronically through a secure Web interface to the FAIRS application on the Internet. For additional information see https://gsa.inl.gov/fairs/.


§ 102-33.405 When must we report to FAIRS?

(a) You must report any changes in your Federal aircraft inventory within 14 calendar days of those changes.


(b) You must report cost and utilization data to FAIRS at the end of every quarter of the fiscal year (December 31, March 31, June 30, and September 30). However, you may submit your information to FAIRS on a daily, weekly, or monthly basis. To provide enough time to calculate your cost and utilization data, you may report any one quarter’s cost and utilization in the following quarter, as follows:


Quarter
Submit
QTR 1 – October 1-December 31Federal inventory for QTR 1.
Federal cost and utilization for previous QTR 4.
CAS cost and utilization for previous QTR 4.
QTR 2 – January 1-March 31Federal inventory for QTR 2.
Federal cost and utilization for QTR 1.
CAS cost and utilization for QTR 1.
QTR 3 – April 1-June 30Federal inventory for QTR 3.
Federal cost and utilization for QTR 2.
CAS cost and utilization for QTR 2.
QTR 4 – July 1-September 30Federal inventory for QTR 4.
Federal cost and utilization for QTR 3.
CAS cost and utilization for QTR 3.

Federal Inventory Data

§ 102-33.410 What are Federal inventory data?

Federal inventory data includes:


(a) Information on each of the operational and non-operational Federal aircraft that you own, bail, borrow, or loan; and


(b) UAS as described in § 102-33.20.


§ 102-33.415 When may we declassify a Federal aircraft and remove it from our Federal aircraft inventory?

When an aircraft is lost or destroyed, or is otherwise non-operational and you want to retain it, you may declassify it and remove it from your Federal aircraft inventory. For further details, see §§ 102-33.250 and 102-33.420. See §§ 102-33.265 and 102-33.270 for reporting excess Federal aircraft.


§ 102-33.420 How must we declassify a Federal aircraft?

To declassify a Federal aircraft, you must –


(a) Send a letter to the Deputy Associate Administrator, Office of Asset and Transportation Management, Office of Government-wide Policy, General Services Administration, 1800 F St. NW., Washington, DC 20405, that requests approval to declassify the aircraft and states that the aircraft is non-operational (which includes lost or destroyed). In this letter you must –


(1) Identify the Federal Supply Classification (FSC) group(s) that the declassified aircraft/parts will fall under, if applicable;


(2) Describe the condition of the aircraft (crash-damaged, unrecoverable, parts unavailable, etc.); and


(3) Include photographs as appropriate.


(b) Within 14 calendar days of receiving GSA’s approval to declassify the aircraft, following 14 CFR 45.13, request approval from your local FAA Flight Standards District Office (FSDO) to remove the manufacturer’s data plate;


(c) Within 14 calendar days of receiving approval from FAA to remove the data plate, inform GSA of FAA’s approval, send the data plate by courier or registered mail to the FAA, as directed by your FSDO, and remove the certificate of airworthiness and the aircraft’s registration form from the aircraft, complete the reverse side of the registration form, and send both documents to The FAA Aircraft Registration Branch, P.O. Box 25504, Oklahoma City, OK 73125-0504; and


(d) Update the FAIRS inventory record to reflect disposal status and update your personal property records, deleting the declassified aircraft from the aircraft category and adding it to another Federal Supply Classification group or groups, as appropriate.


Federal Aircraft Cost and Utilization Data

§ 102-33.425 What Federal aircraft cost and utilization data must we report?

You must report certain costs for each of your Federal aircraft (including your UAS) and the number of hours that you flew each aircraft. In reporting the costs of your Federal aircraft, you must report both the amounts you paid as Federal costs, which are for services the Government provides, and the amounts you paid for commercial aviation services (CAS) in support of your Federal aviation program. For a list and definitions of the Federal aircraft cost and utilization data elements, see the U.S. Government Aircraft Cost Accounting Guide (CAG), which is available at http://www.gsa.gov/aviationpolicy.


§ 102-33.430 Who must report Federal aircraft cost and utilization data?

(a) Executive agencies, except the Armed Forces and agencies in the Intelligence Community, must report Federal cost and utilization data on all Federal aircraft; and


(b) Agencies should report Federal cost and utilization data for loaned aircraft only if Federal money was expended on the aircraft.


Commercial Aviation Services (CAS) Cost and Utilization Data

§ 102-33.435 What CAS cost and utilization data must we report?

You must report:


(a) The costs and flying hours for each CAS aircraft you hire;


(b) The costs and contractual periods for related aviation services that you hire (by contract or through an Inter-service support agreement (ISSA)).



Note to § 102-33.435:

You should not report related aviation services that you hire commercially in support of Federal aircraft. “Federal” aircraft are by definition owned aircraft. The agency that owns the aircraft is responsible for capturing all cost and utilization data and is required to report this data in GSA’s FAIRS. See the U.S. Government Aircraft Cost Accounting Guide (CAG), which is available from GSA at http://www.gsa.gov/aviationpolicy.


§ 102-33.440 Who must report CAS cost and utilization data?

Executive agencies, except the Armed Forces and agencies in the Intelligence Community, must report CAS cost and utilization data. You must report CAS cost and utilization data if your agency makes payments to –


(a) Charter or rent aircraft;


(b) Lease or lease-purchase aircraft;


(c) Hire aircraft and related services through an ISSA or a full service contract; or


(d) Obtain related aviation services through an ISSA or by contract except when you use the services in support of Federal aircraft (see the Note at § 102-33.435).


Accident and Incident Data

§ 102-33.445 What accident and incident data must we report?

You must report within 14 calendar days to GSA, Aviation Policy Division, 1800 F St. NW., Washington, DC 20405, all aviation accidents and incidents that your agency is required to report to the NTSB. You may also report other incident information. GSA and the ICAP will use the collected accident/incident information in conjunction with FAIRS’ data, such as flying hours and missions, to calculate aviation safety statistics for the Federal aviation community and to share safety lessons-learned.


§ 102-33.450 How must we report accident and incident data?

You must report accident and incident data to GSA at http://www.gsa.gov/aviationpolicy or call GSA’s Aviation Policy Division and report the accident or incident telephonically.


Common Aviation Management Information Standard (C-AMIS)

§ 102-33.455 What is C-AMIS?

The Common Aviation Management Information Standard (C-AMIS) is a guide to assist agencies in developing or modernizing their internal aviation management information systems. C-AMIS includes standard specifications and data definitions related to Federal aviation operations. C-AMIS is jointly written by the ICAP and GSA and available from GSA’s Aviation Policy Division.


§ 102-33.460 What is our responsibility in relation to C-AMIS?

If you use a management information system to provide data to FAIRS by batch upload, you are responsible for ensuring that your system is C-AMIS-compliant (see § 102-33.195). For more information on compliance with C-AMIS, contact GSA’s Aviation Policy Division at (202) 208-0519 or (202) 997-7274.


Performance Indicators

§ 102-33.465 What is a performance indicator?

In addition to the definition in § 102-33.20, a performance indicator provides information (either qualitative or quantitative) on the extent to which the actual outcome of a policy, program, or initiative achieves the planned outcome.


§ 102-33.470 Must we develop performance indicators?

Yes, your agency must develop performance indicators in order to measure the degree to which key aviation program objectives are achieved. It is suggested that your performance indicators:


(a) Measure the contribution of the aviation program toward the accomplishment of the agency’s mission;


(b) Support and justify aviation program budget requests; and


(c) Demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of the aviation program’s performance.


§ 102-33.475 What are some examples of performance indicators that an agency can use?

Examples of performance indicators include, but are not limited to, a percentage increase or decrease:


(a) Of operations scheduling effectiveness;


(b) Of repeat system discrepancies over a specific period of time;


(c) In logistical response time for returned parts processing over a specified period of time;


(d) In lost man-hours due to personnel injuries;


(e) In aircraft turn-around time;


(f) In fuel expenditures for a given mission, location, or type/model/series of aircraft;


(g) In aircraft availability or non-availability rates;


(h) In full-mission-capable aircraft over a specific time period;


(i) In non-airworthy maintenance;


(j) In maintenance costs per flying hour; or


(k) In variable cost per passenger mile.


Appendix A to Part 102-33 – Disclosure Statement for Crewmembers and Qualified Non-Crewmembers Flying on Board Government Aircraft Operated as Public Aircraft

Generally, an aircraft used exclusively for the U.S. Government may be considered a “public aircraft” as defined by Public Law 106-181 and 14 CFR Chapter I, provided it is not a Government-owned aircraft transporting passengers or operating for commercial purposes. A public aircraft is not subject to many Federal Aviation Regulations, including requirements relating to aircraft certification, maintenance, and pilot certification. If the aircraft does not qualify as a “public aircraft”, then it is a civil aircraft and must comply with all Federal Aviation Regulations applicable to civil aircraft. If you have any questions concerning whether a particular flight will be a public aircraft operation or a civil aircraft operation, you should contact the agency sponsor of that flight.


Rights and Benefits

You have certain rights and benefits in the unlikely event you are injured or killed while working aboard a Government-owned or operated aircraft. Federal employees and some private citizens are eligible for workers’ compensation benefits under the Federal Employees’ Compensation Act (FECA). When FECA applies, it is the sole remedy. For more information about FECA and its coverage, consult with your agency’s benefits office or contact the Branch of Technical Assistance at the Department of Labor’s Office of Workers’ Compensation Programs.


State or Foreign Laws

State or foreign laws may provide for product liability or “third party” causes of actions for personal injury or wrongful death. If you have questions about a particular case or believe you have a claim, you should consult with an attorney.


Insurance Policies

Some insurance policies may exclude coverage for injuries or death sustained while working or traveling aboard a Government or military aircraft or while within a combat area. You may wish to check your policy or consult with your insurance provider before your flight. The insurance available to Federal employees through the Federal Employees Group Life Insurance Program does not contain an exclusion of this type.


Victim Rights

If you are the victim of an air disaster resulting from criminal activity, Victim and Witness Specialists from the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and/or the local U.S. Attorney’s Office will keep you or your family informed about the status of the criminal investigation(s) and provide you or your family with information about rights and services, such as crisis intervention, counseling and emotional support. State crime victim compensation may be able to cover crime-related expenses, such as medical costs, mental health counseling, funeral and burial costs, and lost wages or loss of support. The Office for Victims of Crime (an agency of the Department of Justice) and the U.S. Attorneys Office are authorized by the Antiterrorism Act of 1996 to provide emergency financial assistance to State programs for the benefit of victims of terrorist acts or mass violence.


Federal Employee

If you are injured or killed on the job during the performance of duty, including while traveling or working aboard a Government aircraft or other Government-owned or operated conveyance for official Government business purposes, you and your family are eligible to collect workers’ compensation benefits under FECA. You and your family may not file a personal injury or wrongful death suit against the United States or its employees. However, you may have cause of action against potentially liable third parties.


Family Member

You or your qualifying family member must normally also choose between FECA disability or death benefits, and those payable under your retirement system (either the Civil Service Retirement System or the Federal Employees Retirement System). You may choose the benefit that is more favorable to you.


Private Citizen

Even if the Federal Government does not regularly employ you, if you are rendering personal service to the Federal Government on a voluntary basis or for nominal pay, you may be defined as a Federal employee for purposes of FECA. If that is the case, you and your family are eligible to receive workers’ compensation benefits under FECA, but may not collect in a personal injury or wrongful death lawsuit against the United States or its employees. You and your family may file suit against potentially liable third parties. Before you board a Government aircraft, you may wish to consult with the department or agency sponsoring the flight to clarify whether you are considered a Federal employee.


If the agency determines that you are not a “Federal employee,” you and your family will not be eligible to receive workers’ compensation benefits under FECA. If you are onboard the aircraft for purposes of official Government business, you may be eligible for workers’ compensation benefits under state law. If an accident occurs within the United States, or its territories, its airspace, or over the high seas, you and your family may claim against the United States under the Federal Tort Claims Act or Suits in Admiralty Act. If you are killed aboard a military aircraft, your family may be eligible to receive compensation under the Military Claims Act, or if you are an inhabitant of a foreign country, under the Foreign Claims Act.



Note to appendix A to part 102-33:

This disclosure statement is not all-inclusive. You should contact your agency’s personnel office, or if you are a private citizen, your agency sponsor or point-of-contact for further assistance.


PART 102-34 – MOTOR VEHICLE MANAGEMENT


Authority:40 U.S.C. 121(c); 40 U.S.C. 17503; 31 U.S.C. 1344; 49 U.S.C. 32917; E.O. 12375.


Source:74 FR 11871, Mar. 20, 2009, unless otherwise noted.

Subpart A – General Provisions

§ 102-34.5 What does this part cover?

This part governs the economical and efficient management and control of motor vehicles that the Government owns, leases commercially or leases through GSA Fleet. Agencies will incorporate appropriate provisions of this part into contracts offering Government-furnished equipment in order to ensure adequate control over the use of motor vehicles.


§ 102-34.10 What are the governing authorities for this part?

The authorities for the regulations in this part are 40 U.S.C. 121(c), 40 U.S.C. 17503, 31 U.S.C. 1344, 49 U.S.C. 32917, and E.O. 12375.


§ 102-34.15 Who must comply with these provisions?

All executive agencies must comply with the provisions of this part. The legislative and judicial branches are encouraged to follow these provisions.


§ 102-34.20 What motor vehicles are not covered by this part?

Motor vehicles not covered by this part are:


(a) Military design motor vehicles;


(b) Motor vehicles used for military field training, combat, or tactical purposes;


(c) Motor vehicles used principally within the confines of a regularly established military post, camp, or depot; and


(d) Motor vehicles regularly used by an agency to perform investigative, law enforcement, or intelligence duties, if the head of the agency determines that exclusive control of the vehicle is essential for effective performance of duties, although such vehicles are subject to subpart D and subpart J of this part.


§ 102-34.25 To whom do “we”, “you”, and their variants refer?

Unless otherwise indicated, use of pronouns “we”, “you”, and their variants throughout this part refer to you as an executive agency, as your agency’s fleet manager, or as a motor vehicle user or operator, as appropriate.


§ 102-34.30 How do we request a deviation from the provisions of this part?

Refer to §§ 102-2.60 through 102-2.110 of this chapter for information on how to obtain a deviation from this part.


Definitions

§ 102-34.35 What definitions apply to this part?

The following definitions apply to this part:


Commercial design motor vehicle means a motor vehicle procurable from regular production lines and designed for use by the general public.


Commercial lease or lease commercially means obtaining a motor vehicle by contract or other arrangement from a commercial source for 120 continuous days or more. (Procedures for purchasing and leasing motor vehicles through GSA can be found in 41 CFR subpart 101-26.5).


Domestic fleet means all reportable motor vehicles operated in any State, Commonwealth, territory or possession of the United States, and the District of Columbia.


Foreign fleet means all reportable motor vehicles operated in areas outside any State, Commonwealth, territory or possession of the United States, and the District of Columbia.


Government motor vehicle means any motor vehicle that the Government owns or leases. This includes motor vehicles obtained through purchase, excess, forfeiture, commercial lease, or GSA Fleet lease.


Government-owned motor vehicle means any motor vehicle that the Government has obtained through purchase, excess, forfeiture, or otherwise and for which the Government holds title.


GSA Fleet lease means obtaining a motor vehicle from the General Services Administration Fleet (GSA Fleet).


Law enforcement motor vehicle means a light duty motor vehicle that is specifically approved in an agency’s appropriation act for use in apprehension, surveillance, police or other law enforcement work or specifically designed for use in law enforcement. If not identified in an agency’s appropriation language, a motor vehicle qualifies as a law enforcement motor vehicle only in the following cases:


(1) A passenger automobile having heavy duty components for electrical, cooling and suspension systems and at least the next higher cubic inch displacement or more powerful engine than is standard for the automobile concerned;


(2) A light truck having emergency warning lights and identified with markings such as “police;”


(3) An unmarked motor vehicle certified by the agency head as essential for the safe and efficient performance of intelligence, counterintelligence, protective, or other law enforcement duties; or


(4) A forfeited motor vehicle seized by a Federal agency that is subsequently used for the purpose of performing law enforcement activities.


Light duty motor vehicle means any motor vehicle with a gross motor vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of 8,500 pounds or less.


Light truck means a motor vehicle on a truck chassis with a gross motor vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of 8,500 pounds or less.


Military design motor vehicle means a motor vehicle (excluding commercial design motor vehicles) designed according to military specifications to directly support combat or tactical operations or training for such operations.


Motor vehicle means any vehicle, self propelled or drawn by mechanical power, designed and operated principally for highway transportation of property or passengers, but does not include a military design motor vehicle or vehicles not covered by this part (see § 102-34.20).


Motor vehicle identification (also referred to as “motor vehicle markings”) means the legends “For Official Use Only” and “U.S. Government” placed on a motor vehicle plus other legends readily identifying the department, agency, establishment, corporation, or service by which the motor vehicle is used.


Motor vehicle markings (see definition of “Motor vehicle identification” in this section).


Motor vehicle purchase means buying a motor vehicle from a commercial source, usually a motor vehicle manufacturer or a motor vehicle manufacturer’s dealership. (Procedures for purchasing and leasing motor vehicles through GSA can be found in 41 CFR subpart 101-26.5.)


Motor vehicle rental means obtaining a motor vehicle by contract or other arrangement from a commercial source for less than 120 continuous days.


Motor vehicles transferred from excess means obtaining a motor vehicle reported as excess and transferred with or without cost.


Owning agency means the executive agency that holds the vehicle title, manufacturer’s Certificate of Origin, or is the lessee of a commercial lease. This term does not apply to agencies that lease motor vehicles from the GSA Fleet.


Passenger automobile means a sedan or station wagon designed primarily to transport people.


Reportable motor vehicles are any Government motor vehicles used by an executive agency or activity, including those used by contractors. Also included are motor vehicles designed or acquired for a specific or unique purpose, including motor vehicles that serve as a platform or conveyance for special equipment, such as a trailer. Excluded are material handling equipment and construction equipment not designed and used primarily for highway operation (e.g., if it must be trailered or towed to be transported).


Using agency means an executive agency that obtains motor vehicles from the GSA Fleet, commercial firms or another executive agency and does not hold the vehicle