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Title 47 – Telecommunication–Volume 1

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Title 47 – Telecommunication–Volume 1


Part


chapter i – Federal Communications Commission

0

CHAPTER I – FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION

SUBCHAPTER A – GENERAL

PART 0 – COMMISSION ORGANIZATION


Authority:47 U.S.C. 151, 154(i), 154(j), 155, 225, and 409, unless otherwise noted.

Subpart A – Organization


Authority:47 U.S.C. 151, 154(i), 154(j), 155, 225, and 409, unless otherwise noted.

General

§ 0.1 The Commission.

The Federal Communications Commission is composed of five (5) members who are appointed by the president subject to confirmation by the Senate. Normally, one Commissioner is appointed or reappointed each year, for a term of five (5) years.


[53 FR 29054, Aug. 2, 1988]


§ 0.3 The Chairman.

(a) One of the members of the Commission is designated by the President to serve as Chairman, or chief executive officer, of the Commission. As Chairman, he has the following duties and responsibilities:


(1) To preside at all meetings and sessions of the Commission.


(2) To represent the Commission in all matters relating to legislation and legislative reports; however, any other Commissioner may present his own or minority views or supplemental reports.


(3) To represent the Commission in all matters requiring conferences or communications with other governmental officers, departments or agencies.


(4) To coordinate and organize the work of the Commission in such a manner as to promote prompt and efficient disposition of all matters within the jurisdiction of the Commission.


(b) The Commission will, in the case of a vacancy in the Office of the Chairman of the Commission, or in the absence or inability of the Chairman to serve, temporarily designate one of its members to act as Chairman until the cause or circumstance requiring such designation has been eliminated or corrected.


[32 FR 10569, July 19, 1967]


§ 0.5 General description of Commission organization and operations.

(a) Principal staff units. The Commission is assisted in the performance of its responsibilities by its staff, which is divided into the following principal units:


(1) Office of Managing Director.


(2) Office of Engineering and Technology.


(3) Office of General Counsel.


(4) Office of Economics and Analytics.


(5) Office of Media Relations.


(6) Office of Legislative Affairs.


(7) Office of Inspector General.


(8) Office of Communications Business Opportunities.


(9) Office of Administrative Law Judges.


(10) Office of Workplace Diversity


(11) Wireline Competition Bureau.


(12) Wireless Telecommunications Bureau.


(13) International Bureau.


(14) Media Bureau.


(15) Enforcement Bureau.


(16) Consumer and Governmental Affairs Bureau.


(17) Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau.


(b) Staff responsibilities and functions. The organization and functions of these major staff units are described in detail in §§ 0.11 through 0.151. The defense and emergency preparedness functions of the Commission are set forth separately, beginning at § 0.181. For a complete description of staff functions, reference should be made to those provisions. (See also the U.S. Government Organization Manual, which contains a chart showing the Commission’s organization, the names of the members and principal staff officers of the Commission, and other information concerning the Commission.)


(c) Delegations of authority to the staff. Pursuant to section 5(c) of the Communications Act, the Commission has delegated authority to its staff to act on matters which are minor or routine or settled in nature and those in which immediate action may be necessary. See subpart B of this part. Actions taken under delegated authority are subject to review by the Commission, on its own motion or on an application for review filed by a person aggrieved by the action. Except for the possibility of review, actions taken under delegated authority have the same force and effect as actions taken by the Commission. The delegation of authority to a staff officer, however, does not mean that the staff officer will exercise that authority in all matters subject to the delegation. The staff is at liberty to refer any matter at any stage to the Commission for action, upon concluding that it involves matters warranting the Commission’s consideration, and the Commission may instruct the staff to do so.


(d) Commission action. Matters requiring Commission action, or warranting its consideration, are dealt with by the Commission at regular monthly meetings, or at special meetings called to consider a particular matter. Meetings are normally held at the principal offices of the Commission in the District of Columbia, but may be held elsewhere in the United States. In appropriate circumstances, Commission action may be taken between meetings “by circulation”, which involves the submission of a document to each of the Commissioners for his approval.


(e) Compliance with Federal financial management requirements. Any Bureau or Office recommending Commission action that may affect agency compliance with Federal financial management requirements must confer with the Office of Managing Director. Such items will indicate the position of the Managing Director when forwarded to the Commission. Any Bureau or Office taking action under delegated authority that may affect agency compliance with Federal financial management requirements must confer with the Office of the Managing Director before taking action.


(Secs. 4(i), 303(r) and 5(c)(i), Communications Act of 1934, as amended; 47 CFR 0.61 and 0.283)

[32 FR 10569, July 19, 1967]


Editorial Note:For Federal Register citations affecting § 0.5, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume and at www.govinfo.gov.

Office of Managing Director

§ 0.11 Functions of the Office.

Link to an amendment published at 87 FR 54328, Sept. 6, 2022.

(a) The Managing Director is appointed by the Chairman with the approval of the Commission. Under the supervision and direction of the Chairman, the Managing Director shall serve as the Commission’s chief operating and executive official with the following duties and responsibilities:


(1) Provide managerial leadership to and exercise supervision and direction over the Commission’s Bureaus and Offices with respect to management and administrative matters but not substantive regulatory matters such as regulatory policy and rule making, authorization of service, administration of sanctions, and adjudication.


(2) Formulate and administer all management and administrative policies, programs, and directives for the Commission consistent with authority delegated by the Commission and the Chairman and recommend to the Chairman and the Commission major changes in such policies and programs.


(3) Assist the Chairman in carrying out the administrative and executive responsibilities delegated to the Chairman as the administrative head of the agency.


(4) Advise the Chairman and Commission on management, administrative, and related matters; review and evaluate the programs and procedures of the Commission; initiate action or make recommendations as may be necessary to administer the Communications Act most effectively in the public interest. Assess the management, administrative, and resource implications of any proposed action or decision to be taken by the Commission or by a Bureau or Office under delegated authority; recommend to the Chairman and Commission program priorities, resource and position allocations, management, and administrative policies.


(5) Plan and administer the Commissions performance review system. Assure that objections, priorities, and action plans established by Bureau and Offices are consistent with overall Commission objectives and priorities.


(6) Plan and administer the Commission’s Program Evaluation System. Ensure that evaluation results are utilized in Commission decision-making and priority-setting activities.


(7) Direct agency efforts to improve management effectiveness, operational efficiency, employee productivity, and service to the public. Administer Commission-wide management programs.


(8) Plan and manage the administrative affairs of the Commission with respect to the functions of personnel and position management; labor-management relations; training; budget and financial management; accounting for the financial transactions of the Commission and preparation of financial statements and reports; information management and processing; organization planning; management analysis; procurement; office space management and utilization; administrative and office services; supply and property management; records management; personnel and physical security; and international telecommunications settlements.


(9) [Reserved]


(10) With the concurrence of the General Counsel, interpret rules and regulations pertaining to fees.


(b) The Secretary is the official custodian of the Commission’s documents.


(c) The Chief Information Officer shall have a significant role in: The decision-making process for annual and multi-year planning, programming, budgeting, and execution decisions, related reporting requirements, and reports related to information technology; the management, governance, and oversight processes related to information technology; and the hiring of personnel with information technology responsibilities. The Chief Information Officer, in consultation with the Chief Financial Officer and budget officials, shall specify and approve the allocation of amounts appropriated to the Commission for information technology, consistent with the provisions of appropriations Acts, budget guidelines, and recommendations from the Director of the Office of Management and Budget.


(Secs. 4, 303, 307, 48 Stat., as amended, 1066, 1082, 1083; 47 U.S.C. 154, 303, 307)

[46 FR 59975, Dec. 8, 1981, as amended at 47 FR 41380, Sept. 20, 1982; 49 FR 45583, Nov. 19, 1984; 50 FR 27953, July 9, 1985; 53 FR 29054, Aug. 2, 1988; 53 FR 47536, Nov. 23, 1988; 54 FR 152, Jan. 4, 1989; 59 FR 26971, May 25, 1994; 60 FR 5323, Jan. 27, 1995; 62 FR 15853, Apr. 3, 1997; 62 FR 51052, Sept. 30, 1997; 67 FR 13217, Mar. 21, 2002; 69 FR 30233, May 27, 2004; 70 FR 21651, Apr. 27, 2005; 71 FR 69034, Nov. 29, 2006; 84 FR 6085, Feb. 26, 2019]


Office of Inspector General

§ 0.13 Functions of the Office.

The Office of Inspector General is directly responsible to the Chairman as head of the agency. However, the Chairman may not prevent or prohibit the Office of Inspector General from carrying out its duties and responsibilities as mandated by the Inspector General Act Amendments of 1988 (Pub. L. 100-504) and the Inspector General Act of 1978 (5 U.S.C. Appendix 3), as amended. The Office has the following duties and responsibilities.


(a) Provide policy direction for and to conduct, supervise and coordinate audits and investigations relating to the programs and operations of the Federal Communications Commission.


(b) Review existing and proposed legislation and regulations relating to programs and operations of the Commission and to make recommendations in its required semiannual reports to Congress concerning the impact of such legislation or regulations on the economy and efficiency in the administration of these programs and operations, or the prevention and detection of fraud and abuse in such programs and operations.


(c) Recommend policies and conduct or coordinate other activities to promote economy and efficiency in the administration of Commission programs, or detect and prevent fraud and abuse in Commission activities. Coordinate with other governmental agencies and non-governmental entities on these matters.


(d) Keep the Chairman of the Commission – and through him the other Commissioners – and the Congress fully and currently informed concerning fraud and other serious problems, abuses, and deficiencies relating to the administration of Commission programs and operations; recommend corrective action and report on the progress made in implementing such corrective action. In addition to providing the Chairman with the results of completed audits and inspections, the Inspector General shall prepare statutorily required reports, identified as such, to include:


(1) Semiannual reports summarizing activities of the office during the preceding six month period (due to the Chairman by April 30 and October 31);


(2) Special reports specifically identifying any serious or flagrant problems, abuses or deficiencies (due to the Chairman immediately upon discovery of these matters by the Inspector General).


[54 FR 15194, Apr. 17, 1989]


Office of Media Relations

§ 0.15 Functions of the Office.

(a) Enhance public understanding of and compliance with the Commission’s regulatory requirements through dissemination of information to the news media.


(b) Act as the principal channel for communicating information to the news media on Commission policies, programs, and activities.


(c) Advise the Commission on information dissemination as it affects liaison with the media.


(d) Manage the FCC’s Internet site and oversee the agency’s Web standards and guidelines.


(e) Maintain liaison with the Consumer and Governmental Affairs Bureau on press and media issues concerning consumer assistance and information including informal consumer complaints.


(f) Manage the FCC’s audio/visual support services and maintain liaison with outside parties regarding the broadcast of Commission proceedings.


[64 FR 60716, Nov. 8, 1999, as amended at 67 FR 13217, Mar. 21, 2002; 67 FR 46112, July 12, 2002]


Office of Legislative Affairs

§ 0.17 Functions of the Office.

The Office of Legislative Affairs is directly responsible to the Commission. The Office has the following duties and responsibilities:


(a) Advise and make recommendations to the Commission with respect to legislation proposed by members of Congress or the Executive Branch and coordinate the preparation of Commission views thereon for submission to Congress or the Executive Branch.


(b) Coordinate with the Office of General Counsel responses to Congressional or Executive Branch inquiries as to the local ramifications of Commission policies, regulations, rules, and statutory interpretations.


(c) Assist the Office of the Managing Director in preparation of the annual report to Congress, the Commission budget and appropriations legislation to Congress; assist the Office of Media Relations in preparation of the Commission’s Annual Report.


(d) Assist the Chairman and Commissioners in preparation for, and the coordination of their appearances before the Committees of Congress.


(e) Coordinate the annual Commission legislative program.


(f) Coordinate Commission and staff responses to inquiries by individual members of Congress, congressional committees and staffs.


(g) Coordinate with the Consumer and Governmental Affairs Bureau on issues involving informal consumer complaints and other general inquiries by consumers.


[52 FR 42438, Nov. 5, 1987, as amended at 64 FR 60716, Nov. 8, 1999; 67 FR 13217, Mar. 21, 2002]


Office of Economics and Analytics

§ 0.21 Functions of the Office.

The Office of Economics and Analytics advises and makes recommendations to the Commission in the areas of economic and data analysis and data management policy. The Office reviews all Commission actions involving significant economic or data analysis and provides expertise, guidance, and assistance to the Bureaus and other Offices in applying the principles of economic and data analysis. The Office coordinates the Commission’s research and development activities relating to economic and data analysis and data management policy. In addition, the Office serves, in close coordination with other relevant Bureaus and Offices, as a principal resource for policy and administrative staff of the Commission with regard to the design, implementation, and administration of auctions. The Office also establishes and implements Commission data management policies in conjunction with the relevant Bureaus and Offices and with the Office of Managing Director and Office of General Counsel. The Office of Economics and Analytics has the following duties and responsibilities:


(a) Identifies and evaluates significant communications policy issues, based on the principles and methods of economics and data analysis.


(b) Collaborates with and advises other Bureaus and Offices in the areas of economic and data analysis and with respect to the analysis of benefits, costs, and regulatory impacts of Commission policies, rules, and proposals.


(c) Prepares a rigorous, economically-grounded cost-benefit analysis for every rulemaking deemed to have an annual effect on the economy of $100 million or more.


(d) Confirms that the Office of Economics and Analytics has reviewed each Commission rulemaking to ensure it is complete before release to the public.


(e) Reviews and comments on all significant issues of economic and data analysis raised in connection with actions proposed to be taken by the Commission and advises the Commission regarding such issues.


(f) Develops, recommends, and implements data management policies in conjunction with the Office of Managing Director, the Office of General Counsel, and relevant Bureaus and Offices, and collaborates with and advises other Bureaus and Offices with respect to data management and data analysis.


(g) Manages the Commission’s economic and data analysis research programs, recommends budget levels and priorities for these programs, and serves as central account manager for all contractual economic and data analysis research studies funded by the Commission.


(h) Conducts economic, statistical, cost-benefit, and other data analysis of the impact of existing and proposed communications policies and operations, including cooperative studies with other staff units and consultant and contract efforts as appropriate.


(i) Coordinates the Commission’s evaluation of government (state and federal), academic, and industry-sponsored research affecting Commission policy.


(j) Coordinates with other Bureaus and Offices in making recommendations to the Commission on communications policy issues that involve economic and data analysis, to include cost-benefit analysis; represents the Commission at appropriate discussions and conferences.


(k) Develops and recommends procedures and plans for effective economic and data analysis, to include cost-benefit analysis, within the Commission.


(l) Seeks to ensure that FCC policy encourages and promotes competitive markets by providing Bureaus and Offices with the necessary support to identify, evaluate, and resolve competition issues.


(m) Serves as the Commission’s principal policy and administrative staff resource with regard to auction design and implementation issues. Jointly with the Wireless Telecommunications Bureau, Media Bureau, Wireline Competition Bureau, and/or other relevant Bureaus and Offices, develops, recommends, and administers policies, programs and rules, and advises the Commission on policy, engineering, and technical matters, concerning auctions of spectrum for wireless telecommunications and broadcast services and uses of competitive bidding to achieve other Commission policy objectives, including universal service support. Administers procurement of auction-related services from outside contractors. Oversees auctions conducted on behalf of the Commission by third parties at the direction of the Commission. Provides policy, administrative, and technical assistance to other Bureaus and Offices on auction issues. Advises and makes recommendations to the Commission, or acts for the Commission under delegated authority, in all matters pertaining to auction implementation. These activities include: Conducting auctions, policy development and coordination; conducting rulemaking and adjudicatory proceedings, including complaint proceedings for matters not within the responsibility of the Enforcement Bureau; acting on waivers of rules; compliance and enforcement activities for matters not within the responsibility of the Enforcement Bureau; determining resource impacts of existing, planned or recommended Commission activities concerning auctions, and developing and recommending resource deployment priorities. Exercises such authority as may be assigned, delegated, or referred to it by the Commission.


(n) With respect to applicable data and reporting duties assigned to the Office, coordinates with the Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau and other relevant Bureaus and Offices on all matters affecting public safety, homeland security, national security, emergency management, disaster management, and related issues.


(o) With respect to applicable data and reporting duties assigned to the Office, and in coordination with the Wireline Competition Bureau and the Wireless Telecommunications Bureau, provides federal staff support for the Federal-State Joint Board on Universal Service and the Federal-State Joint Board on Jurisdictional Separations.


(p) In coordination with other relevant Bureaus and Offices, provides economic, financial, and technical analyses of communications markets and provider performance.


(q) In coordination with the Wireline Competition Bureau, provides technical support for de novo review of decisions of the Administrative Council for Terminal Attachments regarding technical criteria pursuant to § 68.614 of this chapter.


(r) Prepares briefings, position papers, and proposed Commission actions, as appropriate.


(s) In coordination with other relevant Bureaus and Offices, develops and recommends responses to legislative, regulatory or judicial inquiries and proposals concerning or affecting matters within the purview of its functions.


(t) Administers part 1, subparts V and W, of this chapter, including rulemaking.


[83 FR 63075, Dec. 7, 2018, as amended at 85 FR 34526, June 5, 2020]


Office of Engineering and Technology

§ 0.31 Functions of the Office.

The Office of Engineering and Technology has the following duties and responsibilities:


(a) To evaluate evolving technology for interference potential and to suggest ways to facilitate its introduction in response to Bureau initiatives, and advise the Commission and staff offices in such matters.


(b) Represent the Commission at various national conferences and meetings (and, in consultation with the International Bureau, at various international conferences and meetings) devoted to the progress of communications and the development of technical and other information and standards, and serve as Commission coordinator for the various national conferences when appropriate.


(c) To conduct scientific and technical studies in advanced phases of terrestrial and space communications, and special projects to obtain theoretical and experimental data on new or improved techniques.


(d) To advise the Commission concerning engineering matters, including (in consultation with the Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau where appropriate) privacy and security of communications, involved in making or implementing policy or in resolving specific cases.


(e) To develop and implement procedures to acquire, store, and retrieve scientific and technical information useful in the engineering work of the Commission.


(f) To advise and represent the Commission on frequency allocation and spectrum usage matters.


(g) In cooperation with the relevant Bureaus and Offices, including the Office of General Counsel and the Office of Economics and Analytics, to advise the Commission, participate in and coordinate staff work with respect to general frequency allocation proceedings and other proceedings not within the jurisdiction of any single Bureau, and render service and advice with respect to rule making matters and proceedings affecting more than one Bureau.


(h) To collaborate with and advise other Bureaus and Offices in the formulation of technical requirements of the Rules.


(i) To administer parts 2, 5, 15, and 18 of this chapter, including licensing, recordkeeping, and rule making.


(j) To perform all engineering and management functions of the Commission with respect to formulating rules and regulations, technical standards, and general policies for parts 15, 18 and § 63.100 of this chapter, and for type approval and acceptance, and certification of radio equipment for compliance with the Rules.


(k) To maintain liaison with other agencies of government, technical experts representing foreign governments, and members of the public and industry concerned with communications and frequency allocation and usage.


(l) To calibrate and standardize technical equipment and installations used by the Commission.


(m) To exercise authority as may be assigned or referred by the Commission pursuant to section 5(c) of the Communications Act of 1934, as amended.


(n) To assist the Consumer and Governmental Affairs Bureau on issues involving informal consumer complaints and other general inquiries by consumers.


(Secs. 2, 3, 4, 5, 301, 303, 307, 308, 309, 315, 317, 48 Stat., as amended, 1064, 1065, 1066, 1068, 1081, 1082, 1083, 1084, 1085, 1088, 1089; 47 U.S.C. 152, 153, 154, 155, 301, 303, 307, 308, 309, 315, 317)

[45 FR 28718, Apr. 30, 1980, as amended at 46 FR 45342, Sept. 11, 1981; 51 FR 12615, Apr. 14, 1986; 60 FR 5323, Jan. 27, 1995; 62 FR 4170, Jan. 29, 1997; 63 FR 37499, July 13, 1998; 64 FR 60716, Nov. 8, 1999; 67 FR 13217, Mar. 21, 2002; 68 FR 11747, Mar. 12, 2003; 69 FR 70337, Dec. 3, 2004; 71 FR 69034, Nov. 29, 2006; 73 FR 9463, Feb. 21, 2008; 83 FR 63075, Dec. 7, 2018]


Office of General Counsel

§ 0.41 Functions of the Office.

The Office of the General Counsel has the following duties and responsibilities:


(a) To advise and represent the Commission in matters of litigation.


(b) To advise and make recommendations to the Commission with respect to proposed legislation and submit agency views on legislation when appropriate.


(c) To interpret the statutes, international agreements, and international regulations affecting the Commission.


(d) To prepare and make recommendations and interpretations concerning procedural rules of general applicability and to review all rules for consistency with other rules, uniformity, and legal sufficiency.


(e) To conduct research in legal matters as directed by the Commission.


(f) In cooperation with the Office of Engineering and Technology, to participate in, render advice to the Commission, and coordinate the staff work with respect to general frequency allocation proceedings and other proceedings not within the jurisdiction of any single bureau, and to render advice with respect to rule making matters and proceedings affecting more than one bureau.


(g) To exercise such authority as may be assigned or referred to it by the Commission pursuant to section 5(c) of the Communications Act of 1934, as amended.


(h) To cooperate with the International Bureau on all matters pertaining to space satellite communications.


(i) To interpret statutes and executive orders affecting the Commission’s national defense responsibilities, and to perform such functions involving implementation of such statutes and executive orders as may be assigned to it by the Commission or the Defense Commissioner.


(j) To perform all legal functions with respect to leases, contracts, tort claims and such other internal legal problems as may arise.


(k) To issue determinations on matters regarding the interception and recording of telephone conversations by Commission personnel. Nothing in this paragraph, however, shall affect the authority of the Inspector General to intercept or record telephone conversations as necessary in the conduct of investigations or audits.


(l) To advise the Commission in the preparation and revision of rules and the implementation and administration of ethics regulations and the Freedom of Information, Privacy, Government in the Sunshine and Alternative Dispute Resolution Acts.


(m) To assist and make recommendations to the Commission, and to individual Commissioners assigned to review initial decisions, as to the disposition of cases of adjudication and such other cases as, by Commission policy, are handled in the same manner and which have been designated for hearing.


(n) To serve as the principal operating office on ex parte matters involving restricted proceedings. To review and dispose of all ex parte communications received from the public and others.


(Secs. 2, 3, 4, 5, 301, 303, 307, 308, 309, 315, 317, 48 Stat., as amended, 1064, 1065, 1066, 1068, 1081, 1082, 1083, 1084, 1085, 1088, 1089; 47 U.S.C. 152, 153, 154, 155, 301, 303, 307, 308, 309, 315, 317)

[28 FR 12392, Nov. 22, 1963; 37 FR 19372, Sept. 20, 1972, as amended at 40 FR 17253, Apr. 18, 1975; 43 FR 29006, July 5, 1978; 44 FR 39179, July 5, 1979; 46 FR 57050, Nov. 20, 1981; 49 FR 47604, Dec. 6, 1984; 50 FR 2985, Jan. 23, 1985; 50 FR 49048, Nov. 29, 1985; 51 FR 12615, Apr. 14, 1986; 60 FR 5323, Jan. 27, 1995; 60 FR 34901, July 5, 1995; 62 FR 4170, Jan. 29, 1997; 62 FR 15853, Apr. 3, 1997; 64 FR 5950, Feb. 8, 1999; 64 FR 57585, Oct. 26, 1999]


International Bureau

§ 0.51 Functions of the Bureau.

The International Bureau has the following duties and responsibilities:


(a) To initiate and direct the development and articulation of international telecommunications policies, consistent with the priorities of the Commission;


(b) To advise the Chairman and Commissioners on matters of international telecommunications policy, and on the adequacy of the Commission’s actions to promote the vital interests of the American public in international commerce, national defense, and foreign policy;


(c) To develop, recommend, and administer policies, rules, standards, and procedures for the authorization and regulation of international telecommunications facilities and services, domestic and international satellite systems, and international broadcast services;


(d) To monitor compliance with the terms and conditions of authorizations and licenses granted by the Bureau, and to pursue enforcement actions in conjunction with appropriate bureaus and offices;


(e) To represent the Commission on international telecommunications matters at both domestic and international conferences and meetings, and to direct and coordinate the Commission’s preparation for such conferences and meetings;


(f) To serve as the single focal point within the Commission for cooperation and consultation on international telecommunications matters with other Federal agencies, international or foreign organizations, and appropriate regulatory bodies and officials of foreign governments;


(g) To develop, coordinate with other Federal agencies, and administer the regulatory assistance and training programs for foreign administrations to promote telecommunications development;


(h) To provide advice and technical assistance to U.S. trade officials in the negotiation and implementation of telecommunications trade agreements, and consult with other bureaus and offices as appropriate;


(i) To conduct economic, legal, technical, statistical, and other appropriate studies, surveys, and analyses in support of international telecommunications policies and programs.


(j) To collect and disseminate within the Commission information and data on international telecommunications policies, regulatory and market developments in other countries, and international organizations;


(k) To work with the Office of Legislative Affairs to coordinate the Commission’s activities on significant matters of international policy with appropriate Congressional offices;


(l) To promote the international coordination of spectrum allocations and frequency and orbital assignments so as to minimize cases of international radio interference involving U.S. licensees;


(m) To direct and coordinate, in consultation with other bureaus and offices as appropriate, negotiation of international agreements to provide for arrangements and procedures for coordination of radio frequency assignments to prevent or resolve international radio interference involving U.S. licensees;


(n) To ensure fulfillment of the Commission’s responsibilities under international agreements and treaty obligations, and, consistent with Commission policy, to ensure that the Commission’s regulations, procedures, and frequency allocations comply with the mandatory requirements of all applicable international and bilateral agreements;


(o) To oversee and, as appropriate, administer activities pertaining to the international consultation, coordination, and notification of U.S. frequency and orbital assignments, including activities required by bilateral agreements, the international Radio Regulations, and other international agreements;


(p) To advise the Chairman on priorities for international travel and develop, coordinate, and administer the international travel plan;


(q) To exercise authority to issue non-hearing related subpoenas for the attendance and testimony of witnesses and the production of books, papers, correspondence, memoranda, schedules of charges, contracts, agreements, and any other records deemed relevant to the investigation of matters within the jurisdiction of the International Bureau. Before issuing a subpoena, the International Bureau shall obtain the approval of the Office of General Counsel.


(r) To assist the Consumer and Governmental Affairs Bureau on issues involving informal consumer complaints and other general inquiries by consumers.


(s) To coordinate with the Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau on all matters affecting public safety, homeland security, national security, emergency management, disaster management, and related issues.


(t) Issue orders revoking a common carrier’s operating authority pursuant to section 214 of the Act, and issue orders to cease and desist such operations, in cases where the presiding officer has issued a certification order to the Commission that the carrier has waived its opportunity for hearing under that section.


[60 FR 5323, Jan. 27, 1995, as amended at 60 FR 35504, July 10, 1995; 64 FR 60716, Nov. 8, 1999; 67 FR 13217, Mar. 21, 2002; 71 FR 69034, Nov. 29, 2006; 85 FR 63170, Oct. 6, 2020]


Media Bureau

§ 0.61 Functions of the Bureau.

The Media Bureau develops, recommends and administers the policy and licensing programs for the regulation of media, including cable television, broadcast television and radio, and satellite services in the United States and its territories. The Bureau advises and recommends to the Commission, or acts for the Commission under delegated authority, in matters pertaining to multichannel video programming distribution, broadcast radio and television, direct broadcast satellite service policy, and associated matters. The Bureau will, among other things:


(a) Process applications for authorization, assignment, transfer and renewal of media services, including AM, FM, TV, the cable TV relay service, and related services.


(b) Conduct rulemaking proceedings concerning the legal, engineering, and economic aspects of media service.


(c) Conduct comprehensive studies and analyses concerning the legal, engineering, and economic aspects of electronic media services.


(d) [Reserved]


(e) Administer and enforce rules and policies regarding political programming and related matters.


(f) Administer and enforce rules and policies regarding:


(1) Radio and television broadcast industry services;


(2) Cable television systems, operators, and services, including those relating to rates, technical standards, customer service, ownership, competition to cable systems, broadcast station signal retransmission and carriage, program access, wiring equipment, channel leasing, and federal-state/local regulatory relationships. This includes: acting, after Commission assumption of jurisdiction to regulate cable television rates for basic service and associated equipment, on cable operator requests for approval of existing or increased rates; reviewing appeals of local franchising authorities’ rate making decisions involving rates for the basic service tier and associated equipment, except when such appeals raise novel or unusual issues; evaluating basic rate regulation certification requests filed by cable system franchising authorities; periodically reviewing and, when appropriate, revising standard forms used in administering: the certification process for local franchising authorities wishing to regulate rates, and the substantive rate regulation standards prescribed by the Commission;


(3) Open video systems;


(4) Preemption of restrictions on devices designed for over-the-air reception of television broadcast signals, multichannel multipoint distribution service, and direct broadcast satellite services;


(5) The commercial availability of navigational devices;


(6) The accessibility of video programming to persons with disabilities;


(7) Program access and carriage;


(8) The Satellite Home Viewer Improvement Act; and


(9) Post-licensing for satellite consumer broadcast services (DBS, DTH and DARS).



Note to paragraph (f):

The Media Bureau’s enforcement authority does not include enforcement in those areas assigned to the Enforcement Bureau. See 47 CFR 0.111.


(g) Conduct rulemaking and policy proceedings regarding pole attachments.


(h) Process and act on all applications for authorization, petitions for special relief, petitions to deny, waiver requests, requests for certification, objections, complaints, and requests for declaratory rulings and stays regarding the areas listed.


(i) Assist the Consumer and Governmental Affairs Bureau on issues involving informal consumer complaints and other general inquiries by consumers.


(j) Exercise authority to issue non-hearing related subpoenas for the attendance and testimony of witnesses and the production of books, papers, correspondence, memoranda, schedules of charges, contracts, agreements, and any other records deemed relevant to the investigation of matters within the jurisdiction of the Media Bureau. Before issuing a subpoena, the Media Bureau shall obtain the approval of the Office of General Counsel.


(k) Carry out the functions of the Commission under the Communications Act of 1934, as amended, except as reserved to the Commission under § 0.283.


(l) To coordinate with the Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau on all matters affecting public safety, homeland security, national security, emergency management, disaster management, and related issues.


[67 FR 13217, Mar. 21, 2002, as amended at 71 FR 69034, Nov. 29, 2006; 84 FR 9465, Mar. 15, 2019]


Office of Workplace Diversity

§ 0.81 Functions of the Office.

(a) The Office of Workplace Diversity (OWD), as a staff office to the Commission, shall develop, coordinate, evaluate, and recommend to the Commission policies, programs, and practices that foster a diverse workforce and promote and ensure equal opportunity for all employees and applicants for employment. A principal function of the Office is to lead, advise, and assist the Commission, including all of its component Bureau/Office managers, supervisors, and staff, at all levels, on ways to promote inclusion and full participation of all employees in pursuit of the Commission’s mission. In accordance with this function, the Office shall:


(1) Conduct independent analyses of the Commission’s policies and practices to ensure that those policies and practices foster diversity in the workplace and ensure equal opportunity and equal treatment for employees and applicants; and


(2) Advise the Commission, Bureaus, and Offices of their responsibilities under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended; Section 501 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended; Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967, as amended; Executive Order 11478; and all other statutes, Executive Orders, and regulatory provisions relating to workplace diversity, equal employment opportunity, nondiscrimination, and civil rights.


(b) The Office has the following duties and responsibilities:


(1) Through its Director, serves as the principal advisor to the Chairman and Commission officials on all aspects of workplace diversity, affirmative recruitment, equal employment opportunity, non-discrimination, and civil rights;


(2) Provides leadership and guidance to create a work environment that values and encourages diversity in the workplace;


(3) Is responsible for developing, implementing, and evaluating programs and policies to foster a workplace whose diversity reflects the diverse makeup of the Nation, enhances the mission of the Commission, and demonstrates the value and effectiveness of a diverse workforce;


(4) Is responsible for developing, implementing, and evaluating programs and policies that promote understanding among members of the Commission’s workforce of their differences and the value of those differences and provide a channel for communication among diverse members of the workforce at all levels;


(5) Develops, implements, and evaluates programs and policies to ensure that all members of the Commission’s workforce and candidates for employment have equal access to opportunities for employment, career growth, training, and development and are protected from discrimination and harassment;


(6) Develops and recommends Commission-wide workforce diversity goals and reports on achievements;


(7) Is responsible for developing, implementing, and evaluating programs and policies to enable all Bureaus and Offices to manage a diverse workforce effectively and in compliance with all equal employment opportunity and civil rights requirements;


(8) Works closely with the Associate Managing Director – Human Resources Management to ensure compliance with Federal and Commission recruitment and staffing requirements;


(9) Manages the Commission’s equal employment opportunity compliance program. Responsibilities in this area include processing complaints alleging discrimination, recommending to the Chairman final decisions on EEO complaints within the Commission, and providing counseling services to employees and applicants on EEO matters;


(10) Develops and administers the Commission’s program of accessibility and accommodation for disabled persons in accordance with applicable regulations;


(11) Represents the Commission at meeting with other public and private groups and organizations on matters counseling workplace diversity and equal employment opportunity and workplace diversity issues;


(12) Maintains liaison with and solicits views of organizations within and outside the Commission on matters relating to equal opportunity and workplace diversity.


[61 FR 2727, Jan. 29, 1996]


Wireline Competition Bureau

§ 0.91 Functions of the Bureau.

The Wireline Competition Bureau advises and makes recommendations to the Commission, or acts for the Commission under delegated authority, in all matters pertaining to the regulation and licensing of communications common carriers and ancillary operations (other than matters pertaining exclusively to the regulation and licensing of wireless telecommunications services and facilities). The Bureau will, among other things:


(a) Develop and recommend policy goals, objectives, programs and plans for the Commission in rulemaking and adjudicatory matters concerning wireline telecommunications, drawing on relevant economic, technological, legislative, regulatory and judicial information and developments. Overall objectives include meeting the present and future wireline telecommunications needs of the Nation; fostering economic growth; ensuring choice, opportunity, and fairness in the development of wireline telecommunications; promoting economically efficient investment in wireline telecommunications infrastructure; promoting the development and widespread availability of wireline telecommunications services; and developing deregulatory initiatives where appropriate.


(b) Act on requests for interpretation or waiver of rules.


(c) Administer the provisions of the Communications Act requiring that the charges, practices, classifications, and regulations of communications common carriers providing interstate and foreign services are just and reasonable.


(d) Act on applications for service and facility authorizations, including applications from Bell operating companies for authority to provide in-region interLATA services and applications from wireline carriers for transfers of licenses and discontinuance of service.


(e) Develop and administer rules and policies relating to incumbent local exchange carrier accounting.


(f) Develop and administer recordkeeping and reporting requirements for telecommunications carriers, providers of interconnected VoIP service (as that term is defined in § 9.3 of this chapter), and providers of broadband services.


(g) Provide federal staff support for the Federal-State Joint Board on Universal Service and the Federal-State Joint Board on Jurisdictional Separations.


(h) Review the deployment of advanced telecommunications capability to ensure that such deployment is reasonable and timely, consistent with section 706 of the Act, and, where appropriate, recommend action to encourage such deployment.


(i) Provide economic, financial, and technical analyses of telecommunications markets and carrier performance.


(j) Act on petitions for de novo review of decisions of the Administrative Council for Terminal Attachments regarding technical criteria pursuant to § 68.614.


(k) Interact with the public, local, state, and other governmental agencies and industry groups on wireline telecommunications regulation and related matters. Assist the Consumer and Governmental Affairs Bureau on issues involving informal consumer complaints and other general inquiries by consumers.


(l) Review and coordinate orders, programs and actions initiated by other Bureaus and Offices in matters affecting wireline telecommunications to ensure consistency with overall Commission policy.


(m) Carry out the functions of the Commission under the Communications Act of 1934, as amended, except as reserved to the Commission under § 0.291.


(n) Address audit findings relating to the schools and libraries support mechanism, subject to the overall authority of the Managing Director as the Commission’s audit follow-up official.


(o) Coordinate with the Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau on all matters affecting public safety, homeland security, national security, emergency management, disaster management, and related issues.


(p) In coordination with the Office of Economics and Analytics and Wireless Telecommunications Bureau, serves as the Commission’s principal policy and administrative staff resource with respect to the use of market-based mechanisms, including competitive bidding, to distribute universal service support. Develops, recommends and administers policies, programs, rules and procedures concerning the use of market-based mechanisms, including competitive bidding, to distribute universal service support.


(q) Issue orders revoking a common carrier’s operating authority pursuant to section 214 of the Act, and issue orders to cease and desist such operations, in cases where the presiding officer has issued a certification order to the Commission that the carrier has waived its opportunity for hearing under that section.


(r) Review and resolve appeals of decisions by the STIR/SHAKEN authentication framework Governance Authority (as those terms are defined in § 64.6300 of this chapter) in accordance with § 64.6308 of this chapter.


[67 FR 13218, Mar. 21, 2002, as amended at 68 FR 13850, Mar. 21, 2003; 69 FR 55109, Sept. 13, 2004; 71 FR 69034, Nov. 29, 2006; 76 FR 73851, Nov. 29, 2011; 78 FR 49148, Aug. 13, 2013; 83 FR 63076, Dec. 7, 2018; 85 FR 63171, Oct. 6, 2020; 86 FR 12546, Mar. 4, 2021; 86 FR 48520, Aug. 31, 2021]


Office of Communications Business Opportunities

§ 0.101 Functions of the office.

(a) The Office of Communications Business Opportunities (OCBO), as a staff office to the Commission, develops, coordinates, evaluates, and recommends to the Commission, policies, programs, and practices that promote participation by small entities, women, and minorities in the communications industry. A principal function of the Office is to lead, advise, and assist the Commission, including all of its component Bureau/Office managers, supervisors, and staff, at all levels, on ways to ensure that the competitive concerns of small entities, women, and minorities, are fully considered by the agency in notice and comment rulemakings. In accordance with this function, the Office:


(1) Conducts independent analyses of the Commission’s policies and practices to ensure that those policies and practices fully consider the interests of small entities, women, and minorities.


(2) Advises the Commission, Bureaus, and Offices of their responsibilities under the Congressional Review Act provisions regarding small businesses; the Report to Congress regarding Market Entry Barriers for Small Telecommunications Businesses (47 U.S.C. 257); and the Telecommunications Development Fund (47 U.S.C. 614).


(b) The Office has the following duties and responsibilities:


(1) Through its director, serves as the principal small business policy advisor to the Commission;


(2) Develops, implements, and evaluates programs and policies that promote participation by small entities, women and minorities in the communications industry;


(3) Manages the Regulatory Flexibility Analysis process pursuant to the Regulatory Flexibility Act and the Small Business Regulatory Enforcement Fairness Act to ensure that small business interests are fully considered in agency actions;


(4) Develops and recommends Commission-wide goals and objectives for addressing the concerns of small entities, women, and minorities and reports of achievement;


(5) Acts as the principal channel for disseminating information regarding the Commission’s activities and programs affecting small entities, women, and minorities;


(6) Develops, recommends, coordinates, and administers objectives, plans and programs to encourage participation by small entities, women, and minorities in the decision-making process;


(7) Promotes increased awareness within the Commission of the impact of policies on small entities, women, and minorities;


(8) Acts as the Commission’s liaison to other federal agencies on matters relating to small business.


[69 FR 7376, Feb. 17, 2003]


Enforcement Bureau

§ 0.111 Functions of the Bureau.

(a) Serve as the primary Commission entity responsible for enforcement of the Communications Act and other communications statutes, the Commission’s rules, Commission orders and Commission authorizations, other than matters that are addressed in the context of a pending application for a license or other authorization or in the context of administration, including post-grant administration, of a licensing or other authorization or registration program.


(1) Resolve complaints, including complaints filed under section 208 of the Communications Act, regarding acts or omissions of common carriers (wireline, wireless and international).



Note to paragraph (a)(1):

The Consumer and Governmental Affairs Bureau has primary responsibility for addressing individual informal complaints from consumers against common carriers (wireline, wireless and international) and against other wireless licensees, and informal consumer complaints involving access to telecommunications services and equipment for persons with disabilities. The International Bureau has primary responsibility for complaints regarding international settlements rules and policies.


(2) Resolve complaints regarding acts or omissions of non-common carriers subject to the Commission’s jurisdiction under Title II of the Communications Act and related provisions, including complaints against aggregators under section 226 of the Communications Act and against entities subject to the requirements of section 227 of the Communications Act.



Note to paragraph (a)(2):

The Consumer and Governmental Affairs Bureau has primary responsibility for addressing individual informal complaints from consumers against non-common carriers subject to the Commission’s jurisdiction under Title II of the Communications Act and related provisions.


(3) Resolve formal complaints regarding accessibility to communications services and equipment for persons with disabilities, including complaints filed pursuant to sections 225 and 255 of the Communications Act.


(4) Resolve complaints regarding radiofrequency interference and complaints regarding radiofrequency equipment and devices, including complaints of violations of sections 302 and 333 of the Communications Act.



Note to paragraph (a)(4):

The Office of Engineering and Technology has shared responsibility for radiofrequency equipment and device complaints.


(5) Resolve complaints regarding compliance with the Commission’s Emergency Alert System rules.


(6) Resolve complaints regarding the lighting and marking of radio transmitting towers under section 303(q) of the Communications Act.



Note to paragraph (a)(6):

The Wireless Telecommunications Bureau has responsibility for administration of the tower registration program.


(7) Resolve complaints regarding compliance with statutory and regulatory provisions regarding indecent communications subject to the Commission’s jurisdiction.


(8) Resolve complaints regarding the broadcast and cable television children’s television programming commercial limits contained in section 102 of the Children’s Television Act.



Note to paragraph (a)(8):

The Media Bureau has responsibility for enforcement of these limits in the broadcast television renewal context.


(9) Resolve complaints regarding unauthorized construction and operation of communications facilities, including complaints of violations of section 301 of the Communications Act.


(10) Resolve complaints regarding false distress signals under section 325(a) of the Communications Act.


(11) Resolves other complaints against Title III licensees and permittees (Title III of the Communications Act of 1934, as amended), including complaints under § 20.12(e) of this chapter, except that the Media Bureau has primary responsibility for complaints regarding children’s television programming requirements, and for political and related programming matters involving broadcasters, cable operators and other multichannel video programming distributors. The relevant licensing Bureau has primary responsibility for complaints involving tower siting and the Commission’s environmental rules. The Media Bureau has primary responsibility for complaints regarding compliance with conditions imposed on transfers of control and assignments of licenses of Cable Television Relay Service authorizations.



Note to paragraph (a)(11):

The Media Bureau has primary responsibility for complaints regarding children’s television programming requirements, and for political and related programming matters and equal employment opportunity matters involving broadcasters, cable operators and other multichannel video programming distributors. The relevant licensing Bureau has primary responsibility for complaints involving tower sitting and the Commission’s environmental rules. The Media Bureau has primary responsibility for complaints regarding compliance with conditions imposed on transfers of control and assignments of licenses of Cable Television Relay Service authorizations.


(12) Resolve complaints regarding pole attachments filed under section 224 of the Communications Act.


(13) Resolve complaints regarding multichannel video and cable television service under part 76 of this chapter, except that the Media Bureau has primary responsibility for complaints regarding the following: Subpart A (general), with the exception of § 76.11; subpart B (Registration Statements); subpart C (Cable Franchise Applications); subpart D (carriage of television broadcast signals); subpart F (nonduplication protection and syndicated exclusivity); subpart G, §§ 76.205 and 76.206 (political broadcasting); subpart I ([Reserved]); subpart J (ownership); subpart L (cable television access); subpart N, § 76.944 (basic cable rate appeals), and §§ 76.970, 76.971, and 76.977 (cable leased access rates); subpart O (competitive access to cable programming); subpart P (competitive availability of navigation devices); subpart Q (regulation of carriage agreements); subpart S (Open Video Systems); and subparts T, U, and V to the extent related to the matters listed in this paragraph (a)(13).



Note to paragraph (a)(13):

The Media Bureau has primary responsibility for complaints regarding the following: subpart A (general), with the exception of § 76.11 of this chapter; subpart B (Registration Statements); subpart C (Federal-State/Local Relationships [Reserved]; subpart D (carriage of television broadcast signals); subpart E (equal employment opportunity requirements); subpart F (nonduplication protection and syndicated exclusivity); subpart G, §§ 76.205, 76.206 and 76.209 of this chapter (political broadcasting); subpart I (Forms and Reports); subpart J (ownership); subpart L (cable television access); subpart N, § 76.944 of this chapter (basic cable rate appeals), and §§ 76.970, 76.971 and 76.977 of this chapter (cable leased access rates); subpart O (competitive access to cable programming); subpart P (competitive availability of navigation devices); subpart Q (regulation of carriage agreements); subpart S (Open Video Systems); and subparts T, U and V to the extent related to the matters listed in this note.


(14) Resolve universal service suspension and debarment proceedings pursuant to § 54.521 of this chapter.


(15) Upon referral from the General Counsel pursuant to § 0.251(g), impose sanctions for violations of the Commission’s ex parte rules including, but not limited to, the imposition of monetary forfeitures, consistent with § 0.311.


(16) Resolve complaints regarding other matters assigned to it by the Commission, matters that do not fall within the responsibility of another Bureau or Office or matters that are determined by mutual agreement with another Bureau or Office to be appropriately handled by the Enforcement Bureau.


(17) Identify and analyze complaint information, conduct investigations, conduct external audits and collect information, including pursuant to sections 218, 220, 308(b), 403 and 409(e) through (k) of the Communications Act, in connection with complaints, on its own initiative or upon request of another Bureau or Office.


(18) Issue or draft orders taking or recommending appropriate action in response to complaints or investigations, including, but not limited to, admonishments, damage awards where authorized by law or other affirmative relief, notices of violation, notices of apparent liability and related orders, notices of opportunity for hearing regarding a potential forfeiture, hearing designation orders, orders designating licenses or other authorizations for a revocation hearing and consent decrees. Issue or draft appropriate orders after a hearing proceeding has been terminated by the presiding officer on the basis of waiver. Issue or draft appropriate interlocutory orders and take or recommend appropriate action in the exercise of its responsibilities.


(19) Encourage cooperative compliance efforts.


(20) Mediate and settle disputes.


(21) Provide information regarding pending complaints, compliance with relevant requirements and the complaint process, where appropriate and to the extent the information is not available from the Consumer and Governmental Affairs Bureau or other Bureaus and Offices.


(22) Exercise responsibility for rulemaking proceedings regarding general enforcement policies and procedures.


(23) Advise the Commission or responsible Bureau or Office regarding the enforcement implications of existing and proposed rules.


(24) Serve as the primary point of contact for coordinating enforcement matters, including market and consumer enforcement matters, with other federal, state and local government agencies, as well as with foreign governments after appropriate consultation, and provide assistance to such entities. Refer matters to such entities, as well as to private sector entities, as appropriate.


(25) Resolve complaints alleging violations of the open Internet rules.


(26) Conduct audits and investigations and resolve issues of compliance concerning equal employment opportunity requirements involving Title III licensees and permittees or multichannel video programming distributors, including cable service providers, under part 76 of this chapter.


(27) Identify suspected illegal calls and provide written notice to voice service providers. The Enforcement Bureau shall:


(i) Identify with as much particularity as possible the suspected traffic;


(ii) Cite the statutory or regulatory provisions the suspected traffic appears to violate;


(iii) Provide the basis for the Enforcement Bureau’s reasonable belief that the identified traffic is unlawful, including any relevant nonconfidential evidence from credible sources such as the industry traceback consortium or law enforcement agencies; and


(iv) Direct the voice service provider receiving the notice that it must comply with § 64.1200(n)(2) or (5) of this chapter.


(28) Take enforcement action, including de-listing from the Robocall Mitigation Database, against any provider:


(i) Whose certification described in § 64.6305(c) and (d) of this chapter is deficient after giving that provider notice and an opportunity to cure the deficiency; or


(ii) Who accepts calls directly from a domestic voice service provider, gateway provider, or foreign provider not listed in the Robocall Mitigation Database in violation of § 64.6305(e) of this chapter.


(b) Serve as a party in hearing proceedings conducted pursuant to 47 CFR part 1, subpart B.


(c) In coordination with the International Bureau, participate in international conferences dealing with monitoring and measurement; serve as the point of contact for the U.S. Government in matters of international monitoring, fixed and mobile direction-finding and interference resolution; and oversee coordination of non-routine communications and materials between the Commission and international or regional public organizations or foreign administrations.


(d) In conjunction with the Office of Engineering and Technology, work with technical standards bodies.


(e) Coordinate with and assist the Wireless Telecommunications Bureau with respect to the Commission’s privatized ship radio inspection program.


(f) Provide field support for, and field representation of, the Bureau, other Bureaus and Offices and the Commission. Coordinate with other Bureaus and Offices as appropriate.


(g) Handle congressional and other correspondence relating to or requesting specific enforcement actions, specific complaints or other specific matters within the responsibility of the Bureau, to the extent not otherwise handled by the Consumer and Governmental Affairs Bureau, the Office of General Counsel (impermissible ex parte presentations) or another Bureau or Office;


(h) Have authority to issue non-hearing related subpoenas for the attendance and testimony of witnesses and the production of books, papers, correspondence, memoranda, schedules of charges, contracts, agreements, and any other records deemed relevant to the investigation of matters within the responsibility of the Bureau. Before issuing a subpoena, the Enforcement Bureau shall obtain the approval of the Office of General Counsel.


(i) Conduct the annual registration and select a single consortium to conduct private-led efforts to trace back the origin of suspected unlawful robocalls, under section 13(d) of the TRACED Act, 133 Stat. at 3287, and § 64.1203 of this chapter, consistent with FCC No. 20-34.


(j) Collects and reviews information received from private entities related to violations of §§ 64.1200(a) and 64.1604(a) of this chapter.


(k) Perform such other functions as may be assigned or referred to it by the Commission.


[64 FR 60716, Nov. 8, 1999, as amended at 67 FR 13218, Mar. 21, 2002; 68 FR 36942, June 20, 2003; 69 FR 30233, May 27, 2004; 71 FR 69034, Nov. 29, 2006; 76 FR 24381, May 2, 2011; 76 FR 26220, May 6, 2011; 76 FR 59232, Sept. 23, 2011; 76 FR 60754, Sept. 30, 2011; 78 FR 23151, Apr. 18, 2013; 80 FR 53749, Sept. 8, 2015; 84 FR 9465, Mar. 15, 2019; 85 FR 21788, Apr. 20, 2020; 85 FR 63171, Oct. 6, 2020; 86 FR 17734, Apr. 6, 2021; 86 FR 52843, Sept. 23, 2021; 87 FR 42944, July 18, 2022]


§ 0.121 Location of field installations.

(a) Field offices are located throughout the United States. For the address and phone number of the closest office contact the Enforcement Bureau or see the U.S. Government Manual.


(b) Protected field offices are located at the following geographical coordinates (coordinates are referenced to North American Datum 1983 (NAD83)):


Allegan, Michigan, 42°36′20.1″ N. Latitude, 85°57′20.1″ W. Longitude

Belfast, Maine, 44°26′42.3″ N. Latitude, 69°04′56.1″ W. Longitude

Canandaigua, New York, 42°54′48.2″ N. Latitude, 77°15′57.9″ W. Longitude

Douglas, Arizona, 31°30′02.3″ N. Latitude, 109°39′14.3″ W. Longitude

Ferndale, Washington, 48°57′20.4″ N. Latitude, 122°33′17.6″ W. Longitude

Grand Island, Nebraska, 40°55′21.0″ N. Latitude, 98°25′43.2″ W. Longitude

Kenai, Alaska, 60°43′26.0″ N. Latitude, 151°20′15.0″ W. Longitude

Kingsville, Texas, 27°26′30.1″ N. Latitude, 97°53′01.0″ W. Longitude

Laurel, Maryland, 39°09′54.4″ N. Latitude, 76°49′15.9″ W. Longitude

Livermore, California, 37°43′29.7″ N. Latitude, 121°45′15.8″ W. Longitude

Powder Springs, Georgia, 33°51′44.4″ N. Latitude, 84°43′25.8″ W. Longitude

Santa Isabel, Puerto Rico, 18°00′18.9″ N. Latitude, 66°22′30.6″ W. Longitude

Vero Beach, Florida, 27°36′22.1″ N. Latitude, 80°38′05.2″ W. Longitude

Waipahu, Hawaii, 21°22′33.6″ N. Latitude, 157°59′44.1″ W. Longitude

[53 FR 29054, Aug. 2, 1988, as amended at 61 FR 8477, Mar. 5, 1996; 63 FR 68918, Dec. 14, 1998; 64 FR 60718, Nov. 8, 1999; 67 FR 13219, Mar. 21, 2002; 69 FR 58097, Sept. 29, 2004]


Wireless Telecommunications Bureau

§ 0.131 Functions of the Bureau.

The Wireless Telecommunications Bureau develops, recommends and administers the programs and policies for the regulation of the terms and conditions under which communications entities offer domestic wireless telecommunications services and of ancillary operations related to the provision of such services (satellite communications excluded). These functions include all wireless telecommunications service providers’ and licensees’ activities. The Bureau also performs the following specific functions:


(a) Advises and makes recommendations to the Commission, or acts for the Commission under delegated authority, in all matters pertaining to the licensing and regulation of wireless telecommunications, including ancillary operations related to the provision or use of such services; any matters concerning wireless carriers that also affect wireline carriers in cooperation with the Wireline Competition Bureau; and, in cooperation with the Office of Economics and Analytics, all policies, programs, and rules regarding spectrum auctions, and, in cooperation with the Wireline Competition Bureau and the Office of Economics and Analytics, USF mechanisms affecting wireless carriers. These activities include: Policy development and coordination; conducting rulemaking and adjudicatory proceedings, including licensing and complaint proceedings for matters not within the responsibility of the Enforcement Bureau; acting on waivers of rules; acting on applications for service and facility authorizations; compliance and enforcement activities for matters not within the responsibility of the Enforcement Bureau; determining resource impacts of existing, planned or recommended Commission activities concerning wireless telecommunications, and developing and recommending resource deployment priorities.


(b) Develops and recommends policy goals, objectives, programs and plans for the Commission on matters concerning wireless telecommunications, drawing upon relevant economic, technological, legislative, regulatory and judicial information and developments. Such matters include meeting the present and future wireless telecommunications needs of the Nation; fostering economic growth by promoting efficiency and innovation in the allocation, licensing and use of the electromagnetic spectrum; ensuring choice, opportunity and fairness in the development of wireless telecommunications services and markets; promoting economically efficient investment in wireless telecommunications infrastructure and the integration of wireless communications networks into the public telecommunications network; enabling access to national communications services; promoting the development and widespread availability of wireless telecommunications services. Reviews and coordinates orders, programs and actions initiated by other Bureaus and Offices in matters affecting wireless telecommunications to ensure consistency of overall Commission policy.


(c) Serves as a staff resource, in coordination with the Office of Economics and Analytics with regard to the development and implementation of spectrum policy through spectrum auctions. Jointly with the Office of Economics and Analytics, develops, recommends and administers policies, programs and rules concerning licensing of spectrum for wireless telecommunications through auctions and advises the Commission on policy, engineering, and technical matters relating to auctions of spectrum used for other purposes.


(d) Regulates the charges, practices, classifications, terms and conditions for, and facilities used to provide, wireless telecommunications services. Develops and recommends consistent, integrated policies, programs and rules for the regulation of commercial mobile radio services and private mobile radio services.


(e) Develops and recommends policy, rules, standards, procedures and forms for the authorization and regulation of wireless telecommunications facilities and services, including all facility authorization applications involving domestic terrestrial transmission facilities. Coordinates with and assists the International Bureau regarding frequency assignment, coordination and interference matters.


(f) Develops and recommends responses to legislative, regulatory or judicial inquiries and proposals concerning or affecting wireless telecommunications.


(g) Develops and recommends policies regarding matters affecting the collaboration and coordination of relations among Federal agencies, and between the Federal government and the states, concerning wireless telecommunications issues. Maintains liaison with Federal and state government bodies concerning such issues.


(h) Develops and recommends policies, programs and rules to ensure interference-free operation of wireless telecommunications equipment and networks. Coordinates with and assists other Bureaus and Offices, as appropriate, concerning spectrum management, planning, and interference matters and issues, and in compliance and enforcement activities. Studies technical requirements for equipment for wireless telecommunications services in accordance with standards established by the Chief, Office of Engineering and Technology.


(i) Advises and assists consumers, businesses and other government agencies on wireless telecommunications issues and matters related thereto. Also assists the Consumer and Governmental Affairs Bureau with informal consumer complaints and other general inquiries by consumers.


(j) Administers the Commission’s commercial radio operator program (part 13 of this chapter); the Commission’s program for registration, construction, marking and lighting of antenna structures (part 17 of this chapter), and the Commission’s privatized ship radio inspection program (part 80 of this chapter).


(k) Coordinates with and assists the International Bureau with respect to treaty activities and international conferences concerning wireless telecommunications.


(l) Exercises such authority as may be assigned, delegated or referred to it by the Commission.


(m) Certifies frequency coordinators; considers petitions seeking review of coordinator actions; and engages in oversight of coordinator actions and practices.


(n) Administers the Commission’s amateur radio programs (part 97 of this chapter) and the issuing of maritime mobile service identities (MMSIs).


(o) Exercises authority to issue non-hearing related subpoenas for the attendance and testimony of witnesses and the production of books, papers, correspondence, memoranda, schedules of charges, contracts, agreements, and any other records deemed relevant to the investigation of wireless telecommunications operators for any alleged violation or violations of the Communications Act of 1934, as amended, or the Commission’s rules and orders. Before issuing a subpoena, the Wireless Telecommunications Bureau shall obtain the approval of the Office of General Counsel.


(p) Certifies, in the name of the Commission, volunteer entities to coordinate maintain and disseminate a common data base of amateur station special event call signs, and issues Public Notices detailing the procedures of amateur service call sign systems.


(q) Coordinates with the Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau on all matters affecting public safety, homeland security, national security, emergency management, disaster management, and related issues.


(r) In coordination with the Wireline Competition Bureau and the Office of Economics and Analytics, develops and recommends policies, programs, rules and procedures concerning the use of market-based mechanisms, including competitive bidding, to distribute universal service support.


(s)(1) Extends the Communications Act Safety Radiotelephony Certificate for a period of up to 90 days beyond the specified expiration date.


(2) Grants emergency exemption requests, extensions or waivers of inspection to ships in accordance with applicable provisions of the Communications Act, the Safety Convention, the Great Lakes Agreement or the Commission’s rules.


[60 FR 35505, July 10, 1995, as amended at 61 FR 4361, Feb. 6, 1996; 62 FR 17567, Apr. 10, 1997; 64 FR 60718, Nov. 8, 1999; 65 FR 375, Jan. 5, 2000; 67 FR 13219, Mar. 21, 2002; 69 FR 24997, May 5, 2004; 71 FR 69035, Nov. 29, 2006; 76 FR 73851, Nov. 29, 2011; 78 FR 23151, Apr. 18, 2013; 78 FR 32165, May 29, 2013; 83 FR 63076, Dec. 7, 2018; 85 FR 34526, June 5, 2020]


Consumer and Governmental Affairs Bureau

§ 0.141 Functions of the Bureau.

Link to an amendment published at 87 FR 54328, Sept. 6, 2022.

The Consumer and Governmental Affairs Bureau develops and administers the Commission’s consumer and governmental affairs policies and initiatives to enhance the public’s understanding of the Commission’s work and to facilitate the Agency’s relationships with other governmental agencies and organizations. The Bureau is responsible for rulemaking proceedings regarding general consumer education policies and procedures and serves as the primary Commission entity responsible for communicating with the general public regarding Commission policies, programs, and activities in order to facilitate public participation in the Commission’s decision-making processes. The Bureau also performs the following functions:


(a) Advises and makes recommendations to the Commission, or acts for the Commission under delegated authority, in matters pertaining to consumers and governmental affairs. This includes policy development and coordination as well as adjudication and rulemaking.


(b) Collaborates with, and advises and assists, the public, state and local governments, and other governmental agencies and industry groups on consumer matters.


(c) Advises the Commission and other Bureaus and Offices of consumer and governmental affairs-related areas of concern or interest; initiates, reviews, and coordinates orders, programs and actions, in conjunction with other Bureaus and Offices, in matters regarding consumer education policies and procedures, and any other related issues affecting consumer policy; represents the Commission on consumer and governmental-related committees, working groups, task forces and conferences within and outside the Commission; and provides expert advice and assistance to Bureaus and Offices and consumers regarding compliance with applicable disability and accessibility requirements, rules, and regulations.


(d) Collects and analyzes information from industry, other Bureaus and Offices, and the media, as well as information received in the Bureau from informal consumer inquiries and complaints, rulemakings, and consumer forums; identifies trends that affect consumers; in consultation with the Office of the Managing Director, provides objectives and evaluation methods for the public information portion of the Commission’s Government Performance and Results Act submissions and other Commission-wide strategic planning efforts.


(e) Researches, develops, and distributes materials to inform consumers about the Commission’s rules, proposals, and events, and to promote consumer participation in Commission rulemakings and activities; maintains the Commission’s Consumer Information Directory; develops a library of commonly requested materials on issues of interest to all consumers. Ensures that alternative translations of Commission materials are available to Commission employees, Bureaus, Offices, and members of the public.


(f) Advises and makes recommendations to the Commission, or acts for the Commission under delegated authority, in matters pertaining to persons with disabilities. Provides expert advice and assistance, as required, to other Bureaus and Offices, consumers, industry, and others on issues relevant to persons with disabilities. Initiates rulemakings, where appropriate; reviews relevant agenda items and other documents and coordinates with Bureaus and Offices to develop recommendations and propose policies to ensure that communications are accessible to persons with disabilities, in conformance with existing disability laws and policies, and that they support the Commission’s goal of increasing accessibility of communications services and technologies for persons with disabilities.


(g) Plans, develops, and conducts consumer outreach and education initiatives to educate the public about important Commission regulatory programs. In coordination with other Bureaus and Offices, establishes liaison(s) for information sharing purposes to ensure coordination on all consumer outreach projects. Ensures that alternative translations of Commission materials are available to Commission employees, Bureaus, Offices and members of the public.


(h) Serves as the official FCC records custodian for designated records, including intake processing, organization and file maintenance, reference services, and retirement and retrieval of records; manages the Electronic Comment Filing System and certifies records for adjudicatory and court proceedings. Maintains manual and computerized files that provide for the public inspection of public record materials concerning Broadcast Ownership, AM/FM/TV, TV translators, FM Translators, Cable TV, Wireless, Auction, Common Carrier Tariff matters, International space station files, earth station files, DBS files, and other miscellaneous international files. Also maintains for public inspection Time Brokerage and Affiliation Agreements, court citation files, and legislative histories concerning telecommunications dockets. Provides the public and Commission staff prompt access to manual and computerized records and filing systems. Periodically reviews the status of open docketed proceedings and, following:


(1) Consultation with and concurrence from the relevant bureau or office with responsibility for a particular proceeding,


(2) The issuance of a public notice listing proceedings under consideration for termination, and;


(3) A reasonable period during which interested parties may comment, closes any docket in which no further action is required or contemplated (with termination constituting a final determination in any such proceeding).


(i) Provides informal mediation and resolution of individual informal consumer inquiries and complaints consistent with Commission regulations. Resolves certain classes of informal complaints, as specified by the Commission, through findings of fact and issuance of orders. Receives, reviews, and analyzes responses to informal complaints; maintains manual and computerized files that permit the public inspection of informal consumer complaints; mediates and attempts to settle unresolved disputes in informal complaints as appropriate; and coordinates with other Bureaus and Offices to ensure that consumers are provided with accurate, up-to-date information. Develops and fosters partnerships with state regulatory entities to promote the sharing of information pertaining to informal complaint files maintained by the Bureau.


(j) Provides leadership to other Bureaus and Offices for dissemination of consumer information via the Internet.


(k) In coordination with other Bureaus and Offices, handles Congressional and other correspondence related to specific informal consumer complaints, or other specific matters within the responsibility of the Bureau, to the extent not otherwise handled by the Office of General Counsel or other Bureaus or Offices. Responds to and/or coordinates due diligence and other requests for information pertaining to informal inquiries and complaints under the responsibility of the Bureau with other Bureaus and Offices.


[67 FR 13219, Mar. 21, 2002, as amended at 76 FR 24388, May 2, 2011]


Office of Administrative Law Judges

§ 0.151 Functions of the Office.

The Office of Administrative Law Judges consists of as many Administrative Law Judges qualified and appointed pursuant to the requirements of 5 U.S.C. 3105 as the Commission may find necessary. It is responsible for hearing and conducting adjudicatory cases designated for hearing other than those designated to be heard by the Commission en banc, or by one or more commissioners. The Office of Administrative Law Judges is also responsible for conducting such other hearing proceedings as the Commission may assign.


[85 FR 63171, Oct. 6, 2020]


Homeland Security, Defense and Emergency Preparedness Functions

§ 0.181 The Defense Commissioner.

The Defense Commissioner is designated by the Commission. The Defense Commissioner directs the homeland security, national security and emergency preparedness, and defense activities of the Commission and has the following duties and responsibilities:


(a) To keep the Commission informed as to significant developments in the field of homeland security, emergency preparedness, defense, and any related activities that involve formulation or revision of Commission policy in any area of responsibility of the Commission.


(b) To represent the Commission in public safety, homeland security, national security, emergency preparedness, disaster management, defense and related matters requiring conferences or communications with other governmental officers, departments, or agencies.


(c) To act as the Homeland Security and Defense Coordinator in representations with other agencies with respect to planning for the continuity of the essential functions of the Commission under emergency conditions.


(d) To serve as a member of the Joint Telecommunications Resources Board (JTRB).


(e) To serve as the principal point of contact for the Commission on all matters pertaining to the Department of Homeland Security.


(f) To take such measures as will assure continuity of the Commission’s functions under any foreseeable circumstances with a minimum of interruption. In the event of an emergency, the Defense Commissioner, in consultation with the Chief, Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau, will decide whether to activate the Commission’s Continuity of Operations (COOP) plan and/or initiate the Commission’s emergency response procedures.


(g) In the event of enemy attack, or the imminent threat thereof, or other disaster resulting in the inability of the Commission to function at its offices in Washington, D.C., to assume all of the duties and responsibilities of the Commission and the Chairman, until relieved or augmented by other Commissioners or members of the staff, as set forth in §§ 0.186 and 0.383.


(h) To approve national emergency plans and develop preparedness programs covering: provision of service by common carriers; broadcasting and cable facilities, satellite and the wireless radio services; radio frequency assignment; electromagnetic radiation; investigation and enforcement.


(i) To perform such other duties and assume such other responsibilities related to the Commission’s defense activities as may be necessary for the continuity of functions and the protection of Commission personnel and property.


(j) The Commission may designate an Alternate Defense Commissioner who is authorized to perform the functions of the Defense Commissioner if he or she is not available.


[29 FR 14664, Oct. 28, 1964, as amended at 41 FR 31209, July 27, 1976; 64 FR 60720, Nov. 8, 1999; 69 FR 32033, May 27, 2004; 71 FR 69035, Nov. 29, 2006; 72 FR 48842, Aug. 24, 2007; 77 FR 62462, Oct. 15, 2012]


§ 0.185 Responsibilities of the bureaus and staff offices.

The head of each of the bureaus and staff offices, in rendering assistance to the Chief, Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau in the performance of that person’s duties with respect to homeland security, national security, emergency management and preparedness, disaster management, defense, and related activities will have the following duties and responsibilities:


(a) To keep the Chief, Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau informed of the investigation, progress, and completion of programs, plans, or activities with respect to homeland security, national security and emergency preparedness, and defense in which they are engaged or have been requested to engage.


(b) To render assistance and advice to the Chief, Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau, on matters which relate to the functions of their respective bureaus or staff offices.


(c) To render such assistance and advice to other agencies as may be consistent with the functions of their respective bureaus or staff offices and the Commission’s policy with respect thereto.


(d) To perform such other duties related to the Commission’s homeland security, national security, emergency management and preparedness, disaster management, defense, and related activities as may be assigned to them by the Commission.


(e) To serve as Public Safety/Homeland Security Liaison to the Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau or designate a Deputy Chief of the Bureau or Office as such liaison.


[29 FR 14665, Oct. 28, 1964, as amended at 50 FR 27953, July 9, 1985; 59 FR 26971, May 25, 1994; 61 FR 8477, Mar. 5, 1996; 64 FR 60721, Nov. 8, 1999; 69 FR 30234, May 27, 2004; 71 FR 69035, Nov. 29, 2006]


§ 0.186 Emergency Relocation Board.

(a) As specified in the Commission’s Continuity of Operations Plan and consistent with the exercise of the War Emergency Powers of the President as set forth in section 706 of the Communications Act of 1934, as amended, if the full Commission or a quorum thereof is unable to act, an Emergency Relocation Board will be convened at the Commission’s Headquarters or other relocation site designated to serve as Primary FCC Staff to perform the functions of the Commission. Relocation may be required to accommodate a variety of emergency scenarios. Examples include scenarios in which FCC headquarters is unavailable or uninhabitable; or many, if not all, agencies must evacuate the immediate Washington, DC, area. The FCC’s Continuity of Operations Plan (COOP) includes the deliberate and pre-planned movement of selected key principals and supporting staff to a relocation facility. As an example, a sudden emergency, such as a fire or hazardous materials incident, may require the evacuation of FCC headquarters with little or no advance notice, but for only a short duration. Alternatively, an emergency so severe that FCC headquarters is rendered unusable and likely will be for a period long enough to significantly impact normal operations, may require COOP implementation. Nothing in this subsection shall be construed to diminish the authority of the Commission or its staff to perform functions of the Commission at the Commission’s headquarters or other relocation site using existing authority provided for elsewhere in this Chapter.


(b) The Board shall comprise such Commissioners as may be present (including Commissioners available through electronic communications or telephone) and able to act. In the absence of the Chairman, the Commissioner present with the longest seniority in office will serve as acting Chairman. If no Commissioner is present and able to act, the person designated as next most senior official in the Commission’s Continuity of Operations Plan will head the Board.


[69 FR 30234, May 27, 2004]


Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau

§ 0.191 Functions of the Bureau.

The Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau advises and makes recommendations to the Commission, or acts for the Commission under delegated authority, in all matters pertaining to public safety, homeland security, national security, emergency management and preparedness, disaster management, and ancillary operations. The Bureau has responsibility for coordinating public safety, homeland security, national security, emergency management and preparedness, disaster management, and related activities within the Commission. The Bureau also performs the following functions.


(a) Develops, recommends, and administers policy goals, objectives, rules, regulations, programs and plans for the Commission to promote effective and reliable communications for public safety, homeland security, national security, emergency management and preparedness, disaster management and related activities, including public safety communications (including 911, enhanced 911, and other emergency number issues), priority emergency communications, alert and warning systems (including the Emergency Alert System), continuity of government operations, implementation of Homeland Security Presidential Directives and Orders, disaster management coordination and outreach, communications infrastructure protection, reliability, operability and interoperability of networks and communications systems, the Communications Assistance for Law Enforcement Act (CALEA), and network security. Recommends policies and procedures for public safety, homeland security, national security, emergency management and preparedness, and recommends national emergency plans and preparedness programs covering Commission functions during national emergency conditions. Conducts outreach and coordination activities with, among others, state and local governmental agencies, hospitals and other emergency health care providers, and public safety organizations. Recommends national emergency plans, policies, and preparedness programs covering the provision of service by communications service providers, including telecommunications service providers, information service providers, common carriers, and non-common carriers; broadcasting and cable facilities; satellite and wireless radio services; radio frequency assignment; electro-magnetic radiation; investigation and enforcement.


(b) Under the general direction of the Defense Commissioner, coordinates the public safety, homeland security, national security, emergency management and preparedness, disaster management, and related activities of the Commission, including national security and emergency preparedness and defense mobilization, Continuity of Government (COG) planning, alert and warning systems (including the Emergency Alert System), and other functions as may be delegated during a national emergency or activation of the President’s war emergency powers as specified in section 706 of the Communications Act. Provides support to the Defense Commissioner, including with respect to his or her participation in the Joint Telecommunications Resources Board, and the National Security Telecommunications Advisory Committee and other public safety and homeland security organizations and committees. Represents the Defense Commissioner with other Government agencies and organizations, the communications industry, and Commission licensees on public safety, homeland security, national security, emergency management and preparedness, disaster management, and related issues. Keeps the Defense Commissioner informed as to significant developments in the fields of public safety, homeland security, national security, emergency management, and disaster management activities, and related areas.


(c) Develops and administers rules, regulations, and policies for priority emergency communications, including the Telecommunications Service Priority System. Supports the Chiefs of the Wireline Competition, International and Wireless Telecommunications Bureaus on matters involving assignment of Telecommunications Service Priority System priorities and in administration of that system.


(d) The Chief, Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau, or that person’s designee, acts as FCC Alternate Homeland Security and Defense Coordinator and principal to the National Communications System, and the Chief, Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau, or that person’s designee, shall serve as the Commission’s representative on National Communications Systems Committees.


(e) Conducts rulemaking proceedings and acts on requests for interpretation or waiver of rules.


(f) Advises and makes recommendations to the Commission, or acts for the Commission under delegated authority, in all matters pertaining to the licensing and regulation of public safety, homeland security, national security, emergency management and preparedness, and disaster management wireless telecommunications, including ancillary operations related to the provision or use of such services. These activities include: policy development and coordination; conducting rulemaking and adjudicatory proceedings, including complaint proceedings for matters not within the responsibility of the Enforcement Bureau; acting on waivers of rules; acting on applications for service and facility authorizations; compliance and enforcement activities for matters not within the responsibility of the Enforcement Bureau; determining resource impacts of existing, planned or recommended Commission activities concerning wireless telecommunications, and developing and recommending resource deployment priorities. In addition, advises and assists public safety entities on wireless telecommunications issues and matters related thereto. Administers all authority previously delegated to the Wireless Telecommunications Bureau (including those delegations expressly provided to the Public Safety and Critical Infrastructure Division of the Wireless Telecommunications Bureau) in Improving Public Safety Communications in the 800 MHz Band, WT Docket 02-55.


(g) Conducts studies of public safety, homeland security, national security, emergency management and preparedness, disaster management, and related issues. Develops and administers recordkeeping and reporting requirements for communications companies pertaining to these issues. Administers any Commission information collection requirements pertaining to public safety, homeland security, national security, emergency management and preparedness, disaster management, and related issues, including the communications disruption reporting requirements set forth in part 4 of this chapter and revision of the filing system and template used for the submission of those communications disruption reports.


(h) Interacts with the public, local, state, and other governmental agencies and industry groups (including advisory committees and public safety organizations and associations) on public safety, homeland security, national security, emergency management, disaster management and related issues. As requested, represents the Commission at meetings and conferences. Serves as the point of contact for the U.S. Government in matters of international monitoring, fixed and mobile direction-finding and interference resolution; and oversees coordination of non-routine communications and materials between the Commission and international or regional public organizations or foreign administrations.


(i) Maintains and operates the Commission’s public safety, homeland security, national security, emergency management and preparedness, and disaster management facilities and operations, including the Communications Center, the establishment of any Emergency Operations Center (EOC), and any liaison activities with other federal, state, or local government organizations.


(j) Reviews and coordinates orders, programs and actions initiated by other Bureaus and Offices in matters affecting public safety, homeland security, national security, emergency management and preparedness, disaster management and related issues to ensure consistency with overall Commission policy. Provides advice to the Commission and other Bureaus and offices regarding the public safety, homeland security, national security, emergency management, and disaster management implications of existing and proposed rules.


(k) Develops and recommends responses to legislative, regulatory or judicial inquiries and proposals concerning or affecting public safety, homeland security, national security, emergency management, disaster management and related issues. Responses to judicial inquiries should be developed with and recommended to the Office of General Counsel.


(l) Develops and maintains the Commission’s plans and procedures, including the oversight, preparation, and training of Commission personnel, for Continuity of Operations (COOP), Continuity of Government functions, and Commission activities and responses to national emergencies and other similar situations.


(m) Acts on emergency requests for Special Temporary Authority during non-business hours when the other Offices and Bureaus of the Commission are closed. Such actions shall be coordinated with, if possible, and promptly reported to the responsible Bureau or Office.


(n) Maintains liaison with other Bureaus and Offices concerning matters affecting public safety, homeland security, national security, emergency management and preparedness, disaster management and related issues.


(o) [Reserved]


(p) Performs such other functions and duties as may be assigned or referred to it by the Commission or the Defense Commissioner.


(q) Oversees the Emergency Response Interoperability Center, establishes the intergovernmental advisory committees described under § 0.192(b), and administers the agency’s responsibilities in connection with such committees.


[71 FR 69035, Nov. 29, 2006, as amended at 73 FR 9463, Feb. 21, 2008; 75 FR 28207, May 20, 2010; 75 FR 78169, Dec. 15, 2010]


§ 0.192 Emergency Response Interoperability Center.

(a) The Emergency Response Interoperability Center acts under the general direction of the Chief of the Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau to develop, recommend, and administer policy goals, objectives, rules, regulations, programs, and plans for the Commission in matters pertaining to the implementation of national interoperability standards and the development of technical and operational requirements and procedures for the 700 MHz public safety broadband wireless network and other public safety communications systems. These requirements and procedures may involve such issues as interoperability, roaming, priority access, gateway functions and interfaces, interconnectivity of public safety broadband networks, authentication and encryption, and requirements for common public safety broadband applications.


(b) To the extent permitted by applicable law, the Chief of the Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau shall have delegated authority to establish one or more advisory bodies, consistent with the Federal Advisory Committee Act or other applicable law, to advise the Emergency Response Interoperability Center in the performance of its responsibilities. Such advisory bodies may include representatives from relevant Federal public safety and homeland security entities, representatives from state and local public safety entities, industry representatives, and service providers.


[75 FR 28207, May 20, 2010]


Subpart B – Delegations of Authority


Authority:47 U.S.C. 151, 154(i), 154(j), 155, 225, and 409.

General

§ 0.201 General provisions.

(a) There are three basic categories of delegations made by the Commission pursuant to section 5(c) of the Communications Act of 1934, as amended:


(1) Delegations to act in non-hearing matters and proceedings. The great bulk of delegations in this category are made to bureau chiefs and other members of the Commission’s staff. This category also includes delegations to individual commissioners and to boards or committees of commissioners.


(2) Delegations to rule on interlocutory matters in hearing proceedings. Delegations in this category are made to any person, other than the Commission, designated to serve as the presiding officer in a hearing proceeding pursuant to § 1.241.


(3) Delegations to review an initial decision. Delegations in this category are made to individual commissioners, to panels of commissioners.


(b) Delegations are arranged in this subpart under headings denoting the person, panel, or board to whom authority has been delegated, rather than by the categories listed in paragraph (a) of this section.


(c) Procedures pertaining to the filing and disposition of interlocutory pleadings in hearing proceedings are set forth in §§ 1.291 through 1.298 of this chapter. Procedures pertaining to appeals from rulings of the presiding officer are set forth in §§ 1.301 and 1.302. Procedures pertaining to reconsideration and review of actions taken pursuant to delegated authority are set forth in §§ 1.101, 1.102, 1.104, 1.106, 1.113, 1.115, and 1.117. Procedures pertaining to exceptions to initial decisions are set forth in §§ 1.276 through 1.279.


(d) The Commission, by vote of a majority of the members then holding office, may delegate its functions either by rule or by order, and may at any time amend, modify, or rescind any such rule or order.


(1) Functions of a continuing or recurring nature are delegated by rule. The rule is published in the Federal Register and is included in this subpart.


(2) Functions pertaining to a particular matter or proceeding are delegated by order. The order is published in the Federal Register and associated with the record of that matter or proceeding, but neither the order nor any reference to the delegation made thereby is included in this subpart.


[28 FR 12402, Nov. 22, 1963, as amended at 50 FR 26567, June 27, 1985; 62 FR 4170, Jan. 29, 1997; 76 FR 70907, Nov. 16, 2011; 85 FR 63171, Oct. 6, 2020]


§ 0.203 Authority of person, panel, or board to which functions are delegated.

(a) The person, panel, or board to which functions are delegated shall, with respect to such functions, have all the jurisdiction, powers, and authority conferred by law upon the Commission, and shall be subject to the same duties and obligations.


(b) Except as provided in § 1.102 of this chapter, any action taken pursuant to delegated authority shall have the same force and effect and shall be made, evidenced, and enforced in the same manner as actions of the Commission.


[28 FR 12402, Nov. 22, 1963]


§ 0.204 The exercise of delegated authority.

(a) Authority to issue orders and to enter into correspondence. Any official (or group of officials) to whom authority is delegated in this subpart is authorized to issue orders (including rulings, decisions, or other action documents) pursuant to such authority and to enter into general correspondence concerning any matter for which he is responsible under this subpart or subpart A of this part.


(b) Authority of subordinate officials. Authority delegated to any official to issue orders or to enter into correspondence under paragraph (a) of this section may be exercised by that official or by appropriate subordinate officials acting for him.


(c) Signature. (1) Other orders made by a committee, board or panel identify the body and are signed by the Secretary.


(2) Upon signing an order, the Secretary affixes the Commission’s seal.


(3) General correspondence by a committee or board is signed by the committee or board chairman.


(4) All other orders and letters are signed by the official who has given final approval of their contents.


(5) With the exception of license forms requiring the signature of an appropriate official of the issuing bureau or office, license forms bear only the seal of the Commission.


(d) Form of orders. Orders may be issued in any appropriate form (e.g., as captioned orders, letters, telegrams) and may, if appropriate, be issued orally. Orders issued orally shall, if practicable, be confirmed promptly in writing.


(e) Minutes entries. Except as otherwise provided in this subpart, actions taken as provided in paragraph (d) of this section shall be recorded in writing and filed in the official minutes of the Commission.


[33 FR 8227, June 1, 1968, as amended at 38 FR 18550, July 12, 1973; 62 FR 4170, Jan. 29, 1997]


Commissioners

§ 0.211 Chairman.

The responsibility for the general administration of internal affairs of the Commission is delegated to the Chairman of the Commission. The Chairman will keep the Commission advised concerning his actions taken under this delegation of authority. This authority includes:


(a) Actions of routine character as to which the Chairman may take final action.


(b) Actions of non-routine character which do not involve policy determinations. The Chairman may take final action on these matters but shall specifically advise the Commission on these actions.


(c) Actions of an important character or those which involve policy determinations. In these matters the Chairman will develop proposals for presentation to the Commission.


(d) To act within the purview of the Federal Tort Claims Act, as amended, 28 U.S.C. 2672, upon tort claims directed against the Commission where the amount of damages does not exceed $5,000.


(e) Authority to act as “Head of the Agency” or “Agency Head” for administrative determinations required by the Federal Acquisition Regulation and Federal Management Circulars.


(f) Authority to act as “Head of the Agency” or “Agency Head” for all administrative determinations pursuant to the Debt Collection Improvement Act of 1996, Public Laws 104-134, 110 Stat. 1321, 1358 (1996) (DCIA).


[28 FR 12402, Nov. 22, 1963, as amended at 41 FR 49095, Nov. 8, 1976; 51 FR 23550, June 30, 1986; 69 FR 27847, May 17, 2004; 76 FR 70907, Nov. 16, 2011]


§ 0.212 Board of Commissioners.

(a) Whenever the Chairman or Acting Chairman of the Commission determines that a quorum of the Commission is not present or able to act, he may convene a Board of Commissioners. The Board shall be composed of all Commissioners present and able to act.


(b) The Board of Commissioners is authorized to act upon all matters normally acted upon by the Commission en banc, except the following:


(1) The final determination on the merits of any adjudicatory or investigatory hearing proceeding or of any rule making proceeding, except upon a finding by the Board that the public interest would be disserved by waiting the convening of a quorum of the Commission.


(2) Petitions for reconsideration of Commission actions.


(3) Applications for review of actions taken pursuant to delegated authority, except that the Board may dismiss any such application that does not contain any statement required under § 1.115(a) or (b) of this chapter, or does not comply with the filing requirements of § 1.115(d) or (f) of this chapter.


(c) The Board of Commissioners is authorized to act upon all matters normally acted upon by an individual Commissioner (when he or his alternates are not present or able to act) or by a committee of Commissioners (in the absence of a quorum of the committee).


(d) Actions taken by the Board of Commissioners shall be recorded in the same manner as actions taken by the Commission en banc.


(e) This section has no application in circumstances in which the Commission is unable to function at its offices in Washington, D.C. See §§ 0.181-0.186 and §§ 0.381-0.387.


[30 FR 9314, July 27, 1965, as amended at 86 FR 12546, Mar. 4, 2021]


§ 0.218 Authority of, and delegated to, an individual Commissioner or Commissioners.

(a) One or more members of the Commission may be designated to preside in a hearing proceeding. The Commissioner or Commissioners designated to preside at such a hearing shall fix the time and place of the hearing and shall act upon all motions, petitions or other matters which may arise while the proceeding is in hearing status.


(b) One or more members of the Commission may be designated to review an initial decision issued in any hearing case.


(c) Except for actions taken during the course of a hearing and upon the record thereof, actions taken by a Commissioner or Commissioners pursuant to the provisions of this section shall be recorded in writing and filed in the official minutes of the Commission.


[27 FR 7931, Aug. 10, 1962]


Managing Director

§ 0.231 Authority delegated.

Link to an amendment published at 87 FR 54328, Sept. 6, 2022.

(a) The Managing Director, or his designee, upon securing concurrence of the General Counsel, is delegated authority to act upon requests for waiver, reduction or deferment of fees, establish payment dates, and issue notices proposing amendments or adjustments to the fee schedules established under part 1, subpart G, of this chapter.


(b) The Managing Director, or his designee, is delegated authority to make nonsubstantive, editorial revisions of the Commission’s rules and regulations upon approval of the bureau or staff office primarily responsible for the particular part or section involved.


(c) [Reserved]


(d) The Managing Director, or his designee, upon securing the concurrence of the General Counsel, is delegated authority, within the purview of the Federal Tort Claims Act, as amended, 28 U.S.C. 2672, to grant tort claims directed against the Commission where the amount of the claim does not exceed $5,000. In addition thereto, the Managing Director, or his designee, upon securing the concurrence of the General Counsel, is delegated authority to act in the disposition of claims arising under the Military Personnel and Civilian Employees’ Claims Act, as amended, 31 U.S.C. 3701 and 3721, where the amount of the claim does not exceed $6,500.


(e) The Managing Director is delegated authority to act as Head of the Procurement Activity and Contracting Officer for the Commission and to designate appropriate subordinate officials to act as Contracting Officers for the Commission.


(f) (1) The Managing Director, or his designee, is delegated authority to perform all administrative determinations provided for by the Debt Collection Improvement Act of 1996, Public Laws 104-134, 110 Stat. 1321, 1358 (1996) (DCIA), including, but not limited to the provisions of Title 31, United States Code section 3711 to:


(i) Collect claims of the United States Government for money or property arising out of the activities of, or referred to, the Federal Communications Commission,


(ii) Compromise a claim of the Government of not more than $100,000 (excluding interest) or such higher amount as the Attorney General of the United States may from time to time prescribe, and


(iii) Suspend or end collection action on a claim of the Government of not more than $100,000 (excluding interest) when it appears that no person liable on the claim has the present or prospective ability to pay a significant amount of the claim or the cost of collecting the claim is likely to be more than the amount recovered.


(2)(i) This delegation does not include waiver authority provided by 31 U.S.C. 3720B.


(ii) The Chief Financial Officer, or the Deputy Chief Financial Officer, is delegated authority to perform all administrative determinations provided for by 31 U.S.C. 3720B.


(g) The Managing Director, after consultation with the Chairman shall establish, renew, and terminate all Federal advisory committees. He shall also exercise all management responsibilities under the Federal Advisory Committee Act as amended (Pub. L. No. 92-463, 5 U.S.C. App.).


(h) [Reserved]


(i) The Secretary, acting under the supervision of the Managing Director, serves as the official custodian of the Commission’s documents and shall have authority to appoint a deputy or deputies for the purposes of custody and certification of documents located in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania or other established locations. The Secretary is delegated authority to rule on requests for extensions of time based on operational problems associated with the Commission’s electronic comment filing system. See § 1.46 of this chapter.


(j) The Managing Director or his designee is delegated the authority, after seeking the opinion of the General Counsel, to determine, in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles for federal agencies the organizations, programs (including funds), and accounts that are required to be included in the financial statements of the Commission.


(k) The Managing Director, or his designee, after seeking the opinion of the General Counsel, is delegated the authority to direct all organizations, programs (including funds), and accounts that are required to be included in the financial statements of the Commission to comply with all relevant and applicable federal financial management and reporting statutes.


(l) Subpoena authority. The Managing Director is delegated authority to issue subpoenas for the Office of Managing Director’s oversight of audits of the USF programs and the Office of Managing Director’s review and evaluation of the interstate telecommunications relay services fund, the North American numbering plan, regulatory fee collection, FCC operating expenses, and debt collection. Before issuing a subpoena, the Office of Managing Director shall obtain the approval of the Office of General Counsel.


(Secs. 4, 303, 48 Stat., as amended, 1066, 1082; 47 U.S.C. 154, 303; 18 U.S.C. 207(j); 39 U.S.C. 3220; Notice of Preliminary Guidelines issued by the Department of Justice, 50 FR 46622, November 8, 1985)



Cross Reference:

47 CFR part 19, subpart E.


[29 FR 14666, Oct. 28, 1964]


Editorial Note:For Federal Register citations affecting § 0.231, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume and at www.govinfo.gov.

Chief Engineer

§ 0.241 Authority delegated.

(a) The performance of functions and activities described in § 0.31 is delegated to the Chief of the Office of Engineering and Technology: Provided that the following matters shall be referred to the Commission en banc for disposition:


(1) Notice of proposed rulemaking and of inquiry and final orders in rulemaking proceedings, inquiry proceedings and non-editorial orders making changes, except that:


(i) The Chief of the Office of Engineering and Technology is delegated authority, together with the Chief of the Wireless Telecommunications Bureau, to adopt certain technical standards applicable to hearing aid compatibility under § 20.19 of this chapter, as specified in § 20.19(k).


(ii) The Chief of the Office of Engineering and Technology is delegated authority, by notice-and-comment rulemaking if required by statute or otherwise in the public interest, to issue an order amending rules in parts 2, 5, 15, or 18 of this chapter that reference industry standards to specify revised versions of the standards. This delegation is limited to modifying rules to reference revisions to standards that are already in the rules and not to incorporate a new standard into the rules, and is limited to the approval of changes to the technical standards that do not raise major compliance issues.


(2) Applications for review of actions taken pursuant to delegated authority, except that the Chief of the Office of Engineering and Technology may dismiss any such application that does not contain any statement required under § 1.115(a) or (b) of this chapter, or does not comply with the filing requirements of § 1.115(d) or (f) of this chapter.


(3) Petitions and other requests for waivers of the Commission’s rules, whether or not accompanied by an applications, when such petitions or requests contain new or novel arguments not previously considered by the Commission or present facts or arguments which appear to justify a change in Commission policy.


(4) Petitions and other requests for declaratory rulings, when such petitions or requests contain new or novel arguments not previously considered by the Commission or preset facts or arguments which appear to justify a change in Commission policy.


(5) Any other petition, pleading or request presenting new or novel questions of fact, law, or policy which cannot be resolved under outstanding precedents and guidelines.


(6) Any other complaint or enforcement matter presenting new or novel questions of fact, law, or policy which cannot be resolved under outstanding precedents and guidelines.


(7) Authority to issued a notice of opportunity for hearing pursuant to § 1.80(g) of this chapter; and authority to issue notices of apparent liability, final forfeiture orders, and orders cancelling or reducing forfeitures imposed under § 1.80(f) of this chapter, if the amount set out in the notice of apparent liability is more than $20,000.


(8) Proposed actions following any case remanded by the courts.


(b) The Chief of the Office of Engineering and Technology is delegated authority to administer the Equipment Authorization program as described in part 2 of this chapter.


(c) The Chief of the Office of Engineering and Technology is delegated authority to administer the Experimental Radio licensing program pursuant to part 5 of this chapter.


(d) The Chief of the Office of Engineering and Technology is delegated authority to examine all applications for certification (approval) of subscription television technical systems as acceptable for use under a subscription television authorization as provided for in this chapter, to notify the applicant that an examination of the certified technical information and data submitted in accordance with the provisions of this chapter indicates that the system does or does not appear to be acceptable for authorization as a subscription television system. This delegation shall be exercised in consultation with the Chief, Media Bureau.


(e) The Chief of the Office of Engineering and Technology is authorized to dismiss or deny petitions for rulemaking which are repetitive or moot or which for other reasons plainly do not warrant consideration by the Commission.


(f) The Chief of the Office of Engineering and Technology is authorized to enter into agreements with the National Institute of Standards and Technology and other accreditation bodies to perform accreditation of test laboratories pursuant to § 2.948(e) of this chapter. In addition, the Chief is authorized to make determinations regarding the continued acceptability of individual accrediting organizations and accredited laboratories.


(g) The Chief of the Office of Engineering and Technology is delegated authority to enter into agreements with the National Institute of Standards and Technology to perform accreditation of Telecommunication Certification Bodies (TCBs) pursuant to §§ 2.960 and 2.962 of this chapter. In addition, the Chief is delegated authority to develop specific methods that will be used to accredit TCBs, to designate TCBs, to make determinations regarding the continued acceptability of individual TCBs, and to develop procedures that TCBs will use for performing post-market surveillance.


(h) The Chief of the Office of Engineering and Technology is delegated authority to administer the database functions for unlicensed devices operating in the television broadcast bands (TV bands) as set forth in subpart H of part 15 of this chapter. The Chief is delegated authority to develop specific methods that will be used to designate TV bands database managers, to designate these database managers; to develop procedures that these database managers will use to ensure compliance with the requirements for database operations; to make determinations regarding the continued acceptability of individual database managers; and to perform other functions as needed for the administration of the TV bands databases. The Chief is also delegated authority jointly with the Chief of the Wireless Telecommunications Bureau to administer provisions of § 15.713(h)(8) of this chapter pertaining to the registration of event sites where large numbers of wireless microphones that operate on frequencies specified in § 74.802 of this chapter are used.


(i) The Chief of the Office of Engineering and Technology is delegated authority to make nonsubstantive, editorial revisions to the Commission’s rules and regulations contained in parts 2, 4, 5, 15, and 18 of this chapter.


(j) The Chief of the Office of Engineering and Technology is delegated authority jointly with the Chief of the Wireless Telecommunications Bureau to administer the Spectrum Access System (SAS) and SAS Administrator functions set forth in part 96 of this chapter. The Chief is delegated authority to develop specific methods that will be used to designate SAS Administrators; to designate SAS Administrators; to develop procedures that these SAS Administrators will use to ensure compliance with the requirements for SAS operation; to make determinations regarding the continued acceptability of individual SAS Administrators; and to perform other functions as needed for the administration of the SAS. The Chief is delegated the authority to perform these same functions with regard to the Environmental Sensing Capability.


(k) The Chief of the Office of Engineering and Technology is delegated authority to administer the Automated Frequency Coordination (AFC) system and AFC system operator functions set forth in subpart E of part 15 of this chapter. The Chief is delegated authority to develop specific methods that will be used to designate AFC system operators; to designate AFC system operators; to develop procedures that these AFC system operators will use to ensure compliance with the requirements for AFC system operations; to make determinations regarding the continued acceptability of individual AFC system operators; and to perform other functions as needed for the administration of the AFC systems.


[51 FR 41106, Nov. 13, 1986, as amended at 57 FR 18088, Apr. 29, 1992; 60 FR 5324, Jan. 27, 1995; 60 FR 32119, June 20, 1995; 61 FR 4918, Feb. 9, 1996; 61 FR 31045, June 19, 1996; 62 FR 48952, Sept. 18, 1997; 64 FR 4995, Feb. 2, 1999; 67 FR 13220, Mar. 21, 2002; 69 FR 70337, Dec. 3, 2004; 73 FR 9463, Feb. 21, 2008; 73 FR 25587, May 7, 2008; 75 FR 75835, Dec. 6, 2010; 80 FR 33438, June 12, 2015; 80 FR 36217, June 23, 2015; 85 FR 31410, May 26, 2020; 86 FR 12546, Mar. 4, 2021]


§ 0.247 Record of actions taken.

The application and authorization files and other appropriate files of the Office of Engineering and Technology are designated as the official minute entries of actions taken pursuant to §§ 0.241 and 0.243.


[33 FR 8228, June 1, 1968, as amended at 44 FR 39179, July 5, 1979; 51 FR 12615, Apr. 14, 1986]


General Counsel

§ 0.251 Authority delegated.

(a) The General Counsel is delegated authority to act as the “designated agency ethics official.”


(b) Insofar as authority is not delegated to any other Bureau or Office, and with respect only to matters which are not in hearing status, the General Counsel is delegated authority:


(1) To act upon requests for extension of time within which briefs, comments or pleadings may be filed.


(2) To dismiss, as repetitious, any petition for reconsideration of a Commission order which disposed of a petition for reconsideration and which did not reverse, change, or modify the original order.


(3) To dismiss or deny petitions for rulemaking which are repetitive or moot or which, for other reasons, plainly do not warrant consideration by the Commission.


(4) To dismiss as repetitious any petition for reconsideration of a Commission order denying an application for review which fails to rely on new facts or changed circumstances.


(c) The General Counsel is delegated authority in adjudicatory hearing proceedings which are pending before the Commission en banc to act on all requests for relief, and to issue all appropriate orders, except those which involve final disposition on the merits of a previously specified issue concerning an applicant’s basic qualifications or two or more applicants’ comparative qualifications.


(d) When an adjudicatory proceeding is before the Commission for the issuance of a final order or decision, the General Counsel will make every effort to submit a draft order or decision for Commission consideration within four months of the filing of the last responsive pleading. If the Commission is unable to adopt an order or decision in such cases within five months of the last responsive pleading, it shall issue an order indicating that additional time will be required to resolve the case.


(e) The official record of all actions taken by the General Counsel pursuant to § 0.251 (c) and (d) is contained in the original docket folder, which is maintained by the Reference Information Center.


(f) The General Counsel is delegated authority to issue written determinations on matters regarding the interception of telephone conversations. Nothing in this paragraph, however, shall affect the authority of the Inspector General to intercept or record telephone conversations as necessary in the conduct of investigations or audits.


(g) The General Counsel is delegated authority to issue rulings on whether violations of the ex parte rules have occurred and to impose appropriate sanctions. The General Counsel shall refer to the Enforcement Bureau for disposition pursuant to § 0.311(b) any matter in which a forfeiture or a citation under 47 U.S.C. 503(b)(5) may be warranted. If the Enforcement Bureau determines that forfeiture or a citation is not warranted, the matter shall be referred back to the General Counsel for appropriate action.


(h) The General Counsel is delegated authority to make determinations regarding and waive the applicability of section 4(b) of the Communications Act (47 U.S.C. § 154(b)) and the Federal conflict of interest statutes (18 U.S.C. §§ 203, 205 and 208).


(i) The General Counsel is delegated authority to perform all administrative determinations provided for by the Debt Collection Improvement Act of 1996, Public Law 104-134, 110 Stat. 1321, 1358 (1996) (DCIA), including, but not limited to the provisions of Title 31, U.S.C. 3711 to:


(1) Collect claims of the United States Government of money or property arising out of the activities of, or referred to, the Federal Communications Commission,


(2) Compromise a claim of the Government of not more than $100,000 (excluding interest) or such higher amount as the Attorney General of the United States may from time to time prescribe, and


(3) Suspend or end collection action on a claim of the Government of not more than $100,000 (excluding interest) when it appears that no person liable on the claim has the present or prospective ability to pay a significant amount of the claim or the cost of collecting the claim is likely to be more than the amount recovered.



Note to paragraph (i):

This delegation does not include waiver authority provided by 31 U.S.C. 3720B.


(j) The General Counsel is delegated authority to act as the Commission’s Chief FOIA Officer, as specified in 5 U.S.C. 552(j). In this role, the General Counsel is delegated authority to dismiss FOIA applications for review that are untimely, repetitious, or fail to articulate specific grounds for review.


(Secs. 2, 3, 4, 5, 301, 303, 307, 308, 309, 315, 317, 48 Stat., as amended, 1064, 1065, 1066, 1068, 1081, 1082, 1083, 1084, 1085, 1088, 1089; 47 U.S.C. 152, 153, 154, 155, 301, 303, 307, 308, 309, 315, 317)

[28 FR 12402, Nov. 22, 1963]


Editorial Note:For Federal Register citations affecting § 0.251, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume and at www.govinfo.gov.

International Bureau


Source:Sections 0.261 and 0.262 appear at 60 FR 5324, Jan. 27, 1995, unless otherwise noted.

§ 0.261 Authority delegated.

(a) Subject to the limitations set forth in paragraph (b) of this section, the Chief, International Bureau, is hereby delegated the authority to perform the functions and activities described in § 0.51, including without limitation the following:


(1) To recommend rulemakings, studies, and analyses (legal, engineering, social, and economic) of various petitions for policy or rule changes submitted by industry or the public, and to assist the Commission in conducting the same;


(2) To assume the principal representational role on behalf of the Commission in international conferences, meetings, and negotiations, and direct Commission preparation for such conferences, meetings, and negotiations with other bureaus and offices, as appropriate;


(3) To act upon applications for international telecommunications and services pursuant to relevant portions of part 63 of this chapter, and coordinate with the Wireline Competition Bureau as appropriate;


(4) To act upon applications for international and domestic satellite systems and earth stations pursuant to part 25 of this chapter;


(5) To act upon applications for cable landing licenses pursuant to § 1.767 of this chapter;


(6) To act upon requests for designation of Recognized Private Operating Agency (RPOA) status under part 63 of this chapter;


(7) To act upon applications relating to international broadcast station operations, or for permission to deliver programming to foreign stations, under part 73 of this chapter;


(8) To administer and enforce the policies and rules on international settlements under part 64 of this chapter;


(9) To administer portions of part 2 of this chapter dealing with international treaties and call sign provisions, and to make call sign assignments, individually and in blocks, to U.S. Government agencies and FCC operating bureaus;


(10) To act upon applications for closure of public coast stations in the maritime service under part 63 of this chapter and to coordinate its efforts with the Wireless Telecommunications Bureau.


(11) To administer Commission participation in the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) Fellowship telecommunication training program for foreign officials offered through the U.S. Telecommunications Training Institute;


(12) In consultation with the affected Bureaus and Offices, to recommend revision of Commission rules and procedures as appropriate to conform to the outcomes of international conferences, agreements, or treaties;


(13) To notify the ITU of the United States’ terrestrial and satellite assignments for inclusion in the Master International Frequency Register;


(14) To conduct studies and compile such data relating to international telecommunications as may be necessary for the Commission to develop and maintain an adequate regulatory program; and


(15) To interpret and enforce rules and regulations pertaining to matters under its jurisdiction and not within the jurisdiction of the Enforcement Bureau.


(16) To administer and make available on a public website, a standardized set of national security and law enforcement questions for the categories of information set forth in part 1, subpart CC, of this chapter.


(b) Notwithstanding the authority delegated in paragraph (a) of this section, the Chief, International Bureau, shall not have authority:


(1) To act on any application, petition, pleading, complaint, enforcement matter, or other request that:


(i) Presents new or novel arguments not previously considered by the Commission;


(ii) Presents facts or arguments which appear to justify a change in Commission policy; or


(iii) Cannot be resolved under outstanding precedents and guidelines after consultation with appropriate Bureaus or Offices.


(2) To issue notices of proposed rulemaking, notices of inquiry, or reports or orders arising from rulemaking or inquiry proceedings;


(3) To act upon any application for review of actions taken by the Chief, International Bureau, pursuant to delegated authority, except that the Chief of the International Bureau may dismiss any such application that does not contain any statement required under § 1.115(a) or (b) of this chapter, or does not comply with the filing requirements of § 1.115(d) or (f) of this chapter;


(4) To act upon any formal or informal radio application or section 214 application for common carrier services which is in hearing status;


(5) To designate for hearing any applications except:


(i) Mutually exclusive applications for radio facilities filed pursuant to parts 23, 25, or 73 of this chapter; and


(ii) Applications for facilities where the issues presented relate solely to whether the applicant has complied with outstanding precedents and guidelines; or


(6) To impose, reduce, or cancel forfeitures pursuant to section 203 or section 503(b) of the Communications Act of 1934, as amended, in amounts of more than $80,000 for common carrier providers and $20,000 for non-common carrier providers.


[60 FR 5324, Jan. 27, 1995, as amended at 60 FR 35506, July 10, 1995; 64 FR 60721, Nov. 8, 1999; 67 FR 13220, Mar. 21, 2002; 75 FR 7972, Feb. 23, 2010; 76 FR 70907, Nov. 16, 2011; 85 FR 76381, Nov. 27, 2020; 86 FR 12546, Mar. 4, 2021]


§ 0.262 Record of actions taken.

The application and authorization files in the appropriate central files of the International Bureau are designated as the Commission’s official records of actions by the Chief, International Bureau, pursuant to authority delegated to him.


Office of Economics and Analytics

§ 0.271 Authority delegated.

The Chief, Office of Economics and Analytics, is delegated authority to perform all functions and activities described in § 0.21 (and to perform the specified functions set forth in in paragraphs (f) through (i) of this section to the extent they fall within the subject matters over which the Office of Economics and Analytics has primary authority under § 0.21), subject to the exceptions and limitations in paragraphs (a) through (e) of this section:


(a) The Chief, Office of Economics and Analytics, shall not have authority to act on notices of proposed rulemaking and of inquiry, final orders in rulemaking proceedings and inquiry proceedings, and reports arising from any of the foregoing except such order involving ministerial conforming amendments to rule parts and notices and orders addressing the detailed procedures for implementation of auctions of spectrum and broadcast services and uses of competitive bidding to achieve other Commission policy objectives, including universal service support.


(b) The Chief, Office of Economics and Analytics, shall not have authority to act on any complaints, petitions, pleadings, requests, or other matters presenting new or novel questions of fact, law, or policy that cannot be resolved under existing precedents and guidelines.


(c) The Chief, Office of Economics and Analytics, shall not have authority to act on any applications for review of actions taken by the Chief of the Office of Economics and Analytics pursuant to delegated authority, except that the Chief may dismiss any such application that does not contain any statement required under § 1.115(a) or (b) of this chapter, or does not comply with the filing requirements of § 1.115(d) or (f) of this chapter.


(d) The Chief, Office of Economics and Analytics, shall not have authority to act on any applications that are in hearing status.


(e) The Chief, Office of Economics and Analytics, shall not have authority to impose, reduce or cancel forfeitures pursuant to the Communications Act of 1934, as amended, in amounts of more than $80,000. Payments for bid withdrawal, default or to prevent unjust enrichment that are imposed pursuant to Section 309(j) of the Communications Act of 1934, as amended, and regulations in this chapter implementing Section 309(j) governing auction authority, are excluded from this restriction.


(f) The Chief, Office of Economics and Analytics, is delegated authority to deny requests for extension of time or to extend the time within which comments may be filed.


(g) The Chief, Office of Economics and Analytics, is authorized to dismiss or deny petitions for rulemaking that are repetitive or moot or that for other reasons plainly do not warrant consideration by the Commission.


(h) The Chief, Office of Economics and Analytics, is authorized to dismiss or deny petitions for reconsideration to the extent permitted by § 1.429(l) of this chapter and to the extent permitted by § 1.106 of this chapter.


(i) The Chief, Office of Economics and Analytics, is delegated authority to make nonsubstantive, editorial revisions to the Commission’s rules and regulations contained in part 1, subparts Q, V, W, and AA, of this chapter.


[85 FR 34527, June 5, 2020, as amended at 86 FR 12547, Mar. 4, 2021]


§ 0.272 Record of actions taken.

The application and authorization files and other appropriate files of the Office of Economics and Analytics are designated as the Commission’s official records of action of the Chief, Office of Economics and Analytics, pursuant to authority delegated to the Chief. The official records of action are maintained in the Reference Information Center in the Consumer and Governmental Affairs Bureau.


[83 FR 63076, Dec. 7, 2018]


§ 0.273 Actions taken under delegated authority.

In discharging the authority conferred by § 0.271, the Chief, Office of Economics and Analytics, shall establish working relationships with other Bureaus and staff Offices to assure the effective coordination of actions taken in the analysis of regulatory impacts, including assessments of paperwork burdens and initial and final regulatory flexibility assessments.


[83 FR 63076, Dec. 7, 2018]


Chief, Media Bureau

§ 0.283 Authority delegated.

The Chief, Media Bureau, is delegated authority to perform all functions of the Bureau, described in § 0.61, provided that the following matters shall be referred to the Commission en banc for disposition:


(a) Notices of proposed rulemaking and of inquiry and final orders in such proceedings, with the exception of rulemaking proceedings involving the allotment of FM and television channels.


(b) Application for review of actions taken pursuant to delegated authority, except that the Chief of the Media Bureau may dismiss any such application that does not contain any statement required under § 1.115(a) or (b) of this chapter, or does not comply with the filing requirements of § 1.115(d) or (f) of this chapter.


(c) Matters that present novel questions of law, fact or policy that cannot be resolved under existing precedents and guidelines.


(d) The imposition, reduction or cancellation of forfeitures pursuant to section 503(b) of the Communications Act of 1934, as amended, in amounts of more than $20,000.


[67 FR 13220, Mar. 21, 2002, as amended at 86 FR 12547, Mar. 4, 2021]


§ 0.284 Actions taken under delegated authority.

(a) In discharging the authority conferred by § 0.283 of this part, the Chief, Media Bureau, shall establish working relationships with other bureaus and staff offices to assure the effective coordination of actions taken in the following areas of joint responsibility;


(1) Complaints arising under section 315 of the Communications Act – Office of General Counsel.


(2) Requests for waiver of tower painting and lighting specifications-Wireless Telecommunications Bureau.


(3) Requests for use of frequencies or bands of frequencies shared with private sector nonbroadcast or government services – Office of Engineering and Technology and appropriate operating bureau.


(4) Requests involving coordination with other agencies of government – Office of General Counsel, Office of Engineering and Technology and appropriate operating bureau.


(5) Proposals involving possible harmful impact on radio astronomy or radio research installations – Office of Engineering and Technology.


(b) With respect to non-routine applications granted under authority delegated in § 0.283 of this part, the Chief, Media Bureau or his designees, shall enter on the working papers associated with each application a narrative justification of the action taken. While not available for public inspection, these working papers shall, upon request, be made available to the Commissioners and members of their staffs.


[47 FR 47829, Oct. 28, 1982; 47 FR 56852, Dec. 21, 1982, as amended at 51 FR 12615, Apr. 14, 1986; 52 FR 5288, Feb. 20, 1987; 59 FR 32132, June 22, 1994; 59 FR 67092, Dec. 28, 1994; 61 FR 8477, Mar. 5, 1996; 64 FR 60721, Nov. 8, 1999; 67 FR 13220, Mar. 21, 2002; 71 FR 69036, Nov. 29, 2006]


§ 0.285 Record of actions taken.

The history card, the station file, and other appropriate files are designated to be the official records of action taken by the Chief of the Media Bureau. The official records of action are maintained in the Reference Information Center in the Consumer and Governmental Affairs Bureau.


[67 FR 13220, Mar. 21, 2002]


Chief, Wireline Competition Bureau

§ 0.291 Authority delegated.

The Chief, Wireline Competition Bureau, is hereby delegated authority to perform all functions of the Bureau, described in § 0.91, subject to the following exceptions and limitations.


(a) Authority concerning applications. (1) The Chief, Wireline Competition Bureau shall not have authority to act on any formal or informal common carrier applications or section 214 applications for common carrier services which are in hearing status.


(2) The Chief, Wireline Competition Bureau shall not have authority to act on any applications or requests which present novel questions of fact, law or policy which cannot be resolved under outstanding precedents and guidelines.


(b) Authority concerning section 220 of the Act. The Chief, Wireline Competition Bureau shall not have authority to promulgate regulations or orders prescribing permanent depreciation rates for common carriers, or to prescribe interim depreciation rates to be effective more than one year, pursuant to section 220 of the Communications Act of 1934, as amended.


(c) Authority concerning forfeitures. The Chief, Wireline Competition Bureau shall not have authority to impose, reduce or cancel forfeitures pursuant to Section 203 or Section 503(b) of the Communications Act of 1934, as amended, in amounts of more than $80,000.


(d) Authority concerning applications for review. The Chief, Wireline Competition Bureau, shall not have authority to act upon any applications for review of actions taken by the Chief, Wireline Competition Bureau, pursuant to any delegated authority, except that the Chief of the Wireline Competition Bureau may dismiss any such application that does not contain any statement required under § 1.115(a) or (b) of this chapter, or does not comply with the filing requirements of § 1.115(d) or (f) of this chapter.


(e) Authority concerning rulemaking and investigatory proceedings. The Chief, Wireline Competition Bureau, shall not have authority to issue notices of proposed rulemaking, notices of inquiry, or reports or orders arising from either of the foregoing, except that the Chief, Wireline Competition Bureau, shall have authority, in consultation and coordination with the Chief, International Bureau, to issue and revise a manual on the details of the reporting requirements for international carriers referenced in § 43.61(a)(3) of this chapter.


(f) Authority concerning the issuance of subpoenas. The Chief of the Wireline Competition Bureau or her/his designee is authorized to issue non-hearing related subpoenas for the attendance and testimony of witnesses and the production of books, papers, correspondence, memoranda, schedules of charges, contracts, agreements, and any other records deemed relevant to the investigation of matters within the jurisdiction of the Wireline Competition Bureau. Before issuing a subpoena, the Bureau shall obtain the approval of the Office of General Counsel.


(g) The Chief, Wireline Competition Bureau, is delegated authority to enter into agreements with the National Institute of Standards and Technology to perform accreditation of Telecommunication Certification Bodies (TCBs) pursuant to §§ 68.160 and 68.162 of this chapter. In addition, the Chief is delegated authority to develop specific methods that will be used to accredit TCBs, to designate TCBs, to make determinations regarding the continued acceptability of individual TCBs and to develop procedures that TCBs will use for performing post-market surveillance.


(h) [Reserved]


(i) Authority concerning schools and libraries support mechanism audits. The Chief, Wireline Competition Bureau, shall have authority to address audit findings relating to the schools and libraries support mechanism. This authority is not subject to the limitation set forth in paragraph (a)(2) of this section.


(Secs. 4, 5, 303, 48 Stat. 1066, 1068, 1082, as amended; 47 U.S.C. 154, 155, 303; secs. 2, 3, 4, 5, 301, 303, 307, 308, 309, 315, 317, 48 Stat., as amended, 1064, 1065, 1066, 1068, 1081, 1082, 1083, 1084, 1085, 1089; 47 U.S.C. 152, 153, 154, 155, 303, 307, 308, 309, 315, 317)

[44 FR 18501, Mar. 28, 1979]


Editorial Note:For Federal Register citations affecting § 0.291, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume and at www.govinfo.gov.

§ 0.301 [Reserved]

§ 0.302 Record of actions taken.

The application and authorization files are designated as the Commission’s official records of action of the Chief, Wireline Competition Bureau pursuant to authority delegated to the Chief. The official records of action are maintained in the Reference Information Center in the Consumer and Governmental Affairs Bureau.


[67 FR 13221, Mar. 21, 2002]


§ 0.303 [Reserved]

§ 0.304 Authority for determinations of exempt telecommunications company status.

Authority is delegated to the Chief, Wireline Competition Bureau to act upon any application for a determination of exempt telecommunications company status filed pursuant to section 34(a)(1) of the Public Utility Holding Company Act of 1935, as amended by section 103 of the Telecommunications Act of 1996.


[64 FR 5950, Feb. 8, 1999, as amended at 67 FR 13221, Mar. 21, 2002]


Enforcement Bureau

§ 0.311 Authority delegated.

The Chief, Enforcement Bureau, is delegated authority to perform all functions of the Bureau, described in § 0.111, provided that:


(a) The following matters shall be referred to the Commission en banc for disposition:


(1) Notices of proposed rulemaking and of inquiry and final orders in such proceedings.


(2) Applications for review of actions taken pursuant to delegated authority, except that the Chief of the Enforcement Bureau may dismiss any such application that does not contain any statement required under § 1.115(a) or (b) of this chapter, or does not comply with the filing requirements of § 1.115(d) or (f) of this chapter.


(3) Matters that present novel questions of law, fact or policy that cannot be resolved under existing precedents and guidelines.


(4) Forfeiture notices and forfeiture orders if the amount is more than $100,000 in the case of common carriers or more than $25,000 in the case of all other persons or entities.


(5) Orders concluding an investigation under section 208(b) of the Communications Act and orders addressing petitions for reconsideration of such orders.


(6) Release of information pursuant to section 220(f) of the Communications Act, except for release of such information to a state public utility commission or in response to a Freedom of Information Act Request.


(b) Action on complaints regarding compliance with section 705(a) of the Communications Act shall be coordinated with the Office of General Counsel.


[64 FR 60721, Nov. 8, 1999, as amended at 67 FR 13221, Mar. 21, 2002; 71 FR 69036, Nov. 29, 2006; 86 FR 12547, Mar. 4, 2021]


§ 0.314 Additional authority delegated.

The Regional Directors are delegated authority to act upon applications, requests, or other matters, which are not in hearing status, and direct the following activities necessary to conduct investigations or inspections:


(a) On informal requests from broadcast stations to extend temporary authority for operation without monitors, plate ammeter, plate volmeter, base current meter, common point meter, and transmission line meter from FM and television stations.


(b) To act on and make determinations on behalf of the Commission regarding requests for assignments and reassignments of priorities under the Telecommunications Service Priority System, part 64 of the rules, when circumstances require immediate action and the common carrier seeking to provide service states that it cannot contact the National Communications System or the Commission office normally responsible for such assignments. To the extent possible, all such actions and determinations shall be made in coordination with the Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau.


(c) Require special equipment and program tests during inspections or investigations to determine compliance with technical requirements specified by the Commission.


(d) Require stations to operate with the pre-sunrise and nighttime facilities during daytime hours in order that an inspection or investigation may be made by an authorized Commission representative to determine operating parameters.


(e) Issue notices and orders to operators of industrial, scientific, and medical (ISM) equipment, as provided in § 18.115 of this chapter.


(f) Act on requests for permission to resume operation of ISM equipment on a temporary basis, as provided by § 18.115 of this chapter, and requests for extensions of time within which to file final reports, as provided by § 18.117 of this chapter.


(g) Issue notices and orders to operators of part 15 devices, as provided in § 15.5 of this chapter.


(h) Issue notices and orders to suspend operations to multi-channel video programming distributors, as provided in § 76.613 of this chapter.


(i) Issue notices and orders to suspend operations to part 74 licensees, as provided in § 74.23 of this chapter.


[64 FR 60721, Nov. 8, 1999, as amended at 67 FR 13221, Mar. 21, 2002; 71 FR 69036, Nov. 29, 2006; 78 FR 23151, Apr. 18, 2013; 80 FR 53749, Sept. 8, 2015]


§ 0.317 Record of action taken.

The application, authorization, and other appropriate files of the Enforcement Bureau are designated as the Commission’s official records of action taken pursuant to authority delegated under §§ 0.311 and 0.314, and shall constitute the official Commission minutes entry of such actions. The official records of action are maintained in the Reference Information Center in the Consumer and Governmental Affairs Bureau.


[80 FR 53749, Sept. 8, 2015]


Wireless Telecommunications Bureau

§ 0.331 Authority delegated.

The Chief, Wireless Telecommunications Bureau, is hereby delegated authority to perform all functions of the Bureau, described in § 0.131, subject to the exceptions and limitations in paragraphs (a) through (d) of this section, and also the functions described in paragraph (e) of this section.


(a) Authority concerning applications. (1) The Chief, Wireless Telecommunications Bureau shall not have authority to act on any radio applications that are in hearing status.


(2) The Chief, Wireless Telecommunications Bureau shall not have authority to act on any complaints, petitions or requests, whether or not accompanied by an application, when such complaints, petitions or requests present new or novel questions of law or policy which cannot be resolved under outstanding Commission precedents and guidelines.


(b) Authority concerning forfeitures and penalties. The Chief, Wireless Telecommunications Bureau, shall not have authority to impose, reduce, or cancel forfeitures pursuant to the Communications Act of 1934, as amended, and imposed under regulations in this chapter in amounts of more than $80,000 for commercial radio providers and $20,000 for private radio providers.


(c) Authority concerning applications for review. The Chief, Wireless Telecommunications Bureau, shall not have authority to act upon any applications for review of actions taken by the Chief of the Wireless Telecommunications Bureau pursuant to any delegated authority, except that the Chief may dismiss any such application that does not contain any statement required under § 1.115(a) or (b) of this chapter, or does not comply with the filing requirements of § 1.115 (d) or (f) of this chapter.


(d) Authority concerning rulemaking proceedings. The Chief, Wireless Telecommunications Bureau shall not have the authority to act upon notices of proposed rulemaking and inquiry, final orders in rulemaking proceedings and inquiry proceedings, and reports arising from any of the foregoing except such orders involving ministerial conforming amendments to rule parts, or orders conforming any of the applicable rules to formally adopted international conventions or agreements where novel questions of fact, law, or policy are not involved. Orders conforming any of the applicable rules in part 17 of this chapter to rules formally adopted by the Federal Aviation Administration also need not be referred to the Commission if they do not involve novel questions of fact, law, or policy. In addition, revisions to the airport terminal use list in § 90.35(c)(61) of this chapter and revisions to the Government Radiolocation list in § 90.371(b) of this chapter need not be referred to the Commission. Adoption of certain technical standards applicable to hearing aid compatibility under § 20.19 of this chapter made together with the Chief of the Office of Engineering and Technology, as specified in § 20.19(k) of this chapter, also need not be referred to the Commission. Also, the addition of new Marine VHF frequency coordination committee(s) to § 80.514 of this chapter need not be referred to the Commission if they do not involve novel questions of fact, policy or law, as well as requests by the United States Coast Guard to:


(1) Designate radio protection areas for mandatory Vessel Traffic Services (VTS) and establish marine channels as VTS frequencies for these areas; or


(2) Designate regions for shared commercial and non-commercial vessel use of VHF marine frequencies.


(3) Designate by footnote to frequency table in § 80.373(f) of this chapter marine VHF frequencies are available for intership port operations communications in defined port areas.


(e) The Chief of the Wireless Telecommunications Bureau is delegated authority jointly with the Chief of the Office of Engineering and Technology to administer provisions of § 15.713(h)(8) of this chapter pertaining to the registration of event sites where large numbers of wireless microphones that operate on frequencies specified in § 74.802 of this chapter are used.


(f) The Chief of the Wireless Telecommunications Bureau is delegated authority jointly with the Chief of the Office of Engineering and Technology to administer the Spectrum Access System (SAS) and SAS Administrator functions set forth in part 96 of this chapter. The Chief is delegated authority to develop specific methods that will be used to designate SAS Administrators; to designate SAS Administrators; to develop procedures that these SAS Administrators will use to ensure compliance with the requirements for SAS operation; to make determinations regarding the continued acceptability of individual SAS Administrators; and to perform other functions as needed for the administration of the SAS. The Chief is delegated the authority to perform these same functions with regard to the Environmental Sensing Capability.


[60 FR 35506, July 10, 1995, as amended at 61 FR 26465, May 28, 1996; 62 FR 40285, July 28, 1997; 65 FR 43715, July 14, 2000; 67 FR 63284, Oct. 11, 2002; 69 FR 46440, Aug. 3, 2004; 73 FR 25587, May 7, 2008; 75 FR 75835, Dec. 6, 2010; 79 FR 56984, Sept. 24, 2014; 80 FR 36218, June 23, 2015; 85 FR 34527, June 5, 2020; 86 FR 12547, Mar. 4, 2021]


§ 0.332 Actions taken under delegated authority.

In discharging the authority conferred by § 0.331, the Chief, Wireless Telecommunications Bureau, shall establish working relationships with other bureaus and staff offices to assure the effective coordination of actions taken in the following areas of joint responsibility:


(a) [Reserved]


(b) Requests for waiver of tower painting and lighting specifications – Enforcement Bureau.


(c) Matters involving public safety, homeland security, national security, emergency management and preparedness, and disaster management communications – the Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau.


(d) Complaints involving equal employment opportunities – Office of General Counsel.


(e) Requests for use of frequencies or bands of frequencies shared with broadcast, common carrier, or government services – Office of Engineering and Technology and appropriate operating bureau.


(f) Requests involving coordination with other Federal or state agencies when appropriate – Office of General Counsel, Office of Engineering and Technology or operating bureau.


(g) Proposals involving possible harmful impact on radio astronomy or radio research installations – Office of Engineering and Technology.


[40 FR 4423, Jan. 30, 1975, as amended at 44 FR 11070, Feb. 27, 1979; 44 FR 39180, July 5, 1979; 50 FR 27953, July 9, 1985; 51 FR 12615, Apr. 14, 1986; 51 FR 20290, June 4, 1986; 52 FR 5288, Feb. 20, 1987; 59 FR 26971, May 25, 1994; 60 FR 5325, Jan. 27, 1995; 60 FR 35507, July 10, 1995; 61 FR 8477, Mar. 5, 1996; 64 FR 60722, Nov. 8, 1999; 71 FR 69037, Nov. 29, 2006]


§§ 0.333-0.337 [Reserved]

Administrative Law Judges

§ 0.341 Authority of Administrative Law Judges and other presiding officers.

(a) After a presiding officer (other than the Commission) has been designated to conduct a hearing proceeding, and until he or she has issued an initial decision or certified the record to the Commission for decision, or the proceeding has been transferred to another presiding officer, all motions, petitions and other matters that may arise during the proceeding shall be acted upon by such presiding officer, except those which are to be acted upon by the Commission. See § 1.291(a)(1) of this chapter.


(b) Any question which would be acted upon by the presiding officer if it were raised by the parties to the proceeding may be raised and acted upon by the presiding officer on his or her own motion.


(c) Any question which would be acted upon by the presiding officer (other than the Commission) may be certified to the Commission on the presiding officer’s own motion.


(d) Except for actions taken during the course of a hearing and upon the record thereof, actions taken by a presiding officer pursuant to the provisions of this section shall be recorded in writing and filed in the official record of the proceeding.


(e) The presiding officer may waive any rule governing the conduct of Commission hearings upon motion or upon the presiding officer’s own motion for good cause, subject to the provisions of the Administrative Procedure Act and the Communications Act of 1934, as amended.


(f) The presiding officer may issue such orders and conduct such proceedings as will best conduce to the proper dispatch of business and the ends of justice.


(g)(1) For program carriage complaints filed pursuant to § 76.1302 of this chapter that the Chief, Media Bureau refers to a presiding officer for an initial decision, the presiding officer shall release an initial decision in compliance with one of the following deadlines:


(i) 240 calendar days after a party informs the presiding officer that it elects not to pursue alternative dispute resolution as set forth in § 76.7(g)(2) of this chapter; or


(ii) If the parties have mutually elected to pursue alternative dispute resolution pursuant to § 76.7(g)(2) of this chapter, within 240 calendar days after the parties inform the presiding officer that they have failed to resolve their dispute through alternative dispute resolution.


(2) The presiding officer may toll these deadlines under the following circumstances:


(i) If the complainant and defendant jointly request that the presiding officer toll these deadlines in order to pursue settlement discussions or alternative dispute resolution or for any other reason that the complainant and defendant mutually agree justifies tolling; or


(ii) If complying with the deadline would violate the due process rights of a party or would be inconsistent with fundamental fairness; or


(iii) In extraordinary situations, due to a lack of adjudicatory resources available at the time.


[85 FR 63171, Oct. 6, 2020]


§ 0.347 Record of actions taken.

The record of actions taken by a presiding officer, including initial and recommended decisions and actions taken pursuant to § 0.341, is available through the Commission’s Electronic Comment Filing System (ECFS). ECFS serves as the repository for records in the Commission’s docketed proceedings from 1992 to the present. The public may use ECFS to retrieve all such records, as well as selected pre-1992 documents. The Office of the Secretary maintains copies of documents that include nonpublic information.


[85 FR 63171, Oct. 6, 2020]


Consumer and Governmental Affairs Bureau

§ 0.361 Authority delegated.

The Chief, Consumer and Governmental Affairs Bureau, is delegated authority to perform all functions of the Bureau, described in § 0.141, provided that the following matters shall be referred to the Commission en banc for disposition:


(a) Notices of proposed rulemaking and of inquiry and final orders in such proceedings.


(b) Application for review of actions taken pursuant to delegated authority, except that the Chief of Consumer and Governmental Affairs Bureau may dismiss any such application that does not contain any statement required under § 1.115(a) or (b) of this chapter, or does not comply with the filing requirements of § 1.115(d) or (f) of this chapter.


(c) Matters that present novel questions of law, fact or policy that cannot be resolved under existing precedents and guidelines.


[64 FR 60722, Nov. 8, 1999, as amended at 67 FR 13221, Mar. 21, 2002; 86 FR 12547, Mar. 4, 2021]


Office of Communications Business Opportunities

§ 0.371 Authority delegated.

The Director, Office of Communications Business Opportunities, or his/her designee, is hereby delegated authority to:


(a) Manage the Commission’s compliance with the Regulatory Flexibility Act and the Small Business Regulatory Enforcement Fairness Act;


(b) Develop the Commission’s goals and objectives regarding increased opportunities for small entities, women, and minorities;


(c) Collect and analyze data on the Commission’s efforts toward ensuring full consideration of the interests of small entities, women, and minorities;


(d) Prepare and release reports on the opportunities available and obstacles faced by small entities, women, and minorities in the communications industry;


(e) Conduct studies and collect data on the issues and problems faced by small entities, women, and minorities in the communications industry;


(f) Assume representational role on behalf of the Commission before other federal agencies and at conferences, meetings, and hearings regarding small entities, women, and minorities in the communications industry;


(g) Develop programs and strategies designed to increase competition, employment opportunities and diversity of viewpoint through the promotion of ownership by small entities, women, and minorities;


(h) Manage the Commission’s efforts to increase the awareness of small entities, women, and minorities and to ensure that all available information is accessible to the same.


[69 FR 7377, Feb. 17, 2003]


National Security and Emergency Preparedness Delegations

§ 0.381 Defense Commissioner.

The authority delegated to the Commission under Executive Orders 12472 and 12656 is redelegated to the Defense Commissioner.


[69 FR 30234, May 27, 2004]


§ 0.383 Emergency Relocation Board, authority delegated.

(a) During any period in which the Commission is unable to function because of the circumstances set forth in § 0.186(b), all work, business or functions of the Federal Communications Commission arising under the Communications Act of 1934, as amended, is assigned and referred to the Emergency Relocation Board.


(b) The Board, acting by a majority thereof, shall have the power and authority to hear and determine, order, certify, report or otherwise act as to any of the said work, business or functions so assigned or referred to it, and in respect thereof shall have all the jurisdiction and powers conferred by law upon the Commission, and be subject to the same duties and obligations.


(c) Any order, decision or report made or other action taken by the said Board in respect of any matters so assigned or referred shall have the same effect and force, and may be made, evidenced, and enforced in the same manner, as if made or taken by the Commission.


[28 FR 12402, Nov. 22, 1963, as amended at 33 FR 8228, June 1, 1968; 53 FR 29055, Aug. 2, 1988]


§ 0.387 Other national security and emergency preparedness delegations; cross reference.

For authority of the Chief of the Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau to declare a temporary communications emergency, see § 0.191(o).


[71 FR 69037, Nov. 29, 2006]


Office of Workplace Diversity

§ 0.391 Authority delegated.

The Director, Office of Workplace Diversity, or his/her designee, is hereby delegated authority to:


(a) Manage the Commission’s internal EEO compliance program pursuant to Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended, the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967, as amended, the Equal Pay Act, and other applicable laws, rules, regulations, and Executive Orders, with authority that includes appointing EEO counselors, investigators, and mediators; investigating complaints of employment discrimination, and recommending to the Chairman final agency decisions on EEO complaints;


(b) Mediate EEO complaints;


(c) Develop the Commission’s affirmative action goals and objectives;


(d) Collect and analyze data on the Commission’s affirmative action and EEO activities and accomplishments;


(e) Prepare and release reports on EEO, affirmative action, workplace diversity, and related subjects;


(f) Review personnel activities, including hiring, promotions, discipline, training, awards, and performance recognition for conformance with EEO and workplace diversity goals, objectives and requirements;


(g) Conduct studies and collect data on workplace diversity issues and problems;


(h) Assume representational role on behalf of the Commission at conferences, meetings, and negotiations on EEO and workplace diversity issues;


(i) Develop programs and strategies designed to foster and encourage fairness, equality, and inclusion of all employees in the workforce.


[61 FR 2728, Jan. 29, 1996]


Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau

§ 0.392 Authority delegated.

The Chief, Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau, is hereby delegated authority to perform all functions of the Bureau, described in §§ 0.191 and 0.192, subject to the following exceptions and limitations in paragraphs (a) through (e) of this section.


(a) The Chief, Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau shall not have authority to act on any applications or requests that present novel questions of fact, law or policy that cannot be resolved under outstanding precedents and guidelines.


(b) The Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau shall not have authority to act upon any applications for review of actions taken by the Chief, Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau, pursuant to any delegated authority, except that the Chief of the Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau may dismiss any such application that does not contain any statement required under § 1.115(a) or (b) of this chapter, or does not comply with the filing requirements of § 1.115(d) or (f) of this chapter.


(c) The Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau shall not have authority to act upon any formal or informal radio application or section 214 application for common carrier services which is in hearing status.


(d) The Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau shall not have authority to impose, reduce, or cancel forfeitures pursuant to section 203 or section 503(b) of the Communications Act of 1934, as amended, in amounts of more than $80,000 for common carrier providers and $20,000 for non-common carrier providers.


(e) The Chief, Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau shall not have authority to issue notices of proposed rulemaking, notices of inquiry, or reports or orders arising from either of the foregoing except such orders involving ministerial conforming amendments to rule parts, or orders conforming any of the applicable rules to formally adopted international conventions or agreements where novel questions of fact, law, or policy are not involved.


(f) The Chief, Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau or her/his designee has the authority to rule on emergency requests for Special Temporary Authority during non-business hours. Action on emergency requests for Special Temporary Authority during non-business hours shall be promptly reported to the responsible Bureau or Office.


(g) [Reserved]


(h) The Chief, Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau or her/his designee is authorized to issue non-hearing related subpoenas for the attendance and testimony of witnesses and the production of books, papers, correspondence, memoranda, schedules of charges, contracts, agreements, and any other records deemed relevant to the investigation of matters within the jurisdiction of the Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau. Before issuing a subpoena, the Bureau shall obtain the approval of the Office of General Counsel.


(i) The Chief of the Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau is delegated authority to administer the communications disruption reporting requirements contained in part 4 of this chapter and to revise the filing system and template used for the submission of such communications disruption reports.


(j) The Chief of the Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau is delegated authority to administer the communications reliability and redundancy rules and policies contained in part 9, subpart H, of this chapter, develop and revise forms and procedures as may be required for the administration of part 9, subpart H, of this chapter, review certifications filed in connection therewith, and order remedial action on a case-by-case basis to ensure the reliability of 911 service in accordance with such rules and policies.


[71 FR 69037, Nov. 29, 2006, as amended at 72 FR 39760, July 20, 2007; 73 FR 9463, Feb. 21, 2008; 75 FR 28207, May 20, 2010; 75 FR 78169, Dec. 15, 2010; 79 FR 3130, Jan. 17, 2014; 86 FR 12547, Mar. 4, 2021]


Subpart C – General Information

General

§ 0.401 Location of Commission offices.

The Commission maintains several offices and receipt locations. Applications and other filings not submitted in accordance with the addresses or locations set forth below will be returned to the applicant without processing. When an application or other filing does not involve the payment of a fee, the appropriate filing address or location is established elsewhere in the rules for the various types of submissions made to the Commission. The public should identify the correct filing location by reference to these rules. Applications or submissions requiring fees must be submitted in accordance with § 0.401(b) of the rules irrespective of the addresses that may be set out elsewhere in the rules for other submissions.


(a) General correspondence, as well as applications and filings not requiring the fees set forth at part 1, subpart G of the rules (or not claiming an exemption, waiver or deferral from the fee requirement), should be delivered to one of the following locations.


(1) The main office of the Commission is located at 45 L Street NE, Washington, DC 20554.


(i) Documents submitted by mail to this office should be addressed to: Federal Communications Commission, Washington, DC 20554.


(ii) All hand-carried documents should be addressed to the Commission’s Secretary, Office of the Secretary, Federal Communications Commission and delivered to 9050 Junction Drive, Annapolis Junction, MD 20701.


(iii) Electronic filings, where required, recommended, or permitted, must be transmitted as specified by the Commission or relevant Bureau or Office.


(2) The Commission’s laboratory is located near Columbia, Maryland. The mailing address is:



Federal Communications Commission, Equipment Authorization Division, 7435 Oakland Mills Road, Columbia, MD 21046

(3) The Commission also maintains offices at Gettysburg, PA.


(i) The address of the Wireless Telecommunications Bureau’s licensing facilities are:


(A) Federal Communications Commission, 1270 Fairfield Road, Gettysburg, PA 17325-7245; and


(B) Federal Communications Commission, Wireless Telecommunications Bureau, Washington, DC 20554.


(ii) The mailing address of the International Telecommunications Section of the Finance Branch is: Federal Communications Commission, P.O. Box IT-70, Gettysburg, PA 17326.


(4) For the locations of the field offices, contact the Enforcement Bureau.


(5) The location of the Office of General Counsel is 45 L Street NE, Washington, DC 20554.


(b) Applications or filings requiring the fees set forth at part 1, subpart G of the rules must be delivered through the appropriate electronic filing system with the correct fee and completed Fee Form attached to the application or filing, unless otherwise directed by the Commission. In the case of any conflict between this rule subpart and other rules establishing filing locations for submissions subject to a fee, this subpart shall govern.



Note to paragraph (b) introductory text:

Applicants seeking a waiver or deferral of fees must submit their application or filing in accordance with the addresses set forth below. Applicants claiming a statutory exemption from the fees should file their applications in accordance with paragraph (a) of this section.


(1) Applications and filings submitted by mail shall be submitted following the procedures set forth by the Commission in the appropriate fee rules.



Note to paragraph (b)(1):

Wireless Telecommunications Bureau applications that require frequency coordination by certified coordinators must be submitted to the appropriate certified frequency coordinator before filing with the Commission. After coordination, the applications are filed with the Commission as set forth herein. (See §§ 90.127 and 90.175 of this chapter.)


(2) Alternatively, applications and other filings may be sent electronically via the Universal Licensing System (ULS) or the Cable Operations and Licensing System (COALS) as appropriate for use of those systems.


[52 FR 10227, Mar. 31, 1987]


Editorial Note:For Federal Register citations affecting § 0.401, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume and at www.govinfo.gov.

§ 0.403 Office hours.

The main offices of the Commission are open from 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Monday through Friday, excluding legal holidays, unless otherwise stated.


[52 FR 10228, Mar. 31, 1987]


§ 0.405 Statutory provisions.

The following statutory provisions, among others, will be of interest to persons having business with the Commission:


(a) The Federal Communications Commission was created by the Communications Act of 1934, 48 Stat. 1064, June 19, 1934, as amended, 47 U.S.C. 151-609.


(b) The Commission exercises authority under the Submarine Cable Landing Act, 42 Stat. 8, May 27, 1921, 47 U.S.C. 34-39. See section 5 of Executive Order 10530, 19 FR 2709, May 10, 1954, as amended, 3 CFR, 1965 ed., p. 463.


(c) The Commission exercises authority under the Communications Satellite Act of 1962, 76 Stat. 419, August 31, 1962, 47 U.S.C. 701-744.


(d) The Commission operates under the Administrative Procedure Act, 60 Stat. 237, June 11, 1946, as amended, originally codified as 5 U.S.C. 1001-1011. Pursuant to Pub. L. 89-554, September 6, 1966, 80 Stat. 378, the provisions of the Administrative Procedure Act now appear as follows in the Code:


Administrative Procedure Act
5 U.S.C.
Sec. 2-9551-558
Sec. 10701-706
Sec. 113105, 7521, 5362, 1305
Sec. 12559

[32 FR 10570, July 19, 1967]


§ 0.406 The rules and regulations.

Persons having business with the Commission should familiarize themselves with those portions of its rules and regulations pertinent to such business. All of the rules have been published and are readily available. See §§ 0.411(b), 0.412, and 0.415. For the benefit of those who are not familiar with the rules, there is set forth in this section a brief description of their format and contents.


(a) Format. The rules are set forth in the Code of Federal Regulations as chapter I of title 47. Chapter I is divided into parts numbered from 0-99. Each part, in turn, is divided into numbered sections. To allow for the addition of new parts and sections in logical sequence, without extensive renumbering, parts and sections are not always numbered consecutively. Thus, for example, part 2 is followed by part 5, and § 1.8 is followed by § 1.10; in this case, parts 3 and 4 and § 1.9 have been reserved for future use. In numbering sections, the number before the period is the part number; and the number after the period locates the section within that part. Thus, for example, § 1.1 is the first section of part 1 and § 5.1 is the first section in part 5. Except in the case of accounting regulations (parts 31-35), the period should not be read as a decimal point; thus, § 1.511 is not located between §§ 1.51 and 1.52 but at a much later point in the rules. In citing the Code of Federal Regulations, the citation, 47 CFR 5.1, for example, is to § 5.1 (in part 5) of chapter I of title 47 of the Code, and permits the exact location of that rule. No citation to other rule units (e.g., subpart or chapter) is needed.


(b) Contents. Parts 0-19 of the rules have been reserved for provisions of a general nature. Parts 20-69 of this chapter have been reserved for provisions pertaining to common carriers. Parts 20-29 and 80-109 of this chapter have been reserved for provisions pertaining to the wireless telecommunications services. In the rules pertaining to common carriers, parts 20-25 and 80-99 of this chapter pertain to the use of radio; In the rules pertaining to common carriers, parts 21, 23, and 25 of this chapter pertain to the use of radio; parts 31-66 of this chapter pertain primarily to telephone and telegraph companies. Persons having business with the Commission will find it useful to consult one or more of the following parts containing provisions of a general nature in addition to the rules of the radio or wire communication service in which they are interested:


(1) Part 0, Commission organization. Part 0 describes the structure and functions of the Commission, lists delegations of authority to the staff, and sets forth information designed to assist those desiring to obtain information from, or to do business with, the Commission. This part is designed, among other things, to meet certain of the requirements of the Administrative Procedure Act, as amended.


(2) Part 1 of this chapter, practice and procedure. Part 1, subpart A, of this chapter contains the general rules of practice and procedure. Except as expressly provided to the contrary, these rules are applicable in all Commission proceedings and should be of interest to all persons having business with the Commission. Part 1, subpart A of this chapter also contains certain other miscellaneous provisions. Part 1, subpart B, of this chapter contains the procedures applicable in formal hearing proceedings (see § 1.201 of this chapter). Part 1, subpart C, of this chapter contains the procedures followed in making or revising the rule or regulations. Part 1, subpart D, of this chapter contains rules applicable to applications for licenses in the Broadcast Radio Services, including the forms to be used, the filing requirements, the procedures for processing and acting upon such applications, and certain other matters. Part 1, subpart E, of this chapter contains general rules and procedures applicable to common carriers. Part 1, subpart F, of this chapter contain rules applicable to applications for licenses in the Wireless Telecommunications Bureau services, including the forms to be used, the filing requirements, the procedures for processing and acting on such applications, and certain other matters. Part 1, subpart F, of this chapter contains rules applicable to applications for licenses in the Private Radio Services, including the forms to be used, the filing requirements, the procedures for processing and acting on such applications, and certain other matters. Part 1, subpart G, of this chapter contains rules pertaining to the application processing fees established by the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1985 (Pub. L. 99-272, 100 Stat. 82 (1986)) and also contains rules pertaining to the regulatory fees established by the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1993 (Pub. L. 103-66, 107 Stat. 397 (1993)). Part 1, subpart H, of this chapter, concerning ex parte presentations, sets forth standards governing communications with commission personnel in hearing proceedings and contested application proceedings. Part 1, subparts G and H, of this chapter will be of interest to all regulatees, and part 1, subpart H, of this chapter will, in addition, be of interest to all persons involved in hearing proceedings.


(3) Part 2, frequency allocations and radio treaty matters; general rules and regulations. Part 2 will be of interest to all persons interested in the use of radio. It contains definitions of technical terms used in the rules and regulations; provisions governing the allocation of radio frequencies among the numerous uses made of radio (e.g., broadcasting, land mobile) and radio services (e.g., television, public safety), including the Table of Frequency Allocations (§ 2.106); technical provisions dealing with emissions; provisions dealing with call signs and emergency communications; provisions governing authorization of radio equipment; and a list of treaties and other international agreements pertaining to the use of radio.


(4) Part 5, experimental radio service. Part 5 provides for the temporary use of radio frequencies for research in the radio art, for communications involving other research projects, for the development of equipment, data, or techniques, and for the conduct of equipment product development or market trials.


(5) Part 13, commercial radio operators. Part 13 describes the procedures to be followed in applying for a commercial operator license, including the forms to be used and the examinations given, and sets forth rules governing licensed operators. It will be of interest to applicants for such licenses, licensed operators, and the licensees of radio stations which may be operated only by persons holding a commercial radio operator license.


(6) Part 15, radio frequency devices. Part 15 contains regulations designed to prevent harmful interference to radio communication from radio receivers and other devices which radiate radio frequency energy, and provides for the certification of radio receivers. It also provides for the certification of low power transmitters and for the operation of certificated transmitters without a license.


(7) Part 17, construction, marking, and lighting of antenna structures. Part 17 contains criteria for determining whether applications for radio towers require notification of proposed construction to the Federal Aviation Administration, and specifications for obstruction marking and lighting of antenna structures.


(8) Part 18, industrial, scientific and medical equipment. Part 18 contains regulations designed to prevent harmful interference to radio communication from ultrasonic equipment, industrial heating equipment, medical diathermy equipment, radio frequency stabilized arc welders, and other equipment which uses radio energy for purposes other than communication.


(9) Part 19, employee responsibilities and conduct. Part 19 prescribes standards of conduct for the members and staff of the Commission.


[32 FR 10571, July 19, 1967, as amended at 32 FR 12180, Aug. 24, 1967; 37 FR 20553, Sept. 30, 1972; 52 FR 5288, Feb. 20, 1987; 58 FR 13021, Mar. 9, 1993; 59 FR 30998, June 16, 1994; 60 FR 35507, July 10, 1995; 63 FR 36596, July 7, 1998; 78 FR 25160, Apr. 29, 2013]


§ 0.408 OMB control numbers and expiration dates assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995.

(a) Purpose. This section displays the OMB control numbers and expiration dates for the Commission information collection requirements assigned by the Office of Management and Budget (“OMB”) pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, Public Law 104-13. The Commission intends that this section comply with the requirement that agencies “display” current OMB control numbers and expiration dates assigned by the Director, OMB, for each approved information collection requirement. Notwithstanding any other provisions of law, no person shall be subject to any penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information subject to the Paperwork Reduction Act (PRA) that does not display a currently valid OMB control number. The expiration dates shown in this section are accurate as of January 31, 2017. New, revised, or extended information collections approved by OMB after that date can be found at https://www.reginfo.gov/public/do/PRAMain. Questions concerning the OMB control numbers and expiration dates should be directed to the Associate Managing Director – Performance Evaluation and Records Management, (PERM), Office of Managing Director, Federal Communications Commission, Washington, DC 20554 by sending an email to [email protected]


(b) Display.


OMB control no.
FCC form no. or 47 CFR section or part, docket no., or title identifying the collection
OMB expiration date
3060-0004Secs. 1.1307 and 1.131107/31/17
3060-0009FCC 31612/31/18
3060-0010FCC 32311/30/19
3060-0016FCC 2100, Schedule C07/31/19
3060-0017FCC 2100, Schedule D03/31/19
3060-0027FCC 301 and FCC 2100, Schedule A03/31/19
3060-0029FCC 34008/31/17
3060-0031FCC 314 and FCC 31509/30/18
3060-0053FCC 702 and FCC 70305/31/17
3060-0055FCC 32711/30/17
3060-0056Part 68 – Connection of Terminal Equipment to the Telephone Network05/31/17
3060-0057FCC 73104/30/17
3060-0059FCC 74004/30/19
3060-0065FCC 44212/31/18
3060-0075FCC 34504/30/19
3060-0076FCC 39506/30/19
3060-0084FCC 323-E11/30/19
3060-0093FCC 40509/30/17
3060-0095FCC 395-A05/31/17
3060-0110FCC 303-S12/31/19
3060-0113FCC 39611/30/18
3060-0120FCC 396-A06/30/18
3060-0126Sec. 73.182008/31/17
3060-0132FCC 1068A01/31/18
3060-0139FCC 85411/30/18
3060-0149Part 63 – Application and Supplemental Information Requirements12/31/18
3060-0157Sec. 73.9905/31/17
3060-0161Sec. 73.6112/31/17
3060-0166Part 42, Secs. 42.5, 42.6 and 42.706/30/19
3060-0168Sec. 43.4309/30/18
3060-0169Sec. 43.5110/31/17
3060-0170Sec. 73.103002/28/19
3060-0171Sec. 73.112502/28/19
3060-0174Secs. 73.1212, 76.1615, and 76.171507/31/18
3060-0175Sec. 73.125010/31/19
3060-0176Sec. 73.151005/31/17
3060-0178Sec. 73.156001/31/20
3060-0179Sec. 73.159007/31/19
3060-0180Sec. 73.161001/31/19
3060-0182Sec. 73.162008/31/18
3060-0185Sec. 73.361310/31/17
3060-0188Call Sign Reservation and Authorization System02/28/19
3060-0190Sec. 73.354404/30/18
3060-0192Sec. 87.10309/30/19
3060-0204Sec. 90.20(a)(2)(v) and 90.20(a)(2)(xi)09/30/17
3060-0207Part 11 – Emergency Alert System (EAS)10/31/19
3060-0208Sec. 73.187001/31/18
3060-0213Sec. 73.352511/30/17
3060-0214Secs. 73.3526, 73.3527, 73.1212, 76.1701, and 73.194305/31/19
3060-0216Secs. 73.3538 and 73.1690(e)05/31/19
3060-0221Sec. 90.15510/31/19
3060-0222Sec. 97.21302/28/18
3060-0228Sec. 80.59 and FCC 806, 824, 827 and 82908/31/18
3060-0233Part 54 – High Cost Loop Support Reporting10/31/18
3060-0248Sec. 74.75105/31/19
3060-0249Secs. 74.781, 74.1281, and 78.6903/31/18
3060-0250Secs. 73.1207, 74.784 and 74.128404/30/17
3060-0259Sec. 90.26304/30/18
3060-0261Sec. 90.21505/31/19
3060-0262Sec. 90.17903/31/17
3060-0264Sec. 80.41305/31/18
3060-0265Sec. 80.86804/30/19
3060-0270Sec. 90.44302/28/19
3060-0281Sec. 90.65102/28/19
3060-0286Sec. 80.30212/31/18
3060-0288Sec. 78.3305/31/17
3060-0289Secs. 76.601, 76.1704, 76.1705, and 76.171704/30/17
3060-0291Sec. 90.477(a), (b)(2), (d)(2) and (d)(3)05/31/17
3060-0292Part 69 and Sec. 69.60506/30/19
3060-0295Sec. 90.60701/31/19
3060-0297Sec. 80.50306/30/18
3060-0298Part 61, Tariffs (Other than Tariff Review Plan)09/30/19
3060-0310FCC 32211/30/17
3060-0311Sec. 76.5403/31/17
3060-0316Secs. 76.1700, 76.1702, 76.1703, 76.1707, and 76.171105/31/19
3060-0320Sec. 73.135005/31/18
3060-0325Sec. 80.60506/30/17
3060-0329Sec. 2.95501/31/18
3060-0331FCC 32110/31/17
3060-0332Secs. 76.614 and 76.170604/30/19
3060-0340Sec. 73.5104/30/18
3060-0341Sec. 73.168010/31/17
3060-0346Sec. 78.2704/30/18
3060-0347Sec. 97.31107/31/17
3060-0349Secs. 73.2080, 76.73, 76.75, 76.79, and 76.170212/31/18
3060-0355FCC 492 and FCC 492A02/28/19
3060-0357Sec. 63.70111/30/18
3060-0360Sec. 80.40901/31/20
3060-0370Part 32 – Uniform System of Accounts for Telecommunications Companies08/31/17
3060-0384Secs. 64.901, 64.904 and 64.90506/30/19
3060-0386Secs. 1.5, 73.1615, 73.1635, 73.1740, 73.3598, 74.788, and FCC 33703/31/19
3060-0387Secs. 15.201(d), 15.209, 15.211, 15.213 and 15.22103/31/18
3060-0390FCC 395-B08/31/17
3060-0391Parts 54 and 36 – Program to Monitor the Impacts of the Universal Service Support Mechanisms06/30/17
3060-0392Part 1, Subpart J – Pole Attachment Complaint Procedures03/31/19
3060-0394Sec. 1.42011/30/19
3060-0398Secs. 2.948, 2.949, and 15.117(g)(2)09/30/19
3060-0400Tariff Review Plan (TRP)09/30/19
3060-0404FCC 35005/31/19
3060-0405FCC 34912/31/18
3060-0411FCC 48511/30/17
3060-0414Terrain Shielding Policy04/30/18
3060-0419Secs. 76.94, 76.95, 76.105, 76.106, 76.107, and 76.160902/28/19
3060-0422Sec. 68.503/31/19
3060-0423Sec. 73.358811/30/19
3060-0430Sec. 1.120601/31/18
3060-0433FCC 32004/30/17
3060-0439Sec. 64.20106/30/19
3060-0441Secs. 90.621 and 90.69306/30/18
3060-0463Telecommunications Relay Services and Speech-to-Speech Services for Individuals with Hearing and Speech Disabilities06/30/17
3060-0466Secs. 73.1201, 74.783 and 74.128309/30/19
3060-0470Secs. 64.901 and 64.903, and RAO Letters 19 and 2608/31/17
3060-0473Sec. 74.125111/30/19
3060-0474Sec. 74.126306/30/17
3060-0484Secs. 4.901/31/20
3060-0489Sec. 73.3704/30/18
3060-0496FCC Report 43-0804/30/19
3060-0500Sec. 76.171307/31/19
3060-0501Secs. 73.1942, 76.206 and 76.161109/30/17
3060-0506FCC 302-FM09/30/17
3060-0508Part 1 and Part 22 Reporting and Recordkeeping Requirements04/30/18
3060-0512FCC Report 43-0102/28/18
3060-0519Rules and Regulations Implementing the Telephone Consumer Protection Act (TCPA) of 199109/30/18
3060-0526Sec. 69.12304/30/17
3060-0531Secs. 101.1011, 101.1325(b), 101.1327(a), 101.527, 101.529, and 101.10306/30/18
3060-0532Secs. 2.1033 and 15.12106/30/17
3060-0537Secs. 13.9(c), 13.13(c), 13.17(b), 13.211(e), and 13.21706/30/19
3060-0546Sec. 76.5902/28/19
3060-0548Secs. 76.1708, 76.1709, 76.1620, 76.56 and 76.161406/30/17
3060-0550FCC 32808/31/18
3060-0560Sec. 76.91108/31/18
3060-0562Sec. 76.91601/31/19
3060-0565Sec. 76.94401/31/18
3060-0568Secs. 76.970, 76.971 and 76.97503/31/18
3060-0569Sec. 76.97510/31/17
3060-0573FCC 39403/31/18
3060-0580Sec. 76.171007/31/18
3060-0584FCC 44 and FCC 4502/28/18
3060-0589FCC 159, FCC 159-B, FCC 159-C, FCC 159-E and 159-W05/31/17
3060-0594FCC 122012/31/18
3060-0599Secs. 90.187, 90.425 and 90.62709/30/19
3060-0600FCC 17506/30/19
3060-0601FCC 120012/31/18
3060-0607Sec. 76.92211/30/17
3060-0609Sec. 76.934(e)12/31/18
3060-0625Sec. 24.10302/28/19
3060-0626Sec. 90.48311/30/19
3060-0627FCC 302-AM09/30/17
3060-0633Secs. 74.165, 74.432, and 74.83204/30/18

3060-0634Sec. 73.69105/31/18
3060-0636Secs. 2.906, 2.909, 2.1071, 2.1075, 2.1076, 2.1077 and 15.3705/31/18
3060-0645Secs. 17.4, 17.48 and 17.4905/31/18
3060-0647FCC 33309/30/18
3060-0649Secs. 76.1601, 76.1617, 76.1697 and 76.170803/31/19
3060-0652Secs. 76.309, 76.1602, 76.1603 and 76.161907/31/17
3060-0653Sec. 64.703(b) and (c)01/31/20
3060-0655Requests for Waivers of Regulatory and Application Fees11/30/19
3060-0665Sec. 64.70706/30/19
3060-0667Secs. 76.630, 76.1621 and 76.162201/31/20
3060-0668Sec. 76.93603/31/19
3060-0669Sec. 76.94605/31/19
3060-0674Sec. 76.161805/31/17
3060-0678Part 25 – Licensing of, and Spectrum Usage by, Commercial Earth Stations and Space Stations08/31/19
3060-0685FCC 1210 and FCC 124012/31/17
3060-0686FCC 214, FCC 412FCN, FCC 214TC and FCC 214STA02/28/18
3060-0687Access to Telecommunications Equipment and Services by Persons with Disabilities04/30/18
3060-0688FCC 123502/28/19
3060-0690Sec. 101.1701/31/18
3060-0691Sec. 90.66504/30/19
3060-0692Secs. 76.613, 76.802 and 76.80402/28/19
3060-0695Sec. 87.21907/31/17
3060-0698Secs. 25.203(i) and 73.1030(a)(2)01/31/20
3060-0700FCC 127505/31/19
3060-0703FCC 120512/31/17
3060-0704Secs. 42.10, 42.11 and 64.1900 and Section 254(g)09/30/17
3060-0706Secs. 76.952 and 76.99001/31/20
3060-0707Over-the Air Reception Devices (OTARD)10/31/19
3060-0710Parts 1 and 51 – Implementation of Local Competition Provisions in the Telecommunications Act of 199609/30/19
3060-0713Alternative Broadcast Inspection Program (ABIP) Compliance Notification02/28/17
3060-0715Carriers’ Use of Customer Proprietary Network Information and Other Customer Information09/30/17
3060-0716Secs. 73.88, 73.718, 73.685 and 73.163004/30/18
3060-0717Secs. 64.703(a), 64.709 and 64.71006/30/17
3060-0718Part 101 – Terrestrial Microwave Fixed Radio Service02/28/19
3060-0719Quarterly Report of IntraLATA Carriers Listing Payphone Automatic Number Identifications06/30/19
3060-0723Sec. 276 – Public Disclosure of Network Information by Bell Operating Companies (BOCs)07/31/18
3060-0725Quarterly Filing of Nondiscrimination Reports by Bell Operating Companies (BOCs)06/30/18
3060-0727Sec. 73.21304/30/18
3060-0737Disclosure Requirements for Information Services Provided Under a Presubscription or Comparable Arrangement10/31/17
3060-0740Sec. 95.101507/31/17
3060-0741Technology Transitions01/31/20
3060-0742Secs. 52.21 through 52.3609/30/19
3060-0743Pay Telephone Reclassification and Compensation Provisions of the Telecommunications Act of 199606/30/19
3060-0745Local Exchange Carrier Tariff Streamlining Provisions of the Telecommunications Act of 199607/31/18
3060-0748Secs. 64.1504, 64.1509 and 64.151002/28/19
3060-0750Secs. 73.671 and 73.67307/31/17
3060-0751Sec. 43.5109/30/19
3060-0754FCC 2100, Schedule H04/30/18
3060-0755Secs. 59.1 through 59.401/31/18
3060-0760272 Sunset Order and Access Charge Reform10/31/17
3060-0761Sec. 79.112/31/17
3060-0767Secs. 1.2110, 1.2111 and 1.211204/30/17
3060-076828 GHz Band02/28/18
3060-0770Sec. 61.4911/30/17
3060-0773Sec. 2.80306/30/17
3060-0775Sec. 64.190307/31/19
3060-0779Secs. 90.20(a)(1)(iii), 90.769, 90.767, 90.763(b)(l)(i)(a), 90.763(b)(l)(i)(B), 90.771(b) and 90.74301/31/20
3060-0783Sec. 90.17612/31/17
3060-0787Subscriber Carrier Selection Changes Provisions of the Telecommunications Act of 1996 – Unauthorized Changes of Consumers’ Long Distance Carriers07/31/17
3060-0788DTV Showings/Interference Agreements04/30/19
3060-0790Sec. 68.110(c)05/31/18
3060-0791Sec. 32.730005/31/18
3060-0795FCC 60608/31/17
3060-0798FCC 60106/30/19
3060-0799FCC 60210/31/19
3060-0800FCC 60303/31/18
3060-0804FCC 460, FCC 461, FCC 462, FCC 463, FCC 465, FCC 466, and FCC 46709/30/19
3060-0805Secs. 90.523, 90.527, 90.545 and 90.121107/31/17
3060-0806FCC 470 and FCC 47112/31/18
3060-0807Sec. 51.803 and Supplemental Procedures for Petitions to Sec. 252(e)(5)05/31/19
3060-0809Communications Assistance for Law Enforcement Act12/31/19
3060-0812Exemption from Payment of Regulatory Fees When Claiming Non-Profit Status02/28/18
3060-0813Sec. 20.1802/28/18
3060-0816FCC 47706/30/17
3060-0817BOC Provision of Enhanced Services (ONA Requirements)06/30/18
3060-0819FCC 481, FCC 497, and FCC 55509/30/19
3060-0823Part 64, Pay Telephone Reclassification05/31/17
3060-0824FCC 49811/30/18
3060-0837FCC 2100, Schedule B03/31/19
3060-0844Cable Carriage of Television Broadcast Stations03/31/19
3060-0848Deployment of Wireline Services Offering Advanced Telecommunications Capability03/31/18
3060-0849Commercial Availability of Navigation Devices07/31/17
3060-0850FCC 60505/31/17
3060-0853FCC 479, FCC 486 and FCC 50012/31/19
3060-0854Sec. 64.240109/30/18
3060-0855FCC 499-A and FCC 499-Q12/31/17
3060-0856FCC 472, FCC 473 and FCC 47406/30/19
3060-0859Suggested Guidelines for Petitions for Ruling under Sec. 25303/31/18
3060-0862Handling Confidential Information07/31/17
3060-0863Satellite Delivery of Network Signals to Unserved Households05/31/17
3060-0865Universal Licensing System Recordkeeping and Third-Party Disclosure Requirements02/28/17
3060-0874Consumer Complaint Portal07/31/19
3060-0876Sec. 54.703 and Secs. 54.719 through 54.72510/31/18
3060-0881Sec. 95.86105/31/17
3060-0882Sec. 95.83307/31/17
3060-0888Secs. 76.7, 76.9, 76.61, 76.914, 76.1001, 76.1003, 76.1302 and 76.151301/31/18
3060-0895FCC 50207/31/19
3060-0896Broadcast Auction Form Exhibits09/30/17
3060-0905Sec. 18.21306/30/17
3060-0906FCC 2100, Schedule G10/31/17
3060-0910Ensure Compatibility with Enhanced 911 Emergency Calling Systems05/31/18
3060-0912Secs. 76.501, 76.503 and 76.50401/31/18
3060-0917FCC 16002/28/17
3060-0918FCC 16102/28/17
3060-0920FCC 31803/31/19
3060-0922FCC 39711/30/18
3060-0927Auditor’s Annual Independence and Objectivity Certification01/31/18
3060-0928FCC 2100, Schedule F and Sec. 73.3572(h), 73.3700(b)(3) and 73.3700(h)(2)03/31/19
3060-0931Sec. 80.10308/31/18
3060-0932FCC 2100, Schedule E and Secs. 73.3700(b)(1)(i)-(v) and (vii), (b)(2)(i) and (ii), and 74.793(d)03/31/19
3060-0936Secs. 95.1215, 95.1217, 95.1223, and 95.122510/31/19
3060-0937Establishment of a Class A Television Service05/31/19
3060-0938FCC 31912/31/17
3060-0942Access Charge Reform, Price Cap Performance Review for Local Exchange Carriers, Low-Volume Long Distance Users, Federal-State Joint Board on Universal Service05/31/19
3060-0944Secs. 1.767 and 1.768, FCC 220, and Executive Order 1053002/28/18
3060-0950Bidding Credits for Tribal Lands04/30/19
3060-0951Sec. 1.1204(b) Note, and Sec. 1.1206(a) Note 108/31/19
3060-0952Proposed Demographic Information and Notifications,02/28/19
3060-0953Secs. 95.1111 and 95.111308/31/19
3060-0960Secs. 76.122, 76.123, 76.124 and 76.12701/31/20
3060-0967Sec. 79.2, 79.105, and 79.10604/30/17
3060-0971Sec. 52.1505/31/17
3060-0972Part 69 Filing Requirements for Regulation of Interstate Services of Non-Price Cap Incumbent Local Exchange Carriers and Interexchange Carriers06/30/17
3060-0973Sec. 64.1120(e)06/30/19
3060-0975Secs. 68.105 and 1.400008/31/19
3060-0979License Audit Letter11/30/18
3060-0980Sec. 76.6602/28/19
3060-0984Secs. 90.35(b)(2) and 90.175(b)(1)09/30/19
3060-0986FCC 481, FCC 507, FCC 508, FCC 509, and FCC 52503/31/17
3060-0987Sec. 20.18(l)(1)(i)-(iii) and 20.18(l)(2)(i)-(iii)08/31/17
3060-0989Secs. 63.01, 63.03 and 63.0404/30/17
3060-0991AM Measurement Data01/31/18
3060-0994Flexibility for Delivery of Communications by Mobile Satellite Service Providers in the 2 GHz Band, the L-Band, and the 1.6/2.4 GHz Band10/31/18
3060-0995Sec. 1.2105(c) and 1.220506/30/19
3060-0996AM Auction Section 307(b) Submissions05/31/17
3060-0997Sec. 52.15(k)07/31/17
3060-0998Sec. 87.10904/30/19
3060-0999Sec. 20.19, Hearing Aid Compatibility Status Report, FCC 65511/30/18
3060-1000Sec. 87.14708/31/19
3060-1003Communications Disaster Information Reporting System07/31/18
3060-1004Commission Rules to Ensure Compatibility with Enhanced 911 Emergency Calling Systems06/30/18
3060-1005Numbering Resource Optimization – Phase 304/30/17
3060-1008Secs. 27.50 and 27.60208/31/17
3060-1013Mitigation of Orbital Debris02/28/18
3060-1015Part 15 – Ultra Wideband Transmission Systems11/30/17
3060-1021Sec. 25.13911/30/19
3060-1022Secs. 101.1403, 101.103(f), 101.1413, 101.1440 and 101.141705/31/17
3060-1028International Signaling Point Code (ISPC)11/30/18
3060-1029Data Network Identification Code (DNIC)11/30/18
3060-1030Service Rules for Advanced Wireless Services (AWS) in the 1.7 GHz and 2.1 GHz Bands01/31/18
3060-1031Commission’s Initiative to Implement Enhanced 911 (E911) Emergency Services01/31/19
3060-1033FCC 396-C10/31/18
3060-1034FCC 335-AM and FCC 335-FM02/28/19
3060-1035FCC 309, FCC 310 and FCC 31101/31/20
3060-1039FCC 620 and FCC 62110/31/17
3060-1042Request for Technical Support – Help Request Form03/31/19
3060-1044Review of the Section 251 Unbundling Obligations of Incumbent Local Exchange Carriers05/31/19
3060-1045FCC 324 and Sec. 76.161012/31/17
3060-1046Part 64, Pay Telephone Reclassification and Compensation Provisions of the Telecommunications Act of 199608/31/17
3060-1047Telecommunications Relay Services and Speech-to-Speech Services for Individuals with Hearing and Speech Disabilities, FCC 03-11210/31/17
3060-1048Sec. 1.929(c)(1)11/30/18
3060-1050Sec. 97.30304/30/19
3060-1053Two-Line Captioned Telephone Order and IP Captioned Telephone Service Declaratory Ruling, and Internet Protocol Captioned Telephone Service Reform Order03/31/18
3060-1054FCC 422-IB09/30/18
3060-1056FCC 421-IB07/31/18
3060-1057FCC 420-IB07/31/18
3060-1058FCC 60804/30/18
3060-1060Wireless E911 Coordination Initiative Letter to State 911 Coordinators12/31/19
3060-1063Global Mobile Personal Communications by Satellite (GMPCS) Authorization, Marketing and Importation Rules09/30/18
3060-1064Regulatory Fee Assessment True-Ups07/31/17
3060-1065Sec. 25.70111/30/18
3060-1070Allocation and Service Rules for the 71-76 GHz, 81-86 GHz and 92-95 GHz Bands10/31/17
3060-1078Rules and Regulations Implementing the Controlling the Assault of Non-Solicited Pornography and Marketing Act of 2003 (CAN-SPAM Act), CG Docket 04-5309/30/19
3060-1079Sec. 15.24012/31/19
3060-1080Improving Public Safety Communications in the 800 MHz Band; TA-13.1 and TA-14.110/31/17
3060-1081Secs. 54.202, 54.209, 54.307, 54.313, 54.314 and 54.80909/30/17
3060-1084Rules and Regulations Implementing Minimum Customer Account Record Obligations on All Local and Interexchange Carriers, CG Docket No. 02-38605/31/19
3060-1085Sec. 9.507/31/18
3060-1086Secs. 74.787, 74.790, 74.794, 74.796 and 74.79803/31/19
3060-1087Sec. 15.61504/30/17
3060-1088Rules and Regulations Implementing the Telephone Consumer Protection Act (TCPA) of 199105/31/19
3060-1089Telecommunications Relay Services and Speech-to-Speech Services for Individuals with Hearing and Speech Disabilities, E911 Requirements for IP-Enabled Service Providers08/31/17
3060-1092FCC 609-T and FCC 611-T01/31/20
3060-1094Licensing, Operation, and Transition of the 2500-2690 MHz Band03/31/17
3060-1095Surrenders of Authorizations for International Carrier, Space Station and Earth Station Licensees01/31/18
3060-1096Prepaid Calling Card Service Provider Certification07/31/19
3060-1101Children’s Television Requests for Preemption Flexibility12/31/18
3060-1103Sec. 76.4101/31/19
3060-1104Sec. 73.682(d)02/28/17
3060-1108Consummations of Assignments and Transfers of Control of Authorization02/28/18
3060-1113Commercial Mobile Alert System (CMAS)07/31/17
3060-1116Submarine Cable Reporting01/31/18
3060-1120Service Quality Measurement Plan for Interstate Special Access and Monthly Usage Reporting Requirements09/30/17
3060-1121Secs. 1.30002, 1.30003, 1.30004, 73.875, 73.1657 and 73.169002/28/17
3060-1122Preparation of Annual Reports to Congress for the Collection & Expenditure of Fees or Charges for Enhanced 911 (E911) Services under the NET 911 Improvement Act of 200803/31/18
3060-1124Sec. 80.23112/31/17
3060-1126Sec. 10.35004/30/18
3060-1127First Responder Emergency Contact Information in the Universal Licensing System (ULS)03/31/19
3060-1129Broadband Speed Test and Unavailability Registry04/30/19
3060-1131Implementation of the NET 911 Improvement Act of 2008: Location Information from Owners and Controllers of 911 and E911 Capabilities06/30/19
3060-1133FCC 308 and Secs. 73.3545 and 73.358007/31/18
3060-1138Secs. 1.49 and 1.5406/30/19
3060-1139Consumer Broadband Services Testing and Measurement05/31/17
3060-1142Electronic Tariff Filing System (ETFS)11/30/19
3060-1145Structure and Practices of the Video Relay Service Program08/31/17
3060-1146Implementation of the 21st Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act of 2010, Section 105, Relay Services for Deaf-Blind Individuals, CG Docket No. 10-21006/30/18
3060-1147Wireless E911 Phase II Location Accuracy Requirements05/31/18
3060-1148Sec. 79.301/31/20
3060-1149Generic Clearance for the Collection of Qualitative Feedback on Agency Service Delivery06/30/17
3060-1150Structure and Practices of the Video Relay Service Program, Second Report and Order, CG Docket No. 10-5105/31/18
3060-1151Secs. 1.1420, 1.1422, and 1.142403/31/18
3060-1154Commercial Advertisement Loudness Mitigation (“CALM”) Act; Financial Hardship and General Waiver Requests06/30/18
3060-1155Secs. 15.713, 15.714, 15.715, 15.717 and 27.132005/31/19
3060-1156Sec. 43.6202/28/18
3060-1157Formal Complaint Procedures, Preserving the Open Internet and Broadband Industry Practices09/30/17
3060-1158Disclosure of Network Management Practices, Preserving the Open Internet and Broadband Industry Practices12/31/19
3060-1159Part 25 – Satellite Communications; and Part 27 – Miscellaneous Wireless Communications Services in the 2.3 GHz Band10/31/19
3060-1161Sec. 27.14(g)-(l)10/31/17
3060-1162Closed Captioning of Video Programming Delivered Using Internet Protocol, and Apparatus Closed Captioning Requirements09/30/18
3060-1163Regulations Applicable to Common Carrier and Aeronautical Radio Licensees10/31/18
3060-1165Sec. 74.60512/31/17
3060-1166FCC 18001/31/18
3060-1167Accessible Telecommunications and Advanced Communications Services and Equipment01/31/20
3060-1168FCC 68001/31/18
3060-1169Part 11 – Emergency Alert System (EAS), FCC 12-708/31/18
3060-1170Sec. 90.20904/30/18
3060-1171Secs. 73.682(e) and 76.607(a)06/30/18
3060-1174Secs. 73.503, 73.621 and 73.352707/31/18
3060-1177Sec. 74.80006/30/19
3060-1178FCC 2100, Schedule 399; and Sec. 73.3700(e)03/31/19
3060-1180Expanding the Economic and Innovation Opportunities of Spectrum Through Incentive Auctions08/31/18
3060-1181Study Area Boundary Data Reporting in Esri Shapefile Format06/30/19
3060-1183Establishment of a Public Safety Answering Point Do-Not-Call Registry, CG Docket 12-12902/28/19
3060-1184Secs. 1.946(d), 27.10(d), 27.12, 27.14 and 27.1707/31/19
3060-1185FCC 690 and Record Retention Requirements05/31/19
3060-1186FCC 48001/31/18
3060-1189Secs. 1.1307(b)(1), 20.3, 20.21(a)(2), 20.21(a)(5), 20.21(e)(2), 20.21(e)(8)(i)(G), 20.21(e)(9)(i)(H), 20.21(f), 20.21(h), 22.9, 24.9, 27.9, 90.203, 90.219(b)(l)(i)06/30/18
3060-1190Sec. 87.287(b)06/30/19
3060-1192Survey for Urban Rates for Fixed Voice and Fixed Broadband Residential Services08/31/19
3060-1194FCC 33801/31/19
3060-1195US Telecom Forbearance FCC 13-69 Conditions06/30/17
3060-1196Inmate Calling Services Data Collection06/30/17
3060-1197Comprehensive Market Data Collection for Interstate Special Access Services08/31/17
3060-1198Secs. 90.525, 90.529 and 90.53104/30/18
3060-1199Sec. 15.407(j)08/31/17
3060-1200FCC 5610 and FCC 562009/30/18
3060-1201Structure and Practices of the Video Relay Service Program; Telecommunications Relay Services and Speech-to-Speech Services for Individuals with Hearing and Speech Disabilities09/30/17
3060-1202Improving 911 Reliability and Continuity of Communications Including Networks, Broadband Technologies10/31/17
3060-1203Secs. 79.107, 79.108 and 79.11008/31/19
3060-1204Deployment of Text-to-91104/30/18
3060-1205Sec. 74.80203/31/18
3060-1206FCC 2100, Schedule 38103/31/18
3060-1207Secs. 25.701 and 25.70205/31/19
3060-1208Acceleration of Broadband Deployment by Improving Wireless Facilities Siting Policies05/31/18
3060-1209Sec. 73.121602/28/19
3060-1210Wireless E911 Location Accuracy Requirements07/31/18
3060-1211Secs. 96.17, 96.21, 96.23, 96.33, 96.35, 96.39, 96.41, 96.43, 96.45, 96.51, 96.57, 96.59, 96.61, 96.63, 96.6704/30/17
3060-1212SDARS Political Broadcasting Requirements11/30/18
3060-1213FCC 17706/30/19
3060-1214Direct Access to Numbers Order, FCC 15-70, Conditions07/31/19
3060-1215Use of Spectrum Bands Above 24 GHz for Mobile Radio Services01/31/20
3060-1216Sections 73.3700(b)(4)(i)-(ii), (c), (d), (h)(5)-(6), (g)(4)03/31/19
3060-1217Ensuring Continuity of 911 Communications03/31/19
3060-1218Carriage of Digital Television Broadcast Signals05/31/19
3060-1219Connect America Fund-Alternative Connect America Cost Model Support09/30/19
3060-1220Transparency Rule Disclosures, FCC 15-24, Mobile Broadband Disclosures12/31/18
3060-1221Inmate Calling Services, One-Time Data Collection01/31/20
3060-1222Inmate Calling Services, Annual Reporting, Certification and Consumer Disclosure01/31/20
3060-1223Payment Instructions from the Eligible Entity Seeking Reimbursement from the TV Broadcaster Relocation Fund07/31/17
3060-1224Reverse Auction (Auction 1001) Incentive Payment Instructions from Reverse Auction Winning Bidder07/31/17
3060-1225National Deaf-Blind Equipment Distribution Program01/31/20
3060-1226Receiving Written Consent for Communication with Base Stations in Canada01/31/20

[82 FR 13260, Mar. 10, 2017, as amended at 83 FR 61335, Nov. 29, 2018; 84 FR 2757, Feb. 8, 2019]


§ 0.409 Commission policy on private printing of FCC forms.

The Commission has established a policy regarding the printing of blank FCC forms by private companies if they elect to do so as a matter of expediency and convenience to their clients or consumers. The policy is as follows:


(a) Blank FCC forms may be reproduced by private companies at their own expense provided the following conditions are met:


(1) Use a printing process resulting in a product that is at least comparable in quality to the original document, without change to the page size, image size, configuration of pages, folds or perforations, and matching as closely as possible the paper weight, paper color and ink color.


(2) Delete in its entirety any and all U.S. Government Printing Office (GPO) indicia that may appear in the margin(s).


(3) If the printer wishes to identify a foreign country in which the forms are printed, a marginal notation must be added stating “No U.S. Government funds were used to print this document.”


(4) Do not add to the form any other symbol, word or phrase that might be construed as personalizing the form or advertising on it.


(5) Except as specified above, do not delete from or add to any part of the form, or attach anything thereto.


(6) Assure that the form being reproduced is an edition currently acceptable by the Commission, which will endeavor to keep the public advised of revisions to its forms, but cannot assume responsibility to the extent of eliminating any element of risk against the use of obsolete forms.


(b) These guidelines do not apply to forms which respondents may wish to reproduce as completed facsimiles on automated equipment to satisfy application or report requirements. Requests for permission to submit such forms to the Commission should be addressed to the Office of Managing Director.


[53 FR 27861, July 25, 1988]


Printed Publications

§ 0.411 General reference materials.

The following reference materials are available in many libraries and may be purchased from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402:


(a) Statutory materials. Laws pertaining to communications are contained in Title 47 of the United States Code. Laws enacted since the printing of the last supplement to the Code are printed individually as slip laws, and these are compiled chronologically in the United States Statutes at Large. The Acts of Congress from 1910-62 pertaining to radio have been compiled in a single volume, Radio Laws of the United States (1962 ed.). See §§ 0.405 and 0.414.


(b) Regulatory materials – (1) The Code of Federal Regulations. The rules and regulations of the Commission are contained in chapter I of title 47 of the Code of Federal Regulations. Chapter I is divided into the following four subchapters, which may be purchased separately: Subchapter A – General; Subchapter B – Common Carrier Services; Subchapter C – Broadcast Radio Services; and Subchapter D – Private Radio Services. Most persons will find that they need subchapter A, containing the general rules, and one of the other volumes, depending upon their area of interest. These four volumes are revised annually to reflect changes in the rules. See §§ 0.406, 0.412, and 0.415. The Code of Federal Regulations is fully indexed and contains numerous finding aids. See 1 CFR appendix C.


(2) The Federal Register. As rules are adopted, amended, or repealed, the changes are published in the Federal Register, which is published daily except on legal holidays. Notices of proposed rule making, other rule making documents, statements of general policy, interpretations of general applicability, and other Commission documents having general applicability and legal effect are also published in the Federal Register. Summaries of the full Notices of proposed rule making and other rule making decisions adopted by the Commission constitute rulemaking documents for purposes of Federal Register publication. The Federal Register is fully indexed and contains numerous findings aids.


[32 FR 10571, July 19, 1967, as amended at 44 FR 39180, July 5, 1979; 51 FR 7444, Mar. 4, 1986]


§ 0.413 The Commission’s printed publications.

The Commission’s printed publications are described in §§ 0.414 through 0.420. These publications may be purchased from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, DC 20402.


[64 FR 60722, Nov. 8, 1999]


§ 0.414 The Communications Act and other statutory materials.

This publication, with packets of revised pages, contains the Communications Act of 1934, with amendments through 1964; the Administrative Procedure Act, with amendments through 1964; the Judicial Review Act; the Communications Satellite Act of 1962; and selected sections of the Criminal Code pertaining to communications. It also contains indexes to the Communications Act and the Administrative Procedure Act. Persons who do not have ready access to the United States Code, or who refer frequently to these materials, may find this volume to be useful.


[32 FR 10571, July 19, 1967]


§ 0.415 The rules and regulations (looseleaf service).

(a) In this service, the rules are divided into 10 volumes, each containing several related parts. Each volume may be purchased separately from the Superintendent of Documents. The purchase price for a volume includes a subscription to replacement pages reflecting changes in the rules contained therein until such time as the volume is revised. Each volume is revised periodically, depending primarily on the frequency with which the rules it contains have been amended. When a volume is revised, the revised volume and replacement pages therefor will be furnished to those who renew their subscriptions.


(b) [Reserved]


[41 FR 21449, May 26, 1976, as amended at 45 FR 49935, July 28, 1980; 51 FR 31304, Sept. 2, 1986]


§ 0.416 The Federal Communications Commission Record.

Texts adopted by the Commission or a member of its staff on delegated authority and released through the Office of Media Relations are published in the FCC Record. The FCC Record is published biweekly in pamphlet form. The pamphlets are available on a subscription basis from the Superintendent of Documents. Each biweekly pamphlet contains a table of contents and current index. A consolidated index is published on a periodic basis.


[64 FR 60722, Nov. 8, 1999]


§ 0.417 The Annual Reports.

At the end of each fiscal year, the Commission publishes an Annual Report containing general information concerning the Commission and the history of regulation, a summary of developments during the year, and selected industry statistics.


[32 FR 10571, July 19, 1967]


§ 0.420 Other Commission publications.

The following additional Commission publications may be purchased from the Superintendent of Documents:


(a) Statistics of Communications Common Carriers.


(b) Figure M-3, Estimated AM Ground Conductivity of the United States (set of two maps).


(c) Television Network Program Procurement Report, 2d Interim Report, Part 2, by the Office of Network Study.


[32 FR 10571, July 19, 1967, as amended at 44 FR 39180, July 5, 1979]


Forms and Documents Available Upon Request

§ 0.421 Application forms.

All forms for use in submitting applications for radio authorization, together with instructions and information as to filing such forms, may be obtained at http://www.fcc.gov/forms. For information concerning the forms to be used and filing requirements, see part 1 of this chapter and the appropriate substantive rules.


[80 FR 53749, Sept. 8, 2015]


§ 0.422 Current action documents and public notices.

Documents adopted by the Commission, public notices and other public announcements are released through the Office of Media Relations. These documents are also available on the Commission’s website at www.fcc.gov and can be obtained from the Commission’s duplicating contractor.


[64 FR 60722, Nov. 8, 1999]


§ 0.423 Information bulletins.

Information bulletins and fact sheets containing information about communications issues and the Federal Communications Commission are available on the Commission’s web site at www.fcc.gov, ftp.fcc.gov or may be requested from the Consumer and Governmental Affairs Bureau.


[64 FR 60722, Nov. 8, 1999, as amended at 67 FR 13221, Mar. 21, 2002]


Lists Containing Information Compiled by the Commission

§ 0.431 The FCC service frequency lists.

Lists of frequency assignments to radio stations authorized by the Commission are recapitulated periodically by means of an automated record system. All stations licensed by the Commission are included, except the following: Aircraft, amateur, personal (except General Mobile Radio Service), Civil Air Patrol, and disaster. The resulting documents, the FCC service frequency lists, consist of several volumes arranged by nature of service, in frequency order, including station locations, call signs and other technical particulars of each assignment. These documents are available for public inspection in Washington, D.C., in the Office of Engineering and Technology. Copies may be purchased from the Commission’s duplicating contractor. See § 0.465(a).


[64 FR 60722, Nov. 8, 1999]


§ 0.434 Data bases and lists of authorized broadcast stations and pending broadcast applications.

Periodically the FCC makes available copies of its data bases and lists containing information about authorized broadcast stations, pending applications for such stations, and rulemaking proceedings involving amendments to the TV and FM Table of Allotments. The data bases, and the lists prepared from the data bases, contain frequencies, station locations, and other particulars. The lists are available for public inspection at the FCC’s main office, located at the address indicated in § 0.401(a). Paper copies of the lists may be purchased from the FCC’s duplicating contractor; see § 0.465(a). Many of the databases may be viewed at the Commission’s web site at www.fcc.gov and ftp.fcc.gov under mass media services. Microfiche copies of these lists are maintained by the Reference Information Center. These lists are derived from the data bases and can be used as an alternative research source to the Broadcast Application Processing System (BAPS).


[64 FR 60722, Nov. 8, 1999, as amended at 85 FR 64404, Oct. 13, 2020]


Public Information and Inspection of Records


Source:74 FR 14078, Mar. 30, 2009, unless otherwise noted.

§ 0.441 General.

(a) Any person desiring to obtain information from the Commission may do so by contacting the Consumer and Governmental Affairs Bureau (CGB). Requests for information and general inquiries may be submitted by:


(1) Internet at http://www.fcc.gov/consumer-governmental-affairs or http://www.fcc.gov/foia.


(2) Telephone at 1-888-CALL-FCC (1-888-225-5322).


(3) TDD/TDY at 1-888-TELL-FCC (1-888-835-5322).


(4) Correspondence to: Consumer and Governmental Affairs Bureau at the FCC’s main office, located at the address indicated in § 0.401(a).


(5) Visiting the Reference Information Center of the Consumer and Governmental Affairs Bureau, located at the address indicated in § 0.401(a).


(b) The Commission’s FOIA Public Liaison is available to assist any person requesting information from the Commission in resolving any concerns related to a Freedom of Information Act request. Requesters may contact the FOIA Public Liaison to seek assistance on resolving disputes related to FOIA requests. See http://www.fcc.gov/foia/.


(c) The Office of Government Information Services is available to provide mediation services to help resolve disputes between FOIA requesters and Federal agencies. FOIA requesters may contact the Office of Government Information Services directly to seek its assistance. See http://ogis.archives.gov/.


(d) The General Counsel shall, subject to the authority of the Chairman, exercise the responsibilities of the Chief FOIA Officer specified in 5 U.S.C. 552(j).


[82 FR 4188, Jan. 13, 2017, as amended at 85 FR 64404, Oct. 13, 2020]


§ 0.442 Disclosure to other Federal government agencies of information submitted to the Commission in confidence.

(a) The disclosure of records to other Federal government agencies is generally governed by the Paperwork Reduction Act, 44 U.S.C. 3510, rather than the Freedom of Information Act. The acceptance of materials in confidence under § 0.457 or § 0.459, or any other statute, rule or Commission order, does not preclude their disclosure to other federal agencies.


(b) Information submitted to the Commission in confidence pursuant to § 0.457(c)(2) and (3), (d) and (g) or § 0.459, or any other statute, rule or order, may be disclosed to other agencies of the Federal government upon request or upon the Commission’s own motion, provided:


(1) Specific Commission assurances against such disclosure have not been given;


(2) The other agency has established a legitimate need for the information;


(3) Disclosure is made subject to the provisions of 44 U.S.C. 3510(b); and


(4) Disclosure is not prohibited by the Privacy Act or other provisions of law.


(c) The Commission’s staff may give assurances against disclosure of information to other Federal agencies only with the prior written approval of the General Counsel. In no event will assurance against disclosure to other agencies be given in advance of submission of the information to the Commission if submission is required by statute or by the provisions of this chapter; but the notice provisions of paragraph (d) of this section will apply to such required submissions.


(d)(1) Except as provided in paragraphs (d)(2) and (d)(3) of this section, a party who furnished records to the Commission with a request for confidential treatment, see § 0.459, will be notified at the time that the request for disclosure is submitted and will be afforded ten calendar days in which to submit an opposition to disclosure. This notification may be made either individually or by public notice.


(2) If the agency requesting the records provides in writing to the satisfaction of the Commission that notice to the party who furnished the records to the Commission will interfere unduly with its law enforcement, national security or homeland defense activities and further states that it will notify that party of the Commission’s disclosure once the potential for such interference is eliminated, the Commission will not give notice of disclosure.


(3) A party who furnished records to the Commission in confidence will not be afforded prior notice when the disclosure is made to the Comptroller General of the United States, in the Government Accountability Office. Such a party will instead be notified of disclosure of the records to the Comptroller General either individually or by public notice.


(4) If disclosure is opposed and the Commission decides to make the records available to the other agency, the party who furnished the records to the Commission will be afforded ten calendar days from the date of the ruling to move for a judicial stay of the Commission’s action. If the party does not move for stay within this period, the records will be disclosed.


(e) Except as provided in paragraph (d)(3) of this section, nothing in this section is intended to govern disclosure of information to Congress or the Comptroller General.


§ 0.445 Publication, availability, and use of opinions, orders, policy statements, interpretations, administrative manuals, staff instructions, and frequently requested records.

(a) Adjudicatory opinions and orders of the Commission, or its staff acting on delegated authority, are mailed or delivered by electronic means to the parties, and as part of the record, are available for inspection in accordance with § 0.453.


(b) Documents adopted by the Commission or a member of its staff on delegated authority and released through the Office of Media Relations are published in the FCC Record. Older materials of this nature are available in the FCC Reports. In the event that such older materials are not published in the FCC Reports, reference should be made to the Federal Register or Pike and Fischer Communications Regulation.


(c) All rulemaking documents or summaries thereof are published in the Federal Register and are available on the Commission’s Web site. The complete text of the Commission decision also is released by the Commission and is available for inspection and copying during normal business hours in the Reference Information Center, via the Electronic Document Management System (EDOCS), or as otherwise specified in the rulemaking document published in the Federal Register.


(d) Formal policy statements and interpretations designed to have general applicability are published on the Commission’s Web site and in the Federal Register, the FCC Record, FCC Reports, or Pike and Fischer Communications Regulation. Commission decisions and other Commission documents not entitled formal policy statements or interpretations may contain substantive interpretations and statements regarding policy, and these are published as part of the document in the FCC Record, FCC Reports or Pike and Fischer Communications Regulation. General statements regarding policy and interpretations furnished to individuals, in correspondence or otherwise, are not ordinarily published.


(e) Copies of all records that have been released to any person under § 0.461 and that because of the nature of their subject matter, the Commission determines have become or are likely to become the subject of subsequent requests for substantially the same records, or that have been requested three or more times, are made available in electronic format.


(f) If the documents described in paragraphs (a) through (d) of this section are published in the Federal Register, the FCC Record, FCC Reports, or Pike and Fischer Communications Regulation, they are indexed, and they may be relied upon, used or cited as precedent by the Commission or private parties in any manner. If they are not so published, they may not be relied upon, used or cited as precedent, except against persons who have actual notice of the document in question or by such persons against the Commission. No person is expected to comply with any requirement or policy of the Commission unless he or she has actual notice of that requirement or policy or a document stating it has been published as provided in this paragraph. Nothing in this paragraph, however, shall be construed as precluding a reference to a recent document that is pending publication.


(g) Subparts A and B of this part describe the functions of the staff and list the matters on which authority has been delegated to the staff. All general instructions to the staff and limitations upon its authority are set forth in those subparts or in decisions of the Commission published in the Federal Register. Instructions to the staff in particular matters or cases are privileged and/or protected and are not published or made available for public inspection.


(h) To the extent required to prevent a clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy, or to prevent disclosure of information required or authorized to be withheld by another statute, the Commission may delete identifying details or confidential information when it makes available or publishes any document described in this section. The justification for any such deletion will be fully explained in a preamble to the document.


[82 FR 4188, Jan. 13, 2017]


§ 0.451 Inspection of records: Generally.

(a) Records which are routinely available for public inspection. Section 0.453 specifies those Commission records which are routinely available for public inspection and where those records may be inspected. Procedures governing requests for inspection of such records are set out in § 0.460.


(b) Records which are not routinely available for public inspection. Records which are not specified in § 0.453 are not routinely available for public inspection. Such records fall into three categories.


(1) The first category consists of categories of records listed in § 0.457, and of particular records withheld from public inspection under § 0.459. The Commission has determined that there is a statutory basis for withholding these records from public inspection. In some cases, the Commission is prohibited from permitting the inspection of records. This category also includes records that are the property of another agency that the Commission has no authority to release for inspection. In still other cases, the Commission is authorized, for reason of policy, to withhold records from inspection, but is not required to do so. As applicable, procedures governing demands by competent authority for inspection of these records are set forth in § 0.463.


(2) The second category consists of records that are not specified in § 0.453 or § 0.457 and have not been withheld from inspection under § 0.459. In some cases, these records have not been identified for listing. In other cases an individualized determination is required. Procedures governing requests for inspection of these records are set forth in § 0.461. Procedures governing demands by competent authority for inspection of these records are set forth in § 0.463.


(3) The third category consists of material previously released consistent with the agency’s rules that the agency determines is not likely to become the subject of a subsequent FOIA request or otherwise likely to be of broader public interest.


(4) Except as provided in § 0.461 and § 0.463, or pursuant to § 19.735-203 of this chapter, no officer or employee of the Commission shall permit the inspection of records which are not routinely available for public inspection under § 0.453, or disclose information contained therein. This provision does not restrict the inspection or disclosure of records described in § 0.453(b)(3).


(c) Copies. Section 0.465 applies to requests for copies of Commission records which are routinely available for public inspection under § 0.453 and those which are made available for inspection under § 0.461. Sections 0.467 and 0.465(c)(3) apply to requests for certified copies of Commission records.


(d) Search and copying fees. Section 0.465(c)(2) prescribes the per page fee for copying records made available for inspection under § 0.460 or § 0.461. Section 0.466 prescribes fees to cover the expense of searching for and reviewing records made available for inspection under § 0.460 or § 0.461. Review of initial fee determinations under § 0.467 through § 0.470 and initial fee reduction or waiver determinations under § 0.470(e) may be sought under § 0.461(j).



Note to paragraph (d):

The Commission may require advance payment pursuant to § 0.469 before releasing documents.


[82 FR 4189, Jan. 13, 2017]


§ 0.453 Public reference rooms.

The Commission’s main Web site at http://www.fcc.gov and its electronic reading room at http://www.fcc.gov/general/freedom-information-act-electronic-reading-room host the Commission’s online public reference room. The Commission also maintains the FCC Reference Information Center as its public reference room at its offices in Washington, DC.


(a) The Reference Information Center maintains files containing the record of all docketed cases, petitions for rule making and related papers. A file is maintained for each docketed hearing case and for each docketed rule making proceeding. Cards summarizing the history of such cases for the years before 1984 are available for inspection. Information summarizing the history of such cases for the years from 1984 through present is available online on the Electronic Comment Filing System (ECFS). ECFS serves as the repository for official filings in the FCC’s docketed proceedings from 1992 to the present. The public can use ECFS to retrieve any document in the system, including selected pre-1992 documents.


(b) The Commission will maintain a regularly updated listing of other routinely available records in its electronic reading room at http://www.fcc.gov/general/freedom-information-act-electronic-reading-room.


[82 FR 4189, Jan. 13, 2017]


§ 0.457 Records not routinely available for public inspection.

The records listed in this section are not routinely available for public inspection pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 552(b). The records are listed in this section by category, according to the statutory basis for withholding those records from inspection; under each category, if appropriate, the underlying policy considerations affecting the withholding and disclosure of records in that category are briefly outlined. The Commission will entertain requests from members of the public under § 0.461 for permission to inspect particular records withheld from inspection under the provisions of this section, and will weigh the policy considerations favoring non-disclosure against the reasons cited for permitting inspection in the light of the facts of the particular case. In making such requests, there may be more than one basis for withholding particular records from inspection. The Commission will permit inspection of records unless Commission staff reasonably foresees that disclosure would harm an interest protected by the exemptions described in 5 U.S.C. 552(b) or where disclosure is prohibited by law. The listing of records by category is not intended to imply the contrary but is solely for the information and assistance of persons making such requests. Requests to inspect or copy the transcripts, recordings or minutes of closed agency meetings will be considered under § 0.607 rather than under the provisions of this section.


(a) Materials that are specifically authorized under criteria established by Executive Order (E.O.) to be kept secret in the interest of national defense or foreign policy and are in fact properly classified pursuant to such Executive Order, 5 U.S.C. 552(b)(1).


(1) Classified materials and information will not be made available for public inspection, including materials classified under E.O. 10450, “Security Requirements for Government Employees”; E.O. 10501, as amended, “Safeguarding Official Information in the Interests of the Defense of the United States”; and E.O. 13526, “Classified National Security Information,” or any other executive order concerning the classification of records. See also 47 U.S.C. 154(j).


(2) Materials referred to another Federal agency for classification will not be disclosed while such a determination is pending.


(b) Materials that are related solely to the internal personnel rules and practices of the Commission, 5 U.S.C. 552(b)(2).


(c) Materials that are specifically exempted from disclosure by statute (other than the Government in the Sunshine Act, 5 U.S.C. 552b, provided that such statute either requires that the materials be withheld from the public in such a manner as to leave no discretion on the issue, or establishes particular criteria for withholding or refers to particular types of materials to be withheld), 5 U.S.C. 552(b)(3). The Commission is authorized under the following statutory provisions to withhold materials from public inspection.


(1) Section 4(j) of the Communications Act, 47 U.S.C. 154(j), provides, in part, that, “The Commission is authorized to withhold publication of records or proceedings containing secret information affecting the national defense.” Pursuant to that provision, it has been determined that the following materials should be withheld from public inspection (see also paragraph (a) of this section):


(i) Maps showing the exact location of submarine cables.


(ii) Minutes of Commission actions on classified matters.


(iii) Maps of nation-wide point-to-point microwave networks.


(2) Under section 213 of the Communications Act, 47 U.S.C. 213(f), the Commission is authorized to order, with the reasons therefor, that records and data pertaining to the valuation of the property of common carriers and furnished to the Commission by the carriers pursuant to the provisions of that section, shall not be available for public inspection. If such an order has been issued, the data and records will be withheld from public inspection, except under the provisions of § 0.461. Normally, however, such data and information is available for inspection.


(3) Under section 412 of the Communications Act, 47 U.S.C. 412, the Commission may withhold from public inspection certain contracts, agreements and arrangements between common carriers relating to foreign wire or radio communication. Any person may file a petition requesting that such materials be withheld from public inspection. To support such action, the petition must show that the contract, agreement or arrangement relates to foreign wire or radio communications; that its publication would place American communication companies at a disadvantage in meeting the competition of foreign communication companies; and that the public interest would be served by keeping its terms confidential. If the Commission orders that such materials be kept confidential, they will be made available for inspection only under the provisions of § 0.461.


(4) Section 605 of the Communications Act, 47 U.S.C. 605(a), provides, in part, that, “no person not being authorized by the sender shall intercept any communication [by wire or radio] and divulge or publish the existence, contents, substance, purport, effect, or meaning of such intercepted communications to any person.” In executing its responsibilities, the Commission regularly monitors radio transmissions. Except as required for the enforcement of the communications laws, treaties and the provisions of this chapter, or as authorized in sec. 605, the Commission is prohibited from divulging information obtained in the course of these monitoring activities; and such information, and materials relating thereto, will not be made available for public inspection.


(5) The Trade Secrets Act, 18 U.S.C. 1905, prohibits the unauthorized disclosure of certain confidential information. See paragraph (d) of this section and § 19.735-203 of this chapter.


(d) Trade secrets and commercial or financial information obtained from any person and privileged or confidential – categories of materials not routinely available for public inspection, 5 U.S.C. 552(b)(4) and 18 U.S.C. 1905. (1) The materials listed in this paragraph have been accepted, or are being accepted, by the Commission on a confidential basis pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 552(b)(4). To the extent indicated in each case, the materials are not routinely available for public inspection. If the protection afforded is sufficient, it is unnecessary for persons submitting such materials to submit therewith a request for non-disclosure pursuant to § 0.459. A persuasive showing as to the reasons for inspection will be required in requests submitted under § 0.461 for inspection of such materials.


(i) Financial reports submitted by radio or television licensees.


(ii) Applications for equipment authorizations (type acceptance, type approval, certification, or advance approval of subscription television systems), and materials relating to such applications, are not routinely available for public inspection prior to the effective date of the authorization. The effective date of the authorization will, upon request, be deferred to a date no earlier than that specified by the applicant. Following the effective date of the authorization, the application and related materials (including technical specifications and test measurements) will be made available for inspection upon request (see § 0.460). Portions of applications for equipment certification of scanning receivers and related materials will not be made available for inspection.


(iii) Information submitted in connection with audits, investigations and examination of records pursuant to 47 U.S.C. 220.


(iv) Programming contracts between programmers and multichannel video programming distributors.


(v) The rates, terms and conditions in any agreement between a U.S. carrier and a foreign carrier that govern the settlement of U.S.-international traffic, including the method for allocating return traffic, except as otherwise specified by the Commission by order or by the International Bureau under delegated authority. See, e.g., International Settlements Policy Reform, IB Docket Nos. 11-80, 05-254, 09-10, RM-11322, Report and Order, FCC 12-145 (rel. Nov. 29, 2012).


(vi) Outage reports filed under part 4 of this chapter.


(vii) The following records, relating to coordination of satellite systems pursuant to procedures codified in the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) Radio Regulations:


(A) Records of communications between the Commission and the ITU related to the international coordination process, and


(B) Documents prepared in connection with coordination, notification, and recording of frequency assignments and Plan modifications, including but not limited to minutes of meetings, supporting exhibits, supporting correspondence, and documents and correspondence prepared in connection with operator-to-operator arrangements.


(viii) Information submitted with a 911 reliability certification pursuant to 47 CFR 12.4 that consists of descriptions and documentation of alternative measures to mitigate the risks of nonconformance with certification elements, information detailing specific corrective actions taken with respect to certification elements, or supplemental information requested by the Commission with respect to such certification.


(ix) Confidential Broadcaster Information, as defined in § 1.2206(d) of this chapter, submitted by a broadcast television licensee in a broadcast television spectrum reverse auction conducted under section 6403 of the Middle Class Tax Relief and Job Creation Act of 2012 (Pub. L. 112-96) (the “Spectrum Act”), or in the application to participate in such a reverse auction, is not routinely available for public inspection until the reassignments and reallocations under section 6403(b)(1)(B) of the Spectrum Act become effective or until two years after public notice that the reverse auction is complete and that no such reassignments and reallocations shall become effective. In the event that reassignments and reallocations under section 6403(b)(1)(B) of the Spectrum Act become effective, Confidential Broadcaster Information pertaining to any unsuccessful reverse auction bid or pertaining to any unsuccessful application to participate in such a reverse auction will not be routinely available for public inspection until two years after the effective date.


(x) Copyrighted materials the release of which would have a substantial adverse effect on the copyright holder’s potential market, except to the extent such a release can be considered fair use.


(xi) Lists and updates of U.S.-international routes for which a carrier has an arrangement with a foreign carrier for direct termination in the foreign destination provided pursuant to § 63.22(h) of this chapter.



Note to paragraph (d)(1):

The content of the communications described in paragraph (d)(1)(vii)(A) of this section is in some circumstances separately available through the ITU’s publication process, or through records available in connection with the Commission’s licensing procedures.


(2) Unless the materials to be submitted are listed in paragraph (d)(1) of this section and the protection thereby afforded is adequate, any person who submits materials which he or she wishes withheld from public inspection under 5 U.S.C. 552(b)(4) must submit a request for non-disclosure pursuant to § 0.459. If it is shown in the request that the materials contain trade secrets or privileged or confidential commercial, financial or technical data, the materials will not be made routinely available for inspection; and a persuasive showing as to the reasons for inspection will be required in requests for inspection submitted under § 0.461. In the absence of a request for non-disclosure, the Commission may, in the unusual instance, determine on its own motion that the materials should not be routinely available for public inspection.


(e) Interagency and intra-agency memoranda or letters, 5 U.S.C. 552(b)(5). Interagency and intra-agency memoranda or letters and the work papers of members of the Commission or its staff will not be made available for public inspection, except in accordance with the procedures set forth in § 0.461. Normally such papers are privileged and not available to private parties through the discovery process, because their disclosure would tend to restrain the commitment of ideas to writing, would tend to inhibit communication among Government personnel, and would, in some cases, involve premature disclosure of their contents. The Commission will not use this deliberative process exemption to withhold records created 25 years or more before the date on which the request was received.


(f) Personnel, medical and other files whose disclosure would constitute a clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy, 5 U.S.C. 552(b)(6). Under E.O. 12107, the Commission maintains an Official Personnel Folder for each of its employees. Such folders are under the jurisdiction and control, and are a part of the records, of the U.S. Office of Personnel Management. Except as provided in the rules of the Office of Personnel Management (5 CFR 293.311), such folders will not be made available for public inspection by the Commission. In addition, other records of the Commission containing private, personal or financial information will be withheld from public inspection.


(g) Under 5 U.S.C. 552(b)(7), records compiled for law enforcement purposes, to the extent that production of such records:


(1) Could reasonably be expected to interfere with enforcement proceedings;


(2) Would deprive a person of a right to fair trial or an impartial adjudication;


(3) Could reasonably be expected to constitute an unwarranted invasion of personal privacy;


(4) Could reasonably be expected to disclose the identity of a confidential source;


(5) Would disclose investigative techniques or procedures or would disclose investigative guidelines if such disclosure could reasonably be expected to risk circumvention of the law; or


(6) Could reasonably be expected to endanger the life or physical safety of any individual.


[82 FR 4189, Jan. 13, 2017, as amended at 82 FR 55331, Nov. 21, 2017]


§ 0.458 Nonpublic information.

Any person regulated by or practicing before the Commission coming into possession of written nonpublic information (including written material transmitted in electronic form) as described in § 19.735-203(a) of this chapter under circumstances where it appears that its release was inadvertent or otherwise unauthorized shall be obligated to and shall promptly return the information to the Commission’s Office of Inspector General without further distribution or use. See 47 CFR 19.735-203.


§ 0.459 Requests that materials or information submitted to the Commission be withheld from public inspection.

(a)(1) Procedures applicable to filings in non-electronic proceedings. Any person submitting information or materials to the Commission may submit therewith a request that such information not be made routinely available for public inspection. (If the materials are specifically listed in § 0.457, such a request is unnecessary.) A copy of the request shall be attached to and shall cover all of the materials to which it applies and all copies of those materials. If feasible, the materials to which the request applies shall be physically separated from any materials to which the request does not apply; if this is not feasible, the portion of the materials to which the request applies shall be identified. In the latter circumstance, where confidential treatment is sought only for a portion of a document, the person submitting the document shall submit a redacted version for the public file.


(2) Procedures applicable to filings in electronic proceedings. In proceedings to which the electronic filing requirements set forth in § 1.49(f) of this chapter apply, a party seeking confidential treatment of a portion of a filing must submit in electronic format either a redacted version of the document or an affidavit that it is impossible to submit a redacted document consistent with the filing requirements of this section. Where a party demonstrates that even the fact of a filing must remain confidential, and that this is consistent with the requirements of this section, this affidavit may be filed in paper format under seal.


(3) Comments and other materials may not be submitted by means of the Commission’s Electronic Comment Filing System (ECFS) with a request for confidential treatment under this section.


(4) The Commission may use abbreviated means for indicating that the submitter of a record seeks confidential treatment, such as a checkbox enabling the submitter to indicate that the record is confidential. However, upon receipt of a request for inspection of such records pursuant to § 0.461, the submitter will be notified of such request pursuant to § 0.461(d)(3) and will be requested to justify the confidential treatment of the record, as set forth in paragraph (b) of this section.


(b) Except as provided in § 0.459(a)(3), each such request shall contain a statement of the reasons for withholding the materials from inspection (see § 0.457) and of the facts upon which those records are based, including:


(1) Identification of the specific information for which confidential treatment is sought;


(2) Identification of the Commission proceeding in which the information was submitted or a description of the circumstances giving rise to the submission;


(3) Explanation of the degree to which the information is commercial or financial, or contains a trade secret or is privileged;


(4) Explanation of the degree to which the information concerns a service that is subject to competition;


(5) Explanation of how disclosure of the information could result in substantial competitive harm;


(6) Identification of any measures taken by the submitting party to prevent unauthorized disclosure;


(7) Identification of whether the information is available to the public and the extent of any previous disclosure of the information to third parties;


(8) Justification of the period during which the submitting party asserts that material should not be available for public disclosure; and


(9) Any other information that the party seeking confidential treatment believes may be useful in assessing whether its request for confidentiality should be granted.


(c) Casual requests (including simply stamping pages “confidential”) which do not comply with the requirements of paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section will not be considered.


(d)(1) If a response in opposition to a confidentiality request is filed, the party requesting confidentiality may file a reply within ten business days. All responses or replies filed under this paragraph must be served on all parties.


(2) Requests which comply with the requirements of paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section will be acted upon by the appropriate custodian of records (see § 0.461(d)(1)), who is directed to grant the request if it demonstrates by a preponderance of the evidence that non-disclosure is consistent with the provisions of the Freedom of Information Act, 5 U.S.C. 552. If the request for confidentiality is granted, the ruling will be placed in the public file in lieu of the materials withheld from public inspection.


(3) The Commission may defer acting on requests that materials or information submitted to the Commission be withheld from public inspection until a request for inspection has been made pursuant to § 0.460 or § 0.461. The information will be accorded confidential treatment, as provided for in § 0.459(g) and § 0.461, until the Commission acts on the confidentiality request and all subsequent appeal and stay proceedings have been exhausted.


(e) If the materials are submitted voluntarily (i.e., absent any requirement by statute, regulation, or the Commission), the person submitting them may request the Commission to return the materials without consideration if the request for confidentiality should be denied. In that event, the materials will ordinarily be returned (e.g., an application will be returned if it cannot be considered on a confidential basis). Only in the unusual instance where the public interest so requires will the materials be made available for public inspection. However, no materials submitted with a request for confidentiality will be returned if a request for inspection has been filed under § 0.461. If submission of the materials is required by the Commission and the request for confidentiality is denied, the materials will be made available for public inspection once the period for review of the denial has passed.


(f) If no request for confidentiality is submitted, the Commission assumes no obligation to consider the need for non-disclosure but, in the unusual instance, may determine on its own motion that the materials should be withheld from public inspection. See § 0.457(d).


(g) If a request for confidentiality is denied, the person who submitted the request may, within ten business days, file an application for review by the Commission. If the application for review is denied, the person who submitted the request will be afforded ten business days in which to seek a judicial stay of the ruling. If these periods expire without action by the person who submitted the request, the materials will be returned to the person who submitted them or will be placed in a public file. Notice of denial and of the time for seeking review or a judicial stay will be given by telephone, with follow-up notice in writing. The first day to be counted in computing the time periods established in this paragraph is the day after the date of oral notice. Materials will be accorded confidential treatment, as provided in § 0.459(g) and § 0.461, until the Commission acts on any timely applications for review of an order denying a request for confidentiality, and until a court acts on any timely motion for stay of such an order denying confidential treatment.


(h) If the request for confidentiality is granted, the status of the materials is the same as that of materials listed in § 0.457. Any person wishing to inspect them may submit a request for inspection under § 0.461.


(i) Third party owners of materials submitted to the Commission by another party may participate in the proceeding resolving the confidentiality of the materials.


[74 FR 14078, Mar. 30, 2009, as amended at 76 FR 24389, May 2, 2011]


§ 0.460 Requests for inspection of records which are routinely available for public inspection.

(a) Section 0.453 specifies those Commission records which are routinely available for public inspection and the places at which those records may be inspected. Subject to the limitations set out in this section, a person who wants to inspect such records need only appear at the Reference Information Center and ask to see the records. Many records also are available on the Commission’s Web site, http://www.fcc.gov and the Commission’s electronic reading room, http://www.fcc.gov/general/freedom-information-act-electronic-reading-room. Commission documents are generally published in the FCC Record, and many of these documents or summaries thereof are also published in the Federal Register.


(b) A person who wishes to inspect the records must appear at the specified location during the office hours of the Commission and must inspect the records at that location. (Procedures governing requests for copies are set out in § 0.465.) However, arrangements may be made in advance, by telephone or by correspondence, to make the records available for inspection on a particular date, and there are many circumstances in which such advance arrangements will save inconvenience. If the request is for a large number of documents, for example, a delay in collecting them is predictable. Current records may be in use by the staff when the request is made. Older records may have been forwarded to another location for storage.


(c) The records in question must be reasonably described by the person requesting them to permit their location by staff personnel. The information needed to locate the records will vary, depending on the records requested. Advice concerning the kind of information needed to locate particular records will be furnished in advance upon request. Members of the public will not be given access to the area in which records are kept and will not be permitted to search the files.


(d) If it appears that there will be an appreciable delay in locating or producing the records (as where a large number of documents is the subject of a single request or where an extended search for a document appears to be necessary), the requester may be directed to submit or confirm the request in writing in appropriate circumstances.


(e)(1) Written requests for records routinely available for public inspection under § 0.453 shall be directed to the Commission’s Reference Information Center pursuant to the procedures set forth in § 0.465. Requests shall set out all information known to the person making the request which would be helpful in identifying and locating the document, including the date range of the records sought, if applicable. Upon request by Commission staff, the requester shall provide his or her street address, phone number (if any), and email address (if any). Written requests shall, in addition, specify the maximum search fee the person making the request is prepared to pay (see § 0.467).


(2) Written requests shall be delivered or mailed directly to the Commission’s Reference Information Center (see § 0.465(a)).


(f) When a written request is received by the Reference Information Center, it will be date-stamped.


(g) All requests limited to records listed in § 0.453 will be granted, subject to paragraph (j) of this section.


(h) The records will be produced for inspection at the earliest possible time.


(i) Records shall be inspected within 7 days after notice is given that they have been located and are available for inspection. After that period, they will be returned to storage and additional charges may be imposed for again producing them.


(j) In addition to the other requirements of this section, the following provisions apply to the reports filed with the Commission pursuant to 5 CFR parts 2634 and 3902.


(1) Such reports shall not be obtained or used:


(i) For any unlawful purpose;


(ii) For any commercial purpose, other than by news and communications media for dissemination to the general public;


(iii) For determining or establishing the credit rating of any individual; or


(iv) For use, directly or indirectly, in the solicitation of money for any political, charitable, or other purpose.


(2) Such reports may not be made available to any person nor may any copy thereof be provided to any person except upon a written application by such person stating:


(i) That person’s name, occupation and address;


(ii) The name and address of any other person or organization on whose behalf the inspection or copying is requested; and


(iii) That such person is aware of the prohibitions on the obtaining or use of the report. Further, any such application for inspection shall be made available to the public throughout the period during which the report itself is made available to the public.


[82 FR 4191, Jan. 13, 2017]


§ 0.461 Requests for inspection of materials not routinely available for public inspection.

Any person desiring to inspect Commission records that are not specified in § 0.453 shall file a request for inspection meeting the requirements of this section. The FOIA Public Liaison is available to assist persons seeking records under this section. See § 0.441(a).


(a)(1) Records include:


(i) Any information that would be an agency record subject to the requirements of the Freedom of Information Act when maintained by the Commission in any format, including an electronic format; and


(ii) Any information maintained for the Commission by an entity under Government contract.


(2) The records in question must be reasonably described by the person requesting them to permit personnel to locate them with a reasonable amount of effort. Whenever possible, a request should include specific information about each record sought, such as the title or name, author, recipient, and subject matter of the record. Requests must also specify the date or time period for the records sought. The custodian of records sought may contact the requester to obtain further information about the records sought to assist in locating them.


(3) The person requesting records under this section may specify the form or format of the records to be produced provided that the records may be made readily reproducible in the requested form or format.


(b)(1) Requests shall reasonably describe, for each document requested (see § 0.461(a)(1)), all information known to the person making the request that would be helpful in identifying and locating the document, including the date range of the records sought, if applicable, and the persons/offices to be searched, if known. Upon request by Commission staff, the requester shall provide his or her street address, phone number (if any), and email address (if any).


(2) The request shall, in addition, specify the maximum search fee the person making the request is prepared to pay or a request for waiver or reduction of fees if the requester is eligible (see § 0.470(e)). By filing a FOIA request, the requester agrees to pay all applicable fees charged under § 0.467, unless the person making the request seeks a waiver of fees (see § 0.470(e)), in which case the Commission will rule on the waiver request before proceeding with the search.


(c) If the records are of the kinds listed in § 0.457 or if they have been withheld from inspection under § 0.459, the request shall, in addition, contain a statement of the reasons for inspection and the facts in support thereof. In the case of other materials, no such statement need accompany the request, but the custodian of the records may require the submission of such a statement if he or she determines that the materials in question may lawfully be withheld from inspection.


(d)(1) Requests shall be:


(i) Filed electronically through the internet at http://foiaonline.regulations.gov/; or


(ii) Delivered or mailed to the Managing Director at the address indicated in § 0.401(a), Attn: FOIA Request.


(2) For purposes of this section, the custodian of the records is the Chief of the Bureau or Office where the records are located. The Chief of the Bureau or Office may designate an appropriate person to act on a FOIA request. The Chief of the Bureau or Office may also designate an appropriate person to sign the response to any FOIA request. See § 0.461(m).


(3) If the request is for materials submitted to the Commission by third parties and not open to routine public inspection under § 0.457(d), § 0.459, or another Commission rule or order, or if a request for confidentiality is pending pursuant to § 0.459, or if the custodian of records has reason to believe that the information may contain confidential commercial information, one copy of the request will be provided by the custodian of the records (see paragraph (e) of this section) to the person who originally submitted the materials to the Commission. If there are many persons who originally submitted the records and are entitled to notice under this paragraph, the custodian of records may use a public notice to notify the submitters of the request for inspection. The submitter or submitters will be given ten calendar days to respond to the FOIA request. See § 0.459(d)(1). If a submitter has any objection to disclosure, he or she is required to submit a detailed written statement specifying all grounds for withholding any portion of the information (see § 0.459). This response shall be served on the party seeking to inspect the records. The requester may submit a reply within ten calendar days unless a different period is specified by the custodian of records. The reply shall be served on all parties that filed a response. In the event that a submitter fails to respond within the time specified, the submitter will be considered to have no objection to disclosure of the information.



Note to paragraph (d)(3):

Under the ex parte rules, § 1.1206(a)(7) of this chapter, a proceeding involving a FOIA request is a permit-but-disclose proceeding, but is subject to the special service rules in this paragraph. We also note that while the FOIA request itself is a permit-but-disclose proceeding, a pleading in a FOIA proceeding may also constitute a presentation in another proceeding if it addresses the merits of that proceeding.


(e)(1) When the request is received by the Managing Director, it will be assigned to the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) Control Office, where it will be entered into the FOIAonline system. The request will be reviewed and, if it is determined that the request meets all the requirements of a proper FOIA request, will be designated as perfected. A FOIA request is then considered properly received. This will occur no later than ten calendar days after the request is first received by the agency.


(2)(i) Except for the purpose of making a determination regarding expedited processing under paragraph (h) of this section, the time for processing a request for inspection of records will be tolled


(A) While the custodian of records seeks reasonable clarification of the request;


(B) Until clarification with the requester of issues regarding fee assessment occurs, including:


(1) Where the amount of fees authorized is less than the estimated cost for completing the production;


(2) Following the denial of a fee waiver, unless the requester had provided a written statement agreeing to pay the fees if the fee waiver was denied;


(3) Where advance payment is required pursuant to § 0.469 and has not been made.


(ii) Only one Commission request for information shall be deemed to toll the time for processing a request for inspection of records under paragraph (e)(2)(i)(A) of this section. Such request must be made no later than ten calendar days after a request is properly received by the custodian of records under paragraph (e)(1) of this section.


(3) The FOIA Control Office will send an acknowledgement to the requester notifying the requester of the control number assigned to the request, the due date of the response, and the telephone contact number (202-418-0440) to be used by the requester to obtain the status of the request. Requesters may also obtain the status of an FOIA request via email at [email protected] or by viewing their request at http://foiaonline.regulations.gov/.


(4) Multiple FOIA requests by the same or different FOIA requesters may be consolidated for disposition. See also § 0.470(b)(2).


(f) Requests for inspection of records will be acted on as follows by the custodian of the records.


(1) If the Commission is prohibited from disclosing the records in question, the request for inspection will be denied with a statement setting forth the specific grounds for denial.


(2)(i) If records in the possession of the Commission are the property of another agency, the request will be referred to that agency and the person who submitted the request will be so advised, with the reasons for referral.


(ii) If it is determined that the FOIA request seeks only records of another agency or department, the FOIA requester will be so informed by the FOIA Control Officer and will be directed to the correct agency or department.


(iii) If the records in the possession of the Commission involve the equities of another agency, the Commission will consult with that agency prior to releasing the records.


(3) If it is determined that the Commission does not have authority to withhold the records from public inspection, the request will be granted.


(4) If it is determined that the Commission has authority to withhold the records from public inspection, the considerations favoring disclosure and non-disclosure will be weighed in light of the facts presented, and the Commission may, at its discretion, grant the request in full or in part, or deny the request.


(5) If there is a statutory basis for withholding part of a document from inspection, to the extent that portion is reasonably segregable, that part will be deleted and the remainder will be made available for inspection. Unless doing so would harm an interest protected by an applicable exemption, records disclosed in part shall be marked or annotated, if technically feasible, to show the amount of information deleted, the location of the information deleted, and the exemption under which the deletion is made.


(6) In locating and recovering records responsive to an FOIA request, only those records within the Commission’s possession and control as of the date a request is perfected shall be considered.


(g)(1) The custodian of the records will make every effort to act on the request within twenty business days after it is received and perfected by the FOIA Control Office. However, if a request for clarification has been made under paragraph (e)(2)(i)(A) of this section or an issue is outstanding regarding the payment of fees for processing the FOIA request is pending under paragraph (e)(2)(i)(B) of this section, the counting of time will start upon resolution of these requests. If it is not possible to locate the records and to determine whether they should be made available for inspection within twenty business days, the custodian may, upon timely notice to the requester, extend the time for action by up to ten business days, in any of the following circumstances:


(i) It is necessary to search for and collect the requested records from field facilities or other establishments that are separate from the office processing the request.


(ii) It is necessary to search for, collect and appropriately examine a voluminous amount of separate and distinct records which are demanded in a single request; or


(iii) It is necessary to consult with another agency having a substantial interest in the determination of the request, or among two or more components of the Commission having substantial subject matter interest therein.


(2) The custodian of the records will notify the requester in writing of any extension of time exercised pursuant to paragraph (g) of this section. The custodian of the records may also call the requester to extend the time provided a subsequent written confirmation is provided. If it is not possible to locate the records and make the determination within the extended period, the person or persons who made the request will be provided an opportunity to limit the scope of the request so that it may be processed within the extended time limit, or an opportunity to arrange an alternative time frame for processing the request or a modified request, and asked to consent to an extension or further extension. If the requester agrees to an extension, the custodian of the records will confirm the agreement in a letter or email specifying the length of the agreed-upon extension. If he or she does not agree to an extension, the request will be denied, on the grounds that the custodian has not been able to locate the records and/or to make the determination within the period for a ruling mandated by the Freedom of Information Act, 5 U.S.C. 552. In that event, the custodian will provide the requester with the records, if any, that could be located and produced within the allotted time. The requester may file an application for review by the Commission.


(3) If the custodian of the records grants a request for inspection of records submitted to the Commission in confidence under § 0.457(d), § 0.459, or some other Commission rule or order, the custodian of the records will give the submitter written notice of the decision and of the submitter’s right to seek review pursuant to paragraph (i) of this section.


(h)(1) Requesters who seek expedited processing of FOIA requests shall submit such requests, along with their FOIA requests, to the Managing Director, as described in paragraph (d) of this section.


(2) Expedited processing shall be granted to a requester demonstrating a compelling need that is certified by the requester to be true and correct to the best of his or her knowledge and belief. Simply stating that the request should be expedited is not a sufficient basis to obtain expedited processing.


(3) For purposes of this section, compelling need means –


(i) That failure to obtain requested records on an expedited basis could reasonably be expected to pose an imminent threat to the life or physical safety of an individual; or


(ii) With respect to a request made by a person primarily engaged in disseminating information, there is an urgency to inform the public concerning actual or alleged Federal Government activity.


(4)(i) Notice of the determination whether to grant expedited processing shall be provided to the requester by the custodian of records within ten calendar days after receipt of the request by the FOIA Control Office. Once the determination has been made to grant expedited processing, the custodian shall process the FOIA request as soon as practicable.


(ii) If a request for expedited processing is denied, the person seeking expedited processing may file an application for review within five business days after the date of the written denial. The application for review shall be delivered or mailed to the General Counsel. (For general procedures relating to applications for review, see § 1.115 of this chapter.) The Commission shall act expeditiously on the application for review, and shall notify the custodian of records and the requester of the disposition of such an application for review.


(i)(1) If a request for inspection of records submitted to the Commission in confidence under § 0.457(d), § 0.459, or another Commission rule or order is granted in whole or in part, an application for review may be filed by the person who submitted the records to the Commission, by a third party owner of the records or by a person with a personal privacy interest in the records, or by the person who filed the request for inspection of records within the ten business days after the date of the written ruling. The application for review shall be filed within ten business days after the date of the written ruling, shall be delivered or mailed to the General Counsel, or sent via email to [email protected], and shall be served on the person who filed the request for inspection of records and any other parties to the proceeding. The person who filed the request for inspection of records may respond to the application for review within ten business days after it is filed.


(2) The first day to be counted in computing the time period for filing the application for review is the day after the date of the written ruling. An application for review is considered filed when it is received by the Commission. If an application for review is not filed within this period, the records will be produced for inspection.


(3) If an application for review is denied, the person filing the application for review will be notified in writing and advised of his or her rights. A denial of an application for review is not subject to a petition for reconsideration under § 1.106 of this chapter.


(4) If an application for review filed by the person who submitted, owns, or has a personal privacy interest in the records to the Commission is denied, or if the records are made available on review which were not initially made available, the person will be afforded ten business days from the date of the written ruling in which to move for a judicial stay of the Commission’s action. The first day to be counted in computing the time period for seeking a judicial stay is the day after the date of the written ruling. If a motion for stay is not made within this period, the records will be produced for inspection.


(j) Except as provided in paragraph (i) of this section, an application for review of an initial action on a request for inspection of records, a fee determination (see § 0.467 through § 0.470), or a fee reduction or waiver decision (see § 0.470(e)) may be filed only by the person who made the request. The application shall be filed within 90 calendar days after the date of the written ruling by the custodian of records. An application for review is considered filed when it is received by the Commission. The application shall be delivered or mailed to the General Counsel, or sent via email to [email protected] If the proceeding involves records subject to confidential treatment under § 0.457 or § 0.459, or involves a person with an interest as described in § 0.461(i), the application for review shall be served on such persons. That person may file a response within 14 calendar days after the application for review is filed. If the records are made available for review, the person who submitted them to the Commission will be afforded 14 calendar days after the date of the written ruling to seek a judicial stay. See paragraph (i) of this section. The first day to be counted in computing the time period for filing the application for review or seeking a judicial stay is the day after the date of the written ruling.



Note to paragraphs (i) and (j):

The General Counsel may review applications for review with the custodian of records and attempt to informally resolve outstanding issues with the consent of the requester. For general procedures relating to applications for review, see § 1.115 of this chapter.


(k)(1)(i) The Commission will make every effort to act on an application for review of an action on a request for inspection of records within twenty business days after it is filed. In the following circumstances and to the extent time has not been extended under paragraphs (g)(1)(i), (ii), or (iii) of this section, the Commission may extend the time for acting on the application for review up to ten business days. (The total period of extensions taken under this paragraph and under paragraph (g) of this section without the consent of the person who submitted the request shall not exceed ten business days.):


(A) It is necessary to search for and collect the requested records from field facilities or other establishments that are separate from the office processing the request;


(B) It is necessary to search for, collect and appropriately examine a voluminous amount of separate and distinct records which are demanded in a single request; or


(C) It is necessary to consult with another agency having a substantial interest in the determination of the request or among two or more components of the Commission having substantial subject matter interest therein.


(ii) If these circumstances are not present, the person who made the request may be asked to consent to an extension or further extension. If the requester or person who made the request agrees to an extension, the General Counsel will confirm the agreement in a letter specifying the length of the agreed-upon extension. If the requestor or person who made the request does not agree to an extension, the Commission will continue to search for and/or assess the records and will advise the person who made the request of further developments; but that person may file a complaint in an appropriate United States district court.


(2) The Commission may at its discretion or upon request consolidate for consideration related applications for review filed under paragraph (i) or (j) of this section.


(l)(1) Subject to the application for review and judicial stay provisions of paragraphs (i) and (j) of this section, if the request is granted, the records will be produced for inspection at the earliest possible time.


(2) If a request for inspection of records becomes the subject of an action for judicial review before the custodian of records has acted on the request, or before the Commission has acted on an application for review, the Commission may continue to consider the request for production of records.


(m) Staff orders and letters ruling on requests for inspection are signed by the official (or officials) who give final approval of their contents. Decisions of the Commission ruling on applications for review will set forth the names of the Commissioners participating in the decision.


[82 FR 4192, Jan. 13, 2017, as amended at 85 FR 64405, Oct. 13, 2020]


§ 0.463 Disclosure of Commission records and information in legal proceedings in which the Commission is a non-party.

(a) This section sets forth procedures to be followed with respect to the production or disclosure of any material within the custody and control of the Commission, any information relating to such material, or any information acquired by any person while employed by the Commission as part of the person’s official duties or because of the person’s official status.


(b) In the event that a demand is made by a court or other competent authority outside the Commission for the production of records or testimony (e.g., a subpoena, order, or other demand), the General Counsel shall promptly be advised of such demand, the nature of the records or testimony sought, and all other relevant facts and circumstances. The General Counsel, in consultation with the Managing Director, will thereupon issue such instructions as he or she may deem advisable consistent with this subpart.


(c) A party in a court or administrative legal proceeding in which the Commission is a non-party who wishes to obtain records or testimony from the Commission shall submit a written request to the General Counsel. Such request must be accompanied by a statement setting forth the nature of the proceeding (including any relevant supporting documentation, e.g., a copy of the Complaint), the relevance of the records or testimony to the proceeding (including a proffer concerning the anticipated scope and duration of the testimony), a showing that other evidence reasonably suited to the requester’s needs is not available from any other source (including a request submitted pursuant to § 0.460 or § 0.461 of the Commission’s rules), and any other information that may be relevant to the Commission’s consideration of the request for records or testimony. The purpose of the foregoing requirements is to assist the General Counsel in making an informed decision regarding whether the production of records or the testimony should be authorized.


(d) In deciding whether to authorize the release of records or to permit the testimony of present or former Commission personnel, the General Counsel, in consultation with the Managing Director, shall consider the following factors:


(1) Whether the request or demand would involve the Commission in issues or controversies unrelated to the Commission’s mission;


(2) Whether the request or demand is unduly burdensome;


(3) Whether the time and money of the Commission and/or the United States would be used for private purposes;


(4) The extent to which the time of employees for conducting official business would be compromised;


(5) Whether the public might misconstrue variances between personal opinions of employees and Commission policy;


(6) Whether the request or demand demonstrates that the records or testimony sought are relevant and material to the underlying proceeding, unavailable from other sources, and whether the request is reasonable in its scope;


(7) Whether, if the request or demand were granted, the number of similar requests would have a cumulative effect on the expenditure of Commission resources;


(8) Whether the requestor has agreed to pay search and review fees as set forth in § 0.467 of this subpart;


(9) Whether disclosure of the records or the testimony sought would otherwise be inappropriate under the circumstances; and


(10) Any other factor that is appropriate.


(e) Among those demands and requests in response to which compliance will not ordinarily be authorized are those with respect to which any of the following factors exist:


(1) Disclosure of the records or the testimony would violate a statute, Executive Order, rule, or regulation;


(2) The integrity of the administrative and deliberative processes of the Commission would be compromised;


(3) Disclosure of the records or the testimony would not be appropriate under the rules of procedure governing the case or matter in which the demand arose;


(4) Disclosure of the records, including release in camera, or the testimony, is not appropriate or required under the relevant substantive law concerning privilege;


(5) Disclosure of the records, except when in camera and necessary to assert a claim of privilege, or of the testimony, would reveal information properly classified or other matters exempt from unrestricted disclosure; or


(6) Disclosure of the records or the testimony could interfere with ongoing Commission enforcement proceedings or other legal or administrative proceedings, compromise constitutional rights, reveal the identity of an intelligence source or confidential informant, or disclose trade secrets or similarly confidential commercial or financial information.


(f) The General Counsel, following consultation with the Managing Director and any relevant Commission Bureau or Office, is authorized to approve non-privileged testimony by a present or former employee of the Commission or the production of non-privileged records in response to a valid demand issued by competent legal authority, or a request for records or testimony received under this section, and to assert governmental privileges on behalf of the Commission in litigation that may be associated with any such demand or request.


(g) Any employee or former employee of the Commission who receives a demand for records of the Commission or testimony regarding the records or activities of the Commission shall promptly notify the General Counsel so that the General Counsel may take appropriate steps to protect the Commission’s rights.


(Secs. 4(i), 303(r), Communications Act of 1934, as amended, 47 U.S.C. 154(i) and 303(r); 5 U.S.C. 301; 47 CFR 0.231(d))


§ 0.465 Request for copies of materials which are available, or made available, for public inspection.

(a) The Commission may award a contract to a commercial duplication firm to make copies of Commission records and offer them for sale to the public. In addition to the charge for copying, the contractor may charge a search fee for locating and retrieving the requested documents from the Commission’s files.



Note to paragraph (a):

The name, address, telephone number, and schedule of fees for the current copy contractor, if any, are published at the time of contract award of renewal in a public notice and periodically thereafter. Current information is available at http://www.fcc.gov/foia and http://www.fcc.gov/consumer-governmental-affairs. Questions regarding this information should be directed to the Reference Information Center of the Consumer and Governmental Affairs Bureau at 202-418-0270.


(b)(1) Records routinely available for public inspection under § 0.453 are available to the public through the Commission’s Reference Information Center. Section 0.461 does not apply to such records.


(2) Audio or video recordings or transcripts of Commission proceedings are available to the public through the Commission’s Reference Information Center. In some cases, only some of these formats may be available.


(c)(1) Contractual arrangements which have been entered into with commercial firms, as described in this section, do not in any way limit the right of the public to inspect Commission records or to retrieve whatever information may be desired. Coin-operated and debit card copy machines are available for use by the public.


(2) The Commission has reserved the right to make copies of its records for its own use or for the use of other agencies of the U.S. Government. When it serves the regulatory or financial interests of the U.S. Government, the Commission will make and furnish copies of its records free of charge. In other circumstances, however, if it should be necessary for the Commission to make and furnish copies of its records for the use of others, the fee for this service shall be ten cents ($0.10) per page or $5 per computer disk in addition to charges for staff time as provided in § 0.467. For copies prepared with other media, such as thumb drives or other portable electronic storage, the charge will be the actual direct cost including operator time. Requests for copying should be accompanied by a statement specifying the maximum copying fee the person making the request is prepared to pay. If the Commission estimates that copying charges are likely to exceed the greater of $25 or the amount which the requester has indicated that he/she is prepared to pay, then it shall notify the requester of the estimated amount of fees. Such a notice shall offer the requester the opportunity to confer with Commission personnel with the object of revising or clarifying the request.



Note to paragraph (c)(2):

The criterion considered in acting on a waiver request is whether “waiver or reduction of the fee is in the public interest because furnishing the information can be considered as primarily benefiting the general public.” 5 U.S.C. 552(a)(4)(A). A request for a waiver or reduction of fees will be decided by the General Counsel as set forth in § 0.470(e).


(3) Certified documents. Copies of documents which are available or made available, for inspection under §§ 0.451 through 0.465, will be prepared and certified, under seal, by the Secretary or his or her designee. Requests shall be in writing, specifying the exact documents, the number of copies desired, and the date on which they will be required. The request shall allow a reasonable time for the preparation and certification of copies. The fee for preparing copies shall be the same as that charged by the Commission as described in paragraph (c)(2) of this section. The fee for certification shall be $10 for each document.


(d)(1) Computer maintained databases produced by the Commission and routinely available to the public (see § 0.453) may be obtained from the FCC’s Web site at http://www.fcc.gov or if unavailable on the Commission’s Web site, from the Reference Information Center.


(2) Copies of computer generated data stored as paper printouts or electronic media and available to the public may also be obtained from the Commission’s Reference Information Center (see paragraph (a) of this section).


(3) Copies of computer source programs and associated documentation produced by the Commission and available to the public may be obtained from the Office of the Managing Director.


(e) This section does not apply to records available on the Commission’s Web site, http://www.fcc.gov, or printed publications which may be purchased from the Superintendent of Documents or private firms (see §§ 0.411 through 0.420), nor does it apply to application forms or information bulletins, which are prepared for the use and information of the public and are available upon request (see §§ 0.421 and 0.423) or on the Commission’s Web site, http://www.fcc.gov/formpage.html.


[82 FR 4195, Jan. 13, 2017]


§ 0.466 Definitions.

(a) For the purpose of §§ 0.467 and 0.468, the following definitions shall apply:


(1) The term direct costs means those expenditures which the Commission actually incurs in searching for and duplicating (and in case of commercial requesters, reviewing) documents to respond to a FOIA request. Direct costs include the salary of the employee performing the work (the basic rate of pay for the employee plus twenty percent of that rate to cover benefits), and the cost of operating duplicating machinery. Not included in direct costs are overhead expenses, such as costs of space, and heating or lighting the facility in which the records are stored.


(2) The term search includes all time spent looking for material that is responsive to a request, including page-by-page or line-by-line identification of material contained within documents. Such activity should be distinguished, however, from “review” of material in order to determine whether the material is exempt from disclosure (see paragraph (a)(3) of this section).


(3) The term review refers to the process of examining documents located in response to a commercial use request (see paragraph (a)(4) of this section) to determine whether any portion of a document located is exempt from disclosure. It also includes processing any documents for disclosure, e.g., performing such functions that are necessary to excise them or otherwise prepare them for release. Review does not include time spent resolving general legal or policy issues regarding the application of FOIA exemptions.


(4) The term commercial use request refers to a request from or on behalf of one who seeks information for a use or purpose that furthers the commercial interests of the requester. In determining whether a requester properly falls within this category, the Commission shall determine the use to which a requester will put the documents requested. Where the Commission has reasonable cause to question the use to which a requester will put the documents sought, or where that use is not clear from the request itself, the Commission shall seek additional clarification before assigning the request to a specific category. The dissemination of records by a representative of the news media (see § 0.466(a)(7)) shall not be considered to be for a commercial use.


(5) The term educational institution refers to a preschool, a public or private elementary or secondary school, an institution of graduate higher education, an institution of professional education and an institution of vocational education, which operates a program or programs of scholarly research.


(6) The term non-commercial scientific institution refers to an institution that is not operated on a commercial basis as that term is referenced in paragraph (a)(4) of this section, and which is operated solely for the purpose of conducting scientific research the results of which are not intended to promote any particular product or industry.


(7) The term representative of the news media refers to any person or entity that gathers information of potential interest to a segment of the public, uses its editorial skills to turn the raw materials into a distinct work, and distributes that work to an audience. In this clause, the term news means information that is about current events or that would be of current interest to the public. Examples of news-media entities are television or radio stations broadcasting to the public at large and publishers of periodicals (but only if such entities qualify as disseminators of news) who make their products available for purchase or subscription by, or free distribution to, the general public. These examples are not all-inclusive. Moreover, as methods of news delivery evolve (for example, the adoption of electronic dissemination of newspapers through telecommunications services), such alternative media shall be considered to be news-media entities. A freelance journalist shall be regarded as working for a news-media entity if the journalist can demonstrate a solid basis for expecting publication through that entity, whether or not the journalist is actually employed by the entity. A publication contract would present a solid basis for such an expectation; the Commission may also consider the past publication record of the requester in making such a determination. See 5 U.S.C. 552(a)(4)(A)(ii).


(8) The term all other requester refers to any person not within the definitions in paragraphs (a)(4) through (a)(7) of this paragraph.


(b) [Reserved]


[74 FR 14078, Mar. 30, 2009, as amended at 76 FR 24389, May 2, 2011]


§ 0.467 Search and review fees.

(a)(1) Subject to the provisions of this section, an hourly fee shall be charged for recovery of the full, allowable direct costs of searching for and reviewing records requested under § 0.460 or § 0.461, unless such fees are reduced or waived pursuant to § 0.470. The fee is based on the pay grade level of the FCC’s employee(s) who conduct(s) the search or review, or the actual hourly rate of FCC contractors or other non-FCC personnel who conduct a search.



Note to paragraph (a)(1):

The fees for FCC employees will be modified periodically to correspond with modifications in the rate of pay approved by Congress and any such modifications will be announced by public notice and will be posted on the Commission’s Web site, http://www.fcc.gov/foia/#feeschedule.


(2) The fees specified in paragraph (a)(1) of this section are computed at Step 5 of each grade level based on the General Schedule or the hourly rate of non-FCC personnel, including in addition twenty percent for personnel benefits. Search and review fees will be assessed in
1/4 hour increments.


(b) Search fees may be assessed for time spent searching, even if the Commission fails to locate responsive records or if any records located are determined to be exempt from disclosure.


(c) The Commission shall charge only for the initial review, i.e., the review undertaken initially when the Commission analyzes the applicability of a specific exemption to a particular record. The Commission shall not charge for review at the appeal level of an exemption already applied. However, records or portions of records withheld in full under an exemption that is subsequently determined not to apply may be reviewed again to determine the applicability of other exemptions not previously considered. The costs of such a subsequent review, under these circumstances, are properly assessable.


(d) The fee charged will not exceed an amount based on the time typically required to locate records of the kind requested.


(e)(1) If the Commission estimates that search charges are likely to exceed the greater of $25 or the amount which the requester indicated he/she is prepared to pay, then it shall notify the requester of the estimated amount of fees. Such a notice shall offer the requester the opportunity to confer with Commission personnel with the object of revising or clarifying the request. See § 0.465(c)(2) and § 0.470(d).


(2) The time for processing a request for inspection shall be tolled while conferring with the requester about his or her willingness to pay the fees required to process the request. See § 0.461(e).


(f) When the search has been completed, the custodian of the records will give notice of the charges incurred to the person who made the request.


(g) The fee shall be paid to the Financial Management Division, Office of Managing Director, or as otherwise directed by the Commission.


[82 FR 4195, Jan. 13, 2017]


§ 0.468 Interest.

Interest shall be charged those requesters who fail to pay the fees charged. The agency will begin assessing interest charges on the amount billed starting on the 31st day following the day on which the billing was sent. The date on which the payment is received by the agency will determine whether and how much interest is due. The interest shall be set at the rate prescribed in 31 U.S.C. 3717.


§ 0.469 Advance payments.

(a) The Commission may not require advance payment of estimated FOIA fees except as provided in paragraph (b) or where the Commission estimates or determines that allowable charges that a requester may be required to pay are likely to exceed $250.00 and the requester has no history of payment. Where allowable charges are likely to exceed $250.00 and the requester has a history of prompt payment of FOIA fees the Commission may notify the requester of the estimated cost and obtain satisfactory assurance of full payment. Notification that fees may exceed $250.00 is not, however, a prerequisite for collecting fees above that amount.


(b) Where a requester has previously failed to pay a fee charged in a timely fashion (i.e., within 30 days of the date of the billing), the Commission may require the requester to pay the full amount owed plus any applicable interest as provided in § 0.468, and to make an advance payment of the full amount of the estimated fee before the Commission begins to process a new request or a pending request from that requester.


(c) When the Commission acts under paragraph (a) of this section, the administrative time limits prescribed in §§ 0.461(g) and (k) (i.e., twenty business days from receipt of initial requests and twenty business days from receipt of appeals from initial denials, plus permissible extensions of these time limits (see § 0.461(g)(1)(i) through (iii) and § 0.461(k)(1)(i) through (iii)) will begin only after the agency has received the fee payments described in this section. See § 0.461(e)(2)(ii) and § 0.467(e)(2).


§ 0.470 Assessment of fees.

(a)(1) Commercial use requesters. (i) When the Commission receives a request for documents for commercial use, it will assess charges that recover the full direct cost of searching for, reviewing and duplicating the records sought pursuant to § 0.466 and § 0.467.


(ii) Commercial use requesters shall not be assessed search fees if the Commission fails to comply with the time limits under § 0.461(g), except as provided in paragraph (a)(1)(iii) of this section.


(iii) Commercial requesters may still be assessed search fees when the Commission fails to comply with the time limits under § 0.461(g) if the Commission determines that unusual circumstances apply and more than 5,000 pages are necessary to respond to the request, so long as the Commission has provided a timely written notice to the requester and has discussed with the requester (or made not less than three good-faith attempts to do so) how the requester could effectively limit the scope of the request. Additionally, if a court has determined that exceptional circumstances exist, a failure to comply with a time limit under § 0.461(g) will be excused for the length of time provided by the court order.


(2) Educational and non-commercial scientific institution requesters and requesters who are representatives of the news media. (i) The Commission shall provide documents to requesters in these categories for the cost of duplication only, pursuant to § 0.465 above, excluding duplication charges for the first 100 pages, provided however, that requesters who are representatives of the news media shall be entitled to a reduced assessment of charges only when the request is for the purpose of distributing information.


(ii) Educational requesters or requesters who are representatives of the news media shall not be assessed fees for the cost of duplication if the Commission fails to comply with the time limits under § 0.461(g), except as provided in paragraph (a)(2)(iii) of this section.


(iii) Educational requesters or requesters who are representatives of the news media may still be assessed duplication fees when the Commission fails to comply with the time limits under § 0.461(g) if the Commission determines that unusual circumstances apply and more than 5,000 pages are necessary to respond to the request, so long as the Commission has provided a timely written notice to the requester and has discussed with the requester (or made not less than three good-faith attempts to do so) how the requester could effectively limit the scope of the request. Additionally, if a court has determined that exceptional circumstances exist, a failure to comply with a time limit under § 0.461(g) will be excused for the length of time provided by the court order.


(3) All other requesters. (i) The Commission shall charge requesters who do not fit into any of the categories above fees which cover the full, reasonable direct cost of searching for and duplicating records that are responsive to the request, pursuant to § 0.465 and § 0.467, except that the first 100 pages of duplication and the first two hours of search time shall be furnished without charge.


(ii) All other requesters shall not be assessed search fees if the Commission fails to comply with the time limits under § 0.461(g), except as provided in paragraph (a)(3)(iii) of this section.


(iii) All other requesters may still be assessed search fees when the Commission fails to comply with the time limits under § 0.461(g) if the Commission determines that unusual circumstances apply and more than 5,000 pages are necessary to respond to the request, so long as the Commission has provided a timely written notice to the requester and has discussed with the requester (or made not less than three good-faith attempts to do so) how the requester could effectively limit the scope of the request. Additionally, if a court has determined that exceptional circumstances exist, a failure to comply with a time limit under § 0.461(g) will be excused for the length of time provided by the court order.


(b)(1) The 100 page restriction on assessment of duplication fees in paragraphs (a)(2) and (3) of this section refers to 100 paper copies of a standard size, which will normally be 8
1/2″ x 11″ or 11″ x 14″.


(2) When the agency reasonably believes that a requester or group of requesters is attempting to segregate a request into a series of separate individual requests for the purpose of evading the assessment of fees, the agency will aggregate any such requests and assess charges accordingly.


(c) When a requester believes he or she is entitled to a waiver pursuant to paragraph (e) of this section, the requester must include, in his or her original FOIA request, a statement explaining with specificity, the reasons demonstrating that he or she qualifies for a fee waiver. Included in this statement should be a certification that the information will not be used to further the commercial interests of the requester.


(d) If the Commission reasonably believes that a commercial interest exists, based on the information provided pursuant to paragraph (c) of this section, the requester shall be so notified and given an additional ten business days to provide further information to justify receiving a reduced fee. See § 0.467(e)(2).


(e)(1) Copying, search and review charges shall be waived or reduced by the General Counsel when “disclosure of the information is in the public interest because it is likely to contribute significantly to public understanding of the operations or activities of the government and is not primarily in the commercial interest of the requester.” 5 U.S.C. 552(a)(4)(A)(iii). Simply repeating the fee waiver language of section 552(a)(4)(A)(iii) is not a sufficient basis to obtain a fee waiver.


(2) The criteria used to determine whether disclosure is in the public interest because it is likely to contribute significantly to public understanding of the operations or activities of the government include:


(i) Whether the subject of the requested records concerns the operations or activities of the government;


(ii) Whether the disclosure is likely to contribute to an understanding of government operations or activities; and


(iii) Whether disclosure of the requested information will contribute to public understanding as opposed to the individual understanding of the requester or a narrow segment of interested persons.


(3) The criteria used to determine whether disclosure is primarily in the commercial interest of the requester include:


(i) Whether the requester has a commercial interest that would be furthered by the requested disclosure; and, if so


(ii) Whether the magnitude of the identified commercial interest of the requester is sufficiently large, in comparison with the public interest in disclosure, that disclosure is primarily in the commercial interest of the requester.


(4) This request for fee reduction or waiver must accompany the initial request for records and will be decided under the same procedures used for record requests.


(5) If no fees or de minimis fees would result from processing a FOIA request and a fee waiver or reduction has been sought, the General Counsel will not reach a determination on the waiver or reduction request.


(f) Whenever Commission staff determines that the total fee calculated under this section likely is less than the cost to collect and process the fee, no fee will be charged.


(g) Review of initial fee determinations under § 0.467 through § 0.470 and initial fee reduction or waiver determinations under paragraph (e) of this section may be sought under § 0.461(j).


[82 FR 4196, Jan. 13, 2017]


Places for Making Submittals or Requests, for Filing Applications, and for Taking Examinations

§ 0.471 Miscellaneous submittals or requests.

Persons desiring to make submittals or requests of a general nature should communicate with the Secretary of the Commission.


[36 FR 15121, Aug. 13, 1971]


§ 0.473 Reports of violations.

Reports of violations of the Communications Act or of the Commission’s rules and regulations may be submitted to the Commission in Washington or to any field office.


[32 FR 10578, July 19, 1967]


§ 0.475 Applications for employment.

Persons who wish to apply for employment should communicate with the Associate Managing Director-Personnel Management.


(Secs. 4(i), 303(n), Communications Act of 1934, as amended, 47 U.S.C. 154(i) and 303(n); 47 CFR 0.231(d))

[49 FR 13368, Apr. 4, 1984]


§ 0.481 Place of filing applications for radio authorizations.

For locations for filing applications, and appropriate fees, see §§ 1.1102 through 1.1107 of this chapter.


[69 FR 41130, July 7, 2004]


§ 0.482 Application for waiver of wireless radio service rules.

All requests for waiver of the rules (see § 1.925 of this chapter) governing the Wireless Radio Services (see § 1.907 of this chapter) that require a fee (see § 1.1102 of this chapter) shall be submitted via the Universal Licensing System or to the U.S. Bank, St. Louis, Missouri at the address set forth in § 1.1102. Waiver requests that do not require a fee should be submitted via the Universal Licensing System or to: Federal Communications Commission, 1270 Fairfield Road, Gettysburg, Pennsylvania 17325-7245. Waiver requests attached to applications must be submitted in accordance with § 0.401(b) or § 0.401(c) of the rules.


[63 FR 68919, Dec. 14, 1998, as amended at 73 FR 9018, Feb. 19, 2008]


§ 0.483 Applications for amateur or commercial radio operator licenses.

(a) Application filing procedures for amateur radio operator licenses are set forth in part 97 of this chapter.


(b) Application filing procedures for commercial radio operator licenses are set forth in part 13 of this chapter.


[47 FR 53378, Nov. 26, 1982, as amended at 78 FR 23151, Apr. 18, 2013]


§ 0.484 Amateur radio operator examinations.

Generally, examinations for amateur radio operation licenses shall be administered at locations and times specified by volunteer examiners. (See § 97.509). When the FCC conducts examinations for amateur radio operator licenses, they shall take place at locations and times designated by the FCC.


[58 FR 13021, Mar. 9, 1993]


§ 0.485 Commercial radio operator examinations.

Generally, written and telegraphy examinations for commercial radio operator licenses shall be conducted at locations and times specified by commercial operator license examination managers. (See § 13.209 of this chapter). When the FCC conducts these examinations, they shall take place at locations and times specified by the FCC.


[58 FR 9124, Feb. 19, 1993]


§ 0.489 [Reserved]

§ 0.491 Application for exemption from compulsory ship radio requirements.

Applications for exemption filed under the provisions of sections 352(b) or 383 of the Communications Act; Regulation 4, chapter I of the Safety Convention; Regulation 5, chapter IV of the Safety Convention; or Article IX of the Great Lakes Agreement, must be filed as a waiver request using the procedures specified in § 0.482 of this part. Emergency requests must be filed via the Universal Licensing System or at the Federal Communications Commission, Office of the Secretary.


[71 FR 15618, Mar. 29, 2006]


§ 0.493 Non-radio common carrier applications.

All such applications shall be filed at the Commission’s offices in Washington, DC.


[28 FR 12413, Nov. 22, 1963. Redesignated at 32 FR 10578, July 19, 1967]


Subpart D – Mandatory Declassification of National Security Information


Authority:Secs. 4(i), 303(r), Communications Act of 1934, as amended (47 U.S.C. 154(i) and 303(r)).


Source:47 FR 53377, Nov. 26, 1982, unless otherwise noted.

§ 0.501 General.

Executive Order 12356 requires that information relating to national security be protected against unauthorized disclosure as long as required by national security considerations. The Order also provides that all information classified under Executive Order 12356 or predecessor orders be subject to a review for declassification upon receipt of a request made by a United States citizen or permanent resident alien, a Federal agency, or a state or local government.


§ 0.502 Purpose.

This subpart prescribes the procedures to be followed in submitting requests, processing such requests, appeals taken from denials of declassification requests and fees and charges.


§ 0.503 Submission of requests for mandatory declassification review.

(a) Requests for mandatory review of national security information shall be in writing, addressed to the Managing Director, and reasonably describe the information sought with sufficient particularity to enable Commission personnel to identify the documents containing that information and be reasonable in scope.


(b) When the request is for information originally classified by the Commission, the Managing Director shall assign the request to the appropriate bureau or office for action.


(c) Requests related to information, either derivatively classified by the Commission or originally classified by another agency, shall be forwarded, together with a copy of the record, to the originating agency. The transmittal may contain a recommendation for action.


§ 0.504 Processing requests for declassification.

(a) Responses to mandatory declassification review requests shall be governed by the amount of search and review time required to process the request. A final determination shall be made within one year from the date of receipt of the request, except in unusual circumstances.


(b) Upon a determination by the bureau or office that the requested material originally classified by the Commission no longer warrants protection, it shall be declassified and made available to the requester, unless withholding is otherwise authorized under law.


(c) If the information may not be declassified or released in whole or in part, the requester shall be notified as to the reasons for the denial, given notice of the right to appeal the denial to the Classification Review Committee, and given notice that such an appeal must be filed within 60 days of the date of denial in order to be considered.


(d) The Commission’s Classification Review Committee, consisting of the Managing Director (Chairman), the General Counsel or his designee, and the Chief, Internal Review and Security Division, shall have authority to act, within 30 days, upon all appeals regarding denials of requests for mandatory declassification of Commission-originated classifications. The Committee shall be authorized to overrule previous determinations in whole or in part when, in its judgment, continued classification is no longer required. If the Committee determines that continued classification is required under the criteria of the Order, the requester shall be promptly notified and advised that an application for review may be filed with the Commission pursuant to 47 CFR 1.115.


§ 0.505 Fees and charges.

(a) The Commission has designated a contractor to make copies of Commission records and offer them for sale (See § 0.465).


(b) An hourly fee is charged for recovery of the direct costs of searching for requested documents (See § 0.466).


§ 0.506 FOIA and Privacy Act requests.

Requests for declassification that are submitted under the provisions of the Freedom of Information Act, as amended, (See § 0.461), of the Privacy Act of 1974, (See § 0.554) shall be processed in accordance with the provisions of those Acts.


Subpart E – Privacy Act Regulations


Authority:Secs. 4, 303, 49 Stat. as amended, 1066, 1082 (47 U.S.C. 154, 303).


Source:40 FR 44512, Sept. 26, 1975, unless otherwise noted.

§ 0.551 Purpose and scope; definitions.

(a) The purpose of this subpart is to implement the Privacy Act of 1974, 5 U.S.C. 552(a), and to protect the rights of the individual in the accuracy and privacy of information concerning him which is contained in Commission records. The regulations contained herein cover any group of records under the Commission’s control from which information about individuals is retrievable by the name of an individual or by some other personal identifier.


(b) In this subpart:


(1) Individual means a citizen of the United States or an alien lawfully admitted for permanent residence;


(2) Record means any item, collection or grouping of information about an individual that is maintained by the Commission, including but not limited to, such individual’s education, financial transactions, medical history, and criminal or employment history, and that contains such individual’s name, or the identifying number, symbol, or other identifying particular assigned to the individual, such as a finger or voice print or a photograph.


(3) System of Records means a group of records under the control of the Commission from which information is retrievable by the name of the individual or by some identifying number, symbol, or other identifying particular assigned to the individual;


(4) Routine Use means, with respect to the disclosure of a record, the use of such record for a purpose which is compatible with the purpose for which it was collected;


(5) System Manager means the Commission official responsible for the storage, maintenance, safekeeping, and disposal of a system of records.


(Secs. 4(i) and 303(n), Communications Act of 1934, as amended, 47 U.S.C. 154(i) and 303(n); 47 CFR 0.231(d))

[40 FR 44512, Sept. 26, 1975, as amended at 49 FR 13368, Apr. 4, 1984]


§ 0.552 Notice identifying Commission systems of records.

The Commission publishes in the Federal Register upon establishment or revision a notice of the existence and character of the system of records, including for each system of records:


(a) The name and location of the system;


(b) The categories of individuals on whom records are maintained in the system;


(c) The categories of records maintained in the system;


(d) Each routine use of the records contained in the system, including the categories of users and the purposes of such use;


(e) The policies and practices of the agency regarding storage, retrievability, access controls, retention, and disposal of the records;


(f) The title and business address of the system manager;


(g) The address of the agency office to which inquiries should be addressed and the addresses of locations at which the individual may inquire whether a system contains records pertaining to himself;


(h) The agency procedures whereby an individual can be notified how access can be gained to any record pertaining to that individual contained in a system of records, and the procedure for correcting or contesting its contents; and


(i) The categories of sources of records in the system.


(Secs. 4(i) and 303(n), Communications Act of 1934, as amended, 47 U.S.C. 154(i) and 303(n); 47 CFR 0.231(d))

[40 FR 44512, Sept. 26, 1975, as amended at 49 FR 13368, Apr. 4, 1984]


§ 0.553 New uses of information.

Before establishing a new routine use of a system of records, the Commission will publish a notice in the Federal Register of its intention to do so, and will provide at least 30 days for public comment on such use. The notice will contain:


(a) The name of the system of records for which the new routine use is to be established;


(b) The authority for the system;


(c) The categories of records maintained;


(d) The proposed routine use(s); and


(e) The categories of recipients for each proposed routine use.


§ 0.554 Procedures for requests pertaining to individual records in a system of records.

(a) Upon request, the Commission will notify individuals as to whether it maintains information about them in a system of records and, subject to the provisons of § 0.555(b), will disclose the substance of such information to that individual. In order to properly request notification or access to record information, reference must be made to the Notice described in § 0.552. A table of contents, which is alphabetized by bureau or office, precedes the system descriptions and allows members of the public to easily identify record systems of interest to them. An individual may inquire into information contained in any or all systems of records described in the Notice. However, each inquiry shall be limited to information from systems located within a single bureau or office and shall be addressed to that bureau or office.


(b) Reasonable identification is required of all individuals making requests pursuant to paragraph (a) of this section in order to assure that disclosure of any information is made to the proper person.


(1) Individuals who choose to register a request for information in person may verify their identity by showing any two of the following: social security card; drivers license; employee identification card; medicare card; birth certificate; bank credit card; or other positive means of identification. Documents incorporating a picture and/or signature of the individual shall be produced if possible. If an individual cannot provide suitable documentation for identification, that individual will be required to sign an identity statement stipulating that knowingly or willfully seeking or obtaining access to records about another person under false pretenses is punishable by a fine of up to $5,000.



Note:

An individual’s refusal to disclose his social security number shall not constitute cause in and of itself, for denial of a request.


(2) All requests for record information sent by mail shall be signed by the requestor and shall include his printed name, current address and telephone number (if any). Commission officials receiving such requests will attempt to verify the identity of the requestor by comparing his or her signature to those in the record. If the record contains no signatures and if positive identification cannot be made on the basis of other information submitted, the requestor will be required to sign an identity statement and stipulate that knowingly or willfully seeking or obtaining access to records about another person under false pretense is punishable by a fine of up to $5,000.


(3) If positive identification cannot be made on the basis of the information submitted, and if data in the record is so sensitive that unauthorized access could cause harm or embarrassment to the individual to whom the record pertains, the Commission reserves the right to deny access to the record pending the production of additional more satisfactory evidence of identity.



Note:

The Commission will require verification of identity only where it has determined that knowledge of the existence of record information or its substance is not subject to the public disclosure requirements of the Freedom of Information Act, 5 U.S.C. 552, as amended.


(c) All requests for notification of the existence of record information or for access to such information shall be delivered to the business address of the system manager responsible for the system of records in question, except that requests relating to official personnel records shall be addressed to the Associate Managing Director – Personnel Management. Such addresses can be found in the Federal Register Notice described in § 0.552.


(d) A written acknowledgement of receipt of a request for notification and/or access will be provided within 10 days (excluding Saturdays, Sundays, and legal public holidays) to the individual making the request. Such an acknowledgement may, if necessary, request any additional information needed to locate a record. A search of all systems of records identified in the individual’s request will be made to determine if any records pertaining to the individual are contained therein, and the individual will be notified of the search results as soon as the search has been completed. Normally, a request will be processed and the individual notified of the search results within 30 days (excluding Saturdays, Sundays, and legal holidays) from the date the inquiry is received. However, in some cases, as where records have to be recalled from Federal Record Centers, notification may be delayed. If it is determined that a record pertaining to the individual making the request does exist, the notification will state approximately when the record will be available for personal review. No separate acknowledgement is required if the request can be processed and the individual notified of the search results within the ten-day period.


(Secs. 4(i) and 303(n), Communications Act of 1934, as amended, 47 U.S.C. 154(i) and 303(n); 47 CFR 0.231(d))

[40 FR 44512, Sept. 26, 1975, as amended at 49 FR 13368, Apr. 4, 1984]


§ 0.555 Disclosure of record information to individuals.

(a) Individuals having been notified that the Commission maintains a record pertaining to them in a system of records may request access to such record in one of three ways: by in person inspection at the system location; by transfer of the record to a nearer location; or by mail.


(1) Individuals who wish to review their records at the system location must do so during regular Commission business hours (8:00 a.m.-4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday). For personal and administrative convenience, individuals are urged to arrange to review a record by appointment. Preferences as to specific dates and times can be made by writing or calling the system manager responsible for the system of records in question at least two days in advance of the desired appointment date, and by providing a telephone number where the individual can be reached during the day in case the appointment must be changed. Verification of identity is required as in § 0.554(b)(1) before access will be granted an individual appearing in person. Individuals may be accompanied by a person of his or her own choosing when reviewing a record. However, in such cases, a written statement authorizing discussion of their record in the presence of a Commission representative having physical custody of the records.


(2) Individuals may request that copies of records be sent directly to them. In such cases, individuals must verify their identity as described in § 0.554(b)(2) and provide an accurate return mailing address or email address. Records shall be sent only to that address.


(b) The disclosure of record information under this section is subject to the following limitations:


(1) Records containing medical information pertaining to an individual are subject to individual access under this section unless, in the judgment of the system manager having custody of the records after consultation with a medical doctor, access to such record information could have an adverse impact on the individual. In such cases, a copy of the record will be delivered to a medical doctor named by the individual.


(2) Classified material, investigative material compiled for law enforcement purposes, investigatory material compiled solely for determining suitability for Federal employment or access to classified information, and certain testing or examination material shall be removed from the records to the extent permitted in the Privacy Act of 1974, 5 U.S.C. 552(a). Section 0.561 of this subpart sets forth the systems of records maintained by the Commission which are either totally or partially exempt from disclosure under this subparagraph.


(c) No fee will be imposed if the number of pages of records requested is 25 or less. Requests involving more than 25 pages shall be submitted to the duplicating contractor (see § 0.456(a)).


(d) The provisions of this section in no way give an individual the right to access any information compiled in reasonable anticipation of a civil action or proceeding.


(e) In the event that a determination is made denying an individual access to records pertaining to that individual for any reason, such individual may either:


(1) Seek administrative review of the adverse determination. Such a request shall be in writing and should be addressed to the system manager who made the initial decision. In addition, the request for review shall state specifically why the initial decision should be reversed.


(2) Seek judicial relief in the district courts of the United States pursuant to paragraph (g)(1)(B) of the Act.


(Secs. 4(i) and 303(n), Communications Act of 1934, as amended, 47 U.S.C. 154(i) and 303(n); 47 CFR 0.231(d))

[40 FR 44512, Sept. 26, 1975, as amended at 40 FR 58858, Dec. 19, 1975; 49 FR 13369, Apr. 4, 1984; 80 FR 53749, Sept. 8, 2015]


§ 0.556 Request to correct or amend records.

(a) An individual may request the amendment of information contained in their record. Except as otherwise provided in this paragraph (a), the request to amend should be submitted in writing to the system manager responsible for the records. Requests to amend the official personnel records of active FCC employees should be submitted to the Associate Managing Director – Human Resources Management, at the address indicated in § 0.401(a). Requests to amend official personnel records of former FCC employees should be sent to the Assistant Director for Work Force Information, Compliance and Investigations Group, Office of Personnel Management, 1900 E Street, NW., Washington, D.C. 20415. Any request to amend should contain as a minimum:


(1) The identity verification information required by § 0.554(b)(2) and the information needed to locate the record as required by § 0.554(a).


(2) A brief description of the item or items of information to be amended; and


(3) The reason for the requested change.


(b) A written acknowledgement of the receipt of a request to amend a record will be provided within 10 days (excluding Saturdays, Sundays, and legal public holidays) to the individual requesting the amendment. Such an acknowledgement may, if necessary, request any additional information needed to make a determination. There will be no acknowledgement if the request can be reviewed, processed, and the individual notified of compliance or denial within the 10 day period.


(c) The responsible system manager, or in the case of official personnel records of active FCC employees, the Associate Managing Director – Personnel Management, shall (normally within 30 days) take one of the following actions regarding a request to amend:


(1) If the system manager agrees that an amendment to the record is warranted, the system manager shall:


(i) So advise the individual in writing;


(ii) Correct the record in compliance with the individual’s request; and


(iii) If an accounting of disclosures has been made, advise all previous recipients of the fact that the record has been corrected and of the substance of the correction.


(2) If the system manager, after an initial review, does not agree that all or any portion of the record merits amendment, the system manager shall:


(i) Notify the individual in writing of such refusal to amend and the reasons therefore;


(ii) Advise the individual that further administrative review of the initial decision by the full Commission may be sought pursuant to the procedures set forth in § 0.557. (In cases where the request to amend involves official personnel records, review is available exclusively from the Assistant Director for Work Force Information, Compliance and Investigations Group, Office of Personnel Management, Washington, DC 20415; and


(iii) Inform the individual of the procedures for requesting Commission review pursuant to § 0.557.


(d) In reviewing a record in response to a request to amend, the system manager shall assess the accuracy, relevance, timeliness, or completeness of the record in light of each data element placed into controversy and the use of the record in making decisions that could possibly affect the individual. Moreover, the system manager shall ajudge the merits of any request to delete information based on whether or not the information in controversy is both relevant and necessary to accomplish a statutory purpose required of the Commission by law or executive order of the President.


(Secs. 4(i) and 303(n), Communications Act of 1934, as amended, 47 U.S.C. 154(i) and 303(n); 47 CFR 0.231(d))

[40 FR 44512, Sept. 26, 1975, as amended at 45 FR 39850, June 12, 1980; 49 FR 13369, Apr. 4, 1984; 65 FR 58466, Sept. 29, 2000; 85 FR 64405, Oct. 13, 2020]


§ 0.557 Administrative review of an initial decision not to amend a record.

(a) Individuals have 30 days from the date of the determination not to amend a record consistent with their request to seek further administrative review by the full Commisison. Such a request shall be in writing and should be addressed to either the system manager who made the initial adverse decision, or, in the case of official personnel records of active FCC employees, to the Assistant Director for Work Force Information, Compliance and Investigations Group, Office of Personnel Management, Washington, DC 20415. Any request for administrative review must:


(1) Clearly identify the questions presented for review (e.g., whether the record information in question is, in fact, accurate; whether information subject to a request to delete is relevant and necessary to the purpose for which it is maintained);


(2) Specify with particularity why the decision reached by the system manager is erroneous or inequitable; and


(3) Clearly state how the record should be amended or corrected.


(b) The Commission shall conduct an independent review of the record in controversy using the standards of review set out in § 0.556(d). It may seek such additional information as is necessary to make its determination. Final administrative review shall be completed not later than 30 days (excluding Saturdays, Sundays and legal public holidays) from the date on which the individual requests such review unless the Chairman determines that a fair and equitable review cannot be made within the 30 day period. In such event, the individual will be informed in writing of the reasons for the delay and the approximate date on which the review is expected to be completed.


(c) If upon review of the record in controversy the Commission agrees with the individual that the requested amendment is warranted, the Commission will proceed in accordance with § 0.556(c)(1) (i) through (iii).


(d) If after the review, the Commission also refuses to amend the record as requested, it shall:


(1) Notify the individual in writing of its refusal and the reasons therefore;


(2) Advise the individual that a concise statement of the reasons for disagreeing with the decision of the Commisison may be filed;


(3) Inform the individual:


(i) That such a statement should be signed and addressed to the system manager having custody of the record in question;


(ii) That the statement will be made available to any one to whom the record is subsequently disclosed together with, at the Commission’s discretion, a summary of its reasons for refusing to amend the record; and


(iii) That prior recipients of the record will be provided a copy of the statement of dispute to the extent that an accounting of such disclosures is maintained; and


(4) Advise the individual that judicial review of the Commisison’s decision not to amend the record in any district court of the United States is available.


(Secs. 4(i) and 303(n), Communications Act of 1934, as amended, 47 U.S.C. 154(i) and 303(n); 47 CFR 0.231(d))

[40 FR 44512, Sept. 26, 1975, as amended at 45 FR 39850, June 12, 1980; 49 FR 13369, Apr. 4, 1984]


§ 0.558 Advice and assistance.

(a) Individuals who have questions regarding the procedures contained in this subpart for gaining access to a particular system of records or for contesting the contents of a record, either administratively or judicially, should write or call the Privacy Liaison Officer located at the address indicated in § 0.401(a), Attn: Office of General Counsel.


(b) Individuals who request clarification of the Notice described in § 0.552 or who have questions concerning the characterization of specific systems of records as set forth in § 0.552, should write or call the Privacy Liaison Officer at the address indicated in § 0.401(a), directed to the Performance Evaluation and Records Management.


[85 FR 64405, Oct. 13, 2020]


§ 0.559 Disclosure of disputed information to persons other than the individual to whom it pertains.

If the Commission determines not to amend a record consistent with an individual’s request, and if the individual files a statement of disagreement pursuant to § 0.557(d)(2), the Commission shall clearly annotate the record so that the disputed portion becomes apparent to anyone who may subsequently have access to, use or disclose the record. A copy of the individual’s statement of disagreement shall accompany any subsequent disclosure of the record. In addition, the Commission may include a brief summary of its reasons for not amending the record when disclosing the record. Such statements become part of the individual’s record for granting access, but are not subject to the amendment procedures of § 0.556.


§ 0.560 Penalty for false representation of identity.

Any individual who knowingly and willfully requests or obtains under false pretenses any record concerning an individual from any system of records maintained by the Commission shall be guilty of a misdemeanor and subject to a fine of not more than $5,000.


§ 0.561 Exemptions.

The following systems of records are totally or partially exempt from subsections (c)(3), (d), (e)(1), (e)(4) (G), (H), and (I), and (f) of the Privacy Act of 1974, 5 U.S.C. 552(a), and from §§ 0.554 through 0.557 of this subpart:


(a) System name. Radio Operator Records – FCC/FOB-1. Parts of this system of records are exempt pursuant to Section (k)(2) of the Act because they contain investigatory material compiled solely for law enforcement purposes.


(b) System name. Violators File (records kept on individuals who have been subjects of FCC field enforcement actions) – FCC/FOB-2. Parts of this system of records are EXEMPT because they are maintained as a protective service for individuals described in section 3056 of title 18, and because they are necessary for Commission employees to perform their duties, pursuant to sections (k) (1), (2), and (3) of the Act.


(c) System name. Attorney Misconduct Files – FCC/OGC-2. This system of records is exempt pursuant to section 3(k)(2) of the Act because it is maintained for law enforcement purposes.


(d) System name. Licensees or Unlicensed Persons Operating Radio Equipment Improperly – FCC. Parts of this system of records are exempt pursuant to section 3(k)(2) of the Act because they embody investigatory material compiled solely for law enforcement purposes.


(e) System name. Personnel Investigation Records – FCC/Central-6. Parts of these systems of records are exempt because they emobdy investigatory material pursuant to sections 3(k)(2) and 3(k)(5) of the Act as applicable.


(f) System name. Criminal Investigative Files – FCC/OIG-1. Compiled for the purpose of criminal investigations. This system of records is exempt pursuant to section (j)(2) of the Act because the records contain investigatory material compiled for criminal law enforcement purposes.


(g) System name. General Investigative Files – FCC/OIG-2. Compiled for law enforcement purposes. This system of records is exempt pursuant to section (k)(2) of the Act because the records contain investigatory material compiled for law enforcement purposes.


(Secs. 4(i) and 303(n), Communications Act of 1934, as amended, 47 U.S.C. 154(i) and 303(n); 47 CFR 0.231(d))

[40 FR 44512, Sept. 26, 1975, as amended at 49 FR 13369, Apr. 4, 1984; 58 FR 11549, Feb. 26, 1993]


Subpart F – Meeting Procedures


Authority:Secs. 4, 303, 48 Stat., as amended, 1066, 1082; (47 U.S.C. 154, 303).


Source:42 FR 12867, Mar. 7, 1977, unless otherwise noted.

§ 0.601 Definitions.

For purposes of this section:


(a) The term agency means:


(1) The Commission,


(2) A board of Commissioners (see § 0.212),


(3) The Telecommunications Committee (see § 0.215), and


(4) Any other group of Commissioners hereafter established by the Commission on a continuing or ad hoc basis and authorized to act on behalf of the Commission.


(b) The term meeting means the deliberations among a quorum of the Commission, a Board of Commissioners, or a quorum of a committee of Commissioners, where such deliberations determine or result in the joint conduct or disposition of official agency business, except that the term does not include deliberations to decide whether to announce a meeting with less than seven days notice, or whether a meeting should be open or closed. (The term includes conference telephone calls, but does not include the separate consideration of Commission business by Commissioners.) For purposes of this subpart each item on the agenda of a meeting is considered a meeting or a portion of a meeting.


[42 FR 12867, Mar. 7, 1977, as amended at 48 FR 56391, Dec. 21, 1983; 64 FR 2149, Jan. 13, 1999]


§ 0.602 Open meetings.

(a) All meetings shall be conducted in accordance with the provisions of this subpart.


(b) Except as provided in § 0.603, every portion of every meeting shall be open to public observation. Observation does not include participation or disruptive conduct by observers, and persons engaging in such conduct will be removed from the meeting.


(c) The right of the public to observe open meetings does not alter those rules in this chapter which relate to the filing of motions, pleadings, or other documents. Unless such pleadings conform to the other procedural requirements of this chapter, pleadings based upon comments or discussions at open meetings, as a general rule, will not become part of the official record, will receive no consideration, and no further action by the Commission will be taken thereon.


(d) Deliberations, discussions, comments or observations made during the course of open meetings do not themselves constitute action of the Commission. Comments made by Commissioners may be advanced for purposes of discussion and may not reflect the ultimate position of a Commissioner.


[42 FR 12867, Mar. 7, 1977, as amended at 45 FR 63491, Sept. 25, 1980]


§ 0.603 Bases for closing a meeting to the public.

Except where the agency finds that the public interest requires otherwise, an agency or advisory committee meeting may be closed to the public, and information pertaining to such meetings which would otherwise be disclosed to the public under § 0.605 may be withheld, if the agency determines that an open meeting or the disclosure of such information is likely to:


(a) Disclose matters that: (1) Are specifically authorized under criteria established by executive order to be kept secret in the interest of national defense or foreign policy, and (2) are in fact properly classified pursuant to such executive order (see § 0.457(a));


(b) Relate solely to the internal personnel rules and practices of an agency (see § 0.457(b));


(c) Disclose matters specifically exempted from disclosure, by statute (other than the Freedom of Information Act, 5 U.S.C. 552). Provided, That such statute (1) requires that the matters be withheld from the public in such a manner as to leave no discretion on the issue, or (2) establishes particular criteria for withholding or refers to particular types of matters to be withheld (see § 0.457(c));


(d) Disclose trade secrets and commercial or financial information obtained from a person and privileged or confidential (see § 0.457(d));


(e) Involve accusing any person of a crime or formally censuring any person;


(f) Disclose information of a personal nature where disclosure would constitute a clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy (see § 0.457(f));


(g) Disclose investigatory records compiled for law enforcement purposes, or information which if written would be contained in such records, but only to the extent that the production of such records or information would (1) interfere with enforcement proceedings, (2) deprive a person of a right to a fair trial or an impartial adjudication, (3) constitute an unwarranted invasion of personal privacy, (4) disclose the identity of a confidential source, and, in the case of a record compiled by a criminal law enforcement authority in the course of a criminal investigation, or by an agency conducting a lawful national security intelligence investigation, confidential information furnished only by the confidential source, (5) disclose investigative techniques and procedures, or (6) endanger the life or physical safety of law enforcement personnel;


(h) Disclose information contained in or related to examination, operating, or condition reports prepared by, on behalf of, or for the use of an agency responsible for the regulation or supervision of financial institutions;


(i) Disclose information the premature disclosure of which would be likely to significantly frustrate implementation of a proposed agency action, except where the agency has already disclosed to the public the content or nature of the disclosed action, or where the agency is required by law to make such disclosure on its own initiative prior to taking final agency action on such proposal; or


(j) Specifically concern the agency’s issuance of a subpoena, or the agency’s participation in a civil action or proceeding, an action in a foreign court or international tribunal, or an arbitration, or the initiation, conduct, or disposition by the agency of a particular case of formal agency adjudication pursuant to the procedures specified in 5 U.S.C. 554 or otherwise involving a determination on the record after opportunity for hearing.


§ 0.605 Procedures for announcing meetings.

(a) Notice of all open and closed meetings will be given.


(b) The meeting notice will be submitted for publication in the Federal Register on or before the date on which the announcement is made. Copies will be available in the Press and News Media Division on the day the announcement is made. Copies will also be attached to “FCC Actions Alert”, which is mailed to certain individuals and groups who have demonstrated an interest in representing the public in Commission proceedings.


(c)(1) If the agency staff determines that a meeting should be open to the public, it will, at least one week prior to the meeting, announce in writing the time, place and subject matter of the meeting, that it is to be open to the public, and the name and phone number of the Chief, Press and News Media Division, who has been designated to respond to requests for information about the meeting.


(2) If the staff determines that a meeting should be closed to the public, it will refer the matter to the General Counsel, who will certify that there is (or is not) a legal basis for closing the meeting to the public. Following action by the General Counsel, the matter may be referred to the agency for a vote on the question of closing the meeting (See § 0.606).


(d)(1) If the question of closing a meeting is considered by the agency but no vote is taken, the agency will, at least one week prior to the meeting, announce in writing the time, place and subject matter of the meeting, that it is to be open to the public, and the name and phone number of the Chief, Press and News Media Division.


(2) If a vote is taken, the agency will, in the same announcement and within one day after the vote, make public the vote of each participating Commissioner.


(3) If the vote is to close the meeting, the agency will also, in that announcement, set out a full written explanation of its action, including the applicable provision(s) of § 0.603, and a list of persons expected to attend the meeting, including Commission personnel, together with their affiliations. The Commissioners, their assistants, the General Counsel, the Executive Director, the Chief, Press and News Media Division, and the Secretary are expected to attend all Commission meetings. The appropriate Bureau or Office Chief and Division Chief are expected to attend meetings which relate to their responsibilities (see subpart A of this part).


(4) If a meeting is closed, the agency may omit from the announcement information usually included, if and to the extent that it finds that disclosure would be likely to have any of the consequences listed in § 0.603.


(e) If the prompt and orderly conduct of agency business requires that a meeting be held less than one week after the announcement of the meeting, or before that announcement, the agency will issue the announcement at the earliest practicable time. In addition to other information, the announcement will contain the vote of each member of the agency who participated in the decision to give less than seven days notice, and the particular reason for that decision.


(f) If, after announcement of a meeting, the time or place of the meeting is changed or the meeting is cancelled, the agency will announce the change at the earliest practicable time.


(g) If the subject matter or the determination to open or close a meeting is changed, the agency will publicly announce the change and the vote of each member at the earliest practicable time. The announcement will contain a finding that agency business requires the change and that no earlier announcement of the change was possible.


(47 U.S.C. 154, 155, 303)

[42 FR 12867, Mar. 7, 1977, as amended at 44 FR 12425, Mar. 7, 1979; 44 FR 70472, Dec. 7, 1979; 64 FR 2150, Jan. 13, 1999]


§ 0.606 Procedures for closing a meeting to the public.

(a) For every meeting closed under § 0.603, the General Counsel will certify that there is a legal basis for closing the meeting to the public and will state each relevant provision of § 0.603. The staff of the agency will refer the matter to the General Counsel for certification before it is referred to the agency for a vote on closing the meeting. Certifications will be retained in a public file in the Office of the Secretary.


(b) The agency will vote on the question of closing a meeting.


(1) If a member of the agency requests that a vote be taken;


(2) If the staff recommends that a meeting be closed and one member of the agency requests that a vote be taken; or


(3) If a person whose interests may be directly affected by a meeting requests the agency to close the meeting for any of the reasons listed in § 0.603 (e), (f) or (g), or if any person requests that a closed meeting be opened, and a member of the agency requests that a vote be taken. (Such requests may be filed with the Secretary at any time prior to the meeting and should briefly state the reason(s) for opening or closing the meeting. To assure that they reach the Commission for consideration prior to the meeting, they should be submitted at the earliest practicable time and should be called specifically to the attention of the Secretary – in person or by telephone. It will be helpful if copies of the request are furnished to the members of the agency and the General Counsel. The filing of a request shall not stay the holding of a meeting.)


(c) A meeting will be closed to the public pursuant to § 0.603 only by vote of a majority of the entire membership of the agency. The vote of each participating Commissioner will be recorded. No Commissioner may vote by proxy.


(d) A separate vote will be taken before any meeting is closed to the public and before any information is withheld from the meeting notice. However, a single vote may be taken with respect to a series of meetings proposed to be closed to the public, and with respect to information concerning such series of meetings (a vote on each question, if both are presented), if each meeting involves the same particular matters and is scheduled to be held no later than 30 days after the first meeting in the series.


(e) Less than seven days notice may be given only by majority vote of the entire membership of the agency.


(f) The subject matter or the determination to open or close a meeting will be changed only if a majority of the entire membership of the agency determines by recorded vote that agency business so requires and that no earlier announcement of the change was possible.


[42 FR 12867, Mar. 7, 1977, as amended at 71 FR 15618, Mar. 29, 2006]


§ 0.607 Transcript, recording or minutes; availability to the public.

(a) The agency will maintain a complete transcript or electronic recording adequate to record fully the proceedings of each meeting closed to the public, except that in a meeting closed pursuant to paragraph (h) or (j) of § 0.603, the agency may maintain minutes in lieu of a transcript or recording. Such minutes shall fully and clearly describe all matters discussed and shall provide a full and accurate summary of any actions taken, and the reasons therefor, including a description of each of the views expressed on any item and the record of any roll call vote. All documents considered in connection with any item will be identified in the minutes.


(b) A public file of transcripts (or minutes) of closed meetings will be maintained in the Office of the Secretary. The transcript of a meeting will be placed in that file if, after the meeting, the responsible Bureau or Office Chief determines, in light of the discussion, that the meeting could have been open to the public or that the reason for withholding information concerning the matters discussed no longer pertains. Transcripts placed in the public file are available for inspection under § 0.460. Other transcripts, and separable portions thereof which do not contain information properly withheld under § 0.603, may be made available for inspection under § 0.461. When a transcript, or portion thereof, is made available for inspection under § 0.461, it will be placed in the public file. Copies of transcripts may be obtained from the duplicating contractor pursuant to § 0.465(a). There will be no search or transcription fee. Requests for inspection or copies of transcripts shall specify the date of the meeting, the name of the agenda and the agenda item number; this information will appear in the notice of the meeting. Pursuant to § 0.465(c)(3), the Commission will make copies of the transcript available directly, free of charge, if it serves the financial or regulatory interests of the United States.


(c) The Commission will maintain a copy of the transcript or minutes for a period of at least two years after the meeting, or until at least one year after conclusion of the proceeding to which the meeting relates, whichever occurs later.


(d) The Commissioner presiding at the meeting will prepare a statement setting out the time and place of the meeting, the names of persons other than Commission personnel who were present at the meeting, and the names of Commission personnel who participated in the discussion. These statements will be retained in a public file in the Minute and Rules Branch, Office of the Secretary.


[42 FR 12867, Mar. 7, 1977, as amended at 71 FR 15618, Mar. 29, 2006]


Subpart G – Intergovernmental Communication


Source:66 FR 8091, Jan. 29, 2001, unless otherwise noted.

§ 0.701 Intergovernmental Advisory Committee.

(a) Purpose and term of operations. The Intergovernmental Advisory Committee (IAC) is established to facilitate intergovernmental communication between municipal, county, state and tribal governments and the Federal Communications Commission. The IAC will commence operations with its first meeting convened under this section and is authorized to undertake its mission for a period of two years from that date. At his discretion, the Chairman of the Federal Communications Commission may extend the IAC’s term of operations for an additional two years, for which new members will be appointed as set forth in paragraph (b) of this section. Pursuant to Section 204(b) of the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act of 1995, 2 U.S.C. 1534(b), the IAC is not subject to, and is not required to follow, the procedures set forth in the Federal Advisory Committee Act. 5 U.S.C., App. 2 (1988).


(b) Membership. The IAC will be composed of 30 members (or their designated employees), with a minimum of: Four elected municipal officials (city mayors and city council members); two elected county officials (county commissioners or council members); one elected or appointed local government attorney; one elected state executive (governor or lieutenant governor); three elected state legislators; one elected or appointed public utilities or public service commissioner; and three elected or appointed Native American tribal representatives. The Chairman of the Commission will appoint members through an application process initiated by a Public Notice, and will select a Chairman and a Vice Chairman to lead the IAC. The Chairman of the Commission will also appoint members to fill any vacancies and may replace an IAC member, at his discretion, using the appointment process. Members of the IAC are responsible for travel and other incidental expenses incurred while on IAC business and will not be reimbursed by the Commission for such expenses.


(c) Location and frequency of meetings. The IAC will meet in Washington, DC four times a year. Members must attend a minimum of fifty percent of the IAC’s yearly meetings and may be removed by the Chairman of the IAC for failure to comply with this requirement.


(d) Participation in IAC meetings. Participation at IAC meetings will be limited to IAC members or employees designated by IAC members to act on their behalf. Members unable to attend an IAC meeting should notify the IAC Chairman a reasonable time in advance of the meeting and provide the name of the employee designated on their behalf. With the exception of Commission staff and individuals or groups having business before the IAC, no other persons may attend or participate in an IAC meeting.


(e) Commission support and oversight. The Chairman of the Commission, or Commissioner designated by the Chairman for such purpose, will serve as a liaison between the IAC and the Commission and provide general oversight for its activities. The IAC will also communicate directly with the Chief, Consumer & Governmental Affairs Bureau, concerning logistical assistance and staff support, and such other matters as are warranted.


[68 FR 52519, Sept. 4, 2003, as amended at 83 FR 733, Jan. 8, 2018]


PART 1 – PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE


Authority:47 U.S.C. chs. 2, 5, 9, 13; 28 U.S.C. 2461 note, unless otherwise noted.



Editorial Note:Nomenclature changes to part 1 appear at 63 FR 54077, Oct. 8, 1998.

Subpart A – General Rules of Practice and Procedure


Source:28 FR 12415, Nov. 22, 1963, unless otherwise noted.

General

§ 1.1 Proceedings before the Commission.

The Commission may on its own motion or petition of any interested party hold such proceedings as it may deem necessary from time to time in connection with the investigation of any matter which it has power to investigate under the law, or for the purpose of obtaining information necessary or helpful in the determination of its policies, the carrying out of its duties or the formulation or amendment of its rules and regulations. For such purposes it may subpena witnesses and require the production of evidence. Procedures to be followed by the Commission shall, unless specifically prescribed in this part, be such as in the opinion of the Commission will best serve the purposes of such proceedings.


(Sec. 403, 48 Stat. 1094; 47 U.S.C. 403)


§ 1.2 Declaratory rulings.

(a) The Commission may, in accordance with section 5(d) of the Administrative Procedure Act, on motion or on its own motion issue a declaratory ruling terminating a controversy or removing uncertainty.


(b) The bureau or office to which a petition for declaratory ruling has been submitted or assigned by the Commission should docket such a petition within an existing or current proceeding, depending on whether the issues raised within the petition substantially relate to an existing proceeding. The bureau or office then should seek comment on the petition via public notice. Unless otherwise specified by the bureau or office, the filing deadline for responsive pleadings to a docketed petition for declaratory ruling will be 30 days from the release date of the public notice, and the default filing deadline for any replies will be 15 days thereafter.


[76 FR 24390, May 2, 2011]


§ 1.3 Suspension, amendment, or waiver of rules.

The provisions of this chapter may be suspended, revoked, amended, or waived for good cause shown, in whole or in part, at any time by the Commission, subject to the provisions of the Administrative Procedure Act and the provisions of this chapter. Any provision of the rules may be waived by the Commission on its own motion or on petition if good cause therefor is shown.



Cross Reference:

See subpart C of this part for practice and procedure involving rulemaking.


§ 1.4 Computation of time.

(a) Purpose. The purpose of this rule section is to detail the method for computing the amount of time within which persons or entities must act in response to deadlines established by the Commission. It also applies to computation of time for seeking both reconsideration and judicial review of Commission decisions. In addition, this rule section prescribes the method for computing the amount of time within which the Commission must act in response to deadlines established by statute, a Commission rule, or Commission order.


(b) General Rule – Computation of Beginning Date When Action is Initiated by Commission or Staff. Unless otherwise provided, the first day to be counted when a period of time begins with an action taken by the Commission, an Administrative Law Judge or by members of the Commission or its staff pursuant to delegated authority is the day after the day on which public notice of that action is given. See § 1.4(b) (1)-(5) of this section. Unless otherwise provided, all Rules measuring time from the date of the issuance of a Commission document entitled “Public Notice” shall be calculated in accordance with this section. See § 1.4(b)(4) of this section for a description of the “Public Notice” document. Unless otherwise provided in § 1.4 (g) and (h) of this section, it is immaterial whether the first day is a “holiday.” For purposes of this section, the term public notice means the date of any of the following events: See § 1.4(e)(1) of this section for definition of “holiday.”


(1) For all documents in notice and comment and non-notice and comment rulemaking proceedings required by the Administrative Procedure Act, 5 U.S.C. 552, 553, to be published in the Federal Register, including summaries thereof, the date of publication in the Federal Register.



Note to paragraph (b)(1):

Licensing and other adjudicatory decisions with respect to specific parties that may be associated with or contained in rulemaking documents are governed by the provisions of § 1.4(b)(2).



Example 1:A document in a Commission rule making proceeding is published in the Federal Register on Wednesday, May 6, 1987. Public notice commences on Wednesday, May 6, 1987. The first day to be counted in computing the beginning date of a period of time for action in response to the document is Thursday, May 7, 1987, the “day after the day” of public notice.


Example 2:Section 1.429(e) provides that when a petition for reconsideration is timely filed in proper form, public notice of its filing is published in the Federal Register. Section 1.429(f) provides that oppositions to a petition for reconsideration shall be filed within 15 days after public notice of the petition’s filing in the Federal Register. Public notice of the filing of a petition for reconsideration is published in the Federal Register on Wednesday, June 10, 1987. For purposes of computing the filing period for an opposition, the first day to be counted is Thursday, June 11, 1987, which is the day after the date of public notice. Therefore, oppositions to the reconsideration petition must be filed by Thursday, June 25, 1987, 15 days later.

(2) For non-rulemaking documents released by the Commission or staff, including the Commission’s section 271 determinations, 47 U.S.C. 271, the release date.



Example 3:The Chief, Mass Media Bureau, adopts an order on Thursday, April 2, 1987. The text of that order is not released to the public until Friday, April 3, 1987. Public notice of this decision is given on Friday, April 3, 1987. Saturday, April 4, 1987, is the first day to be counted in computing filing periods.

(3) For rule makings of particular applicability, if the rule making document is to be published in the Federal Register and the Commission so states in its decision, the date of public notice will commence on the day of the Federal Register publication date. If the decision fails to specify Federal Register publication, the date of public notice will commence on the release date, even if the document is subsequently published in the Federal Register. See Declaratory Ruling, 51 FR 23059 (June 25, 1986).



Example 4:An order establishing an investigation of a tariff, and designating issues to be resolved in the investigation, is released on Wednesday, April 1, 1987, and is published in the Federal Register on Friday, April 10, 1987. If the decision itself specifies Federal Register publication, the date of public notice is Friday, April 10, 1987. If this decision does not specify Federal Register publication, public notice occurs on Wednesday, April 1, 1987, and the first day to be counted in computing filing periods is Thursday, April 2, 1987.

(4) If the full text of an action document is not to be released by the Commission, but a descriptive document entitled “Public Notice” describing the action is released, the date on which the descriptive “Public Notice” is released.



Example 5:At a public meeting the Commission considers an uncontested application to transfer control of a broadcast station. The Commission grants the application and does not plan to issue a full text of its decision on the uncontested matter. Five days after the meeting, a descriptive “Public Notice” announcing the action is publicly released. The date of public notice commences on the day of the release date.


Example 6:A Public Notice of petitions for rule making filed with the Commission is released on Wednesday, September 2, 1987; public notice of these petitions is given on September 2, 1987. The first day to be counted in computing filing times is Thursday, September 3, 1987.

(5) If a document is neither published in the Federal Register nor released, and if a descriptive document entitled “Public Notice” is not released, the date appearing on the document sent (e.g., mailed, telegraphed, etc.) to persons affected by the action.



Example 7:A Bureau grants a license to an applicant, or issues a waiver for non-conforming operation to an existing licensee, and no “Public Notice” announcing the action is released. The date of public notice commences on the day appearing on the license mailed to the applicant or appearing on the face of the letter granting the waiver mailed to the licensee.

(c) General Rule – Computation of Beginning Date When Action is Initiated by Act, Event or Default. Commission procedures frequently require the computation of a period of time where the period begins with the occurrence of an act, event or default and terminates a specific number of days thereafter. Unless otherwise provided, the first day to be counted when a period of time begins with the occurrence of an act, event or default is the day after the day on which the act, event or default occurs.



Example 8:Commission Rule § 21.39(d) requires the filing of an application requesting consent to involuntary assignment or control of the permit or license within thirty days after the occurrence of the death or legal disability of the licensee or permittee. If a licensee passes away on Sunday, March 1, 1987, the first day to be counted pursuant to § 1.4(c) is the day after the act or event. Therefore, Monday, March 2, 1987, is the first day of the thirty day period specified in § 21.39(d).

(d) General Rule – Computation of Terminal Date. Unless otherwise provided, when computing a period of time the last day of such period of time is included in the computation, and any action required must be taken on or before that day.



Example 9:Paragraph 1.4(b)(1) of this section provides that “public notice” in a notice and comment rule making proceeding begins on the day of Federal Register publication. Paragraph 1.4(b) of this section provides that the first day to be counted in computing a terminal date is the “day after the day” on which public notice occurs. Therefore, if the commission allows or requires an action to be taken 20 days after public notice in the Federal Register, the first day to be counted is the day after the date of the Federal Register publication. Accordingly, if the Federal Register document is published on Thursday, July 23, 1987, public notice is given on Thursday, July 23, and the first day to be counted in computing a 20 day period is Friday, July 24, 1987. The 20th day or terminal date upon which action must be taken is Wednesday, August 12, 1987.

(e) Definitions for purposes of this section:


(1) The term holiday means Saturday, Sunday, officially recognized Federal legal holidays and any other day on which the Commission’s Headquarters are closed and not reopened prior to 5:30 p.m., or on which a Commission office aside from Headquarters is closed (but, in that situation, the holiday will apply only to filings with that particular office). For example, a regularly scheduled Commission business day may become a holiday with respect to the entire Commission if Headquarters is closed prior to 5:30 p.m. due to adverse weather, emergency or other closing. Additionally, a regularly scheduled Commission business day may become a holiday with respect to a particular Commission office aside from Headquarters if that office is closed prior to 5:30 p.m. due to similar circumstances.



Note to paragraph (e)(1):

As of August 1987, officially recognized Federal legal holidays are New Year’s Day, January 1; Martin Luther King’s Birthday, third Monday in January; Washington’s Birthday, third Monday in February; Memorial Day, last Monday in May; Independence Day, July 4; Labor Day, first Monday in September; Columbus Day, second Monday in October; Veterans Day, November 11; Thanksgiving Day, fourth Thursday in November; Christmas Day, December 25. If a legal holiday falls on Saturday or Sunday, the holiday is taken, respectively, on the preceding Friday or the following Monday. In addition, January 20, (Inauguration Day) following a Presidential election year is a legal holiday in the metropolitan Washington, DC area. If Inauguration Day falls on Sunday, the next succeeding day is a legal holiday. See 5 U.S.C. 6103; Executive Order No. 11582, 36 FR 2957 (Feb. 11, 1971). The determination of a “holiday” will apply only to the specific Commission location(s) designated as on “holiday” on that particular day.


(2) The term business day means all days, including days when the Commission opens later than the time specified in Rule § 0.403, which are not “holidays” as defined above.


(3) The term filing period means the number of days allowed or prescribed by statute, rule, order, notice or other Commission action for filing any document with the Commission. It does not include any additional days allowed for filing any document pursuant to paragraphs (g), (h) and (j) of this section.


(4) The term filing date means the date upon which a document must be filed after all computations of time authorized by this section have been made.


(f) Except as provided in § 0.401(b) of this chapter, all petitions, pleadings, tariffs or other documents not required to be accompanied by a fee and which are hand-carried must be tendered for filing in complete form, as directed by the Commission’s rules, with the Office of the Secretary before 4 p.m., at the address indicated in 47 CFR 0.401(a). The Secretary will determine whether a tendered document meets the pre-7:00 p.m. deadline. Documents filed electronically pursuant to § 1.49(f) must be received by the Commission’s electronic filing system before midnight. Applications, attachments and pleadings filed electronically in the Universal Licensing System (ULS) pursuant to § 1.939(b) must be received before midnight on the filing date. Media Bureau applications and reports filed electronically pursuant to § 73.3500 of this chapter must be received by the electronic filing system before midnight on the filing date.


(g) Unless otherwise provided (e.g., §§ 1.773 and 76.1502(e)(1) of this chapter), if the filing period is less than 7 days, intermediate holidays shall not be counted in determining the filing date.



Example 10:A reply is required to be filed within 5 days after the filing of an opposition in a license application proceeding. The opposition is filed on Wednesday, June 10, 1987. The first day to be counted in computing the 5 day time period is Thursday, June 11, 1987. Saturday and Sunday are not counted because they are holidays. The document must be filed with the Commission on or before the following Wednesday, June 17, 1987.

(h) If a document is required to be served upon other parties by statute or Commission regulation and the document is in fact served by mail (see § 1.47(f)), and the filing period for a response is 10 days or less, an additional 3 days (excluding holidays) will be allowed to all parties in the proceeding for filing a response. This paragraph (h) shall not apply to documents filed pursuant to § 1.89, § 1.315(b) or § 1.316. For purposes of this paragraph (h) service by facsimile or by electronic means shall be deemed equivalent to hand delivery.



Example 11:A reply to an opposition for a petition for reconsideration must be filed within 7 days after the opposition is filed. 47 CFR 1.106(h). The rules require that the opposition be served on the person seeking reconsideration. 47 CFR 1.106(g). If the opposition is served on the party seeking reconsideration by mail and the opposition is filed with the Commission on Monday, November 9, 1987, the first day to be counted is Tuesday, November 10, 1987 (the day after the day on which the event occurred, § 1.4(c)), and the seventh day is Monday, November 16. An additional 3 days (excluding holidays) is then added at the end of the 7 day period, and the reply must be filed no later than Thursday, November 19, 1987.


Example 12:Assume that oppositions to a petition in a particular proceeding are due 10 days after the petition is filed and must be served on the parties to the proceeding. If the petition is filed on October 28, 1993, the last day of the filing period for oppositions is Sunday, November 7. If service is made by mail, the opposition is due three days after November 7, or Wednesday, November 10.

(i) If both paragraphs (g) and (h) of this section are applicable, make the paragraph (g) computation before the paragraph (h) computation.



Example 13:Section 1.45(b) requires the filing of replies to oppositions within five days after the time for filing oppositions has expired. If an opposition has been filed on the last day of the filing period (Friday, July 10, 1987), and was served on the replying party by mail, § 1.4(i) of this section specifies that the paragraph (g) computation should be made before the paragraph (h) computation. Therefore, since the specified filing period is less than seven days, paragraph (g) is applied first. The first day of the filing period is Monday, July 13, 1987, and Friday, July 17, 1987 is the fifth day (the intervening weekend was not counted). Paragraph (h) is then applied to add three days for mailing (excluding holidays). That period begins on Monday, July 20, 1987. Therefore, Wednesday, July 22, 1987, is the date by which replies must be filed, since the intervening weekend is again not counted.

(j) Unless otherwise provided (e.g. § 76.1502(e) of this chapter) if, after making all the computations provided for in this section, the filing date falls on a holiday, the document shall be filed on the next business day. See paragraph (e)(1) of this section. If a rule or order of the Commission specifies that the Commission must act by a certain date and that date falls on a holiday, the Commission action must be taken by the next business day.



Example 14:The filing date falls on Friday, December 25, 1987. The document is required to be filed on the next business day, which is Monday, December 28, 1987.

(k) Where specific provisions of part 1 conflict with this section, those specific provisions of part 1 are controlling. See, e.g.,§§ 1.45(d), 1.773(a)(3) and 1.773(b)(2). Additionally, where § 76.1502(e) of this chapter conflicts with this section, those specific provisions of § 76.1502 are controlling. See e.g. 47 CFR 76.1502(e).


(l) When Commission action is required by statute to be taken by a date that falls on a holiday, such action may be taken by the next business day (unless the statute provides otherwise).


[52 FR 49159, Dec. 30, 1987; 53 FR 44196, Nov. 2, 1988, as amended at 56 FR 40567, 40568, Aug. 15, 1991; 58 FR 17529, Apr. 5, 1993; 61 FR 11749, Mar. 22, 1996; 62 FR 26238, May 13, 1997; 63 FR 24124, May 1, 1998; 64 FR 27201, May 19, 1999; 64 FR 60725, Nov. 8, 1999; 65 FR 46109, July 27, 2000; 67 FR 13223, Mar. 21, 2002; 71 FR 15618, Mar. 29, 2006; 74 FR 68544, Dec. 28, 2009; 76 FR 24390, May 2, 2011; 76 FR 70908, Nov. 16, 2011; 85 FR 39075, June 30, 2020]


§ 1.5 Mailing address furnished by licensee.

(a) Each licensee shall furnish the Commission with an address to be used by the Commission in serving documents or directing correspondence to that licensee. Unless any licensee advises the Commission to the contrary, the address contained in the licensee’s most recent application will be used by the Commission for purposes of this paragraph (a). For licensees in the Wireless Radio Services, each licensee shall also furnish the Commission with an email address to be used by Commission for serving documents or directing correspondence to that licensee; correspondence sent to such email address is deemed to have been served on the licensee.


(b) The licensee is responsible for making any arrangements which may be necessary in his particular circumstances to assure that Commission documents or correspondence delivered to this address will promptly reach him or some person authorized by him to act in his behalf.


[28 FR 12415, Nov. 22, 1963, as amended at 85 FR 85527, Dec. 29, 2020]


§ 1.6 Availability of station logs and records for Commission inspection.

(a) Station records and logs shall be made available for inspection or duplication at the request of the Commission or its representative. Such logs or records may be removed from the licensee’s possession by a Commission representative or, upon request, shall be mailed by the licensee to the Commission by either registered mail, return receipt requested, or certified mail, return receipt requested. The return receipt shall be retained by the licensee as part of the station records until such records or logs are returned to the licensee. A receipt shall be furnished when the logs or records are removed from the licensee’s possession by a Commission representative and this receipt shall be retained by the licensee as part of the station records until such records or logs are returned to the licensee. When the Commission has no further need for such records or logs, they shall be returned to the licensee. The provisions of this rule shall apply solely to those station logs and records which are required to be maintained by the provisions of this chapter.


(b) Where records or logs are maintained as the official records of a recognized law enforcement agency and the removal of the records from the possession of the law enforcement agency will hinder its law enforcement activities, such records will not be removed pursuant to this section if the chief of the law enforcement agency promptly certifies in writing to the Federal Communications Commission that removal of the logs or records will hinder law enforcement activities of the agency, stating insofar as feasible the basis for his decision and the date when it can reasonably be expected that such records will be released to the Federal Communications Commission.


§ 1.7 Documents are filed upon receipt.

Unless otherwise provided in this Title, by Public Notice, or by decision of the Commission or of the Commission’s staff acting on delegated authority, pleadings and other documents are considered to be filed with the Commission upon their receipt at the location designated by the Commission.


[60 FR 16055, Mar. 29, 1995]


§ 1.8 Withdrawal of papers.

The granting of a request to dismiss or withdraw an application or a pleading does not authorize the removal of such application or pleading from the Commission’s records.


§ 1.10 Transcript of testimony; copies of documents submitted.

In any matter pending before the Commission, any person submitting data or evidence, whether acting under compulsion or voluntarily, shall have the right to retain a copy thereof, or to procure a copy of any document submitted by him, or of any transcript made of his testimony, upon payment of the charges therefor to the person furnishing the same, which person may be designated by the Commission. The Commission itself shall not be responsible for furnishing the copies.


[29 FR 14406, Oct. 20, 1964]


§ 1.12 Notice to attorneys of Commission documents.

In any matter pending before the Commission in which an attorney has appeared for, submitted a document on behalf of or been otherwise designated by a person, any notice or other written communication pertaining to that matter issued by the Commission and which is required or permitted to be furnished to the person will be communicated to the attorney, or to one of such attorneys if more than one is designated. If direct communication with the party is appropriate, a copy of such communication will be mailed to the attorney; or for matters involving Wireless Radio Services, emailed to the attorney instead of mailed.


[85 FR 85527, Dec. 29, 2020]


§ 1.13 Filing of petitions for review and notices of appeals of Commission orders.

(a) Petitions for review involving a judicial lottery pursuant to 28 U.S.C. 2112(a). (1) This paragraph pertains to each party filing a petition for review in any United States court of appeals of a Commission Order pursuant to 47 U.S.C. 402(a) and 28 U.S.C. 2342(1), that wishes to avail itself of procedures established for selection of a court in the case of multiple petitions for review of the same Commission action, pursuant to 28 U.S.C. 2112(a). Each such party shall, within ten days after the issuance of that order, serve on the Office of General Counsel, by email to the address [email protected], a copy of its petition for review as filed and date-stamped by the court of appeals within which it was filed. Such copies of petitions for review must be received by the Office of General Counsel by 5:30 p.m. Eastern Time on the tenth day of the filing period. A return email from the Office of General Counsel acknowledging receipt of the petition for review will constitute proof of filing. Upon receipt of any copies of petitions for review according to these procedures, the Commission shall follow the procedures established in section 28 U.S.C. 2112(a) to determine the court in which to file the record in that case.


(2) If a party wishes to avail itself of procedures established for selection of a court in the case of multiple petitions for review of the same Commission action, pursuant to 28 U.S.C. 2112(a), but is unable to use email to effect service as described in paragraph (a)(1) of this section, it shall instead, within ten days after the issuance of the order on appeal, serve a copy of its petition for review in person on the General Counsel in the Office of General Counsel, located at the FCC’s main office address indicated in 47 CFR 0.401(a).

Only parties not represented by counsel may use this method. Such parties must telephone the Litigation Division of the Office of General Counsel beforehand to make arrangements at 202-418-1740. Parties are advised to call at least one day before service must be effected.


(3) Computation of time of the ten-day period for filing copies of petitions for review of a Commission order shall be governed by Rule 26 of the Federal Rules of Appellate Procedure. The date of issuance of a Commission order for purposes of filing copies of petitions for review shall be the date of public notice as defined in § 1.4(b) of the Commission’s Rules, 47 CFR 1.4(b).


(b) Notices of appeal pursuant to 47 U.S.C. 402(b). Copies of notices of appeals filed pursuant to 47 U.S.C. 402(b) shall be served upon the General Counsel. The FCC consents to – and encourages – service of such notices by email to the address [email protected]



Note:

For administrative efficiency, the Commission requests that any petitioner seeking judicial review of Commission actions pursuant to 47 U.S.C. 402(a) serve a copy of its petition on the General Counsel regardless of whether it wishes to avail itself of the procedures for multiple appeals set forth in 47 U.S.C. 2112(a). Parties are encouraged to serve such notice by email to the address [email protected]


[81 FR 40821, June 23, 2016, as amended at 85 FR 64405, Oct. 13, 2020]


§ 1.14 Citation of Commission documents.

The appropriate reference to the FCC Record shall be included as part of the citation to any document that has been printed in the Record. The citation should provide the volume, page number and year, in that order (e.g., 1 FCC Rcd. 1 (1986). Older documents may continue to be cited to the FCC Reports, first or second series, if they were printed in the Reports (e.g., 1 FCC 2d 1 (1965)).


[51 FR 45890, Dec. 23, 1986]


§ 1.16 Unsworn declarations under penalty of perjury in lieu of affidavits.

Any document to be filed with the Federal Communications Commission and which is required by any law, rule or other regulation of the United States to be supported, evidenced, established or proved by a written sworn declaration, verification, certificate, statement, oath or affidavit by the person making the same, may be supported, evidenced, established or proved by the unsworn declaration, certification, verification, or statement in writing of such person, except that, such declaration shall not be used in connection with: (a) A deposition, (b) an oath of office, or (c) an oath required to be taken before a specified official other than a notary public. Such declaration shall be subscribed by the declarant as true under penalty of perjury, and dated, in substantially the following form:


(1) If executed without the United States:



“I declare (or certify, verify, or state) under penalty of perjury under the laws of the United States of America that the foregoing is true and correct. Executed on (date).

(Signature)”.

(2) If executed within the United States, its territories, possessions, or commonwealths:



“I declare (or certify, verify, or state) under penalty of perjury that the foregoing is true and correct. Executed on (date).

(Signature)”.

[48 FR 8074, Feb. 25, 1983]


§ 1.17 Truthful and accurate statements to the Commission.

(a) In any investigatory or adjudicatory matter within the Commission’s jurisdiction (including, but not limited to, any informal adjudication or informal investigation but excluding any declaratory ruling proceeding) and in any proceeding to amend the FM or Television Table of Allotments (with respect to expressions of interest) or any tariff proceeding, no person subject to this rule shall;


(1) In any written or oral statement of fact, intentionally provide material factual information that is incorrect or intentionally omit material information that is necessary to prevent any material factual statement that is made from being incorrect or misleading; and


(2) In any written statement of fact, provide material factual information that is incorrect or omit material information that is necessary to prevent any material factual statement that is made from being incorrect or misleading without a reasonable basis for believing that any such material factual statement is correct and not misleading.


(b) For purpose of paragraph (a) of this section, “persons subject to this rule” shall mean the following:


(1) Any applicant for any Commission authorization;


(2) Any holder of any Commission authorization, whether by application or by blanket authorization or other rule;


(3) Any person performing without Commission authorization an activity that requires Commission authorization;


(4) Any person that has received a citation or a letter of inquiry from the Commission or its staff, or is otherwise the subject of a Commission or staff investigation, including an informal investigation;


(5) In a proceeding to amend the FM or Television Table of Allotments, any person filing an expression of interest; and


(6) To the extent not already covered in this paragraph (b), any cable operator or common carrier.


[68 FR 15098, Mar. 28, 2003]


§ 1.18 Administrative Dispute Resolution.

(a) The Commission has adopted an initial policy statement that supports and encourages the use of alternative dispute resolution procedures in its administrative proceedings and proceedings in which the Commission is a party, including the use of regulatory negotiation in Commission rulemaking matters, as authorized under the Administrative Dispute Resolution Act and Negotiated Rulemaking Act.


(b) In accordance with the Commission’s policy to encourage the fullest possible use of alternative dispute resolution procedures in its administrative proceedings, procedures contained in the Administrative Dispute Resolution Act, including the provisions dealing with confidentiality, shall also be applied in Commission alternative dispute resolution proceedings in which the Commission itself is not a party to the dispute.


[56 FR 51178, Oct. 10, 1991, as amended at 57 FR 32181, July 21, 1992]


§ 1.19 Use of metric units required.

Where parenthesized English units accompany metric units throughout this chapter, and the two figures are not precisely equivalent, the metric unit shall be considered the sole requirement; except, however, that the use of metric paper sizes is not currently required, and compliance with the English unit shall be considered sufficient when the Commission form requests that data showing compliance with that particular standard be submitted in English units.


[58 FR 44893, Aug. 25, 1993]


Parties, Practitioners, and Witnesses

§ 1.21 Parties.

(a) Any party may appear before the Commission and be heard in person or by attorney.


(b) The appropriate Bureau Chief(s) of the Commission shall be deemed to be a party to every adjudicatory proceeding (as defined in the Administrative Procedure Act) without the necessity of being so named in the order designating the proceeding for hearing.


(c) When, in any proceeding, a pleading is filed on behalf of either the General Counsel or the Chief Engineer, he shall thereafter be deemed a party to the proceeding.


(d) Except as otherwise expressly provided in this chapter, a duly authorized corporate officer or employee may act for the corporation in any matter which has not been designated for hearing and, in the discretion of the presiding officer, may appear and be heard on behalf of the corporation in a hearing proceeding.


[28 FR 12415, Nov. 22, 1963, as amended at 37 FR 8527, Apr. 28, 1972; 44 FR 39180, July 5, 1979; 51 FR 12616, Apr. 14, 1986; 85 FR 63172, Oct. 6, 2020]


§ 1.22 Authority for representation.

Any person, in a representative capacity, transacting business with the Commission, may be required to show his authority to act in such capacity.


§ 1.23 Persons who may be admitted to practice.

(a) Any person who is a member in good standing of the bar of the Supreme Court of the United States or of the highest court of any state, territory or the District of Columbia, and who is not under any final order of any authority having power to suspend or disbar an attorney in the practice of law within any state, territory or the District of Columbia that suspends, enjoins, restrains, disbars, or otherwise restricts him or her in the practice of law, may represent others before the Commission.


(b) When such member of the bar acting in a representative capacity appears in person or signs a paper in practice before the Commission, his personal appearance or signature shall constitute a representation to the Commission that, under the provisions of this chapter and the law, he is authorized and qualified to represent the particular party in whose behalf he acts. Further proof of authority to act in a representative capacity may be required.


[28 FR 12415, Nov. 22, 1963, as amended at 57 FR 38285, Aug. 24, 1992]


§ 1.24 Censure, suspension, or disbarment of attorneys.

(a) The Commission may censure, suspend, or disbar any person who has practiced, is practicing or holding himself out as entitled to practice before it if it finds that such person:


(1) Does not possess the qualifications required by § 1.23;


(2) Has failed to conform to standards of ethical conduct required of practitioners at the bar of any court of which he is a member;


(3) Is lacking in character or professional integrity; and/or


(4) Displays toward the Commission or any of its hearing officers conduct which, if displayed toward any court of the United States or any of its Territories or the District of Columbia, would be cause for censure, suspension, or disbarment.


(b) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, before any member of the bar of the Commission shall be censured, suspended, or disbarred, charges shall be preferred by the Commission against such practitioner, and he or she shall be afforded an opportunity to be heard thereon.


(c) Upon receipt of official notice from any authority having power to suspend or disbar an attorney in the practice of law within any state, territory, or the District of Columbia which demonstrates that an attorney practicing before the Commission is subject to an order of final suspension (not merely temporary suspension pending further action) or disbarment by such authority, the Commission may, without any preliminary hearing, enter an order temporarily suspending the attorney from practice before it pending final disposition of a disciplinary proceeding brought pursuant to § 1.24(a)(2), which shall afford such attorney an opportunity to be heard and directing the attorney to show cause within thirty days from the date of said order why identical discipline should not be imposed against such attorney by the Commission.


(d) Allegations of attorney misconduct in Commission proceedings shall be referred under seal to the Office of General Counsel. Pending action by the General Counsel, the decision maker may proceed with the merits of the matter but in its decision may make findings concerning the attorney’s conduct only if necessary to resolve questions concerning an applicant and may not reach any conclusions regarding the ethical ramifications of the attorney’s conduct. The General Counsel will determine if the allegations are substantial, and, if so, shall immediately notify the attorney and direct him or her to respond to the allegations. No notice will be provided to other parties to the proceeding. The General Counsel will then determine what further measures are necessary to protect the integrity of the Commission’s administrative process, including but not limited to one or more of the following:


(1) Recommending to the Commission the institution of a proceeding under paragraph (a) of this section;


(2) Referring the matter to the appropriate State, territorial, or District of Columbia bar; or


(3) Consulting with the Department of Justice.


[28 FR 12415, Nov. 22, 1963, as amended at 57 FR 38285, Aug. 24, 1992; 60 FR 53277, Oct. 13, 1995]


§ 1.25 [Reserved]

§ 1.26 Appearances.

Rules relating to appearances are set forth in §§ 1.87, 1.91, 1.221, and 1.703.


§ 1.27 Witnesses; right to counsel.

Any individual compelled to appear in person in any Commission proceeding may be accompanied, represented, and advised by counsel as provided in this section. (Regulations as to persons seeking voluntarily to appear and give evidence are set forth in § 1.225.)


(a) Counsel may advise his client in confidence, either upon his own initiative or that of the witness, before, during, and after the conclusion of the proceeding.


(b) Counsel for the witness will be permitted to make objections on the record, and to state briefly the basis for such objections, in connection with any examination of his client.


(c) At the conclusion of the examination of his client, counsel may ask clarifying questions if in the judgment of the presiding officer such questioning is necessary or desirable in order to avoid ambiguity or incompleteness in the responses previously given.


(d) Except as provided by paragraph (c) of this section, counsel for the witness may not examine or cross-examine any witness, or offer documentary evidence, unless authorized by the Commission to do so.


(5 U.S.C. 555)

[29 FR 12775, Sept. 10, 1964]


§§ 1.28-1.29 [Reserved]

Pleadings, Briefs, and Other Papers

§ 1.41 Informal requests for Commission action.

Except where formal procedures are required under the provisions of this chapter, requests for action may be submitted informally. Requests should set forth clearly and concisely the facts relied upon, the relief sought, the statutory and/or regulatory provisions (if any) pursuant to which the request is filed and under which relief is sought, and the interest of the person submitting the request. In application and licensing matters pertaining to the Wireless Radio Services, as defined in § 1.904, such requests must be submitted electronically, via the ULS, and the request must include an email address for receiving electronic service. See § 1.47(d).


[85 FR 85528, Dec. 29, 2020]


§ 1.42 Applications, reports, complaints; cross-reference.

(a) Rules governing applications and reports are contained in subparts D, E, and F of this part.


(b) Special rules governing complaints against common carriers arising under the Communications Act are set forth in subpart E of this part.


(c) Rules governing the FCC Registration Number (FRN) are contained in subpart W of this part.


[28 FR 12415, Nov. 22, 1963, as amended at 66 FR 47895, Sept. 14, 2001]


§ 1.43 Requests for stay; cross-reference.

General rules relating to requests for stay of any order or decision are set forth in §§ 1.41, 1.44(e), 1.45 (d) and (e), and 1.298(a). See also §§ 1.102, 1.106(n), and 1.115(h).


§ 1.44 Separate pleadings for different requests.

(a) Requests requiring action by the Commission shall not be combined in a pleading with requests for action by an administrative law judge or by any person or persons acting pursuant to delegated authority.


(b) Requests requiring action by an administrative law judge shall not be combined in a pleading with requests for action by the Commission or by any person or persons acting pursuant to delegated authority.


(c) Requests requiring action by any person or persons pursuant to delegated authority shall not be combined in a pleading with requests for action by any other person or persons acting pursuant to delegated authority.


(d) Pleadings which combine requests in a manner prohibited by paragraph (a), (b), or (c) of this section may be returned without consideration to the person who filed the pleading.


(e) Any request to stay the effectiveness of any decision or order of the Commission shall be filed as a separate pleading. Any such request which is not filed as a separate pleading will not be considered by the Commission.



Note:

Matters which are acted on pursuant to delegated authority are set forth in subpart B of part 0 of this chapter. Matters acted on by the hearing examiner are set forth in § 0.341.


§ 1.45 Pleadings; filing periods.

Except as otherwise provided in this chapter, pleadings in Commission proceedings shall be filed in accordance with the provisions of this section. Pleadings associated with licenses, applications, waivers, and other documents in the Wireless Radio Services must be filed via the ULS, and persons other than applicants or licensees filing pleadings in ULS must provide an email address to receive electronic service. See § 1.47(d).


(a) Petitions. Petitions to deny may be filed pursuant to § 1.939 of this part.


(b) Oppositions. Oppositions to any motion, petition, or request may be filed within 10 days after the original pleading is filed.


(c) Replies. The person who filed the original pleading may reply to oppositions within 5 days after the time for filing oppositions has expired. The reply shall be limited to matters raised in the oppositions, and the response to all such matters shall be set forth in a single pleading; separate replies to individual oppositions shall not be filed.


(d) Requests for temporary relief; shorter filing periods. Oppositions to a request for stay of any order or to a request for other temporary relief shall be filed within 7 days after the request is filed. Replies to oppositions should not be filed and will not be considered. The provisions of § 1.4(h) shall not apply in computing the filing date for oppositions to a request for stay or for other temporary relief.


(e) Ex parte disposition of certain pleadings. As a matter of discretion, the Commission may rule ex parte upon requests for continuances and extensions of time, requests for permission to file pleadings in excess of the length prescribed in this chapter, and requests for temporary relief, without waiting for the filing of oppositions or replies.



Note:

Where specific provisions contained in part 1 conflict with this section, those specific provisions are controlling. See, in particular, §§ 1.294(c), 1.298(a), and 1.773.


[28 FR 12415, Nov. 22, 1963, as amended at 33 FR 7153, May 15, 1968; 45 FR 64190, Sept. 29, 1980; 54 FR 31032, July 26, 1989; 54 FR 37682, Sept. 12, 1989; 63 FR 68919, Dec. 14, 1998; 85 FR 85528, Dec. 29, 2020]


§ 1.46 Motions for extension of time.

(a) It is the policy of the Commission that extensions of time shall not be routinely granted.


(b) Motions for extension of time in which to file responses to petitions for rulemaking, replies to such responses, comments filed in response to notice of proposed rulemaking, replies to such comments and other filings in rulemaking proceedings conducted under Subpart C of this part shall be filed at least 7 days before the filing date. If a timely motion is denied, the responses and comments, replies thereto, or other filings need not be filed until 2 business days after the Commission acts on the motion. In emergency situations, the Commission will consider a late-filed motion for a brief extension of time related to the duration of the emergency and will consider motions for acceptance of comments, reply comments or other filings made after the filing date.


(c) If a motion for extension of time in which to make filings in proceedings other than notice and comment rule making proceedings is filed less than 7 days prior to the filing day, the party filing the motion shall (in addition to serving the motion on other parties) orally notify other parties and Commission staff personnel responsible for acting on the motion that the motion has been (or is being) filed.


[39 FR 43301, Dec. 12, 1974, as amended at 41 FR 9550, Mar. 5, 1976; 41 FR 14871, Apr. 8, 1976; 42 FR 28887, June 6, 1977; 63 FR 24124, May 1, 1998]


§ 1.47 Service of documents and proof of service.

(a) Where the Commission or any person is required by statute or by the provisions of this chapter to serve any document upon any person, service shall (in the absence of specific provisions in this chapter to the contrary) be made in accordance with the provisions of this section. Documents that are required to be served by the Commission in agency proceedings (i.e., not in the context of judicial proceedings, Congressional investigations, or other proceedings outside the Commission) may be served in electronic form. Documents associated with licenses, applications, waivers, and other requests in the Wireless Radio Services that are required to be served by the Commission in agency proceedings must be served in electronic form. In proceedings involving a large number of parties, and unless otherwise provided by statute, the Commission may satisfy its service obligation by issuing a public notice that identifies the documents required to be served and that explains how parties can obtain copies of the documents.



Note to paragraph (a):

Paragraph (a) of this section grants staff the authority to decide upon the appropriate format for electronic notification in a particular proceeding, consistent with any applicable statutory requirements. The Commission expects that service by public notice will be used only in proceedings with 20 or more parties.


(b) Where any person is required to serve any document filed with the Commission, service shall be made by that person or by his representative on or before the day on which the document is filed.


(c) Commission counsel who formally participate in any proceeding shall be served in the same manner as other persons who participate in that proceeding. The filing of a document with the Commission does not constitute service upon Commission counsel.


(d) Except in formal complaint proceedings against common carriers under §§ 1.720 through 1.740 and proceedings related to the Wireless Radio Services under subpart F of this part, documents may be served upon a party, his attorney, or other duly constituted agent by delivering a copy or by mailing a copy to the last known address. Documents that are required to be served must be served in paper form, even if documents are filed in electronic form with the Commission, unless the party to be served agrees to accept service in some other form. Petitions, pleadings, and other documents associated with licensing matters in the Wireless Radio Services must be served electronically upon a party, his attorney, or other duly constituted agent by delivering a copy by email to the email address listed in the Universal Licensing System (ULS). If a filer is not an applicant or licensee, the document must include an email address for receiving electronic service.


(e) Delivery of a copy pursuant to this section means handing it to the party, his attorney, or other duly constituted agent; or leaving it with the clerk or other person in charge of the office of the person being served; or, if there is no one in charge of such office, leaving it in a conspicuous place therein; or, if such office is closed or the person to be served has no office, leaving it at his dwelling house or usual place of abode with some person of suitable age and discretion then residing therein. For pleadings, petitions, and other documents associated with licensing matters in the Wireless Radio Services, delivery of a copy pursuant to this section is complete by sending it by email to the email addresses listed in the ULS, or to the email address of the applicant’s or licensee’s attorney provided in a pleading or other document served on the filer.


(f) Service by mail is complete upon mailing. Service by email is complete upon sending to the email address listed in the ULS for a particular license, application, or filing.


(g) Proof of service, as provided in this section, shall be filed before action is taken. The proof of service shall show the time and manner of service, and may be by written acknowledgement of service, by certificate of the person effecting the service, or by other proof satisfactory to the Commission. Failure to make proof of service will not affect the validity of the service. The Commission may allow the proof to be amended or supplied at any time, unless to do so would result in material prejudice to a party. Proof of electronic service shall show the email address of the person making the service, in addition to that person’s residence or business address; the date and time of the electronic service; the name and email address of the person served; and that the document was served electronically.


(h) Every common carrier and interconnected VoIP provider, as defined in § 54.5 of this chapter, and non-interconnected VoIP provider, as defined in § 64.601(a)(15) of this chapter and with interstate end-user revenues that are subject to contribution to the Telecommunications Relay Service Fund, that is subject to the Communications Act of 1934, as amended, shall designate an agent in the District of Columbia, and may designate additional agents if it so chooses, upon whom service of all notices, process, orders, decisions, and requirements of the Commission may be made for and on behalf of such carrier, interconnected VoIP provider, or non-interconnected VoIP provider in any proceeding before the Commission. Every international section 214 authorization holder must also designate an agent in the District of Columbia who is a U.S. citizen or lawful U.S. permanent resident pursuant to § 63.18(q)(1)(iii) of this chapter. Such designation shall include, for the carrier, interconnected VoIP provider, or non-interconnected VoIP provider and its designated agents, a name, business address, telephone or voicemail number, facsimile number, and, if available, internet email address. Such carrier, interconnected VoIP provider, or non-interconnected VoIP provider shall additionally list any other names by which it is known or under which it does business, and, if the carrier, interconnected VoIP provider, or non-interconnected VoIP provider is an affiliated company, the parent, holding, or management company. Within thirty (30) days of the commencement of provision of service, such carrier, interconnected VoIP provider, or non-interconnected VoIP provider shall file such information with the Chief of the Enforcement Bureau’s Market Disputes Resolution Division. Such carriers, interconnected VoIP providers, and non-interconnected VoIP providers may file a hard copy of the relevant portion of the Telecommunications Reporting Worksheet, as delineated by the Commission in the Federal Register, to satisfy the requirement in the preceding sentence. Each Telecommunications Reporting Worksheet filed annually by a common carrier, interconnected VoIP provider, or non-interconnected VoIP provider must contain a name, business address, telephone or voicemail number, facsimile number, and, if available, internet email address for its designated agents, regardless of whether such information has been revised since the previous filing. Carriers, interconnected VoIP providers, and non-interconnected VoIP providers must notify the Commission within one week of any changes in their designation information by filing revised portions of the Telecommunications Reporting Worksheet with the Chief of the Enforcement Bureau’s Market Disputes Resolution Division. A paper copy of this designation list shall be maintained in the Office of the Secretary of the Commission. Service of any notice, process, orders, decisions or requirements of the Commission may be made upon such carrier, interconnected VoIP provider, or non-interconnected VoIP provider by leaving a copy thereof with such designated agent at his office or usual place of residence. If such carrier, interconnected VoIP provider, or non-interconnected VoIP provider fails to designate such an agent, service of any notice or other process in any proceeding before the Commission, or of any order, decision, or requirement of the Commission, may be made by posting such notice, process, order, requirement, or decision in the Office of the Secretary of the Commission.


[28 FR 12415, Nov. 22, 1963, as amended at 40 FR 55644, Dec. 1, 1975; 53 FR 11852, Apr. 11, 1988; 63 FR 1035, Jan. 7, 1998; 63 FR 24124, May 1, 1998; 64 FR 41330, July 30, 1999; 64 FR 60725, Nov. 8, 1999; 71 FR 38796, July 10, 2006; 76 FR 24390, May 2, 2011; 76 FR 65969, Oct. 25, 2011; 83 FR 44831, Sept. 4, 2018; 85 FR 76381, Nov. 27, 2020; 85 FR 85528, Dec. 29, 2020]


§ 1.48 Length of pleadings.

(a) Affidavits, statements, tables of contents and summaries of filings, and other materials which are submitted with and factually support a pleading are not counted in determining the length of the pleading. If other materials are submitted with a pleading, they will be counted in determining its length; and if the length of the pleadings, as so computed, is greater than permitted by the provisions of this chapter, the pleading will be returned without consideration.


(b) It is the policy of the Commission that requests for permission to file pleadings in excess of the length prescribed by the provisions of this chapter shall not be routinely granted. Where the filing period is 10 days or less, the request shall be made within 2 business days after the period begins to run. Where the period is more than 10 days, the request shall be filed at least 10 days before the filing date. (See § 1.4.) If a timely request is made, the pleading need not be filed earlier than 2 business days after the Commission acts upon the request.


[41 FR 14871, Apr. 8, 1976, and 49 FR 40169, Oct. 15, 1984]


§ 1.49 Specifications as to pleadings and documents.

(a) All pleadings and documents filed in paper form in any Commission proceeding shall be typewritten or prepared by mechanical processing methods, and shall be filed electronically or on paper with dimensions of A4 (21 cm. x 29.7 cm.) or on 8
1/2 x 11 inch (21.6 cm. x 27.9 cm.) with the margins set so that the printed material does not exceed 6
1/2 x 9
1/2 inches (16.5 cm. x 24.1 cm.). The printed material may be in any typeface of at least 12-point (0.42333 cm. or
12/72″) in height. The body of the text must be double spaced with a minimum distance of
7/32 of an inch (0.5556 cm.) between each line of text. Footnotes and long, indented quotations may be single spaced, but must be in type that is 12-point or larger in height, with at least
1/16 of an inch (0.158 cm.) between each line of text. Counsel are cautioned against employing extended single spaced passages or excessive footnotes to evade prescribed pleading lengths. If single-spaced passages or footnotes are used in this manner the pleading will, at the discretion of the Commission, either be rejected as unacceptable for filing or dismissed with leave to be refiled in proper form. Pleadings may be printed on both sides of the paper. Pleadings that use only one side of the paper shall be stapled, or otherwise bound, in the upper left-hand corner; those using both sides of the paper shall be stapled twice, or otherwise bound, along the left-hand margin so that it opens like a book. The foregoing shall not apply to printed briefs specifically requested by the Commission, official publications, charted or maps, original documents (or admissible copies thereof) offered as exhibits, specially prepared exhibits, or if otherwise specifically provided. All copies shall be clearly legible.


(b) Except as provided in paragraph (d) of this section, all pleadings and documents filed with the Commission, the length of which as computed under this chapter exceeds ten pages, shall include, as part of the pleading or document, a table of contents with page references.


(c) Except as provided in paragraph (d) of this section, all pleadings and documents filed with the Commission, the length of which filings as computed under this chapter exceeds ten pages, shall include, as part of the pleading or document, a summary of the filing, suitably paragraphed, which should be a succinct, but accurate and clear condensation of the substance of the filing. It should not be a mere repetition of the headings under which the filing is arranged. For pleadings and documents exceeding ten but not twenty-five pages in length, the summary should seldom exceed one and never two pages; for pleadings and documents exceeding twenty-five pages in length, the summary should seldom exceed two and never five pages.


(d) The requirements of paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section shall not apply to:


(1) Interrogatories or answers to interrogatories, and depositions;


(2) FCC forms or applications;


(3) Transcripts;


(4) Contracts and reports;


(5) Letters; or


(6) Hearing exhibits, and exhibits or appendicies accompanying any document or pleading submitted to the Commission.


(e) Petitions, pleadings, and other documents associated with licensing matters in the Wireless Radio Services must be filed electronically in ULS. See § 22.6 of this chapter for specifications.


(f)(1) In the following types of proceedings, all pleadings, including permissible ex parte submissions, notices of ex parte presentations, comments, reply comments, and petitions for reconsideration and replies thereto, must be filed in electronic format:


(i) Formal complaint proceedings under section 208 of the Act and rules in §§ 1.720 through 1.740, and pole attachment complaint proceedings under section 224 of the Act and rules in §§ 1.1401 through 1.1415;


(ii) Proceedings, other than rulemaking proceedings, relating to customer proprietary network information (CPNI);


(iii) Proceedings relating to cable special relief petitions;


(iv) Proceedings involving Over-the-Air Reception Devices;


(v) Common carrier certifications under § 54.314 of this chapter;


(vi) Domestic Section 214 transfer-of-control applications pursuant to §§ 63.52 and 63.53 of this chapter;


(vii) Domestic section 214 discontinuance applications pursuant to § 63.63 and/or § 63.71 of this chapter;


(viii) Notices of network change and associated certifications pursuant to § 51.325 et seq. of this chapter; and


(ix) Hearing proceedings under §§ 1.201 through 1.377.


(2) Unless required under paragraph (f)(1) of this section, in the following types of proceedings, all pleadings, including permissible ex parte submissions, notices of ex parte presentations, comments, reply comments, and petitions for reconsideration and replies thereto, may be filed in electronic format:


(i) General rulemaking proceedings other than broadcast allotment proceedings;


(ii) Notice of inquiry proceedings;


(iii) Petition for rulemaking proceedings (except broadcast allotment proceedings);


(iv) Petition for forbearance proceedings; and


(v) Filings responsive to domestic section 214 transfers under § 63.03 of this chapter, section 214 discontinuances under § 63.71 of this chapter, and notices of network change under § 51.325 et seq. of this chapter.


(3) To further greater reliance on electronic filing wherever possible, the Bureaus and Offices, in coordination with the Managing Director, may provide to the public capabilities for electronic filing of additional types of pleadings notwithstanding any provisions of this chapter that may otherwise be construed as requiring such filings to be submitted on paper.


(4) For purposes of compliance with any prescribed pleading lengths, the length of any document filed in electronic form shall be equal to the length of the document if printed out and formatted according to the specifications of paragraph (a) of this section, or shall be no more than 250 words per page.



Note to § 1.49:

The table of contents and the summary pages shall not be included in complying with any page limitation requirements as set forth by Commission rule.


[40 FR 19198, May 2, 1975, as amended at 47 FR 26393, June 18, 1982; 51 FR 16322, May 2, 1986; 54 FR 31032, July 26, 1989; 58 FR 44893, Aug. 25, 1993; 59 FR 37721, July 25, 1994; 63 FR 24125, May 1, 1998; 63 FR 68920, Dec. 14, 1998; 74 FR 39227, Aug. 6, 2009; 76 FR 24390, May 2, 2011; 80 FR 1587, Jan. 13, 2015; 80 FR 19847, Apr. 13, 2015; 83 FR 2556, Jan. 18, 2018; 83 FR 7922, Feb. 22, 2018; 83 FR 44831, Sept. 4, 2018; 85 FR 63172, Oct. 6, 2020; 85 FR 85528, Dec. 29, 2020]


§ 1.50 Specifications as to briefs.

The Commission’s preference is for briefs that are either typewritten, prepared by other mechanical processing methods, or, in the case of matters in the Wireless Radio Services, composed electronically and sent via ULS. Printed briefs will be accepted only if specifically requested by the Commission. Typewritten, mechanically produced, or electronically transmitted briefs must conform to all of the applicable specifications for pleadings and documents set forth in § 1.49.


[63 FR 68920, Dec. 14, 1998]


§ 1.51 Number of copies of pleadings, briefs, and other papers.

(a) In hearing proceedings, all pleadings, letters, documents, or other written submissions, shall be filed using the Commission’s Electronic Comment Filing System, excluding confidential material as set forth in § 1.314 of these rules. Each written submission that includes confidential material shall be filed as directed by the Commission, along with an additional courtesy copy transmitted to the presiding officer.


(b) In rulemaking proceedings which have not been designated for hearing, see § 1.419.


(c) In matters other than rulemaking and hearing cases, unless otherwise specified by Commission rules, an original and one copy shall be filed. If the matter relates to part 22 of the rules, see § 22.6 of this chapter.


(d) Where statute or regulation provides for service by the Commission of papers filed with the Commission, an additional copy of such papers shall be filed for each person to be served.


(e) The parties to any proceeding may, on notice, be required to file additional copies of any or all filings made in that proceeding.


(f) For application and licensing matters involving the Wireless Radio Services, pleadings, briefs or other documents must be filed electronically in ULS.


(g) Participants that file pleadings, briefs or other documents electronically in ULS need only submit one copy, so long as the submission conforms to any procedural or filing requirements established for formal electronic comments. (See § 1.49)


(h) Pleadings, briefs or other documents filed electronically in ULS by a party represented by an attorney shall include the name, street address, email address, and telephone number of at least one attorney of record. Parties not represented by an attorney that files electronically in ULS shall provide their name, street address, email address, and telephone number.


[76 FR 24391, May 2, 2011, as amended at 83 FR 2556, Jan. 18, 2018; 85 FR 63172, Oct. 6, 2020; 85 FR 85528, Dec. 29, 2020]


§ 1.52 Subscription and verification.

The original of all petitions, motions, pleadings, briefs, and other documents filed by any party represented by counsel shall be signed by at least one attorney of record in his individual name, whose address shall be stated. A party who is not represented by an attorney shall sign and verify the document and state his address. Pleadings, petitions, and other documents related to licensing matters in the Wireless Radio Services shall be signed by at least one attorney of record in his individual name or by the party who is not represented by an attorney and shall include his email and physical mailing address. Either the original document, the electronic reproduction of such original document containing the facsimile signature of the attorney or represented party, or, in the case of matters in the Wireless Radio Services, an electronic filing via ULS is acceptable for filing. If a facsimile or electronic reproduction of such original document is filed, the signatory shall retain the original until the Commission’s decision is final and no longer subject to judicial review. If filed electronically, a signature will be considered any symbol executed or adopted by the party with the intent that such symbol be a signature, including symbols formed by computer-generated electronic impulses. Except when otherwise specifically provided by rule or statute, documents signed by the attorney for a party need not be verified or accompanied by affidavit. The signature or electronic reproduction thereof by an attorney constitutes a certificate by him that he has read the document; that to the best of his knowledge, information, and belief there is good ground to support it; and that it is not interposed for delay. If the original of a document is not signed or is signed with intent to defeat the purpose of this section, or an electronic reproduction does not contain a facsimile signature, it may be stricken as sham and false, and the matter may proceed as though the document had not been filed. An attorney may be subjected to appropriate disciplinary action, pursuant to § 1.24, for a willful violation of this section or if scandalous or indecent matter is inserted.


[63 FR 24125, May 1, 1998, as amended at 63 FR 68920, Dec. 14, 1998; 83 FR 2556, Jan. 18, 2018; 85 FR 85529, Dec. 29, 2020]


Forbearance Proceedings

§ 1.53 Separate pleadings for petitions for forbearance.

In order to be considered as a petition for forbearance subject to the one-year deadline set forth in 47 U.S.C. 160(c), any petition requesting that the Commission exercise its forbearance authority under 47 U.S.C. 160 shall be filed as a separate pleading and shall be identified in the caption of such pleading as a petition for forbearance under 47 U.S.C. 160(c). Any request which is not in compliance with this rule is deemed not to constitute a petition pursuant to 47 U.S.C. 160(c), and is not subject to the deadline set forth therein.


[65 FR 7460, Feb. 15, 2000]


§ 1.54 Petitions for forbearance must be complete as filed.

(a) Description of relief sought. Petitions for forbearance must identify the requested relief, including:


(1) Each statutory provision, rule, or requirement from which forbearance is sought.


(2) Each carrier, or group of carriers, for which forbearance is sought.


(3) Each service for which forbearance is sought.


(4) Each geographic location, zone, or area for which forbearance is sought.


(5) Any other factor, condition, or limitation relevant to determining the scope of the requested relief.


(b) Prima facie case. Petitions for forbearance must contain facts and arguments which, if true and persuasive, are sufficient to meet each of the statutory criteria for forbearance.


(1) A petition for forbearance must specify how each of the statutory criteria is met with regard to each statutory provision or rule, or requirement from which forbearance is sought.


(2) If the petitioner intends to rely on data or information in the possession of third parties, the petition must identify:


(i) The nature of the data or information.


(ii) The parties believed to have or control the data or information.


(iii) The relationship of the data or information to facts and arguments presented in the petition.


(3) The petitioner shall, at the time of filing, provide a copy of the petition to each third party identified as possessing data or information on which the petitioner intends to rely.


(c) Identification of related matters. A petition for forbearance must identify any proceeding pending before the Commission in which the petitioner has requested, or otherwise taken a position regarding, relief that is identical to, or comparable to, the relief sought in the forbearance petition. Alternatively, the petition must declare that the petitioner has not, in a pending proceeding, requested or otherwise taken a position on the relief sought.


(d) Filing requirements. Petitions for forbearance shall comply with the filing requirements in § 1.49.


(1) Petitions for forbearance shall be e-mailed to [email protected] at the time for filing.


(2) All filings related to a forbearance petition, including all data, shall be provided in a searchable format. To be searchable, a spreadsheet containing a significant amount of data must be capable of being manipulated to allow meaningful analysis.


(e) Contents. Petitions for forbearance shall include:


(1) A plain, concise, written summary statement of the relief sought.


(2) A full statement of the petitioner’s prima facie case for relief.


(3) Appendices that list:


(i) The scope of relief sought as required in § 1.54(a);


(ii) All supporting data upon which the petition intends to rely, including a market analysis; and


(iii) Any supporting statements or affidavits.


(f) Supplemental information. The Commission will consider further facts and arguments entered into the record by a petitioner only:


(1) In response to facts and arguments introduced by commenters or opponents.


(2) By permission of the Commission.


[74 FR 39227, Aug. 6, 2009]


§ 1.55 Public notice of petitions for forbearance.

(a) Filing a petition for forbearance initiates the statutory time limit for consideration of the petition.


(b) The Commission will issue a public notice when it receives a properly filed petition for forbearance. The notice will include:


(1) A statement of the nature of the petition for forbearance.


(2) The scope of the forbearance sought and a description of the subjects and issues involved.


(3) The docket number assigned to the proceeding.


(4) A statement of the time for filing oppositions or comments and replies thereto.


[74 FR 39227, Aug. 6, 2009]


§ 1.56 Motions for summary denial of petitions for forbearance.

(a) Opponents of a petition for forbearance may submit a motion for summary denial if it can be shown that the petition for forbearance, viewed in the light most favorable to the petitioner, cannot meet the statutory criteria for forbearance.


(b) A motion for summary denial may not be filed later than the due date for comments and oppositions announced in the public notice.


(c) Oppositions to motions for summary denial may not be filed later than the due date for reply comments announced in the public notice.


(d) No reply may be filed to an opposition to a motion for summary denial.


[74 FR 39227, Aug. 6, 2009]


§ 1.57 Circulation and voting of petitions for forbearance.

(a) If a petition for forbearance includes novel questions of fact, law or policy which cannot be resolved under outstanding precedents and decisions, the Chairman will circulate a draft order no later than 28 days prior to the statutory deadline, unless all Commissioners agree to a shorter period.


(b) The Commission will vote on any circulated order resolving a forbearance petition not later than seven days before the last day that action must be taken to prevent the petition from being deemed granted by operation of law.


[74 FR 39227, Aug. 6, 2009]


§ 1.58 Forbearance petition quiet period prohibition.

The prohibition in § 1.1203(a) on contacts with decisionmakers concerning matters listed in the Sunshine Agenda shall also apply to a petition for forbearance for a period of 14 days prior to the statutory deadline under 47 U.S.C. 160(c) or as announced by the Commission.


[74 FR 39227, Aug. 6, 2009]


§ 1.59 Withdrawal or narrowing of petitions for forbearance.

(a) A petitioner may withdraw or narrow a petition for forbearance without approval of the Commission by filing a notice of full or partial withdrawal at any time prior to the end of the tenth business day after the due date for reply comments announced in the public notice.


(b) Except as provided in paragraph (a) of this section, a petition for forbearance may be withdrawn, or narrowed so significantly as to amount to a withdrawal of a large portion of the forbearance relief originally requested by the petitioner, only with approval of the Commission.


[74 FR 39227, Aug. 6, 2009]


General Application Procedures

§ 1.61 Procedures for handling applications requiring special aeronautical study.

(a) Antenna Structure Registration is conducted by the Wireless Telecommunications Bureau as follows:


(1) Each antenna structure owner that must notify the FAA of proposed construction using FAA Form 7460-1 shall, upon proposing new or modified construction, register that antenna structure with the Wireless Telecommunications Bureau using FCC Form 854.


(2) In accordance with § 1.1307 and § 17.4(c) of this chapter, the Bureau will address any environmental concerns prior to processing the registration.


(3) If a final FAA determination of “no hazard” is not submitted along with FCC Form 854, processing of the registration may be delayed or disapproved.


(4) If the owner of the antenna structure cannot file FCC Form 854 because it is subject to a denial of Federal benefits under the Anti-Drug Abuse Act of 1988, 21 U.S.C. 862, the first licensee authorized to locate on the structure must register the structure using FCC Form 854, and provide a copy of the Antenna Structure Registration (FCC Form 854R) to the owner. The owner remains responsible for providing a copy of FCC Form 854R to all tenant licensees on the structure and for posting the registration number as required by § 17.4(g) of this chapter.


(5) Upon receipt of FCC Form 854, and attached FAA final determination of “no hazard,” the Bureau may prescribe antenna structure painting and/or lighting specifications or other conditions in accordance with the FAA airspace recommendation. Unless otherwise specified by the Bureau, the antenna structure must conform to the FAA’s painting and lighting recommendations set forth in the FAA’s determination of “no hazard” and the associated FAA study number. The Bureau returns a completed Antenna Structure Registration (FCC Form 854R) to the registrant. If the proposed structure is disapproved the registrant is so advised.


(b) Each operating Bureau or Office examines the applications for Commission authorization for which it is responsible to ensure compliance with FAA notification procedures as well as Commission Antenna Structure Registration as follows:


(1) If Antenna Structure Registration is required, the operating Bureau reviews the application for the Antenna Structure Registration Number and proceeds as follows:


(i) If the application contains the Antenna Structure Registration Number or if the applicant seeks a Cellular or PCS system authorization, the operating Bureau processes the application.


(ii) If the application does not contain the Antenna Structure Registration Number, but the structure owner has already filed FCC Form 854, the operating Bureau places the application on hold until Registration can be confirmed, so long as the owner exhibits due diligence in filing.


(iii) If the application does not contain the Antenna Structure Registration Number, and the structure owner has not filed FCC Form 854, the operating Bureau notifies the applicant that FCC Form 854 must be filed and places the application on hold until Registration can be confirmed, so long as the owner exhibits due diligence in filing.


(2) If Antenna Structure Registration is not required, the operating Bureau processes the application.


(c) Where one or more antenna farm areas have been designated for a community or communities (see § 17.9 of this chapter), an application proposing the erection of an antenna structure over 1,000 feet in height above ground to serve such community or communities will not be accepted for filing unless:


(1) It is proposed to locate the antenna structure in a designated antenna farm area, or


(2) It is accompanied by a statement from the Federal Aviation Administration that the proposed structure will not constitute a menace to air navigation, or


(3) It is accompanied by a request for waiver setting forth reasons sufficient, if true, to justify such a waiver.



Note:

By Commission Order (FCC 65-455), 30 FR 7419, June 5, 1965, the Commission issued the following policy statement concerning the height of radio and television antenna towers:


“We have concluded that this objective can best be achieved by adopting the following policy: Applications for antenna towers higher than 2,000 feet above ground will be presumed to be inconsistent with the public interest, and the applicant will have a burden of overcoming that strong presumption. The applicant must accompany its application with a detailed showing directed to meeting this burden. Only in the exceptional case, where the Commission concludes that a clear and compelling showing has been made that there are public interest reasons requiring a tower higher than 2,000 feet above ground, and after the parties have complied with applicable FAA procedures, and full Commission coordination with FAA on the question of menace to air navigation, will a grant be made. Applicants and parties in interest will, of course, be afforded their statutory hearing rights.”

[28 FR 12415, Nov. 22, 1963, as amended at 32 FR 8813, June 21, 1967; 32 FR 20860, Dec. 28, 1967; 34 FR 6481, Apr. 15, 1969; 45 FR 55201, Aug. 19, 1980; 58 FR 13021, Mar. 9, 1993, 61 FR 4361, Feb. 6, 1996; 77 FR 3952, Jan. 26, 2012; 79 FR 56984, Sept. 24, 2014]


§ 1.62 Operation pending action on renewal application.

(a)(1) Where there is pending before the Commission at the time of expiration of license any proper and timely application for renewal of license with respect to any activity of a continuing nature, in accordance with the provisions of section 9(b) of the Administrative Procedure Act, such license shall continue in effect without further action by the Commission until such time as the Commission shall make a final determination with respect to the renewal application. No operation by any licensee under this section shall be construed as a finding by the Commission that the operation will serve the public interest, convenience, or necessity, nor shall such operation in any way affect or limit the action of the Commission with respect to any pending application or proceeding.


(2) A non-broadcast licensee operating by virtue of this paragraph (a) shall, after the date of expiration specified in the license, post, in addition to the original license, any acknowledgment received from the Commission that the renewal application has been accepted for filing or a signed copy of the application for renewal of license which has been submitted by the licensee, or in services other than common carrier, a statement certifying that the licensee has mailed or filed a renewal application, specifying the date of mailing or filing.


(b) Where there is pending before the Commission at the time of expiration of license any proper and timely application for renewal or extension of the term of a license with respect to any activity not of a continuing nature, the Commission may in its discretion grant a temporary extension of such license pending determination of such application. No such temporary extension shall be construed as a finding by the Commission that the operation of any radio station thereunder will serve the public interest, convenience, or necessity beyond the express terms of such temporary extension of license, nor shall such temporary extension in any way affect or limit the action of the Commission with respect to any pending application or proceeding.


(c) Except where an instrument of authorization clearly states on its face that it relates to an activity not of a continuing nature, or where the non-continuing nature is otherwise clearly apparent upon the face of the authorization, all licenses issued by the Commission shall be deemed to be related to an activity of a continuing nature.


(5 U.S.C. 558)

[28 FR 12415, Nov. 22, 1963, as amended at 84 FR 2758, Feb. 8, 2019]


§ 1.65 Substantial and significant changes in information furnished by applicants to the Commission.

(a) Each applicant is responsible for the continuing accuracy and completeness of information furnished in a pending application or in Commission proceedings involving a pending application. Except as otherwise required by rules applicable to particular types of applications, whenever the information furnished in the pending application is no longer substantially accurate and complete in all significant respects, the applicant shall as promptly as possible and in any event within 30 days, unless good cause is shown, amend or request the amendment of the application so as to furnish such additional or corrected information as may be appropriate. Except as otherwise required by rules applicable to particular types of applications, whenever there has been a substantial change as to any other matter which may be of decisional significance in a Commission proceeding involving the pending application, the applicant shall as promptly as possible and in any event within 30 days, unless good cause is shown, submit a statement furnishing such additional or corrected information as may be appropriate, which shall be served upon parties of record in accordance with § 1.47. Where the matter is before any court for review, statements and requests to amend shall in addition be served upon the Commission’s General Counsel. For the purposes of this section, an application is “pending” before the Commission from the time it is accepted for filing by the Commission until a Commission grant or denial of the application is no longer subject to reconsideration by the Commission or to review by any court.


(b) Applications in broadcast services subject to competitive bidding will be subject to the provisions of §§ 1.2105(b), 73.5002 and 73.3522 of this chapter regarding the modification of their applications.


(c) All broadcast permittees and licensees must report annually to the Commission any adverse finding or adverse final action taken by any court or administrative body that involves conduct bearing on the permittee’s or licensee’s character qualifications and that would be reportable in connection with an application for renewal as reflected in the renewal form. If a report is required by this paragraph(s), it shall be filed on the anniversary of the date that the licensee’s renewal application is required to be filed, except that licensees owning multiple stations with different anniversary dates need file only one report per year on the anniversary of their choice, provided that their reports are not more than one year apart. Permittees and licensees bear the obligation to make diligent, good faith efforts to become knowledgeable of any such reportable adjudicated misconduct.



Note:

The terms adverse finding and adverse final action as used in paragraph (c) of this section include adjudications made by an ultimate trier of fact, whether a government agency or court, but do not include factual determinations which are subject to review de novo unless the time for taking such review has expired under the relevant procedural rules. The pendency of an appeal of an adverse finding or adverse final action does not relieve a permittee or licensee from its obligation to report the finding or action.


[48 FR 27200, June 13, 1983, as amended at 55 FR 23084, June 6, 1990; 56 FR 25635, June 5, 1991; 56 FR 44009, Sept. 6, 1991; 57 FR 47412, Oct. 16, 1992; 63 FR 48622, Sept. 11, 1998; 69 FR 72026, Dec. 10, 2004; 75 FR 4702, Jan. 29, 2010]


§ 1.68 Action on application for license to cover construction permit.

(a) An application for license by the lawful holder of a construction permit will be granted without hearing where the Commission, upon examination of such application, finds that all the terms, conditions, and obligations set forth in the application and permit have been fully met, and that no cause or circumstance arising or first coming to the knowledge of the Commission since the granting of the permit would, in the judgment of the Commission, make the operation of such station against the public interest.


(b) In the event the Commission is unable to make the findings in paragraph (a) of this section, the Commission will designate the application for hearing upon specified issues.


(Sec. 319, 48 Stat. 1089, as amended; 47 U.S.C. 319)


§ 1.77 Detailed application procedures; cross references.

The application procedures set forth in §§ 1.61 through 1.68 are general in nature. Applicants should also refer to the Commission rules regarding the payment of statutory charges (subpart G of this part) and the use of the FCC Registration Number (FRN) (see subpart W of this part). More detailed procedures are set forth in this chapter as follows:


(a) Rules governing applications for authorizations in the Broadcast Radio Services are set forth in subpart D of this part.


(b) Rules governing applications for authorizations in the Common Carrier Radio Services are set forth in subpart E of this part.


(c) Rules governing applications for authorizations in the Private Radio Services are set forth in subpart F of this part.


(d) Rules governing applications for authorizations in the Experimental Radio Service are set forth in part 5 of this chapter.


(e) Rules governing applications for authorizations in the Domestic Public Radio Services are set forth in part 21 of this chapter.


(f) Rules governing applications for authorizations in the Industrial, Scientific, and Medical Service are set forth in part 18 of this chapter.


(g) Rules governing applications for certification of equipment are set forth in part 2, subpart J, of this chapter.


(h) Rules governing applications for commercial radio operator licenses are set forth in part 13 of this chapter.


(i) Rules governing applications for authorizations in the Common Carrier and Private Radio terrestrial microwave services and Local Multipoint Distribution Services are set out in part 101 of this chapter.


[28 FR 12415, Nov. 22, 1963, as amended at 44 FR 39180, July 5, 1979; 47 FR 53378, Nov. 26, 1982; 61 FR 26670, May 28, 1996; 62 FR 23162, Apr. 29, 1997; 63 FR 36596, July 7, 1998; 66 FR 47895, Sept. 14, 2001; 78 FR 25160, Apr. 29, 2013]


Miscellaneous Proceedings

§ 1.80 Forfeiture proceedings.

(a) Persons against whom and violations for which a forfeiture may be assessed. A forfeiture penalty may be assessed against any person found to have:


(1) Willfully or repeatedly failed to comply substantially with the terms and conditions of any license, permit, certificate, or other instrument of authorization issued by the Commission;


(2) Willfully or repeatedly failed to comply with any of the provisions of the Communications Act of 1934, as amended; or of any rule, regulation or order issued by the Commission under that Act or under any treaty, convention, or other agreement to which the United States is a party and which is binding on the United States;


(3) Violated any provision of section 317(c) or 508(a) of the Communications Act;


(4) Violated any provision of sections 227(b) or (e) of the Communications Act or of §§ 64.1200(a)(1) through (5) and 64.1604 of this title;


(5) Violated any provision of section 511(a) or (b) of the Communications Act or of paragraph (b)(6) of this section;


(6) Violated any provision of section 1304, 1343, or 1464 of Title 18, United States Code; or


(7) Violated any provision of section 6507 of the Middle Class Tax Relief and Job Creation Act of 2012 or any rule, regulation, or order issued by the Commission under that statute.



Note 1 to paragraph (a):

A forfeiture penalty assessed under this section is in addition to any other penalty provided for by the Communications Act, except that the penalties provided for in paragraphs (b)(1) through (4) of this section shall not apply to conduct which is subject to a forfeiture penalty or fine under sections 202(c), 203(e), 205(b), 214(d), 219(b), 220(d), 223(b), 364(a), 364(b), 386(a), 386(b), 506, and 634 of the Communications Act. The remaining provisions of this section are applicable to such conduct.


(b) Limits on the amount of forfeiture assessed

– (1) Forfeiture penalty for a broadcast station licensee, permittee, cable television operator, or applicant. If the violator is a broadcast station licensee or permittee, a cable television operator, or an applicant for any broadcast or cable television operator license, permit, certificate, or other instrument of authorization issued by the Commission, except as otherwise noted in this paragraph (b)(1), the forfeiture penalty under this section shall not exceed $55,052 for each violation or each day of a continuing violation, except that the amount assessed for any continuing violation shall not exceed a total of $550,531 for any single act or failure to act described in paragraph (a) of this section. There is no limit on forfeiture assessments for EEO violations by cable operators that occur after notification by the Commission of a potential violation. See section 634(f)(2) of the Communications Act. Notwithstanding the foregoing in this section, if the violator is a broadcast station licensee or permittee or an applicant for any broadcast license, permit, certificate, or other instrument of authorization issued by the Commission, and if the violator is determined by the Commission to have broadcast obscene, indecent, or profane material, the forfeiture penalty under this section shall not exceed $445,445 for each violation or each day of a continuing violation, except that the amount assessed for any continuing violation shall not exceed a total of $4,111,796 for any single act or failure to act described in paragraph (a) of this section.


(2) Forfeiture penalty for a common carrier or applicant. If the violator is a common carrier subject to the provisions of the Communications Act or an applicant for any common carrier license, permit, certificate, or other instrument of authorization issued by the Commission, the amount of any forfeiture penalty determined under this section shall not exceed $220,213 for each violation or each day of a continuing violation, except that the amount assessed for any continuing violation shall not exceed a total of $2,202,123 for any single act or failure to act described in paragraph (a) of this section.


(3) Forfeiture penalty for a manufacturer or service provider. If the violator is a manufacturer or service provider subject to the requirements of section 255, 716, or 718 of the Communications Act, and is determined by the Commission to have violated any such requirement, the manufacturer or service provider shall be liable to the United States for a forfeiture penalty of not more than $126,463 for each violation or each day of a continuing violation, except that the amount assessed for any continuing violation shall not exceed a total of $1,264,622 for any single act or failure to act.


(4) Forfeiture penalty for a 227(e) violation. Any person determined to have violated section 227(e) of the Communications Act or the rules issued by the Commission under section 227(e) of the Communications Act shall be liable to the United States for a forfeiture penalty of not more than $12,646 for each violation or three times that amount for each day of a continuing violation, except that the amount assessed for any continuing violation shall not exceed a total of $1,264,622 for any single act or failure to act. Such penalty shall be in addition to any other forfeiture penalty provided for by the Communications Act.


(5) Forfeiture penalty for a 227(b)(4)(B) violation. Any person determined to have violated section 227(b)(4)(B) of the Communications Act or the rules in 47 CFR part 64 issued by the Commission under section 227(b)(4)(B) of the Communications Act shall be liable to the United States for a forfeiture penalty determined in accordance with paragraphs (A)-(F) of section 503(b)(2) plus an additional penalty not to exceed $10,748.


(6) Forfeiture penalty for pirate radio broadcasting. (i) Any person who willfully and knowingly does or causes or suffers to be done any pirate radio broadcasting shall be subject to a fine of not more than $2,149,551; and


(ii) Any person who willfully and knowingly violates the Act or any rule, regulation, restriction, or condition made or imposed by the Commission under authority of the Act, or any rule, regulation, restriction, or condition made or imposed by any international radio or wire communications treaty or convention, or regulations annexed thereto, to which the United States is party, relating to pirate radio broadcasting shall, in addition to any other penalties provided by law, be subject to a fine of not more than $107,478 for each day during which such offense occurs, in accordance with the limit described in this section.


(7) Forfeiture penalty for a section 6507(b)(4) Tax Relief Act violation. If a violator who is granted access to the Do-Not-Call registry of public safety answering points discloses or disseminates any registered telephone number without authorization, in violation of section 6507(b)(4) of the Middle Class Tax Relief and Job Creation Act of 2012 or the Commission’s implementing rules in 47 CFR part 64, the monetary penalty for such unauthorized disclosure or dissemination of a telephone number from the registry shall be not less than $118,430 per incident nor more than $1,184,300 per incident depending upon whether the conduct leading to the violation was negligent, grossly negligent, reckless, or willful, and depending on whether the violation was a first or subsequent offense.


(8) Forfeiture penalty for a section 6507(b)(5) Tax Relief Act violation. If a violator uses automatic dialing equipment to contact a telephone number on the Do-Not-Call registry of public safety answering points, in violation of section 6507(b)(5) of the Middle Class Tax Relief and Job Creation Act of 2012 or the Commission’s implementing rules in 47 CFR part 64, the monetary penalty for contacting such a telephone number shall be not less than $11,843 per call nor more than $118,430 per call depending on whether the violation was negligent, grossly negligent, reckless, or willful, and depending on whether the violation was a first or subsequent offense.


(9) Maximum forfeiture penalty for any case not previously covered. In any case not covered in paragraphs (b)(1) through (8) of this section, the amount of any forfeiture penalty determined under this section shall not exceed $22,021 for each violation or each day of a continuing violation, except that the amount assessed for any continuing violation shall not exceed a total of $165,159 for any single act or failure to act described in paragraph (a) of this section.


(10) Factors considered in determining the amount of the forfeiture penalty. In determining the amount of the forfeiture penalty, the Commission or its designee will take into account the nature, circumstances, extent and gravity of the violations and, with respect to the violator, the degree of culpability, any history of prior offenses, ability to pay, and such other matters as justice may require.


Table 1 to Paragraph (b)(10) – Base Amounts for Section 503 Forfeitures

Forfeitures
Violation

amount
Misrepresentation/lack of candor(1)
Failure to file required DODC required forms, and/or filing materially inaccurate or incomplete DODC information$15,000
Construction and/or operation without an instrument of authorization for the service10,000
Failure to comply with prescribed lighting and/or marking10,000
Violation of public file rules10,000
Violation of political rules: Reasonable access, lowest unit charge, equal opportunity, and discrimination9,000
Unauthorized substantial transfer of control8,000
Violation of children’s television commercialization or programming requirements8,000
Violations of rules relating to distress and safety frequencies8,000
False distress communications8,000
EAS equipment not installed or operational8,000
Alien ownership violation8,000
Failure to permit inspection7,000
Transmission of indecent/obscene materials7,000
Interference7,000
Importation or marketing of unauthorized equipment7,000
Exceeding of authorized antenna height5,000
Fraud by wire, radio or television5,000
Unauthorized discontinuance of service5,000
Use of unauthorized equipment5,000
Exceeding power limits4,000
Failure to respond to Commission communications4,000
Violation of sponsorship ID requirements4,000
Unauthorized emissions4,000
Using unauthorized frequency4,000
Failure to engage in required frequency coordination4,000
Construction or operation at unauthorized location4,000
Violation of requirements pertaining to broadcasting of lotteries or contests4,000
Violation of transmitter control and metering requirements3,000
Failure to file required forms or information3,000
Failure to make required measurements or conduct required monitoring2,000
Failure to provide station ID1,000
Unauthorized pro forma transfer of control1,000
Failure to maintain required records1,000

Table 2 to Paragraph (b) (10) – Violations Unique to the Service

Violation
Services affected
Amount
Unauthorized conversion of long distance telephone serviceCommon Carrier$40,000
Violation of operator services requirementsCommon Carrier7,000
Violation of pay-per-call requirementsCommon Carrier7,000
Failure to implement rate reduction or refund orderCable7,500
Violation of cable program access rulesCable7,500
Violation of cable leased access rulesCable7,500
Violation of cable cross-ownership rulesCable7,500
Violation of cable broadcast carriage rulesCable7,500
Violation of pole attachment rulesCable7,500
Failure to maintain directional pattern within prescribed parametersBroadcast7,000
Violation of broadcast hoax ruleBroadcast7,000
AM tower fencingBroadcast7,000
Broadcasting telephone conversations without authorizationBroadcast4,000
Violation of enhanced underwriting requirementsBroadcast2,000

Table 3 to Paragraph (b) (10) – Adjustment Criteria for Section 503 Forfeitures


Upward Adjustment Criteria:
(1) Egregious misconduct.
(2) Ability to pay/relative disincentive.
(3) Intentional violation.
(4) Substantial harm.
(5) Prior violations of any FCC requirements.
(6) Substantial economic gain.
(7) Repeated or continuous violation.
Downward Adjustment Criteria:
(1) Minor violation.
(2) Good faith or voluntary disclosure.
(3) History of overall compliance.
(4) Inability to pay.

Table 4 to Paragraph (b)(10) – Non-Section 503 Forfeitures That Are Affected by the Downward Adjustment Factors
1

Violation
Statutory amount after 2022 annual inflation adjustment
Sec. 202(c) Common Carrier Discrimination$13,213, $661/day.
Sec. 203(e) Common Carrier Tariffs$13,213, $661/day.
Sec. 205(b) Common Carrier Prescriptions$26,425.
Sec. 214(d) Common Carrier Line Extensions$2,642/day.
Sec. 219(b) Common Carrier Reports$2,642/day.
Sec. 220(d) Common Carrier Records & Accounts$13,213/day.
Sec. 223(b) Dial-a-Porn$136,924/day.
Sec. 227(e) Caller Identification$12,646/violation. $37,937/day for each day of continuing violation, up to $1,264,622 for any single act or failure to act.
Sec. 364(a) Forfeitures (Ships)$11,011/day (owner).
Sec. 364(b) Forfeitures (Ships)$2,203 (vessel master).
Sec. 386(a) Forfeitures (Ships)$11,011/day (owner).
Sec. 386(b) Forfeitures (Ships)$2,203 (vessel master).
Sec. 511 Pirate Radio Broadcasting$2,149,551, $107,478/day.
Sec. 634 Cable EEO$976/day.


1 Unlike section 503 of the Act, which establishes maximum forfeiture amounts, other sections of the Act, with two exceptions, state prescribed amounts of forfeitures for violations of the relevant section. These amounts are then subject to mitigation or remission under section 504 of the Act. One exception is section 223 of the Act, which provides a maximum forfeiture per day. For convenience, the Commission will treat this amount as if it were a prescribed base amount, subject to downward adjustments. The other exception is section 227(e) of the Act, which provides maximum forfeitures per violation, and for continuing violations. The Commission will apply the factors set forth in section 503(b)(2)(E) of the Act and this table 4 to determine the amount of the penalty to assess in any particular situation. The amounts in this table 4 are adjusted for inflation pursuant to the Debt Collection Improvement Act of 1996 (DCIA), 28 U.S.C. 2461. These non-section 503 forfeitures may be adjusted downward using the “Downward Adjustment Criteria” shown for section 503 forfeitures in table 3 to this paragraph (b)(10).



Note 2 to paragraph (b)(10):

Guidelines for Assessing Forfeitures. The Commission and its staff may use the guidelines in tables 1 through 4 of this paragraph (b)(10) in particular cases. The Commission and its staff retain the discretion to issue a higher or lower forfeiture than provided in the guidelines, to issue no forfeiture at all, or to apply alternative or additional sanctions as permitted by the statute. The forfeiture ceilings per violation or per day for a continuing violation stated in section 503 of the Communications Act and the Commission’s rules are described in paragraph (b)(11) of this section. These statutory maxima became effective September 13, 2013. Forfeitures issued under other sections of the Act are dealt with separately in table 4 to this paragraph (b)(10).


(11) Inflation adjustments to the maximum forfeiture amount. (i) Pursuant to the Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act Improvements Act of 2015, Public Law 114-74 (129 Stat. 599-600), which amends the Federal Civil Monetary Penalty Inflation Adjustment Act of 1990, Public Law 101-410 (104 Stat. 890; 28 U.S.C. 2461 note), the statutory maximum amount of a forfeiture penalty assessed under this section shall be adjusted annually for inflation by order published no later than January 15 each year. Annual inflation adjustments will be based on the percentage (if any) by which the Consumer Price Index for all Urban Consumers (CPI-U) for October preceding the date of the adjustment exceeds the prior year’s CPI-U for October. The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) will issue adjustment rate guidance no later than December 15 each year to adjust for inflation in the CPI-U as of the most recent October.


(ii) The application of the annual inflation adjustment required by the foregoing Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act Improvements Act of 2015 results in the following adjusted statutory maximum forfeitures authorized by the Communications Act:


Table 5 to Paragraph (b)(11)(ii)

U.S. Code citation
Maximum

penalty after

2022 annual

inflation

adjustment
47 U.S.C. 202(c)$13,213
661
47 U.S.C. 203(e)13,213
661
47 U.S.C. 205(b)26,425
47 U.S.C. 214(d)2,642
47 U.S.C. 219(b)2,642
47 U.S.C. 220(d)13,213
47 U.S.C. 223(b)136,924
47 U.S.C. 227(e)12,646
37,937
1,264,622
47 U.S.C. 362(a)11,011
47 U.S.C. 362(b)2,203
47 U.S.C. 386(a)11,011
47 U.S.C. 386(b)2,203
47 U.S.C. 503(b)(2)(A)55,052
550,531
47 U.S.C. 503(b)(2)(B)220,213
22,202,123
47 U.S.C. 503(b)(2)(C)445,445
4,111,796
47 U.S.C. 503(b)(2)(D)22,021
165,159
47 U.S.C. 503(b)(2)(F)126,463
1,264,622
47 U.S.C. 507(a)2,181
47 U.S.C. 507(b)320
47 U.S.C. 5112,149,551
107,478
47 U.S.C. 554976


Note 3 to paragraph (b) (11):

Pursuant to Public Law 104-134, the first inflation adjustment cannot exceed 10 percent of the statutory maximum amount.


(c) Limits on the time when a proceeding may be initiated. (1) In the case of a broadcast station, no forfeiture penalty shall be imposed if the violation occurred more than 1 year prior to the issuance of the appropriate notice or prior to the date of commencement of the current license term, whichever is earlier. For purposes of this paragraph, “date of commencement of the current license term” means the date of commencement of the last term of license for which the licensee has been granted a license by the Commission. A separate license term shall not be deemed to have commenced as a result of continuing a license in effect under section 307(c) pending decision on an application for renewal of the license.


(2) In the case of a forfeiture imposed against a carrier under sections 202(c), 203(e), and 220(d), no forfeiture will be imposed if the violation occurred more than 5 years prior to the issuance of a notice of apparent liability.


(3) In the case of a forfeiture imposed under section 227(e), no forfeiture will be imposed if the violation occurred more than 4 years prior to the date on which the appropriate notice was issued.


(4) In the case of a forfeiture imposed under section 227(b)(4)(B), no forfeiture will be imposed if the violation occurred more than 4 years prior to the date on which the appropriate notice is issued.


(5) In all other cases, no penalty shall be imposed if the violation occurred more than 1 year prior to the date on which the appropriate notice is issued.


(d) Preliminary procedure in some cases; citations. Except for a forfeiture imposed under sections 227(b), 227(e)(5), 511(a), and 511(b) of the Act, no forfeiture penalty shall be imposed upon any person under the preceding sections if such person does not hold a license, permit, certificate, or other authorization issued by the Commission, and if such person is not an applicant for a license, permit, certificate, or other authorization issued by the Commission, unless, prior to the issuance of the appropriate notice, such person:


(1) Is sent a citation reciting the violation charged;


(2) Is given a reasonable opportunity (usually 30 days) to request a personal interview with a Commission official, at the field office which is nearest to such person’s place of residence; and


(3) Subsequently engages in conduct of the type described in the citation. However, a forfeiture penalty may be imposed, if such person is engaged in (and the violation relates to) activities for which a license, permit, certificate, or other authorization is required or if such person is a cable television operator, or in the case of violations of section 303(q), if the person involved is a nonlicensee tower owner who has previously received notice of the obligations imposed by section 303(q) from the Commission or the permittee or licensee who uses that tower. Paragraph (c) of this section does not limit the issuance of citations. When the requirements of this paragraph have been satisfied with respect to a particular violation by a particular person, a forfeiture penalty may be imposed upon such person for conduct of the type described in the citation without issuance of an additional citation.


(e) Preliminary procedure in Preventing Illegal Radio Abuse Through Enforcement Act (PIRATE Act) cases. Absent good cause, in any case alleging a violation of subsection (a) or (b) of section 511 of the Act, the Commission shall proceed directly to issue a notice of apparent liability for forfeiture without first issuing a notice of unlicensed operation.


(f) Alternative procedures. In the discretion of the Commission, a forfeiture proceeding may be initiated either: (1) By issuing a notice of apparent liability, in accordance with paragraph (f) of this section, or (2) a notice of opportunity for hearing, in accordance with paragraph (g).


(g) Notice of apparent liability. Before imposing a forfeiture penalty under the provisions of this paragraph, the Commission or its designee will issue a written notice of apparent liability.


(1) Content of notice. The notice of apparent liability will:


(i) Identify each specific provision, term, or condition of any act, rule, regulation, order, treaty, convention, or other agreement, license, permit, certificate, or instrument of authorization which the respondent has apparently violated or with which he has failed to comply,


(ii) Set forth the nature of the act or omission charged against the respondent and the facts upon which such charge is based,


(iii) State the date(s) on which such conduct occurred, and


(iv) Specify the amount of the apparent forfeiture penalty.


(2) Delivery. The notice of apparent liability will be sent to the respondent, by certified mail, at his last known address (see § 1.5).


(3) Response. The respondent will be afforded a reasonable period of time (usually 30 days from the date of the notice) to show, in writing, why a forfeiture penalty should not be imposed or should be reduced, or to pay the forfeiture. Any showing as to why the forfeiture should not be imposed or should be reduced shall include a detailed factual statement and such documentation and affidavits as may be pertinent.


(4) Forfeiture order. If the proposed forfeiture penalty is not paid in full in response to the notice of apparent liability, the Commission, upon considering all relevant information available to it, will issue an order canceling or reducing the proposed forfeiture or requiring that it be paid in full and stating the date by which the forfeiture must be paid.


(5) Judicial enforcement of forfeiture order. If the forfeiture is not paid, the case will be referred to the Department of Justice for collection under section 504(a) of the Communications Act.


(h) Notice of opportunity for hearing. The procedures set out in this paragraph apply only when a formal hearing under section 503(b)(3)(A) of the Communications Act is being held to determine whether to assess a forfeiture penalty.


(1) Before imposing a forfeiture penalty, the Commission may, in its discretion, issue a notice of opportunity for hearing. The formal hearing proceeding shall be conducted by an administrative law judge under procedures set out in subpart B of this part, including procedures for appeal and review of initial decisions. A final Commission order assessing a forfeiture under the provisions of this paragraph is subject to judicial review under section 402(a) of the Communications Act.


(2) If, after a forfeiture penalty is imposed and not appealed or after a court enters final judgment in favor of the Commission, the forfeiture is not paid, the Commission will refer the matter to the Department of Justice for collection. In an action to recover the forfeiture, the validity and appropriateness of the order imposing the forfeiture are not subject to review.


(3) Where the possible assessment of a forfeiture is an issue in a hearing proceeding to determine whether a pending application should be granted, and the application is dismissed pursuant to a settlement agreement or otherwise, and the presiding judge has not made a determination on the forfeiture issue, the presiding judge shall forward the order of dismissal to the attention of the full Commission. Within the time provided by § 1.117, the Commission may, on its own motion, proceed with a determination of whether a forfeiture against the applicant is warranted. If the Commission so proceeds, it will provide the applicant with a reasonable opportunity to respond to the forfeiture issue (see paragraph (f)(3) of this section) and make a determination under the procedures outlined in paragraph (f) of this section.


(i) Payment. The forfeiture should be paid electronically using the Commission’s electronic payment system in accordance with the procedures set forth on the Commission’s website, www.fcc.gov/licensing-databases/fees.


(j) Remission and mitigation. In its discretion, the Commission, or its designee, may remit or reduce any forfeiture imposed under this section. After issuance of a forfeiture order, any request that it do so shall be submitted as a petition for reconsideration pursuant to § 1.106.


(k) Effective date. Amendments to paragraph (b) of this section implementing Pub. L. No. 101-239 are effective December 19, 1989.


[43 FR 49308, Oct. 23, 1978, as amended at 48 FR 15631, Apr. 12, 1983; 50 FR 40855, Oct. 7, 1985; 55 FR 25605, June 22, 1990; 56 FR 25638, June 5, 1991; 57 FR 23161, June 2, 1992; 57 FR 47006, Oct. 14, 1992; 57 FR 48333, Oct. 23, 1992; 58 FR 6896, Feb. 3, 1993; 58 FR 27473, May 10, 1993; 62 FR 4918, Feb. 3, 1997; 62 FR 43475, Aug. 14, 1997; 63 FR 26992, May 15, 1998; 65 FR 60868, Oct. 13, 2000; 69 FR 47789, Aug. 6, 2004; 72 FR 33914, June 20, 2007; 73 FR 9018, Feb. 19, 2008; 73 FR 44664, July 31, 2008; 76 FR 43203, July 20, 2011; 76 FR 82388, Dec. 30, 2011; 77 FR 71137, Nov. 29, 2012; 78 FR 10100, Feb. 13, 2013; 78 FR 49371, Aug. 14, 2013; 81 FR 42555, June 30, 2016; 82 FR 8171, Jan. 24, 2017; 82 FR 57882, Dec. 8, 2017; 83 FR 4600, Feb. 1. 2018; 84 FR 2462, Feb. 7, 2019; 85 FR 2318, Jan. 15, 2020; 85 FR 22029, Apr. 21, 2020; 85 FR 38333, June 26, 2020; 85 FR 63172, Oct. 6, 2020; 86 FR 3830, Jan. 15, 2021; 86 FR 15797, Mar. 25, 2021; 86 FR 18159, Apr. 7, 2021; 87 FR 397, Jan. 5, 2022]


§ 1.83 Applications for radio operator licenses.

(a) Application filing procedures for amateur radio operator licenses are set forth in part 97 of this chapter.


(b) Application filing procedures for commercial radio operator licenses are set forth in part 13 of this chapter. Detailed information about application forms, filing procedures, and where to file applications for commercial radio operator licenses is contained in the bulletin “Commercial Radio Operator Licenses and Permits.” This bulletin is available from the Commission’s Forms Distribution Center by calling 1-800-418-FORM (3676).


[47 FR 53378, Nov. 26, 1982, as amended at 58 FR 13021, Mar. 9, 1993; 63 FR 68920, Dec. 14, 1998]


§ 1.85 Suspension of operator licenses.

Whenever grounds exist for suspension of an operator license, as provided in section 303(m) of the Communications Act, the Chief of the Wireless Telecommunications Bureau, with respect to amateur and commercial radio operator licenses, may issue an order suspending the operator license. No order of suspension of any operator’s license shall take effect until 15 days’ notice in writing of the cause for the proposed suspension has been given to the operator licensee, who may make written application to the Commission at any time within the said 15 days for a hearing upon such order. The notice to the operator licensee shall not be effective until actually received by him, and from that time he shall have 15 days in which to email the said application. In the event that conditions prevent emailing of the application before the expiration of the 15-day period, the application shall then be emailed as soon as possible thereafter, accompanied by a satisfactory explanation of the delay. Upon receipt by the Commission of such application for hearing, said order of suspension shall be designated for hearing by the Chief, Wireless Telecommunications Bureau and said suspension shall be held in abeyance until the conclusion of the hearing. Upon the conclusion of said hearing, the Commission may affirm, modify, or revoke said order of suspension. If the license is ordered suspended, the operator shall send his operator license to the Mobility Division, Wireless Telecommunications Bureau, in Washington, DC, on or before the effective date of the order, or, if the effective date has passed at the time notice is received, the license shall be sent to the Commission forthwith.


[85 FR 85529, Dec. 29, 2020]


§ 1.87 Modification of license or construction permit on motion of the Commission.

(a) Whenever it appears that a station license or construction permit should be modified, the Commission shall notify the licensee or permittee in writing of the proposed action and reasons therefor, and afford the licensee or permittee at least thirty days to protest such proposed order of modification, except that, where safety of life or property is involved, the Commission may by order provide a shorter period of time.


(b) The notification required in paragraph (a) of this section may be effectuated by a notice of proposed rulemaking in regard to a modification or addition of an FM or television channel to the Table of Allotments (§§ 73.202 and 73.504 of this chapter) or Table of Assignments (§ 73.606 of this chapter). The Commission shall send a copy of any such notice of proposed rulemaking to the affected licensee or permittee by email. For modifications involving Wireless Radio Services, the Commission shall notify the licensee or permittee by email of the proposed action and reasons therefor, and afford the licensee or permittee at least thirty days to protest such proposed order of modification, except that:


(1) Where safety of life or property is involved, the Commission may by order provide a shorter period of time; and


(2) Where the notification required in paragraph (a) of this section is effectuated by publication in the Federal Register, the Commission shall afford the licensee or permittee at least thirty days after publication in the Federal Register to protest such proposed order of modification.


(c) Any other licensee or permittee who believes that its license or permit would be modified by the proposed action may also protest the proposed action before its effective date.


(d) Any protest filed pursuant to this section shall be subject to the requirements of section 309 of the Communications Act of 1934, as amended, for petitions to deny.


(e) In any case where a hearing proceeding is conducted pursuant to the provisions of this section, both the burden of proceeding with the introduction of evidence and the burden of proof shall be upon the Commission except that, with respect to any issue that pertains to the question of whether the proposed action would modify the license or permit of a person filing a protest pursuant to paragraph (c) of this section, such burdens shall be as described by the Commission.


(f) In order to use the right to a hearing and the opportunity to give evidence upon the issues specified in any order designating a matter for hearing, any licensee, or permittee, itself or by counsel, shall, within the period of time as may be specified in that order, file with the Commission a written appearance stating that it will present evidence on the matters specified in the order and, if required, appear before the presiding officer at a date and time to be determined.


(g) The right to file a protest or the right to a hearing proceeding shall, unless good cause is shown in a petition to be filed not later than 5 days before the lapse of time specified in paragraph (a) or (f) of this section, be deemed waived:


(1) In case of failure to timely file the protest as required by paragraph (a) of this section or a written statement as required by paragraph (f) of this section.


(2) In case of filing a written statement provided for in paragraph (f) of this section but failing to appear at the hearing, either in person or by counsel.


(h) Where the right to file a protest or have a hearing is waived, the licensee or permittee will be deemed to have consented to the modification as proposed and a final decision may be issued by the Commission accordingly. Irrespective of any waiver as provided for in paragraph (g) of this section or failure by the licensee or permittee to raise a substantial and material question of fact concerning the proposed modification in his protest, the Commission may, on its own motion, designate the proposed modification for hearing in accordance with this section.


(i) Any order of modification issued pursuant to this section shall include a statement of the findings and the grounds and reasons therefor, shall specify the effective date of the modification, and shall be served on the licensee or permittee.


[52 FR 22654, June 15, 1987, as amended at 85 FR 63172, Oct. 6, 2020; 85 FR 85529, Dec. 29, 2020]


§ 1.88 Predesignation pleading procedure.

In cases where an investigation is being conducted by the Commission in connection with the operation of a broadcast station or a pending application for renewal of a broadcast license, the licensee may file a written statement to the Commission setting forth its views regarding the matters under investigation; the staff, in its discretion, may in writing, advise such licensee of the general nature of the investigation, and advise the licensee of its opportunity to submit such a statement to the staff. Any filing by the licensee will be forwarded to the Commission in conjunction with any staff memorandum recommending that the Commission take action as a result of the invesigation. Nothing in this rule shall supersede the application of our ex parte rules to situations described in § 1.1203 of these rules.


(Secs. 4, 303, 307, 48 Stat., as amended, 1066, 1082, 1083; (47 U.S.C. 154, 303, 307))

[45 FR 65597, Oct. 3, 1980]


§ 1.89 Notice of violations.

(a) Except in cases of willfulness or those in which public health, interest, or safety requires otherwise, any person who holds a license, permit or other authorization appearing to have violated any provision of the Communications Act or any provision of this chapter will, before revocation, suspension, or cease and desist proceedings are instituted, be served with a written notice calling these facts to his or her attention and requesting a statement concerning the matter. FCC Form 793 may be used for this purpose. The Notice of Violation may be combined with a Notice of Apparent Liability to Monetary Forfeiture. In such event, notwithstanding the Notice of Violation, the provisions of § 1.80 apply and not those of § 1.89.


(b) Within 10 days from receipt of notice or such other period as may be specified, the recipient shall send a written answer, in duplicate, directly to the Commission office originating the official notice. If an answer cannot be sent or an acknowledgment cannot be made within such 10-day period by reason of illness or other unavoidable circumstance, acknowledgment and answer shall be made at the earliest practicable date with a satisfactory explanation of the delay.


(c) The answer to each notice shall be complete in itself and shall not be abbreviated by reference to other communications or answers to other notices. In every instance the answer shall contain a statement of action taken to correct the condition or omission complained of and to preclude its recurrence. In addition:


(1) If the notice relates to violations that may be due to the physical or electrical characteristics of transmitting apparatus and any new apparatus is to be installed, the answer shall state the date such apparatus was ordered, the name of the manufacturer, and the promised date of delivery. If the installation of such apparatus requires a construction permit, the file number of the application shall be given, or if a file number has not been assigned by the Commission, such identification shall be given as will permit ready identification of the application.


(2) If the notice of violation relates to lack of attention to or improper operation of the transmitter, the name and license number of the operator in charge (where applicable) shall be given.


[48 FR 24890, June 3, 1983]


§ 1.91 Revocation and/or cease and desist proceedings; hearings.

(a) If it appears that a station license or construction permit should be revoked and/or that a cease and desist order should be issued, the Commission will issue an order directing the person to show cause why an order of revocation and/or a cease and desist order, as the facts may warrant, should not be issued.


(b) An order to show cause why an order of revocation and/or a cease and desist order should not be issued will designate for hearing the matters with respect to which the Commission is inquiring and will call upon the person to whom it is directed (the respondent) to file with the Commission a written appearance stating that the respondent will present evidence upon the matters specified in the order to show cause and, if required, appear before a presiding officer at a time and place to be determined, but no earlier than thirty days after the receipt of such order. However, if safety of life or property is involved, the order to show cause may specify a deadline of less than thirty days from the receipt of such order.


(c) To avail themselves of such opportunity for a hearing, respondents, personally or by counsel, shall file with the Commission, within twenty days of the mailing of the order or such shorter period as may be specified therein, a written appearance stating that they will present evidence on the matters specified in the order and, if required, appear before the presiding officer at a time and place to be determined. The presiding officer in his or her discretion may accept a late-filed appearance. However, a written appearance tendered after the specified time has expired will not be accepted unless accompanied by a petition stating with particularity the facts and reasons relied on to justify such late filing. Such petition for acceptance of a late-filed appearance will be granted only if the presiding officer determines that the facts and reasons stated therein constitute good cause for failure to file on time.


(d) Hearing proceedings on the matters specified in such orders to show cause shall accord with the practice and procedure prescribed in this subpart and subpart B of this part, with the following exceptions:


(1) In all such revocation and/or cease and desist hearings, the burden of proceeding with the introduction of evidence and the burden of proof shall be upon the Commission; and


(2) The Commission may specify in a show cause order, when the circumstances of the proceeding require expedition, a time less than that prescribed in §§ 1.276 and 1.277 within which the initial decision in the proceeding shall become effective, exceptions to such initial decision must be filed, parties must file requests for oral argument, and parties must file notice of intention to participate in oral argument.


(e) Correction of or promise to correct the conditions or matters complained of in a show cause order shall not preclude the issuance of a cease and desist order. Corrections or promises to correct the conditions or matters complained of, and the past record of the licensee, may, however, be considered in determining whether a revocation and/or a cease and desist order should be issued.


(f) Any order of revocation and/or cease and desist order issued after hearing pursuant to this section shall include a statement of findings and the grounds therefor, shall specify the effective date of the order, and shall be served on the person to whom such order is directed.


(Sec. 312, 48 Stat. 1086, as amended; 47 U.S.C. 312)

[28 FR 12415, Nov. 22, 1963, as amended at 85 FR 63172, Oct. 6, 2020]


§ 1.92 Revocation and/or cease and desist proceedings; after waiver of hearing.

(a) After the issuance of an order to show cause, pursuant to § 1.91, designating a matter for hearing, the occurrence of any one of the following events or circumstances will constitute a waiver of such hearing and the proceeding thereafter will be conducted in accordance with the provisions of this section.


(1) The respondent fails to file a timely written appearance as prescribed in § 1.91(c) indicating that the respondent will present evidence on the matters specified in the order and, if required by the order, that the respondent will appear before the presiding officer.


(2) The respondent, having filed a timely written appearance as prescribed in § 1.91(c), fails in fact to present evidence on the matters specified in the order or appear before the presiding officer in person or by counsel at the time and place duly scheduled.


(3) The respondent files with the Commission, within the time specified for a written appearance in § 1.91(c), a written statement expressly waiving his or her rights to a hearing.


(b) When a hearing is waived under the provisions of paragraph (a) (1) or (3) of this section, a written statement signed by the respondent denying or seeking to mitigate or justify the circumstances or conduct complained of in the order to show cause may be submitted within the time specified in § 1.91(c). The Commission in its discretion may accept a late statement. However, a statement tendered after the specified time has expired will not be accepted unless accompanied by a petition stating with particularity the facts and reasons relied on to justify such late filing. Such petitions for acceptance of a late statement will be granted only if the Commission determines that the facts and reasons stated therein constitute good cause for failure to file on time.


(c) Whenever a hearing is waived by the occurrence of any of the events or circumstances listed in paragraph (a) of this section, the presiding officer shall, at the earliest practicable date, issue an order reciting the events or circumstances constituting a waiver of hearing and terminating the hearing proceeding. A presiding officer other than the Commission also shall certify the case to the Commission. Such order shall be served upon the respondent.


(d) After a hearing proceeding has been terminated pursuant to paragraph (c) of this section, the Commission will act upon the matters specified in the order to show cause in the regular course of business. The Commission will determine on the basis of all the information available to it from any source, including such further proceedings as may be warranted, if a revocation order and/or a cease and desist order should issue, and if so, will issue such order. Otherwise, the Commission will issue an order dismissing the proceeding. All orders specified in this paragraph will include a statement of the findings of the Commission and the grounds and reasons therefor, will specify the effective date thereof, and will be served upon the respondent.


(e) Corrections or promise to correct the conditions or matters complained of in a show cause order shall not preclude the issuance of a cease and desist order. Corrections or promises to correct the conditions or matters complained of, and the past record of the licensee, may, however, be considered in determining whether a revocation and/or a cease and desist order should be issued.


(Sec. 312, 48 Stat. 1086, as amended; 47 U.S.C. 312)

[28 FR 12415, Nov. 22, 1963, as amended at 29 FR 6443, May 16, 1964; 37 FR 19372, Sept. 20, 1972; 85 FR 63173, Oct. 6, 2020]


§ 1.93 Consent orders.

(a) As used in this subpart, a “consent order” is a formal decree accepting an agreement between a party to an adjudicatory hearing proceeding held to determine whether that party has violated statutes or Commission rules or policies and the appropriate operating Bureau, with regard to such party’s future compliance with such statutes, rules or policies, and disposing of all issues on which the proceeding was designated for hearing. The order is issued by the officer designated to preside at the hearing proceeding.


(b) Where the interests of timely enforcement or compliance, the nature of the proceeding, and the public interest permit, the Commission, by its operating Bureaus, may negotiate a consent order with a party to secure future compliance with the law in exchange for prompt disposition of a matter subject to administrative adjudicative proceedings. Consent orders may not be negotiated with respect to matters which involve a party’s basic statutory qualifications to hold a license (see 47 U.S.C. 308 and 309).


[41 FR 14871, Apr. 8, 1976, as amended at 85 FR 63173, Oct. 6, 2020]


§ 1.94 Consent order procedures.

(a) Negotiations leading to a consent order may be initiated by the operating Bureau or by a party whose possible violations are issues in the proceeding. Negotiations may be initiated at any time after designation of a proceeding for hearing. If negotiations are initiated the presiding officer shall be notified. Parties shall be prepared at the initial prehearing conference to state whether they are at that time willing to enter negotiations. See § 1.248(c)(7). If either party is unwilling to enter negotiations, the hearing proceeding shall proceed. If the parties agree to enter negotiations, they will be afforded an appropriate opportunity to negotiate before the hearing is commenced.


(b) Other parties to the proceeding are entitled, but are not required, to participate in the negotiations, and may join in any agreement which is reached.


(c) Every agreement shall contain the following:


(1) An admission of all jurisdictional facts;


(2) A waiver of the usual procedures for preparation and review of an initial decision;


(3) A waiver of the right of judicial review or otherwise to challenge or contest the validity of the consent order;


(4) A statement that the designation order may be used in construing the consent order;


(5) A statement that the agreement shall become a part of the record of the proceeding only if the consent order is signed by the presiding officer and the time for review has passed without rejection of the order by the Commission;


(6) A statement that the agreement is for purposes of settlement only and that its signing does not constitute an admission by any party of any violation of law, rules or policy (see 18 U.S.C. 6002); and


(7) A draft order for signature of the presiding officer resolving by consent, and for the future, all issues specified in the designation order.


(d) If agreement is reached, it shall be submitted to the presiding officer, who shall either sign the order, reject the agreement, or suggest to the parties that negotiations continue on such portion of the agreement as the presiding officer considers unsatisfactory or on matters not reached in the agreement. If the presiding officer signs the consent order, the record shall be closed. If the presiding officer rejects the agreement, the hearing proceeding shall continue. If the presiding officer suggests further negotiations and the parties agree to resume negotiating, the presiding officer may, in his or her discretion, decide whether to hold the hearing proceeding in abeyance pending the negotiations.


(e) Any party to the proceeding who has not joined in any agreement which is reached may appeal the consent order under § 1.302, and the Commission may review the agreement on its own motion under the provisions of that section. If the Commission rejects the consent order, the proceeding will be remanded for further proceedings. If the Commission does not reject the consent order, it shall be entered in the record as a final order and is subject to judicial review on the initiative only of parties to the proceeding who did not join in the agreement. The Commission may revise the agreement and consent order. In that event, private parties to the agreement may either accept the revision or withdraw from the agreement. If the party whose possible violations are issues in the proceeding withdraws from the agreement, the consent order will not be issued or made a part of the record, and the proceeding will be remanded for further proceedings.


(f) The provisions of this section shall not alter any existing procedure for informal settlement of any matter prior to designation for hearing (see, e.g., 47 U.S.C. 208) or for summary decision after designation for hearing.


(g) Consent orders, pleadings relating thereto, and Commission orders with respect thereto shall be served on parties to the proceeding. Public notice will be given of orders issued by the Commission or by the presiding officer. Negotiating papers constitute work product, are available to parties participating in negotiations, but are not routinely available for public inspection.


[41 FR 14871, Apr. 8, 1976, as amended at 85 FR 63173, Oct. 6, 2020]


§ 1.95 Violation of consent orders.

Violation of a consent order shall subject the consenting party to any and all sanctions which could have been imposed in the proceeding resulting in the consent order if all of the issues in that proceeding had been decided against the consenting party and to any further sanctions for violation noted as agreed upon in the consent order. The Commission shall have the burden of showing that the consent order has been violated in some (but not in every) respect. Violation of the consent order and the sanctions to be imposed shall be the only issues considered in a proceeding concerning such an alleged violation.


[41 FR 14871, Apr. 8, 1976]


Reconsideration and Review of Actions Taken by the Commission and Pursuant to Delegated Authority; Effective Dates and Finality Dates of Actions

§ 1.101 General provisions.

Under section 5(c) of the Communications Act of 1934, as amended, the Commission is authorized, by rule or order, to delegate certain of its functions to a panel of commissioners, an individual commissioner, an employee board, or an individual employee. Section 0.201(a) of this chapter describes in general terms the basic categories of delegations which are made by the Commission. Subpart B of part 0 of this chapter sets forth all delegations which have been made by rule. Sections 1.102 through 1.117 set forth procedural rules governing reconsideration and review of actions taken pursuant to authority delegated under section 5(c) of the Communications Act, and reconsideration of actions taken by the Commission. As used in §§ 1.102 through 1.117, the term designated authority means any person, panel, or board which has been authorized by rule or order to exercise authority under section 5(c) of the Communications Act.


[76 FR 70908, Nov. 16, 2011]


§ 1.102 Effective dates of actions taken pursuant to delegated authority.

(a) Final actions following review of an initial decision. (1) Final decisions of a commissioner, or panel of commissioners following review of an initial decision shall be effective 40 days after public release of the full text of such final decision.


(2) If a petition for reconsideration of such final decision is filed, the effect of the decision is stayed until 40 days after release of the final order disposing of the petition.


(3) If an application for review of such final decision is filed, or if the Commission on its own motion orders the record of the proceeding before it for review, the effect of the decision is stayed until the Commission’s review of the proceeding has been completed.


(b) Non-hearing and interlocutory actions. (1) Non-hearing or interlocutory actions taken pursuant to delegated authority shall, unless otherwise ordered by the designated authority, be effective upon release of the document containing the full text of such action, or in the event such a document is not released, upon release of a public notice announcing the action in question.


(2) If a petition for reconsideration of a non-hearing action is filed, the designated authority may in its discretion stay the effect of its action pending disposition of the petition for reconsideration. Petitions for reconsideration of interlocutory actions will not be entertained.


(3) If an application for review of a non-hearing or interlocutory action is filed, or if the Commission reviews the action on its own motion, the Commission may in its discretion stay the effect of any such action until its review of the matters at issue has been completed.


[28 FR 12415, Nov. 22, 1963, as amended at 62 FR 4170, Jan. 29, 1997]


§ 1.103 Effective dates of Commission actions; finality of Commission actions.

(a) Unless otherwise specified by law or Commission rule (e.g. §§ 1.102 and 1.427), the effective date of any Commission action shall be the date of public notice of such action as that latter date is defined in § 1.4(b) of these rules: Provided, That the Commission may, on its own motion or on motion by any party, designate an effective date that is either earlier or later in time than the date of public notice of such action. The designation of an earlier or later effective date shall have no effect on any pleading periods.


(b) Notwithstanding any determinations made under paragraph (a) of this section, Commission action shall be deemed final, for purposes of seeking reconsideration at the Commission or judicial review, on the date of public notice as defined in § 1.4(b) of these rules.


(Secs. 4, 303, 307, 48 Stat., as amended, 1066, 1082, 1083; 47 U.S.C. 154, 303, 307)

[46 FR 18556, Mar. 25, 1981]


§ 1.104 Preserving the right of review; deferred consideration of application for review.

(a) The provisions of this section apply to all final actions taken pursuant to delegated authority, including final actions taken by members of the Commission’s staff on nonhearing matters. They do not apply to interlocutory actions of a presiding officer in hearing proceedings, or to orders designating a matter for hearing issued under delegated authority. See §§ 1.106(a) and 1.115(e).


(b) Any person desiring Commission consideration of a final action taken pursuant to delegated authority shall file either a petition for reconsideration or an application for review (but not both) within 30 days from the date of public notice of such action, as that date is defined in § 1.4(b). The petition for reconsideration will be acted on by the designated authority or referred by such authority to the Commission: Provided that a petition for reconsideration of an order designating a matter for hearing will in all cases be referred to the Commission. The application for review will be acted upon by the Commission, except in those cases where a Bureau or Office has been delegated authority to dismiss an application for review.



Note:

In those cases where the Commission does not intend to release a document containing the full text of its action, it will state that fact in the public notice announcing its action.


(c) If in any matter one party files a petition for reconsideration and a second party files an application for review, the Commission will withhold action on the application for review until final action has been taken on the petition for reconsideration.


(d) Any person who has filed a petition for reconsideration may file an application for review within 30 days from the date of public notice of such action, as that date is defined in § 1.4(b) of these rules. If a petition for reconsideration has been filed, any person who has filed an application for review may: (1) Withdraw his application for review, or (2) substitute an amended application therefor.


[28 FR 12415, Nov. 22, 1963, as amended at 41 FR 14871, Apr. 8, 1976; 44 FR 60294, Oct. 19, 1979; 46 FR 18556, Mar. 25, 1981; 62 FR 4170, Jan. 29, 1997; 85 FR 63173, Oct. 6, 2020; 86 FR 12547, Mar. 4, 2021]


§ 1.106 Petitions for reconsideration in non-rulemaking proceedings.

(a)(1) Except as provided in paragraphs (b)(3) and (p) of this section, petitions requesting reconsideration of a final Commission action in non-rulemaking proceedings will be acted on by the Commission. Petitions requesting reconsideration of other final actions taken pursuant to delegated authority will be acted on by the designated authority or referred by such authority to the Commission. A petition for reconsideration of an order designating a case for hearing will be entertained if, and insofar as, the petition relates to an adverse ruling with respect to petitioner’s participation in the proceeding. Petitions for reconsideration of other interlocutory actions will not be entertained. (For provisions governing reconsideration of Commission action in notice and comment rulemaking proceedings, see § 1.429. This § 1.106 does not govern reconsideration of such actions.)


(2) Within the period allowed for filing a petition for reconsideration, any party to the proceeding may request the presiding officer to certify to the Commission the question as to whether, on policy in effect at the time of designation or adopted since designation, and undisputed facts, a hearing should be held. If the presiding officer finds that there is substantial doubt, on established policy and undisputed facts, that a hearing should be held, he will certify the policy question to the Commission with a statement to that effect. No appeal may be filed from an order denying such a request. See also, §§ 1.229 and 1.251.


(b)(1) Subject to the limitations set forth in paragraph (b)(2) of this section, any party to the proceeding, or any other person whose interests are adversely affected by any action taken by the Commission or by the designated authority, may file a petition requesting reconsideration of the action taken. If the petition is filed by a person who is not a party to the proceeding, it shall state with particularity the manner in which the person’s interests are adversely affected by the action taken, and shall show good reason why it was not possible for him to participate in the earlier stages of the proceeding.


(2) Where the Commission has denied an application for review, a petition for reconsideration will be entertained only if one or more of the following circumstances are present:


(i) The petition relies on facts or arguments which relate to events which have occurred or circumstances which have changed since the last opportunity to present such matters to the Commission; or


(ii) The petition relies on facts or arguments unknown to petitioner until after his last opportunity to present them to the Commission, and he could not through the exercise of ordinary diligence have learned of the facts or arguments in question prior to such opportunity.


(3) A petition for reconsideration of an order denying an application for review which fails to rely on new facts or changed circumstances may be dismissed by the staff as repetitious.


(c) In the case of any order other than an order denying an application for review, a petition for reconsideration which relies on facts or arguments not previously presented to the Commission or to the designated authority may be granted only under the following circumstances:


(1) The facts or arguments fall within one or more of the categories set forth in § 1.106(b)(2); or


(2) The Commission or the designated authority determines that consideration of the facts or arguments relied on is required in the public interest.


(d)(1) A petition for reconsideration shall state with particularity the respects in which petitioner believes the action taken by the Commission or the designated authority should be changed. The petition shall state specifically the form of relief sought and, subject to this requirement, may contain alternative requests.


(2) A petition for reconsideration of a decision that sets forth formal findings of fact and conclusions of law shall also cite the findings and/or conclusions which petitioner believes to be erroneous, and shall state with particularity the respects in which he believes such findings and/or conclusions should be changed. The petition may request that additional findings of fact and/or conclusions of law be made.


(e) Where a petition for reconsideration is based upon a claim of electrical interference, under appropriate rules in this chapter, to an existing station or a station for which a construction permit is outstanding, such petition, in addition to meeting the other requirements of this section, must be accompanied by an affidavit of a qualified radio engineer. Such affidavit shall show, either by following the procedures set forth in this chapter for determining interference in the absence of measurements, or by actual measurements made in accordance with the methods prescribed in this chapter, that electrical interference will be caused to the station within its normally protected contour.


(f) The petition for reconsideration and any supplement thereto shall be filed within 30 days from the date of public notice of the final Commission action, as that date is defined in § 1.4(b) of these rules, and shall be served upon parties to the proceeding. The petition for reconsideration shall not exceed 25 double spaced typewritten pages. No supplement or addition to a petition for reconsideration which has not been acted upon by the Commission or by the designated authority, filed after expiration of the 30 day period, will be considered except upon leave granted upon a separate pleading for leave to file, which shall state the grounds therefor.


(g) Oppositions to a petition for reconsideration shall be filed within 10 days after the petition is filed, and shall be served upon petitioner and parties to the proceeding. Oppositions shall not exceed 25 double spaced typewritten pages.


(h) Petitioner may reply to oppositions within seven days after the last day for filing oppositions, and any such reply shall be served upon parties to the proceeding. Replies shall not exceed 10 double spaced typewritten pages, and shall be limited to matters raised in the opposition.


(i) Petitions for reconsideration, oppositions, and replies shall conform to the requirements of §§ 1.49, 1.51, and 1.52 and, except for those related to licensing matters in the Wireless Radio Service and addressed in paragraph (o) of this section, shall be submitted to the Secretary, Federal Communications Commission, Washington, DC 20554, by mail, by commercial courier, by hand, or by electronic submission through the Commission’s Electronic Comment Filing System or other electronic filing system (such as ULS). Petitions submitted only by electronic mail and petitions submitted directly to staff without submission to the Secretary shall not be considered to have been properly filed. Parties filing in electronic form need only submit one copy.


(j) The Commission or designated authority may grant the petition for reconsideration in whole or in part or may deny or dismiss the petition. Its order will contain a concise statement of the reasons for the action taken. Where the petition for reconsideration relates to an instrument of authorization granted without hearing, the Commission or designated authority will take such action within 90 days after the petition is filed.


(k)(1) If the Commission or the designated authority grants the petition for reconsideration in whole or in part, it may, in its decision:


(i) Simultaneously reverse or modify the order from which reconsideration is sought;


(ii) Remand the matter to a bureau or other Commission personnel for such further proceedings, including rehearing, as may be appropriate; or


(iii) Order such other proceedings as may be necessary or appropriate.


(2) If the Commission or designated authority initiates further proceedings, a ruling on the merits of the matter will be deferred pending completion of such proceedings. Following completion of such further proceedings, the Commission or designated authority may affirm, reverse, or modify its original order, or it may set aside the order and remand the matter for such further proceedings, including rehearing, as may be appropriate.


(3) Any order disposing of a petition for reconsideration which reverses or modifies the original order is subject to the same provisions with respect to reconsideration as the original order. In no event, however, shall a ruling which denies a petition for reconsideration be considered a modification of the original order. A petition for reconsideration of an order which has been previously denied on reconsideration may be dismissed by the staff as repetitious.



Note:

For purposes of this section, the word “order” refers to that portion of its action wherein the Commission announces its judgment. This should be distinguished from the “memorandum opinion” or other material which often accompany and explain the order.


(l) No evidence other than newly discovered evidence, evidence which has become available only since the original taking of evidence, or evidence which the Commission or the designated authority believes should have been taken in the original proceeding shall be taken on any rehearing ordered pursuant to the provisions of this section.


(m) The filing of a petition for reconsideration is not a condition precedent to judicial review of any action taken by the Commission or by the designated authority, except where the person seeking such review was not a party to the proceeding resulting in the action, or relies on questions of fact or law upon which the Commission or designated authority has been afforded no opportunity to pass. (See § 1.115(c).) Persons in those categories who meet the requirements of this section may qualify to seek judicial review by filing a petition for reconsideration.


(n) Without special order of the Commission, the filing of a petition for reconsideration shall not excuse any person from complying with or obeying any decision, order, or requirement of the Commission, or operate in any manner to stay or postpone the enforcement thereof. However, upon good cause shown, the Commission will stay the effectiveness of its order or requirement pending a decision on the petition for reconsideration. (This paragraph applies only to actions of the Commission en banc. For provisions applicable to actions under delegated authority, see § 1.102.)


(o) Petitions for reconsideration of licensing actions, as well as oppositions and replies thereto, that are filed with respect to the Wireless Radio Services, must be filed electronically via ULS.


(p) Petitions for reconsideration of a Commission action that plainly do not warrant consideration by the Commission may be dismissed or denied by the relevant bureau(s) or office(s). Examples include, but are not limited to, petitions that:


(1) Fail to identify any material error, omission, or reason warranting reconsideration;


(2) Rely on facts or arguments which have not previously been presented to the Commission and which do not meet the requirements of paragraphs (b)(2), (b)(3), or (c) of this section;


(3) Rely on arguments that have been fully considered and rejected by the Commission within the same proceeding;


(4) Fail to state with particularity the respects in which petitioner believes the action taken should be changed as required by paragraph (d) of this section;


(5) Relate to matters outside the scope of the order for which reconsideration is sought;


(6) Omit information required by these rules to be included with a petition for reconsideration, such as the affidavit required by paragraph (e) of this section (relating to electrical interference);


(7) Fail to comply with the procedural requirements set forth in paragraphs (f) and (i) of this section;


(8) relate to an order for which reconsideration has been previously denied on similar grounds, except for petitions which could be granted under paragraph (c) of this section; or


(9) Are untimely.


(Secs. 4, 303, 307, 405, 48 Stat., as amended, 1066, 1082, 1083, 1095; 47 U.S.C. 154, 303, 307, 405)

[28 FR 12415, Nov. 22, 1963, as amended at 37 FR 7507, Apr. 15, 1972; 41 FR 1287, Jan. 7, 1976; 44 FR 60294, Oct. 19, 1979; 46 FR 18556, Mar. 25, 1981; 62 FR 4170, Jan. 29, 1997; 63 FR 68920, Dec. 14, 1998; 76 FR 24391, May 2, 2011; 85 FR 85529, Dec. 29, 2020]


§ 1.108 Reconsideration on Commission’s own motion.

The Commission may, on its own motion, reconsider any action made or taken by it within 30 days from the date of public notice of such action, as that date is defined in § 1.4(b). When acting on its own motion under this section, the Commission may take any action it could take in acting on a petition for reconsideration, as set forth in § 1.106(k).


[76 FR 24392, May 2, 2011]


§ 1.110 Partial grants; rejection and designation for hearing.

Where the Commission without a hearing grants any application in part, or with any privileges, terms, or conditions other than those requested, or subject to any interference that may result to a station if designated application or applications are subsequently granted, the action of the Commission shall be considered as a grant of such application unless the applicant shall, within 30 days from the date on which such grant is made or from its effective date if a later date is specified, file with the Commission a written request rejecting the grant as made. Upon receipt of such request, the Commission will vacate its original action upon the application and set the application for hearing in the same manner as other applications are set for hearing.


§ 1.113 Action modified or set aside by person, panel, or board.

(a) Within 30 days after public notice has been given of any action taken pursuant to delegated authority, the person, panel, or board taking the action may modify or set it aside on its own motion.


(b) Within 60 days after notice of any sanction imposed under delegated authority has been served on the person affected, the person, panel, or board which imposed the sanction may modify or set it aside on its own motion.


(c) Petitions for reconsideration and applications for review shall be directed to the actions as thus modified, and the time for filing such pleadings shall be computed from the date upon which public notice of the modified action is given or notice of the modified sanction is served on the person affected.


§ 1.115 Application for review of action taken pursuant to delegated authority.

(a) Any person aggrieved by any action taken pursuant to delegated authority may file an application requesting review of that action by the Commission. Any person filing an application for review who has not previously participated in the proceeding shall include with his application a statement describing with particularity the manner in which he is aggrieved by the action taken and showing good reason why it was not possible for him to participate in the earlier stages of the proceeding. Any application for review which fails to make an adequate showing in this respect will be dismissed.


(b)(1) The application for review shall concisely and plainly state the questions presented for review with reference, where appropriate, to the findings of fact or conclusions of law.


(2) The application for review shall specify with particularity, from among the following, the factor(s) which warrant Commission consideration of the questions presented:


(i) The action taken pursuant to delegated authority is in conflict with statute, regulation, case precedent, or established Commission policy.


(ii) The action involves a question of law or policy which has not previously been resolved by the Commission.


(iii) The action involves application of a precedent or policy which should be overturned or revised.


(iv) An erroneous finding as to an important or material question of fact.


(v) Prejudicial procedural error.


(3) The application for review shall state with particularity the respects in which the action taken by the designated authority should be changed.


(4) The application for review shall state the form of relief sought and, subject to this requirement, may contain alternative requests.


(c) No application for review will be granted if it relies on questions of fact or law upon which the designated authority has been afforded no opportunity to pass.



Note:

Subject to the requirements of § 1.106, new questions of fact or law may be presented to the designated authority in a petition for reconsideration.


(d) Except as provided in paragraph (e) of this section and in § 0.461(j) of this chapter, the application for review and any supplemental thereto shall be filed within 30 days of public notice of such action, as that date is defined in § 1.4(b). Opposition to the application shall be filed within 15 days after the application for review is filed. Except as provided in paragraph (e)(1) of this section, replies to oppositions shall be filed within 10 days after the opposition is filed and shall be limited to matters raised in the opposition.


(e)(1) Applications for review of an order designating a matter for hearing that was issued under delegated authority shall be deferred until exceptions to the initial decision in the case are filed, unless the presiding officer certifies such an application for review to the Commission. A matter shall be certified to the Commission if the presiding officer determines that the matter involves a controlling question of law as to which there is substantial ground for difference of opinion and that immediate consideration of the question would materially expedite the ultimate resolution of the litigation. A request to certify a matter to the Commission shall be filed with the presiding officer within 5 days after the designation order is released. A ruling refusing to certify a matter to the Commission is not appealable. Any application for review authorized by the presiding officer shall be filed within 5 days after the order certifying the matter to the Commission is released or such a ruling is made. Oppositions shall be filed within 5 days after the application for review is filed. Replies to oppositions shall be filed only if they are requested by the Commission. Replies (if allowed) shall be filed within 5 days after they are requested. The Commission may dismiss, without stating reasons, an application for review that has been certified, and direct that the objections to the order designating the matter for hearing be deferred and raised when exceptions in the initial decision in the case are filed.


(2) Applications for review of final staff decisions issued on delegated authority in formal complaint proceedings on the Enforcement Bureau’s Accelerated Docket (see, e.g., § 1.730) shall be filed within 15 days of public notice of the decision, as that date is defined in § 1.4(b). These applications for review oppositions and replies in Accelerated Docket proceedings shall be served on parties to the proceeding by hand or facsimile transmission.


(f) Applications for review, oppositions, and replies shall conform to the requirements of §§ 1.49, 1.51, and 1.52, and shall be submitted to the Secretary, Federal Communications Commission, Washington, DC 20554. Except as provided below, applications for review and oppositions thereto shall not exceed 25 double-space typewritten pages. Applications for review of interlocutory actions in hearing proceedings (including designation orders) and oppositions thereto shall not exceed 5 double-spaced typewritten pages. When permitted (see paragraph (e)(1) of this section), reply pleadings shall not exceed 5 double-spaced typewritten pages. The application for review shall be served upon the parties to the proceeding. Oppositions to the application for review shall be served on the person seeking review and on parties to the proceeding. When permitted (see paragraph (e)(1) of this section), replies to the opposition(s) to the application for review shall be served on the person(s) opposing the application for review and on parties to the proceeding.


(g) The Commission may grant the application for review in whole or in part, or it may deny the application with or without specifying reasons therefor. A petition requesting reconsideration of a ruling which denies an application for review will be entertained only if one or more of the following circumstances is present:


(1) The petition relies on facts which related to events which have occurred or circumstances which have changed since the last opportunity to present such matters; or


(2) The petition relies on facts unknown to petitioner until after his last opportunity to present such matters which could not, through the exercise of ordinary diligence, have been learned prior to such opportunity.


(h)(1) If the Commission grants the application for review in whole or in part, it may, in its decision:


(i) Simultaneously reverse or modify the order from which review is sought;


(ii) Remand the matter to the designated authority for reconsideration in accordance with its instructions, and, if an evidentiary hearing has been held, the remand may be to the person(s) who conducted the hearing; or


(iii) Order such other proceedings, including briefs and oral argument, as may be necessary or appropriate.


(2) In the event the Commission orders further proceedings, it may stay the effect of the order from which review is sought. (See § 1.102.) Following the completion of such further proceedings the Commission may affirm, reverse or modify the order from which review is sought, or it may set aside the order and remand the matter to the designated authority for reconsideration in accordance with its instructions. If an evidentiary hearing has been held, the Commission may remand the matter to the person(s) who conducted the hearing for rehearing on such issues and in accordance with such instructions as may be appropriate.



Note:

For purposes of this section, the word “order” refers to that portion of its action wherein the Commission announces its judgment. This should be distinguished from the “memorandum opinion” or other material which often accompany and explain the order.


(i) An order of the Commission which reverses or modifies the action taken pursuant to delegated authority is subject to the same provisions with respect to reconsideration as an original order of the Commission. In no event, however, shall a ruling which denies an application for review be considered a modification of the action taken pursuant to delegated authority.


(j) No evidence other than newly discovered evidence, evidence which has become available only since the original taking of evidence, or evidence which the Commission believes should have been taken in the original proceeding shall be taken on any rehearing ordered pursuant to the provisions of this section.


(k) The filing of an application for review shall be a condition precedent to judicial review of any action taken pursuant to delegated authority.


(Secs. 4, 303, 307, 48 Stat., as amended, 1066, 1082, 1083; 47 U.S.C. 154, 303, 307)

[28 FR 12415, Nov. 22, 1963, as amended at 41 FR 14871, Apr. 8, 1976; 44 FR 60295, Oct. 19, 1979; 46 FR 18556, Mar. 25, 1981; 48 FR 12719, Mar. 28, 1983; 50 FR 39000, Sept. 26, 1985; 54 FR 40392, Oct. 2, 1989; 55 FR 36641, Sept. 6, 1990; 57 FR 19387, May 6, 1992; 62 FR 4170, Jan. 29, 1997; 63 FR 41446, Aug. 4, 1998; 67 FR 13223, Mar. 21, 2002; 76 FR 70908, Nov. 16, 2011; 82 FR 4197, Jan. 13, 2017; 85 FR 63173, Oct. 6, 2020]


§ 1.117 Review on motion of the Commission.

(a) Within 40 days after public notice is given of any action taken pursuant to delegated authority, the Commission may on its own motion order the record of the proceeding before it for review.


(b) If the Commission reviews the proceeding on its own motion, it may order such further procedure as may be useful to it in its review of the action taken pursuant to delegated authority.


(c) With or without such further procedure, the Commission may either affirm, reverse, modify, or set aside the action taken, or remand the proceeding to the designated authority for reconsideration in accordance with its instructions. If an evidentiary hearing has been held, the Commission may remand the proceeding to the person(s) who conducted the hearing for rehearing on such issues and in accordance with such instructions as may be appropriate. An order of the Commission which reverses or modifies the action taken pursuant to delegated authority, or remands the matter for further proceedings, is subject to the same provisions with respect to reconsideration as an original action of the Commission.


Subpart B – Hearing Proceedings


Source:28 FR 12425, Nov. 22, 1963, unless otherwise noted.

General

§ 1.201 Scope.

This subpart shall be applicable to the following cases which have been designated for hearing:


(a) Adjudication (as defined by the Administrative Procedure Act); and


(b) Rule making proceedings which are required by law to be made on the record after opportunity for a Commission hearing.



Note 1 to § 1.201:

For special provisions relating to hearing proceedings under this subpart that the Commission determines shall be conducted and resolved on a written record, see §§ 1.370 through 1.377.



Note 2 to § 1.201:

For special provisions relating to AM broadcast station applications involving other North American countries see § 73.23.


[28 FR 12425, Nov. 22, 1963, as amended at 51 FR 32088, Sept. 9, 1986; 85 FR 63174, Oct. 6, 2020]


§ 1.202 Official reporter; transcript.

The Commission will designate an official reporter for the recording and transcribing of hearing proceedings as necessary. Transcripts will be transmitted to the Secretary for inclusion in the Commission’s Electronic Comment Filing System.


[85 FR 63174, Oct. 6, 2020]


§ 1.203 The record.

The evidence submitted by the parties, together with all papers and requests filed in the proceeding and any transcripts, shall constitute the exclusive record for decision. Where any decision rests on official notice of a material fact not appearing in the record, any party shall on timely request be afforded an opportunity to show the contrary.


(5 U.S.C. 556; 47 U.S.C. 154, 159, 208, 209, 214, 309, 312, 316, and 409)

[85 FR 63174, Oct. 6, 2020]


§ 1.204 Pleadings; definition.

As used in this subpart, the term pleading means any written notice, motion, petition, request, opposition, reply, brief, proposed findings, exceptions, memorandum of law, or other paper filed with the Commission in a hearing proceeding. It does not include exhibits or documents offered in evidence. See § 1.356.


[29 FR 8219, June 30, 1964]


§ 1.205 Continuances and extensions.

Continuances of any proceeding or hearing and extensions of time for making any filing or performing any act required or allowed to be done within a specified time may be granted by the Commission or the presiding officer upon motion for good cause shown, unless the time for performance or filing is limited by statute.


§ 1.207 Interlocutory matters, reconsideration and review; cross references.

(a) Rules governing interlocutory pleadings in hearing proceedings are set forth in §§ 1.291 through 1.298.


(b) Rules governing appeal from rulings made by the presiding officer are set forth as §§ 1.301 and 1.302.


(c) Rules governing the reconsideration and review of actions taken pursuant to delegated authority, and the reconsideration of actions taken by the Commission, are set forth in §§ 1.101 through 1.117.


[28 FR 12425, Nov. 22, 1963, as amended at 29 FR 6443, May 16, 1964; 36 FR 19439, Oct. 6, 1971; 76 FR 70908, Nov. 16, 2011]


§ 1.209 Identification of responsible officer in caption to pleading.

Each pleading filed in a hearing proceeding shall indicate in its caption whether it is to be acted upon by the Commission or, if the Commission is not the presiding officer, by the presiding officer. Unless it is to be acted upon by the Commission, the presiding officer shall be identified by name.


[85 FR 63174, Oct. 6, 2020]


§ 1.210 Electronic filing.

All pleadings filed in a hearing proceeding, as well as all letters, documents, or other written submissions, shall be filed using the Commission’s Electronic Comment Filing System, excluding confidential material as set forth in § 1.314. A courtesy copy of all submissions shall be contemporaneously provided to the presiding officer, as directed by the Commission.


[85 FR 63174, Oct. 6, 2020]


§ 1.211 Service.

Except as otherwise expressly provided in this chapter, all pleadings filed in a hearing proceeding shall be served upon all other counsel in the proceeding or, if a party is not represented by counsel, then upon such party. All such papers shall be accompanied by proof of service. For provisions governing the manner of service, see § 1.47.


[29 FR 8219, June 30, 1964]


Participants and Issues

§ 1.221 Notice of hearing; appearances.

(a) Upon designation of an application for hearing, the Commission issues an order containing the following:


(1) A statement as to the reasons for the Commission’s action.


(2) A statement as to the matters of fact and law involved, and the issues upon which the application will be heard.


(3) A statement as to the time, place, and nature of the hearing. (If the time and place are not specified, the order will indicate that the time and place will be specified at a later date.)


(4) A statement as to the legal authority and jurisdiction under which the hearing is to be held.


(b) The order designating an application for hearing shall be mailed to the applicant and the order, or a summary thereof, shall be published in the Federal Register. Reasonable notice of hearing will be given to the parties in all proceedings.


(c) In order to avail themselves of the opportunity to be heard, applicants or their attorney shall file, within 20 days of the mailing of the order designating a matter for hearing, a written appearance stating that the applicant will present evidence on the matters specified in the order and, if required by the order, appear before the presiding officer at a date and time to be determined. Where an applicant fails to file such a written appearance within the time specified, or has not filed prior to the expiration of that time a petition to dismiss without prejudice, or a petition to accept, for good cause shown, such written appearance beyond expiration of said 20 days, the application will be dismissed with prejudice for failure to prosecute.


(d) The Commission will on its own motion name as parties to the hearing proceeding any person found to be a party in interest.


(e) In order to avail themselves of the opportunity to be heard, any persons named as parties pursuant to paragraph (d) of this section shall, within 20 days of the mailing of the order designating them as parties to a hearing proceeding, file personally or by attorney a written appearance that they will present evidence on the matters specified in the order and, if required by the order, appear before the presiding officer at a date and time to be determined. Any persons so named who fail to file this written appearance within the time specified, shall, unless good cause for such failure is shown, forfeit their hearing rights.


(f)(1) For program carriage complaints filed pursuant to § 76.1302 of this chapter that the Chief, Media Bureau refers to a presiding officer, each party, in person or by attorney, shall file a written appearance within five calendar days after the party informs the presiding officer that it elects not to pursue alternative dispute resolution pursuant to § 76.7(g)(2) of this chapter or, if the parties have mutually elected to pursue alternative dispute resolution pursuant to § 76.7(g)(2) of this chapter, within five calendar days after the parties inform the presiding officer that they have failed to resolve their dispute through alternative dispute resolution. The written appearance shall state that the party will appear for hearing and present evidence on the issues specified in the hearing designation order.


(2) If the complainant fails to file a written appearance by this deadline, or fails to file prior to the deadline either a petition to dismiss the proceeding without prejudice or a petition to accept, for good cause shown, a written appearance beyond such deadline, the presiding officer shall dismiss the complaint with prejudice for failure to prosecute.


(3) If the defendant fails to file a written appearance by this deadline, or fails to file prior to this deadline a petition to accept, for good cause shown, a written appearance beyond such deadline, its opportunity to present evidence at hearing will be deemed to have been waived. If the hearing is so waived, the presiding officer shall expeditiously terminate the proceeding and certify to the Commission the complaint for resolution based on the existing record. When the Commission has designated itself as the presiding officer, it shall expeditiously terminate the proceeding and resolve the complaint based on the existing record.


(5 U.S.C. 554; 47 U.S.C. 154, 159, 208, 209, 214, 309, 312, 316, and 409)

[28 FR 12424, Nov. 22, 1963, as amended at 51 FR 19347, May 29, 1986; 52 FR 5288, Feb. 20, 1987; 55 FR 19154, May 8, 1990; 56 FR 25638, June 5, 1991; 64 FR 60725, Nov. 8, 1999; 66 FR 47895, Sept. 14, 2001; 67 FR 13223, Mar. 21, 2002; 76 FR 60672, Sept. 29, 2011; 85 FR 63174, Oct. 6, 2020]


§ 1.223 Petitions to intervene.

(a) Where the order designating a matter for hearing has failed to notify and name as a party to the hearing proceeding any person who qualifies as a party in interest, such person may acquire the status of a party by filing, under oath and not more than 30 days after the publication in the Federal Register of the hearing issues or any substantial amendment thereto, a petition for intervention showing the basis of its interest. Where the person’s status as a party in interest is established, the petition to intervene will be granted.


(b) Any other person desiring to participate as a party in any hearing proceeding may file a petition for leave to intervene not later than 30 days after the publication in the Federal Register of the full text or a summary of the order designating the matter for hearing or any substantial amendment thereto. The petition must set forth the interest of petitioner in the proceedings, must show how such petitioner’s participation will assist the Commission in the determination of the issues in question, must set forth any proposed issues in addition to those already designated for hearing, and must be accompanied by the affidavit of a person with knowledge as to the facts set forth in the petition. The presiding officer, in his or her discretion, may grant or deny such petition or may permit intervention by such persons limited to a particular stage of the proceeding.


(c) Any person desiring to file a petition for leave to intervene later than 30 days after the publication in the Federal Register of the full text or a summary of the order designating the matter for hearing or any substantial amendment thereto shall set forth the interest of petitioner in the proceeding, show how such petitioner’s participation will assist the Commission in the determination of the issues in question, must set forth any proposed issues in addition to those already designated for hearing, and must set forth reasons why it was not possible to file a petition within the time prescribed by paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section. If, in the opinion of the presiding officer, good cause is shown for the delay in filing, the presiding officer may in his or her discretion grant such petition or may permit intervention limited to particular issues or to a particular stage of the proceeding.


(Sec. 309, 48 Stat. 1085, as amended; 47 U.S.C. 309)

[85 FR 63175, Oct. 6, 2020]


§ 1.224 Motion to proceed in forma pauperis.

(a) A motion to proceed in forma pauperis may be filed by an individual, a corporation, and unincorporated entity, an association or other similar group, if the moving party is either of the following:


(1) A respondent in a revocation proceeding, or a renewal applicant, who cannot carry on his livelihood without the radio license at stake in the proceeding; or


(2) An intervenor in a hearing proceeding who is in a position to introduce testimony which is of probable decisional significance, on a matter of substantial public interest importance, which cannot, or apparently will not, be introduced by other parties to the proceeding, and who is not seeking personal financial gain.


(b) In the case of a licensee, the motion to proceed in forma pauperis shall contain specific allegations of fact sufficient to show that the moving party is eligible under paragraph (a) of this section and that he cannot, because of his poverty, pay the expenses of litigation and still be able to provide himself and his dependents with the necessities of life. Such allegations of fact shall be supported by affidavit of a person or persons with personal knowledge thereof. The information submitted shall detail the income and assets of the individual and his financial obligations and responsibilities, and shall contain an estimate of the cost of participation in the proceeding. Personal financial information may be submitted to the presiding officer in confidence.


(c)(1) In the case of an individual intervenor, the motion to proceed in forma pauperis shall contain specific allegations of fact sufficient to show that he is eligible under paragraph (a) of this section and that he has dedicated financial resources to sustain his participation which are reasonable in light of his personal resources and other demands upon them but are inadequate for effective participation in the proceeding. Such allegations of fact shall be supported by affidavit of a person or persons with personal knowledge thereof. The information submitted shall detail the income and assets of the individual and his immediate family and his financial obligations and responsibilities, and shall contain an estimate of the cost of participation. Personal financial information may be submitted to the presiding officer in confidence.


(2) In the case of an intervening group, the motion to proceed in forma pauperis shall contain specific allegations of fact sufficient to show that the moving party is eligible under paragraph (a) of this section and that it cannot pay the expenses of litigation and still be able to carry out the activities and purposes for which it was organized. Such allegations of fact shall be supported by affidavit of the President and Treasurer of the group, and/or by other persons having personal knowledge thereof. The information submitted shall include a copy of the corporate charter or other documents that describe the activities and purposes of the organization; a current balance sheet and profit and loss statement; facts showing, under all the circumstances, that it would not be reasonable to expect added resources of individuals composing the group to be pooled to meet the expenses of participating in the proceeding; and an estimate of the cost of participation. Personal financial information pertaining to members of the group may be submitted to the presiding officer in confidence.


(d) If the motion is granted, the presiding officer may direct that a free copy of the transcript of testimony be made available to the moving party and may relax the rules of procedure in any manner which will ease his financial burden, is fair to other parties to the proceeding, and does not involve the payment of appropriated funds to a party.


[41 FR 53021, Dec. 3, 1976]


§ 1.225 Participation by non-parties; consideration of communications.

(a) Any person who wishes to appear and give evidence on any matter and who so advises the Secretary, will be notified by the Secretary if that matter is designated for hearing. In the case of requests bearing more than one signature, notice of hearing will be given to the person first signing unless the request indicates that such notice should be sent to someone other than such person.


(b) No persons shall be precluded from giving any relevant, material, and competent testimony because they lack a sufficient interest to justify their intervention as parties in the matter.


(c) No communication will be considered in determining the merits of any matter unless it has been received into evidence. The admissibility of any communication shall be governed by the applicable rules of evidence in § 1.351, and no communication shall be admissible on the basis of a stipulation unless Commission counsel as well as counsel for all of the parties shall join in such stipulation.


[28 FR 12425, Nov. 22, 1963, as amended at 85 FR 63175, Oct. 6, 2020]


§ 1.227 Consolidations.

The Commission, upon motion or upon its own motion, may, where such action will best conduce to the proper dispatch of business and to the ends of justice, consolidate in a hearing proceeding any cases that involve the same applicant or substantially the same issues, or that present conflicting claims.


[85 FR 63175, Oct. 6, 2020]


§ 1.229 Motions to enlarge, change, or delete issues.

(a) A motion to enlarge, change or delete the issues may be filed by any party to a hearing proceeding. Except as provided for in paragraph (b) of this section, such motions must be filed within 15 days after the full text or a summary of the order designating the case for hearing has been published in the Federal Register.


(b)(1) For program carriage complaints filed pursuant to § 76.1302 of this chapter that the Chief, Media Bureau refers to a presiding officer, such motions shall be filed within 15 calendar days after the deadline for submitting written appearances pursuant to § 1.221(f), except that persons not named as parties to the proceeding in the designation order may file such motions with their petitions to intervene up to 30 days after publication of the full text or a summary of the designation order in the Federal Register. (See § 1.223).


(2) Any person desiring to file a motion to modify the issues after the expiration of periods specified in paragraphs (a) and (b)(1) of this section shall set forth the reason why it was not possible to file the motion within the prescribed period. Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, the motion will be granted only if good cause is shown for the delay in filing. Motions for modifications of issues which are based on new facts or newly discovered facts shall be filed within 15 days after such facts are discovered by the moving party.


(c) In the absence of good cause for late filing of a motion to modify the issues, the motion to enlarge will be considered fully on its merits if (and only if) initial examination of the motion demonstrates that it raises a question of probable decisional significance and such substantial public interest importance as to warrant consideration in spite of its untimely filing.


(d) Such motions, opposition thereto, and replies to oppositions shall contain specific allegations of fact sufficient to support the action requested. Such allegations of fact, except for those of which official notice may be taken, shall be supported by affidavits of a person or persons having personal knowledge thereof. The failure to file an opposition or a reply will not necessarily be construed as an admission of any fact or argument contained in a pleading.


(e) In any case in which the presiding officer grants a motion to enlarge the issues to inquire into allegations that an applicant made misrepresentations to the Commission or engaged in other misconduct during the application process, the enlarged issues include notice that, after hearings on the enlarged issue and upon a finding that the alleged misconduct occurred and warrants such penalty, in addition to or in lieu of denying the application, the applicant may be liable for a forfeiture of up to the maximum statutory amount. See 47 U.S.C. 503(b)(2)(A).


[41 FR 14872, Apr. 8, 1976, as amended at 44 FR 34947, June 18, 1979; 51 FR 19347, May 29, 1986; 56 FR 792, Jan. 9, 1991; 56 FR 25639, June 5, 1991; 62 FR 4171, Jan. 29, 1997; 76 FR 60672, Sept. 29, 2011; 76 FR 70908, Nov. 16, 2011; 78 FR 5745, Jan. 28, 2013; 85 FR 63175, Oct. 6, 2020]


Presiding Officer

§ 1.241 Designation of presiding officer.

(a) Hearing proceedings will be conducted by a presiding officer. The designated presiding officer will be identified in the order designating a matter for hearing. Only the Commission, one or more commissioners, or an administrative law judge designated pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 3105 may be designated as a presiding officer. Unless otherwise stated, the term presiding officer will include the Commission when the Commission designates itself to preside over a hearing proceeding.


(b) If a presiding officer becomes unavailable during the course of a hearing proceeding, another presiding officer will be designated.


(5 U.S.C. 556; 47 U.S.C. 154, 159, 208, 209, 214, 309, 312, 316, and 409)

[85 FR 63176, Oct. 6, 2020]


§ 1.242 Appointment of case manager when Commission is the presiding officer.

When the Commission designates itself as the presiding officer in a hearing proceeding, it may delegate authority to a case manager to develop the record in a written hearing (see §§ 1.370 through 1.377). The case manager must be a staff attorney who qualifies as a neutral under 5 U.S.C. 571 and 573. The Commission shall not designate any of the following persons to serve as case manager in a case, and they may not advise or assist the case manager: Staff who participated in identifying the specific issues designated for hearing; staff who have taken or will take an active part in investigating, prosecuting, or advocating in the case; or staff who are expected to investigate and act upon petitions to deny (including challenges thereto). A case manager shall have authority to perform any of the functions generally performed by the presiding officer, except that a case manager shall have no authority to resolve any new or novel issues, to issue an order on the merits resolving any issue designated for hearing in a case, to issue an order on the merits of any motion for summary decision filed under § 1.251, or to perform any other functions that the Commission reserves to itself in the order appointing a case manager.


[85 FR 63176, Oct. 6, 2020]


§ 1.243 Authority of presiding officer.

From the time the presiding officer is designated until issuance of the presiding officer’s decision or the transfer of the proceeding to the Commission or to another presiding officer, the presiding officer shall have such authority as granted by law and by the provisions of this chapter, including authority to:


(a) Administer oaths and affirmations;


(b) Issue subpenas;


(c) Examine witnesses;


(d) Rule upon questions of evidence;


(e) Take or cause depositions to be taken;


(f) Regulate the course of the hearing, maintain decorum, and exclude from the hearing any person engaging in contemptuous conduct or otherwise disrupting the proceedings;


(g) Require the filing of memoranda of law and the presentation of oral argument with respect to any question of law upon which the presiding officer or the Commission is required to rule during the course of the hearing proceeding;


(h) Hold conferences for the settlement or simplification of the issues by consent of the parties;


(i) Dispose of procedural requests and ancillary matters, as appropriate;


(j) Take actions and make decisions in conformity with governing law;


(k) Act on motions to enlarge, modify or delete the hearing issues;


(l) Act on motions to proceed in forma pauperis pursuant to § 1.224;


(m) Decide a matter upon the existing record or request additional information from the parties; and


(n) Issue such orders and conduct such proceedings as will best conduce to the proper dispatch of business and the ends of justice.


(5 U.S.C. 556; 47 U.S.C. 154, 159, 208, 209, 214, 309, 312, 316, and 409)

[28 FR 12425, Nov. 22, 1963, as amended at 41 FR 53022, Dec. 3, 1976; 85 FR 63176, Oct. 6, 2020]


§ 1.244 Designation of a settlement officer.

(a) Parties may request that the presiding officer appoint a settlement officer to facilitate the resolution of the case by settlement.


(b) Where all parties in a case agree that such procedures may be beneficial, such requests may be filed with the presiding officer no later than 15 days prior to the date scheduled for the commencement of hearings or, in hearing proceedings conducted pursuant to §§ 1.370 through 1.377, no later than 15 days before the date set as the deadline for filing the affirmative case. The presiding officer shall suspend the procedural dates in the case pending action upon such requests.


(c) If, in the discretion of the presiding officer, it appears that the appointment of a settlement officer will facilitate the settlement of the case, the presiding officer shall appoint a “neutral” as defined in 5 U.S.C. 571 and 573 to act as the settlement officer.


(1) The parties may request the appointment of a settlement officer of their own choosing so long as that person is a “neutral” as defined in 5 U.S.C. 571 and 573.


(2) The appointment of a settlement officer in a particular case is subject to the approval of all the parties in the proceeding.


(3) Neither the Commission, nor any sitting members of the Commission, nor the presiding officer shall serve as the settlement officer in any case.


(4) Other members of the Commission’s staff who qualify as neutrals may be appointed as settlement officers. The presiding officer shall not appoint a member of the Commission’s staff as a settlement officer in any case if the staff member’s duties include, or have included, drafting, reviewing, and/or recommending actions on the merits of the issues designated for hearing in that case.


(d) The settlement officer shall have the authority to require parties to submit their written direct cases for review. The settlement officer may also meet with the parties and/or their counsel, individually and/or at joint conferences, to discuss their cases and the cases of their competitors. All such meetings will be off-the-record, and the settlement officer may express an opinion as to the relative merit of the parties’ positions and recommend possible means to resolve the proceeding by settlement. The proceedings before the settlement officer shall be subject to the confidentiality provisions of 5 U.S.C. 574. Moreover, no statements, offers of settlement, representations or concessions of the parties or opinions expressed by the settlement officer will be admissible as evidence in any Commission proceeding.


[85 FR 63176, Oct. 6, 2020]


§ 1.245 Disqualification of presiding officer.

(a) In the event that a presiding officer (other than the Commission) deems himself or herself disqualified and desires to withdraw from the case, the presiding officer shall immediately so notify the Commission.


(b) Any party may request the presiding officer to withdraw on the grounds of personal bias or other disqualification.


(1) The person seeking disqualification shall file with the presiding officer an affidavit setting forth in detail the facts alleged to constitute grounds for disqualification.


(2) The presiding officer may file a response to the affidavit; and if the presiding officer believes he or she is not disqualified, he or she shall so rule and continue with the hearing proceeding.


(3) The person seeking disqualification may appeal a ruling denying the request for withdrawal of the presiding officer, and, in that event, shall do so within five days of release of the presiding officer’s ruling. Unless an appeal of the ruling is filed at this time, the right to request withdrawal of the presiding officer shall be deemed waived.


(4) If an appeal of the ruling is filed, the presiding officer shall certify the question, together with the affidavit and any response filed in connection therewith, to the Commission. The hearing shall be suspended pending a ruling on the question by the Commission.


(5) The Commission may rule on the question without hearing, or it may require testimony or argument on the issues raised.


(6) The affidavit, response, testimony or argument thereon, and the Commission’s decision shall be part of the record in the case.


(5 U.S.C. 556; 47 U.S.C. 154, 159, 208, 209, 214, 309, 312, 316, and 409)

[28 FR 12425, Nov. 22, 1963, as amended at 55 FR 36641, Sept. 6, 1990; 62 FR 4171, Jan. 29, 1997; 85 FR 63176, Oct. 6, 2020]


Prehearing Procedures

§ 1.246 Admission of facts and genuineness of documents.

(a) Within 20 days after the time for filing a notice of appearance has expired; or within 20 days after the release of an order adding parties to the proceeding (see §§ 1.223 and 1.227) or changing the issues (see § 1.229); or within such shorter or longer time as the presiding officer may allow on motion or notice, a party may serve upon any other party a written request for the admission by the latter of the genuineness of any relevant documents identified in and exhibited by a clear copy with the request or of the truth of any relevant matters of fact set forth in the request.


(b) Each of the matters of which an admission is requested shall be deemed admitted unless, within a period designated in the request, not less than 10 days after service thereof, or within such shorter or longer time as the presiding officer may allow on motion or notice, the party to whom the request is directed serves upon the party requesting the admission either: (1) A sworn statement denying specifically the matters of which an admission is requested or setting forth in detail the reasons why he cannot truthfully admit or deny those matters, or (2) written objections on the ground that some or all of the requested admissions are privileged or irrelevant or that the request is otherwise improper in whole or in part. If written objections to a part of the request are made, the remainder of the request shall be answered within the period designated in the request. A denial shall fairly meet the substance of the requested admission, and when good faith requires that a party deny only a part or a qualification of a matter of which an admission is requested, he shall specify so much of it as is true and deny only the remainder.


(c) A copy of the request and of any answer shall be served by the party filing on all other parties to the proceeding and upon the presiding officer.


(d) Written objections to the requested admissions may be ruled upon by the presiding officer without additional pleadings.


[33 FR 463, Jan. 12, 1968, as amended at 35 FR 17333, Nov. 11, 1970]


§ 1.248 Status conferences.

(a) The presiding officer may direct the parties or their attorneys to appear at a specified time and place for a status conference during the course of a hearing proceeding, or to submit suggestions in writing, for the purpose of considering, among other things, the matters set forth in paragraph (c) of this section. Any party may request a status conference at any time after release of the order designating a matter for hearing. During a status conference, the presiding officer may issue rulings regarding matters relevant to the conduct of the hearing proceeding including, inter alia, procedural matters, discovery, and the submission of briefs or evidentiary materials.


(b) The presiding officer shall schedule an initial status conference promptly after written appearances have been submitted under § 1.91 or § 1.221. At or promptly after the initial status conference, the presiding officer shall adopt a schedule to govern the hearing proceeding. If the Commission designated a matter for hearing on a written record under §§ 1.370 through 1.376, the scheduling order shall include a deadline for filing a motion to request an oral hearing in accordance with § 1.376. If the Commission did not designate the matter for hearing on a written record, the scheduling order shall include a deadline for filing a motion to conduct the hearing on a written record. Except as circumstances otherwise require, the presiding officer shall allow a reasonable period prior to commencement of the hearing for the orderly completion of all prehearing procedures, including discovery, and for the submission and disposition of all motions.


(c) In status conferences, the following matters, among others, may be considered:


(1) Clarifying, amplifying, or narrowing issues designated for hearing;


(2) Scheduling;


(3) Admission of facts and of the genuineness of documents (see § 1.246), and the possibility of stipulating with respect to facts;


(4) Discovery;


(5) Motions;


(6) Hearing procedure;


(7) Settlement (see § 1.93); and


(8) Such other matters that may aid in resolution of the issues designated for hearing.


(d) Status conferences may be conducted in person or by telephone conference call or similar technology, at the discretion of the presiding officer. An official transcript of all status conferences shall be made unless the presiding officer and the parties agree to forego a transcript, in which case any rulings by the presiding officer during the status conference shall be promptly memorialized in writing.


(e) The failure of any attorney or party, following reasonable notice, to appear at a scheduled status conference may be deemed a waiver by that party of its rights to participate in the hearing proceeding and shall not preclude the presiding officer from conferring with parties or counsel present.


[85 FR 63177, Oct. 6, 2020]


§ 1.249 Presiding officer statement.

The presiding officer shall enter upon the record a statement reciting all actions taken at a status conference convened under § 1.248 and incorporating into the record all of the stipulations and agreements of the parties which were approved by the presiding officer, and any special rules which the presiding officer may deem necessary to govern the course of the proceeding.


[85 FR 63177, Oct. 6, 2020]


Hearing and Intermediate Decision

§ 1.250 Discovery and preservation of evidence; cross-reference.

For provisions relating to prehearing discovery and preservation of admissible evidence in hearing proceedings under this subpart B, see §§ 1.311 through 1.325.


[85 FR 63177, Oct. 6, 2020]


§ 1.251 Summary decision.

(a)(1) Any party to an adjudicatory proceeding may move for summary decision of all or any of the issues designated for hearing. The motion shall be filed at least 20 days prior to the date set for commencement of the hearing or, in hearing proceedings conducted pursuant to §§ 1.370 through 1.377, at least 20 days before the date that the presiding officer sets as the deadline for filing the affirmative case. See § 1.372. The party filing the motion may not rest upon mere allegations or denials but must show, by affidavit or by other materials subject to consideration by the presiding officer, that there is no genuine issue of material fact for determination in the hearing proceeding.


(2) A party may file a motion for summary decision after the deadlines in paragraph (a)(1) of this section only with the presiding officer’s permission, or upon the presiding officer’s invitation. No appeal from an order granting or denying a request for permission to file a motion for summary decision shall be allowed. If the presiding officer authorizes a motion for summary decision after the deadlines in paragraph (a)(1) of this section, proposed findings of fact and conclusions of law on those issues which the moving party believes can be resolved shall be attached to the motion, and any other party may file findings of fact and conclusions of law as an attachment to pleadings filed by the party pursuant to paragraph (b) of this section.


(3) Motions for summary decision should be addressed to the Commission in any hearing proceeding in which the Commission is the presiding officer and it has appointed a case manager pursuant to § 1.242. The Commission, in its discretion, may defer ruling on any such motion until after the case manager has certified the record for decision by the Commission pursuant to § 1.377.


(b) Within 14 days after a motion for summary decision is filed, any other party to the proceeding may file an opposition or a countermotion for summary decision. A party opposing the motion may not rest upon mere allegations or denials but must show, by affidavit or by other materials subject to consideration by the presiding officer, that there is a genuine issue of material fact for determination at the hearing, that he cannot, for good cause, present by affidavit or otherwise facts essential to justify his opposition, or that summary decision is otherwise inappropriate.


(c) Affidavits shall be made on personal knowledge, shall set forth such facts as would be admissible in evidence, and shall show affirmatively that the affiant is competent to testify to the matters stated therein.


(d) The presiding officer may, in his or her discretion, set the matter for argument and may call for the submission of proposed findings, conclusions, briefs or memoranda of law. The presiding officer, giving appropriate weight to the nature of the proceeding, the issue or issues, the proof, and the need for cross-examination, if any, may grant a motion for summary decision to the extent that the pleadings, affidavits, materials obtained by discovery or otherwise, admissions, or matters officially noticed, show that there is no genuine issue as to any material fact and that a party is otherwise entitled to summary decision. If it appears from the affidavits of a party opposing the motion that the party cannot, for good cause shown, present by affidavit or otherwise facts essential to justify the party’s opposition, the presiding officer may deny the motion, may order a continuance to permit affidavits to be obtained or discovery to be had, or make such other order as is just.


(e) If all of the issues (or a dispositive issue) are determined on a motion for summary decision, the hearing proceeding shall be terminated. When a presiding officer (other than the Commission) issues a Summary Decision, it is subject to appeal or review in the same manner as an Initial Decision. See §§ 1.271 through 1.282. If some of the issues only (including no dispositive issue) are decided on a motion for summary decision, or if the motion is denied, the presiding officer will issue a memorandum opinion and order, interlocutory in character, and the hearing proceeding will continue on the remaining issues. Appeal from interlocutory rulings is governed by § 1.301.


(f) The presiding officer may take any action deemed necessary to assure that summary decision procedures are not abused. The presiding officer may rule in advance of a motion that the proceeding is not appropriate for summary decision, and may take such other measures as are necessary to prevent any unwarranted delay.


(1) Should it appear to the satisfaction of the presiding officer that a motion for summary decision has been presented in bad faith or solely for the purpose of delay, or that such a motion is patently frivolous, the presiding officer will enter a determination to that effect upon the record.


(2) If, on making such determination, the presiding officer concludes that the facts warrant disciplinary action against an attorney, the matter, together with any findings and recommendations, will be referred to the Commission for consideration under § 1.24.


(3) If, on making such determination, the presiding officer concludes that the facts warrant a finding of bad faith on the part of a party to the proceeding, the presiding officer will certify the matter to the Commission, with findings and recommendations, for a determination as to whether the facts warrant the addition of an issue to the hearing proceeding as to the character qualifications of that party.


[37 FR 7507, Apr. 15, 1972, as amended at 42 FR 56508, Oct. 26, 1977; 85 FR 63177, Oct. 6, 2020]


§ 1.253 Time and place of hearing.

The presiding officer shall specify the time and place of oral hearings. All oral hearings will take place at Commission Headquarters unless the presiding officer designates another location.


[85 FR 63178, Oct. 6, 2020]


§ 1.254 Nature of the hearing proceeding; burden of proof.

Any hearing upon an application shall be a full hearing proceeding in which the applicant and all other parties in interest shall be permitted to participate but in which both the burden of proceeding with the introduction of evidence upon any issue specified by the Commission, as well as the burden of proof upon all such issues, shall be upon the applicant except as otherwise provided in the order of designation.


(Sec. 309, 48 Stat. 1085, as amended; 47 U.S.C. 309)

[85 FR 63178, Oct. 6, 2020]


§ 1.255 Order of procedure.

(a) At hearings on a formal complaint or petition or in a proceeding for any instrument of authorization which the Commission is empowered to issue, the complainant, petitioner, or applicant, as the case may be, shall, unless the Commission otherwise orders, open and close. At hearings on protests, the protestant opens and closes the proceedings in case the issues are not specifically adopted by the Commission; otherwise the grantee does so. At hearings on orders to show cause, to cease and desist, to revoke or modify a station license under sections 312 and 316 of the Communications Act, or other like proceedings instituted by the Commission, the Commission shall open and close.


(b) At all hearings under Title II of the Communications Act, other than hearings on formal complaints, petitions, or applications, the respondent shall open and close unless otherwise specified by the Commission.


(c) In all other cases, the Commission or presiding officer shall designate the order of presentation. Intervenors shall follow the party in whose behalf intervention is made, and in all cases where the intervention is not in support of an original party, the Commission or presiding officer shall designate at what stage such intervenors shall be heard.


[28 FR 12425, Nov. 22, 1963, as amended at 33 FR 463, Jan. 12, 1968]


§ 1.258- 1.260 [Reserved]

§ 1.261 Corrections to transcript.

At any time during the course of the proceeding, or as directed by the presiding officer, but not later than 10 days after the transmission to the parties of the transcript of any oral conference or hearing, any party to the proceeding may file with the presiding officer a motion requesting corrections to the transcript, which motion shall be accompanied by proof of service thereof upon all other parties to the proceeding. Within 5 days after the filing of such a motion, other parties may file a pleading in support of or in opposition to such motion. Thereafter, the presiding officer shall, by order, specify the corrections to be made in the transcript, and a copy of the order shall be served upon all parties and made a part of the record. The presiding officer may sua sponte specify corrections to be made in the transcript on 5 days’ notice.


[85 FR 63178, Oct. 6, 2020]


§ 1.263 Proposed findings and conclusions.

(a) The presiding officer may direct any party to file proposed findings of fact and conclusions, briefs, or memoranda of law. If the presiding officer does not so order, any party to the proceeding may seek leave to file proposed findings of fact and conclusions, briefs, or memoranda of law. Such proposed findings of fact, conclusions, briefs, and memoranda of law shall be filed within the time prescribed by the presiding officer.


(b) All pleadings and other papers filed pursuant to this section shall be accompanied by proof of service thereof upon all other counsel in the proceeding; if a party is not represented by counsel, proof of service upon such party shall be made.


(c) In the absence of a showing of good cause therefor, the failure to file proposed findings of fact, conclusions, briefs, or memoranda of law, when directed to do so, may be deemed a waiver of the right to participate further in the proceeding.


(5 U.S.C. 557; 47 U.S.C. 154, 159, 208, 209, 214, 309, 312, 316, and 409)

[28 FR 12425, Nov. 22, 1963, as amended at 85 FR 63178, Oct. 6, 2020]


§ 1.264 Contents of findings of fact and conclusions.

Proposed findings of fact shall be set forth in serially numbered paragraphs and shall set out in detail and with particularity all basic evidentiary facts developed on the record (with appropriate citations to the transcript of record or exhibit relied on for each evidentiary fact) supporting the conclusions proposed by the party filing same. Proposed conclusions shall be separately stated. Proposed findings of fact and conclusions submitted by a person other than an applicant may be limited to those issues in connection with the hearing which affect the interests of such person.


(5 U.S.C. 557)


§ 1.265 Closing the record.

At the conclusion of hearing proceedings, the presiding officer shall promptly close the record after the parties have submitted their evidence, filed any proposed findings and conclusions under § 1.263, and submitted any other information required by the presiding officer. After the record is closed, it shall be certified by the presiding officer and filed in the Office of the Secretary. Notice of such certification shall be served on all parties to the proceedings.


[85 FR 63178, Oct. 6, 2020]


§ 1.267 Initial and recommended decisions.

(a) Except as provided in §§ 1.94, 1.251, and 1.274, when the proceeding is terminated on motion, or when the presiding officer is the Commission, the presiding officer shall prepare an initial (or recommended) decision, which shall be transmitted to the Secretary of the Commission. In the case of rate making proceedings conducted under sections 201-205 of the Communications Act, the presumption shall be that the presiding officer shall prepare an initial or recommended decision. The Secretary will make the decision public immediately and file it in the docket of the case.


(b) Each initial and recommended decision shall contain findings of fact and conclusions, as well as the reasons or basis therefor, upon all the material issues of fact, law, or discretion presented on the record; each initial decision shall also contain the appropriate rule or order, and the sanction, relief or denial thereof; and each recommended decision shall contain recommendations as to what disposition of the case should be made by the Commission. Each initial decision will show the date upon which it will become effective in accordance with the rules in this part in the absence of exceptions, appeal, or review.


(c) When the Commission is not the presiding officer, the authority of the presiding officer over the proceedings shall cease when the presiding officer has filed an Initial or Recommended Decision, or if it is a case in which the presiding officer is to file no decision, when they have certified the case for decision: Provided, however, That the presiding officer shall retain limited jurisdiction over the proceeding for the purpose of effecting certification of the record and corrections to the transcript, as provided in §§ 1.265 and 1.261, respectively, and for the purpose of ruling initially on applications for awards of fees and expenses under the Equal Access to Justice Act.


(Sec. 409, 48 Stat. 1096, as amended; 47 U.S.C. 409, 5 U.S.C. 557; secs. 4, 303, 307, 48 Stat., as amended, 1066, 1082, 1083: 47 U.S.C. 154, 303, 307)

[28 FR 12425, Nov. 22, 1963, as amended at 41 FR 14873, Apr. 8, 1976; 47 FR 3786, Jan. 27, 1982; 85 FR 63178, Oct. 6, 2020]


Review Proceedings

§ 1.271 Delegation of review function.

The Commission may direct, by order or rule, that its review function in a case or category of cases be performed by a commissioner, or a panel of commissioners, in which event the commissioner or panel shall exercise the authority and perform the functions which would otherwise have been performed by the Commission under §§ 1.273 through 1.282.



Note:

To provide for an orderly completion of cases, exceptions and related pleadings filed after March 1, 1996, shall be directed to the Commission and will not be acted upon by the Review Board.


[62 FR 4171, Jan. 29, 1997]


§ 1.273 Waiver of initial or recommended decision.

When the Commission serves as the presiding officer, it will not issue an initial or recommended decision. When the Commission is not the presiding officer, at any time before the record is closed all parties to the proceeding may agree to waive an initial or recommended decision, and may request that the Commission issue a final decision or order in the case. If the Commission has directed that its review function in the case be performed by a commissioner or a panel of commissioners, the request shall be directed to the appropriate review authority. The Commission or such review authority may in its discretion grant the request, in whole or in part, if such action will best conduce to the proper dispatch of business and to the ends of justice.


[85 FR 63178, Oct. 6, 2020]


§ 1.274 Certification of the record to the Commission for decision when the Commission is not the presiding officer; presiding officer unavailability.

(a) When the Commission is not the presiding officer, and where the Commission finds upon the record that due and timely execution of its functions imperatively and unavoidably so requires, the Commission may direct that the record in a pending proceeding be certified to it for decision.


(b) When a presiding officer becomes unavailable to the Commission after the taking of evidence has been concluded, the Commission shall direct that the record be certified to it for decision. In that event, the Commission shall designate a new presiding officer in accordance with § 1.241 for the limited purpose of certifying the record to the Commission.


(c) In all other circumstances when the Commission is not the presiding officer, the presiding officer shall prepare and file an initial or recommended decision, which will be released in accordance with § 1.267.


(d) When a presiding officer becomes unavailable to the Commission after the taking of evidence has commenced but before it has been concluded, the Commission shall designate another presiding officer in accordance with § 1.241 to continue the hearing proceeding. Oral testimony already introduced shall not be reheard unless observation of the demeanor of the witness is essential to the resolution of the case.


(Sec. 409, 48 Stat. 1096, as amended; 47 U.S.C. 409)

[85 FR 63179, Oct. 6, 2020]


§ 1.276 Appeal and review of initial decision.

(a)(1) Within 30 days after the date on which public release of the full text of an initial decision is made, or such other time as the Commission may specify, any of the parties may appeal to the Commission by filing exceptions to the initial decision, and such decision shall not become effective and shall then be reviewed by the Commission, whether or not such exceptions may thereafter be withdrawn. It is the Commission’s policy that extensions of time for filing exceptions shall not be routinely granted.


(2) Exceptions shall be consolidated with the argument in a supporting brief and shall not be submitted separately. As used in this subpart, the term exceptions means the document consolidating the exceptions and supporting brief. The brief shall contain (i) a table of contents, (ii) a table of citations, (iii) a concise statement of the case, (iv) a statement of the questions of law presented, and (v) the argument, presenting clearly the points of fact and law relied upon in support of the position taken on each question, with specific reference to the record and all legal or other materials relied on.


(b) The Commission may on its own initiative provide, by order adopted not later than 20 days after the time for filing exceptions expires, that an initial decision shall not become final, and that it shall be further reviewed or considered by the Commission.


(c) In any case in which an initial decision is subject to review in accordance with paragraph (a) or (b) of this section, the Commission may, on its own initiative or upon appropriate requests by a party, take any one or more of the following actions:


(1) Hear oral argument on the exceptions;


(2) Require the filing of briefs;


(3) Prior to or after oral argument or the filing of exceptions or briefs, reopen the record and/or remand the proceedings to the presiding officer to take further testimony or evidence;


(4) Prior to or after oral argument or the filing of exceptions or briefs, remand the proceedings to the presiding officer to make further findings or conclusions; and


(5) Prior to or after oral argument or the filing of exceptions or briefs, issue, or cause to be issued by the presiding officer, a supplemental initial decision.


(d) No initial decision shall become effective before 50 days after public release of the full text thereof is made unless otherwise ordered by the Commission. The timely filing of exceptions, the further review or consideration of an initial decision on the Commission’s initiative, or the taking of action by the Commission under paragraph (c) of this section shall stay the effectiveness of the initial decision until the Commission’s review thereof has been completed. If the effective date of an initial decision falls within any further time allowed for the filing of exceptions, it shall be postponed automatically until 30 days after time for filing exceptions has expired.


(e) If no exceptions are filed, and the Commission has not ordered the review of an initial decision on its initiative, or has not taken action under paragraph (c) of this section, the initial decision shall become effective, an appropriate notation to that effect shall be entered in the docket of the case, and a “Public Notice” thereof shall be given by the Commission. The provisions of § 1.108 shall not apply to such public notices.


(f) When any party fails to file exceptions within the specified time to an initial decision which proposes to deny its application, such party shall be deemed to have no interest in further prosecution of its application, and its application may be dismissed with prejudice for failure to prosecute.


(Sec. 40, 48 Stat. 1096, as amended; 47 U.S.C. 409)

[28 FR 12425, Nov. 22, 1963, as amended at 41 FR 14873, Apr. 8, 1976]


§ 1.277 Exceptions; oral arguments.

(a) The consolidated supporting brief and exceptions to the initial decision (see § 1.276(a)(2)), including rulings upon motions or objections, shall point out with particularity alleged material errors in the decision or ruling and shall contain specific references to the page or pages of the transcript of hearing, exhibit or order if any on which the exception is based. Any objection not saved by exception filed pursuant to this section is waived.


(b) Within the period of time allowed in § 1.276(a) for the filing of exceptions, any party may file a brief in support of an initial decision, in whole or in part, which may contain exceptions and which shall be similar in form to the brief in support of exceptions (see § 1.276(a)(2)).


(c) Except by special permission, the consolidated brief and exceptions will not be accepted if the exceptions and argument exceed 25 double-spaced typewritten pages in length. (The table of contents and table of citations are not counted in the 25 page limit; however, all other contents of and attachments to the brief are counted.) Within 10 days, or such other time as the Commission or delegated authority may specify, after the time for filing exceptions has expired, any other party may file a reply brief, which shall not exceed 25 double spaced typewritten pages and shall contain a table of contents and a table of citations. If exceptions have been filed, any party may request oral argument not later than five days after the time for filing replies to the exceptions has expired. The Commission or delegated authority, in its discretion, will grant oral argument by order only in cases where such oral presentations will assist in the resolution of the issues presented. Within five days after release of an order designating an initial decision for oral argument, as provided in paragraph (d) of this section, any party who wishes to participate in oral argument shall file a written notice of intention to appear and participate in oral argument. Failure to file a written notice shall constitute a waiver of the opportunity to participate.


(d) Each order scheduling a case for oral argument will contain the allotment of time for each party for oral argument before the Commission. The Commission will grant, in its discretion, upon good cause shown, an extension of such time upon petition by a party, which petition must be filed within 5 days after issuance of said order for oral argument.


(e) Within 10 days after a transcript of oral argument has been filed in the Office of the Secretary, any party who participated in the oral argument may file with the Commission a motion requesting correction of the transcript, which motion shall be accompanied by proof of service thereof upon all other parties who participated in the oral argument. Within 5 days after the filing of such a motion, other parties may file a pleading in support of or in opposition to such motion. Thereafter, the officer who presided at the oral argument shall, by order, specify the corrections to be made in the transcript, and a copy of the order shall be served upon all parties to the proceeding. The officer who presided at the oral argument may, on his own initiative, by order, specify corrections to be made in the transcript on 5 days notice of the proposed corrections to all parties who participated in the oral argument.


(f) Any commissioner who is not present at oral argument and who is otherwise authorized to participate in a final decision may participate in making that decision after reading the transcript of oral argument.


(Sec. 409, 48 Stat. 1096, as amended; 47 U.S.C. 409)

[28 FR 12425, Nov. 22, 1963, as amended at 41 FR 14873, Apr. 8, 1976; 41 FR 34259, Aug. 13, 1976; 44 FR 12426, Mar. 7, 1979; 56 FR 793, Jan. 9, 1991; 62 FR 4171, Jan. 29, 1997; 71 FR 15618, Mar. 29, 2006]


§ 1.279 Limitation of matters to be reviewed.

(a) Upon review of any initial decision, the Commission may, in its discretion, limit the issues to be reviewed to those findings and conclusions to which exceptions have been filed, or to those findings and conclusions specified in the Commission’s order of review issued pursuant to § 1.276(b).


(b) No party may file an exception to the presiding officer’s ruling that all or part of the hearing be conducted and resolved on a written record, unless that party previously filed an interlocutory motion to request an oral hearing in accordance with § 1.376.


[85 FR 63179, Oct. 6, 2020]


§ 1.282 Final decision of the Commission.

(a) After opportunity has been afforded for the filing of proposed findings of fact and conclusions, exceptions, supporting statements, briefs, and for the holding of oral argument as provided in this subpart, the Commission will issue a final decision in each case in which an initial decision has not become final.


(b) The final decision shall contain:


(1) Findings of fact and conclusions, as well as the reasons or basis therefor, upon all the material issues of fact, law or discretion presented on the record;


(2) Rulings on each relevant and material exception filed; the Commission will deny irrelevant exceptions, or those which are not of decisional significance, without a specific statement of reasons prescribed by paragraph (b)(1) of this section; and


(3) The appropriate rule or order and the sanction, relief or denial thereof.


(Sec. 8(b), 60 Stat. 2422; 5 U.S.C. 1007(b))

[28 FR 12425, Nov. 22, 1963, as amended at 41 FR 14873, Apr. 8, 1976; 76 FR 70908, Nov. 16, 2011]


Interlocutory Actions in Hearing Proceedings

§ 1.291 General provisions.

(a)(1) The Commission acts on petitions to amend, modify, enlarge or delete the issues in hearing proceedings which involve rule making matters exclusively.


(2) All other interlocutory matters in hearing proceedings are acted on by the presiding officer.


(3) Each interlocutory pleading shall identify the presiding officer in its caption. Unless the pleading is to be acted upon by the Commission, the presiding officer shall be identified by name.


(b) All interlocutory pleadings shall be submitted in accordance with the provisions of §§ 1.4, 1.44, 1.47, 1.48, 1.49, 1.50, 1.51, and 1.52.


(c)(1) Procedural rules governing interlocutory pleadings are set forth in §§ 1.294 through 1.298.


(2) Rules governing appeal from, and reconsideration of, interlocutory rulings made by the presiding officer are set forth in § 1.301.


(3) Petitions requesting reconsideration of an interlocutory ruling will not be entertained.


(d) No initial decision shall become effective under § 1.276(e) until all interlocutory matters pending before the Commission in the proceeding at the time the initial decision is issued have been disposed of and the time allowed for appeal from interlocutory rulings of the presiding officer has expired.


(Secs. 4(i), 303(r) and 5(c)(1) of the Communications Act of 1934, as amended; 47 CFR 0.61 and 0.283)

[85 FR 63179, Oct. 6, 2020]


§ 1.294 Oppositions and replies.

(a) Any party to a hearing proceeding may file an opposition to an interlocutory request filed in that proceeding.


(b) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section or as otherwise ordered by the presiding officer, oppositions to interlocutory requests shall be filed within 4 days after the original pleading is filed, and replies to oppositions will not be entertained.


(c) Additional pleadings may be filed only if specifically requested or authorized by the person(s) who is to make the ruling.


[85 FR 63179, Oct. 6, 2020]


§ 1.296 Service.

No pleading filed pursuant to § 1.51 or § 1.294 will be considered unless it is accompanied by proof of service upon the parties to the proceeding.


(Secs. 4(i), 303(r) and 5(c)(1) of the Communications Act of 1934, as amended; 47 CFR 0.61 and 0.283)

[49 FR 4381, Feb. 6, 1984, as amended at 62 FR 4171, Jan. 29, 1997]


§ 1.297 Oral argument.

Oral argument with respect to any contested interlocutory matter will be held when, in the opinion of the person(s) who is to make the ruling, the ends of justice will be best served thereby. Timely notice will be given of the date, time, and place of any such oral argument.


[29 FR 6444, May 16, 1964]


§ 1.298 Rulings; time for action.

(a) Unless it is found that irreparable injury would thereby be caused one of the parties, or that the public interest requires otherwise, or unless all parties have consented to the contrary, consideration of interlocutory requests will be withheld until the time for filing oppositions (and replies, if replies are allowed) has expired. As a matter of discretion, however, requests for continuances and extensions of time, requests for permission to file pleadings in excess of the length prescribed in this chapter, and requests for temporary relief may be ruled upon ex parte without waiting for the filing of responsive pleadings.


(b) In the discretion of the presiding officer, rulings on interlocutory matters may be made orally to the parties. The presiding officer may, in his or her discretion, state reasons therefor on the record if the ruling is being transcribed, or may promptly issue a written statement of the reasons for the ruling, either separately or as part of an initial decision.


[28 FR 12425, Nov. 22, 1963, as amended at 29 FR 6444, May 16, 1964; 41 FR 14874, Apr. 8, 1976; 85 FR 63179, Oct. 6, 2020]


Appeal and Reconsideration of Presiding Officer’s Ruling

§ 1.301 Appeal from interlocutory rulings by a presiding officer, other than the Commission, or a case manager; effective date of ruling.

(a) Interlocutory rulings which are appealable as a matter of right. Rulings listed in this paragraph are appealable as a matter of right. An appeal from such a ruling may not be deferred and raised as an exception to the initial decision.


(1) If a ruling denies or terminates the right of any person to participate as a party to a hearing proceeding, such person, as a matter of right, may file an appeal from that ruling.


(2) If a ruling requires testimony or the production of documents, over objection based on a claim of privilege, the ruling on the claim of privilege is appealable as a matter of right.


(3) If a ruling denies a motion to disqualify the presiding officer or case manager, the ruling is appealable as a matter of right.


(4) A ruling removing counsel from the hearing is appealable as a matter of right, by counsel on his own behalf or by his client. (In the event of such ruling, the presiding officer will adjourn the hearing proceeding for such period as is reasonably necessary for the client to secure new counsel and for counsel to become familiar with the case).


(b) Other interlocutory rulings. Except as provided in paragraph (a) of this section, appeals from interlocutory rulings shall be filed only if allowed by the presiding officer. Any party desiring to file an appeal shall first file a request for permission to file appeal. The request shall be filed within 5 days after the order is released or (if no written order) after the ruling is made. Pleadings responsive to the request shall be filed only if they are requested by the presiding officer. If the presiding officer made the ruling, the request shall contain a showing that the appeal presents a new or novel question of law or policy and that the ruling is such that error would be likely to require remand should the appeal be deferred and raised as an exception. If a case manager made the ruling, the request shall contain a showing that the appeal presents a question of law or policy that the case manager lacks authority to resolve. The presiding officer shall determine whether the showing is such as to justify an interlocutory appeal and, in accordance with his determination, will either allow or disallow the appeal or modify the ruling. Such ruling is final: Provided, however, That the Commission may, on its own motion, dismiss an appeal allowed under this section on the ground that objection to the ruling should be deferred and raised after the record is certified for decision by the Commission or as an exception to an initial decision.


(1) If an appeal is not allowed, or is dismissed by the Commission, or if permission to file an appeal is not requested, objection to the ruling may be raised after the record is certified for decision by the Commission or on review of the initial decision.


(2) If an appeal is allowed and is considered on its merits, the disposition on appeal is final. Objection to the ruling or to the action on appeal may not be raised after the record is certified for decision by the Commission or on review of the initial decision.


(3) If the presiding officer modifies their initial ruling, any party adversely affected by the modified ruling may file a request for permission to file appeal, pursuant to the provisions of this paragraph.


(c) Procedures, effective date.

(1) Unless the presiding officer orders otherwise, rulings made shall be effective when the order is released or (if no written order) when the ruling is made. The Commission may stay the effect of any ruling that comes before it for consideration on appeal.


(2) Appeals filed under paragraph (a) of this section shall be filed within 5 days after the order is released or (if no written order) after the ruling is made. Appeals filed under paragraph (b) of this section shall be filed within 5 days after the appeal is allowed.


(3) The appeal shall conform with the specifications set out in § 1.49 and shall be subscribed and verified as provided in § 1.52.


(4) The appeal shall be served on parties to the proceeding (see §§ 1.47 and 1.211), and shall be filed with the Secretary, Federal Communications Commission, Washington, D.C. 20554.


(5) The appeal shall not exceed 5 double-spaced typewritten pages.


(6) Appeals are acted on by the Commission.


(7) Oppositions and replies shall be served and filed in the same manner as appeals and shall be served on appellant if he is not a party to the proceeding. Oppositions shall be filed within 5 days after the appeal is filed. Replies shall not be permitted, unless the Commission specifically requests them. Oppositions shall not exceed 5 double-spaced typewritten pages. Replies shall not exceed 5 double-spaced typewritten pages.


(Secs. 4, 303, 307, 48 Stat., as amended, 1066, 1082, 1083; 47 U.S.C. 154, 303, 307)

[35 FR 17333, Nov. 11, 1970, as amended at 40 FR 395