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Title 7 – Agriculture–Volume 7

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Title 7 – Agriculture–Volume 7



SUBTITLE B – Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued)

Part


chapter vii – Farm Service Agency, Department of Agriculture

701


chapter viii – Agricultural Marketing Service (Federal Grain Inspection Service, Fair Trade Practices Program), Department of Agriculture

800


Subtitle B – Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued)

CHAPTER VII – FARM SERVICE AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

SUBCHAPTER A – AGRICULTURAL CONSERVATION PROGRAM

PART 700 [RESERVED]

PART 701 – EMERGENCY CONSERVATION PROGRAM, EMERGENCY FOREST RESTORATION PROGRAM, AND CERTAIN RELATED PROGRAMS PREVIOUSLY ADMINISTERED UNDER THIS PART


Authority:16 U.S.C. 2201-2206; Sec. 101, Pub. L. 109-148, 119 Stat. 2747; and Pub. L. 111-212, 124 Stat. 2302


Source:69 FR 10302, Mar. 4, 2004, unless otherwise noted.

Subpart A – General

§ 701.1 Administration.

(a) Subject to the availability of funds, this part provides the terms, conditions and requirements of the Emergency Conservation Program (ECP) and the Emergency Forest Restoration Program (EFRP) administered by the Farm Service Agency (FSA). Neither program is an entitlement program and payments will only be made to the extent that the Deputy Administrator announces the eligibility of benefits for certain natural disasters, the areas in which such benefits will be available, the time period in which the disaster and the rehabilitation must occur, and only so long as all the conditions for eligibility specified in this part and elsewhere in law are met. However, the Deputy Administrator will not apply any non-statutory limitation on payments provided for in this part in such a way that it would necessarily result in the non-expenditure of program funds required to otherwise be made by law.


(b) ECP and EFRP are administered by the Administrator, FSA through the Deputy Administrator, FSA, and shall be carried out in the field by State and county FSA committees (State and county committees), subject to the availability of funds. Except as otherwise provided in this rule, discretionary determinations to be made under this rule will be made by the Deputy Administrator. Matters committed to the discretion of the Deputy Administrator shall be considered in all cases to be permissive powers and no person or legal entity shall, under any circumstances, be considered to be entitled to an exercise of such power in their favor.


(c) State and county committees, and representatives and employees, do not have authority to modify or waive any regulations in this part.


(d) The State committee may take any action authorized or required of the county committee by this part, but which the county committee has not taken, such as:


(1) Correct or require a county committee to correct any action taken by such county committee that is not in accordance with this part; or


(2) Require a county committee to withhold taking any action that is not in accordance with this part.


(e) No provision or delegation herein to a State or county committee shall preclude the Administrator, FSA, or a designee, from determining any question arising under the program or from reversing or modifying any determination made by a State or county committee.


(f) The Deputy Administrator may authorize State and county committees to waive or modify deadlines and other requirements in cases where lateness or failure to meet such other requirements does not adversely affect the operation of the program.


(g) The Deputy Administrator may limit the authority of state and county committees to approve cost share in excess of specified amounts.


(h) Data furnished by the applicants will be used to determine eligibility for program benefits. Furnishing the data is voluntary; however, the failure to provide data could result in program benefits being withheld or denied.


(i) FSA may consult with any other Federal agency, State agency, or other provider of technical assistance for such assistance as is determined by FSA to be necessary to implement ECP or EFRP. FSA is responsible for the technical aspects of ECP and EFRP but may enter into a Memorandum of Agreement with another party to provide technical assistance. If the requirement for technical assistance results in undue delay or significant hardship to producers in a county, the State committee may request in writing that FSA waive this requirement for that county. However, nothing in this paragraph or in this part creates a right of appeal or action for an applicant with respect to provisions relating to internal procedures of FSA.


(j) The provisions in this part shall not create an entitlement in any person or legal entity to any ECP or EFRP cost share or claim or any particular notice or form or procedure.


(k) Additional terms and conditions may be set forth in the application or the forms participants will be required to sign for participation in the ECP or EFRP.


[69 FR 10302, Mar. 4, 2004, as amended at 75 FR 70087, Nov. 17, 2010]


§ 701.2 Definitions.

(a) The terms defined in part 718 of this chapter shall be applicable to this part and all documents issued in accordance with this part, except as otherwise provided in this section.


(b) The following definitions shall apply to this part:


Agricultural producer means an owner, operator, or tenant of a farm or ranch used to produce for food or fiber, crops (including but not limited to, grain or row crops; seed crops; vegetables or fruits; hay forage or pasture; orchards or vineyards; flowers or bulbs; or field grown ornamentals) or livestock (including but not limited to, dairy or beef cattle; poultry; swine; sheep or goats; fish or other animals raised by aquaculture; other livestock or fowl) for commercial production. Producers of animals raised for recreational uses only are not considered agricultural producers.


Annual agricultural production means production of crops for food or fiber in a commercial operation that occurs on an annual basis under normal conditions.


Applicant means a person or legal entity who has submitted to FSA a request to participate in the ECP or EFRP.


Commercial forest land means forest land with trees intended to be harvested for commercial purposes that has a productivity potential greater than or equal to 20 cubic feet per year of merchantable timber.


Cost-share payment means the payment made by FSA to assist a program participant under this part to establish practices required to address qualifying damage suffered in connection with a qualifying disaster.


Deputy Administrator means the Deputy Administrator for Farm Programs, FSA, the ECP Program Manager, or designee.


Farmland means land devoted to agricultural production, including land used for aquaculture, or other land as may be determined by the Deputy Administrator.


Natural disaster means wildfires, hurricanes or excessive winds, drought, ice storms or blizzards, floods, or other naturally-occurring resource impacting events as determined by FSA. For EFRP, a natural disaster also includes insect or disease infestations as determined by FSA in consultation with other Federal and State agencies as appropriate.


Nonindustrial private forest land means rural commercial forest lands with existing tree cover, or which are suitable for growing trees, that are owned by a private non-industrial forest landowner as defined in this section.


Owners of nonindustrial private forest means, for purposes of the EFRP, an individual, group, association, corporation, Indian Tribe, or other legal private entity owning nonindustrial private forest land or who receives concurrence from the landowner for making the claim in lieu of the owner; and, for practice implementation, the one who holds a lease on the land for a minimum of 10 years. Owners or lessees principally engaged in the primary processing of raw wood products are excluded from this definition. Owners of land leased to lessees who would be excluded under the previous sentence are also excluded.


[69 FR 10302, Mar. 4, 2004, as amended at 75 FR 70087, Nov. 17, 2010; 84 FR 32841, July 10, 2019]


§§ 701.3-701.12 [Reserved]

§ 701.13 Submitting requests.

(a) Subject to the availability of funds, the Deputy Administrator shall provide for an enrollment period for submitting ECP or EFRP cost-share requests.


(b) Requests may be accepted after the announced enrollment period, if such acceptance is approved by the Deputy Administrator and is in accordance with the purposes of the program.


[69 FR 10302, Mar. 4, 2004, as amended at 75 FR 70088, Nov. 17, 2010]


§ 701.14 Onsite inspections.

(a) An onsite inspection must be made before approval of any request for ECP or EFRP assistance.


(b) Notwithstanding paragraph (a) of this section, onsite inspections may be waived by FSA, in its discretion only, where damage is so severe that an onsite inspection is unnecessary, as determined by FSA.


[69 FR 10302, Mar. 4, 2004, as amended at 75 FR 70088, Nov. 17, 2010]


§ 701.15 Starting practices before cost-share request is submitted; non-entitlement to payment; payment subject to the availability of funds.

(a) Subject to paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section, costs will not be shared for practices or components of practices that are started before a request for cost share under this part is submitted with the applicable county FSA office.


(b) Costs may be shared for drought and non-drought practices or components of practices that are started before a request is submitted with the county FSA office, only if:


(1) Considered and approved on a case-by-case basis in accordance with instructions of the Deputy Administrator;


(2) The disaster that is the basis of a claim for cost-share assistance created a situation that required the producer to take immediate action to prevent further losses;


(3) The Deputy Administrator determines that the request for assistance was filed within a reasonable amount of time after the start of the enrollment period; and


(4) The practice was started no more than 60 days before the ECP or EFRP designation was approved for the applicable county office.


(c) Any action taken prior to approval of a claim is taken at the producer’s own risk.


(d) An application for relief may be denied for any reason.


(e) All payments under this part are subject to the availability of funds.


[69 FR 10302, Mar. 4, 2004, as amended at 75 FR 70088, Nov. 17, 2010]


§ 701.16 Practice approval.

(a) Requests shall be prioritized before approval based on factors deemed appropriate by FSA, which include, but are not limited to:


(1) Type and degree of damage;


(2) Type of practices needed to address the problem;


(3) Availability of funds;


(4) Availability of technical assistance;


(5) Environmental concerns;


(6) Safety factors; or


(7) In the case of ECP, welfare of eligible livestock.


(b) Requests for cost-share assistance may be approved if:


(1) Funds are available; and


(2) The requested practice is determined eligible.


[69 FR 10302, Mar. 4, 2004, and amended at 75 FR 70088, Nov. 17, 2010]


§§ 701.17-701.20 [Reserved]

§ 701.21 Filing payment application.

Cost-share assistance is conditioned upon the availability of funds and the performance of the practice in compliance with all applicable specifications and program regulations.


(a) Completion of practice. After completion of the approved practice, the participant must certify completion and request payment by the payment request deadline. FSA will provide the participant with a form or another manner to be used to request payment.


(b) Proof of completion. Participants shall submit to FSA, at the local county office, the information needed to establish the extent of the performance of approved practices and compliance with applicable program provisions.


(c) Payment request deadline. The time limits for submission of information shall be determined by the Deputy Administrator. The payment request deadline for each ECP practice will be provided in the agreement after the application is approved. Time limits may be extended where failure to submit required information within the applicable time limits is due to reasons beyond the control of the participant.


§ 701.22 Eligibility to file for cost-share assistance.

Any eligible participant, as defined in this part, who paid part of the cost of an approved practice may file an application for cost-share payment.


§ 701.23 Eligible costs.

(a) Cost-share assistance may be authorized for all reasonable costs incurred in the completion of the practice, up to the maximums provided in §§ 701.126, 701.127, and 701.226.


(b) Eligible costs shall be limited as follows:


(1) Costs for use of personal equipment shall be limited to those incurred beyond the normal operation of the eligible land.


(2) Costs for personal labor shall be limited to personal labor not normally required in the operation of the eligible land.


(3) Costs for the use of personal equipment and labor must be less than that charged for such equipment and labor by commercial contractors regularly employed in such areas.


(4) Costs shall not exceed those needed to achieve the minimum performance necessary to resolve the problem being corrected by the practice. Any costs above those levels shall not be considered to be eligible costs for purposes of calculations made under this part.


(c) Costs shall not exceed the practice specifications in § 701.112(d) or § 701.212(d) for cost-share calculations.


(d) The gross amount on which the cost-share eligibility may be computed will not include any costs that were reimbursed by a third party including, but not limited to, an insurance indemnity payment.


(e) Total cost-share payments from all sources shall not exceed the total of eligible costs of the practice to the applicant.


[69 FR 10302, Mar. 4, 2004, and amended at 75 FR 70088, Nov. 17, 2010]


§ 701.24 Dividing cost-share among more than one participant.

(a) For qualifying cost-share assistance under this part, the cost shall be credited to the participant who personally performed the practice or who paid to have it performed by a third party. If a payment or credit was made by one participant to another potential participant, paragraph (c) of this section shall apply.


(b) If more than one participant contributed to the performance of the practice, the cost-share assistance for the practice shall be divided among those eligible participants in the proportion they contributed to the performance of the practice. FSA may determine what proportion was contributed by each participant by considering the value of the labor, equipment, or material contributed by each participant and any other factors deemed relevant toward performance.


(c) Allowance by a participant of a credit to another participant through adjustment in rent, cash or other consideration, may be considered as a cost of a practice to the paying party only if FSA determines that such credit is directly related to the practice. An applicant who was fully reimbursed shall be considered as not having contributed to the practice performance.


§ 701.25 Practices carried out with aid from ineligible persons or ineligible legal entities.

Any assistance provided by someone other than the eligible participant, including assistance from a State or Federal agency, shall be deducted from the participant’s total costs incurred for the practice for the purpose of computing ECP or EFRP cost shares. If unusual conditions exist, the Deputy Administrator may waive deduction of such contributions upon a request from the State committee and demonstration of the need for such a waiver.


[69 FR 10302, Mar. 4, 2004, as amended at 75 FR 70088, Nov. 17, 2010]


§§ 701.26-701.30 [Reserved]

§ 701.31 Maintenance and proper use of practices.

(a) Each participant receiving cost-share assistance is responsible for the required maintenance and proper use of the practice. Some practices have an established life span or minimum period of time during which they are expected to function as a conservation practice with proper maintenance. Cost-share assistance shall not be authorized for normal upkeep or maintenance of any practice.


(b) If a practice is not properly maintained for the established life span, the participant may be required to refund all or part of cost-share assistance received. The Deputy Administrator will determine what constitutes failure to maintain a practice and the amount that must be refunded.


§ 701.32 Failure to comply with program provisions.

Costs may be shared for performance actually rendered even though the minimum requirements otherwise established for a practice have not been satisfied if a reasonable effort was made to satisfy the minimum requirements and if the practice, as performed, will adequately address the need for the practice.


§ 701.33 Death, incompetency, or disappearance.

In case of death, incompetency, or disappearance of any participant, any cost-share payment due shall be paid to the successor, as determined in accordance with part 707 of this chapter.


§ 701.34 Appeals.

Part 11 of this title and parts 614 and 780 of this chapter apply to determinations made under this part.


[69 FR 10302, Mar. 4, 2004, as amended at 75 FR 70088, Nov. 17, 2010]


§ 701.35 Compliance with regulatory measures.

Participants who perform practices shall be responsible for obtaining the authorities, permits, rights, easements, or other approvals necessary to the performance and maintenance of the practices according to applicable laws and regulations. The ECP or EFRP participant shall be wholly responsible for any actions taken with respect to the project and shall, in addition, be responsible for returning and refunding any ECP or EFRP cost shares made, where the purpose of the project cannot be accomplished because of the applicants’ lack of clearances or other problems.


[69 FR 10302, Mar. 4, 2004, as amended at 75 FR 70088, Nov. 17, 2010]


§ 701.36 Schemes and devices and claims avoidances.

(a) If FSA determines that a participant has taken any action designed to defeat, or has the effect of defeating, the purposes of this program, the participant shall be required to refund all or part of any of the program payments otherwise due or paid that participant or related person or legal entity for that particular disaster. These actions include, but are not limited to, failure to properly maintain or deliberately destroying a practice and providing false or misleading information related to practices, costs, or arrangements between entities or individuals that would have an effect on any eligibility determination, including, but not limited to, a payment limit eligibility.


(b) All or any part of cost-share assistance that otherwise would be due any participant may be withheld, or required to be refunded, if the participant has adopted, or participated in, any scheme or device designed to evade the maximum cost-share limitation that applies to the program or to evade any other requirement or provision of the program or this part.


(c) If FSA determines that a participant has employed any scheme or device to deprive any other person or legal entity of cost-share assistance, or engaged in any actions to receive payments under this part that also were designed to avoid claims of the United States or its instrumentalities or agents against that party, related parties, or third parties, the participant shall refund all or part of any of those program payments paid to that participant for the project.


(d) For purposes of this section, a scheme or device can include, but is not limited to, instances of coercion, fraud, or misrepresentation regarding the claim for ECP or EFRP assistance and the facts and circumstances surrounding such claim.


(e) A participant who has knowingly supplied false information or filed a false claim shall be ineligible for cost-share assistance related to the disaster for which the false information was filed, or for any period of time FSA deems appropriate. False information or a false claim includes, but is not limited to, a request for payment for a practice not carried out, a false billing, or a billing for practices that do not meet required specifications.


[69 FR 10302, Mar. 4, 2004, and amended at 75 FR 70088, Nov. 17, 2010]


§ 701.37 Loss of control of the property during the practice life span.

In the event of voluntary or involuntary loss of control of the land by the ECP or EFRP cost-share recipient during the practice life-span, if the person or legal entity acquiring control elects not to become a successor to the ECP or EFRP agreement and the practice is not maintained, each participant who received cost-share assistance for the practice may be jointly and severally liable for refunding any ECP or EFRP cost-share assistance related to that practice. The practice life span, for purposes of this section, includes any maintenance period that is essential to its success.


[69 FR 10302, Mar. 4, 2004, as amended at 75 FR 70088, Nov. 17, 2010]


§§ 701.38-701.40 [Reserved]

§ 701.41 Cost-share assistance not subject to claims.

Any cost-share assistance or portion thereof due any participant under this part shall be allowed without regard to questions of title under State law, and without regard to any claim or lien against any crop or property, or proceeds thereof, except liens and other claims of the United States or its instrumentalities. The regulations governing offsets and withholdings at parts 792 and 1403 of this title shall be applicable to this program and the provisions most favorable to a collection of the debt shall control.


§ 701.42 Assignments.

Participants may assign ECP cost-share assistance payments, in whole or in part, according to part 1404 of this title.


§ 701.43 Information collection requirements.

Information collection requirements contained in this part have been approved by the Office of Management and Budget under the provisions at 44 U.S.C. Chapter 35 and have been assigned OMB Number 0560-0082.


§ 701.44 Agricultural Conservation Program (ACP) contracts.

Contracts for ACP that are, or were, administered under this part or similar contracts executed in connection with the Interim Environmental Quality Incentives Program, shall, unless the Deputy Administrator determines otherwise, be administered under, and be subject to, the regulations for ACP contracts and the ACP program that were contained in the 7 CFR parts 700 to 899, edition revised as of January 1, 1998, and under the terms of the agreements that were entered into with participants.


[69 FR 10302, Mar. 4, 2004, as amended at 75 FR 70088, Nov. 17, 2010]


§ 701.45 Forestry Incentives Program (FIP) contracts.

The regulations governing the FIP as of July 31, 2002, and contained in the 7 CFR parts 700 to 899, edition revised as of January 1, 2002, shall continue to apply to FIP contracts in effect as of that date, except as provided in accord with a delegation of the administration of that program and such delegation and actions taken thereunder shall apply to any other FIP matters as may be at issue or in dispute.


[69 FR 10302, Mar. 4, 2004, as amended at 75 FR 70088, Nov. 17, 2010]


Subpart B – Emergency Conservation Program

§§ 701.100-701.102 [Reserved]

§ 701.103 Eligible losses, objective, and payments.

(a) FSA will provide cost-share assistance to farmers and ranchers to rehabilitate farmland damaged by wind erosion, floods, hurricanes, wildfire, or other natural disasters as determined by the Deputy Administrator, and to carry out emergency water conservation measures during periods of severe drought, subject to the availability of funds and only for areas, natural disasters, and time periods approved by the Deputy Administrator.


(b) The objective of the ECP is to make cost-share assistance available to eligible participants on eligible land for certain practices, to rehabilitate farmland damaged by floods, hurricanes, wildfire, wind erosion, or other natural disasters, and for the installation of water conservation measures during periods of severe drought.


(c) Payments may also be made under this subpart for:


(1) Emergency water conservation or water enhancement measures (including measures to assist confined livestock) during periods of severe drought; and


(2) Floodplain easements for runoff and other emergency measures that the Deputy Administrator determines is necessary to safeguard life and property from floods, drought, and the products of erosion on any watershed whenever fire, flood, or other natural occurrence is causing or has caused, a sudden impairment of the watershed.


(d) Payments under this part are subject to the availability of appropriated funds and any limitations that may otherwise be provided for by Congress.


[69 FR 10302, Mar. 4, 2004. Redesignated and amended at 75 FR 70088, Nov. 17, 2010; 84 FR 32841, July 10, 2019]


§ 701.104 Producer eligibility.

(a) To be eligible to participate in the ECP the Deputy Administrator must determine that a person or legal entity is an agricultural producer with an interest in the land affected by the natural disaster, and that person or legal entity must be liable for or have paid the expense that is the subject of the cost share. The applicant must be a landowner or user in the area where the qualifying event has occurred, and must be a party who will incur the expense that is the subject of the cost share.


(b) Federal agencies and States, including all agencies and political subdivisions of a State, are ineligible to participate in the ECP.


(c) All producer eligibility is subject to the availability of funds and an application may be denied for any reason.


[69 FR 10302, Mar. 4, 2004. Redesignated and amended at 75 FR 70088, Nov. 17, 2010]


§ 701.105 Land eligibility.

(a) For land to be eligible, the Deputy Administrator must determine that land that is the subject of the cost share:


(1) Will have new conservation problems caused as a result of a natural disaster that, if not treated, would:


(i) Impair or endanger the land;


(ii) Materially affect the productive capacity of the land;


(iii) Represent unusual damage that, except for wind erosion, is not of the type likely to recur frequently in the same area; and


(iv) Be so costly to repair that Federal assistance is or will be required to return the land to productive agricultural use. Conservation problems existing prior to the disaster are not eligible for cost-share assistance.


(2) Be physically located in a county in which the ECP has been implemented; and


(3) Be one of the following:


(i) Land expected to have annual agricultural production,


(ii) A field windbreak or a farmstead shelterbelt on which the ECP practice to be implemented involves removing debris that interferes with normal farming operations on the farm and correcting damage caused by the disaster; or


(iii) A farm access road on which debris interfering with the normal farming operation needs to be removed.


(b) Land is ineligible for cost share if the Deputy Administrator determines that it is, as applicable:


(1) Owned or controlled by the United States;


(2) Owned or controlled by States, including State agencies or other political subdivisions of a State;


(3) Protected by a levee or dike that was not effectively and properly functioning prior to the disaster, or is protected, or intended to be protected, by a levee or dike not built to U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, NRCS, or comparable standards;


(4) Adjacent to water impoundment reservoirs that are subject to inundation when the reservoir is filled to capacity;


(5) Land on which levees or dikes are located;


(6) Subject to frequent damage or susceptible to severe damage according to paragraph (c) of this section;


(7) Subject to flowage or flood easements and inundation when water is released in normal operations;


(8) Between any levee or dike and a stream, river, or body of water, including land between two or more levees or dikes;


(9) Located in an old or new channel of a stream, creek, river or other similar body of water, except that land located within or on the banks of an irrigation canal may be eligible if the Deputy Administrator determines that the canal is not a channel subject to flooding;


(10) In greenhouses or other confined areas, including but not limited to, land in corrals, milking parlors, barn lots, or feeding areas;


(11) Land on which poor farming practices, such as failure to farm on the contour, have materially contributed to damaging the land;


(12) Unless otherwise provided for, not considered to be in annual agricultural production, such as land devoted to stream banks, channels, levees, dikes, native woodland areas, roads, and recreational uses; or


(13) Devoted to trees including, but not limited to, timber production.


(c) To determine the likely frequency of damage and of the susceptibility of the land to severe damage under paragraph (b)(6) of this section, FSA will consider all relevant factors, including, but not limited to, the location of the land, the history of damage to the land, and whether the land was or could have been protected by a functioning levee or dike built to U. S. Army Corps of Engineers, NRCS, or comparable standards. Further, in making such determinations, information may be obtained and used from the Federal Emergency Management Agency or any other Federal, State (including State agencies or political subdivisions), or other entity or individual providing information regarding, for example, flood susceptibility for the land, soil surveys, aerial photographs, or flood plain data or other relevant information.


[69 FR 10302, Mar. 4, 2004. Redesignated at 75 FR 70088, Nov. 17, 2010]


§§ 701.106-701.109 [Reserved]

§ 701.110 Qualifying minimum cost of restoration.

(a) To qualify for assistance under § 701.103(a), the eligible damage must be so costly that Federal assistance is or will be required to return the land to productive agricultural use or to provide emergency water for livestock.


(b) The Deputy Administrator shall establish the minimum qualifying cost of restoration. Each affected State may be allowed to establish a higher minimum qualifying cost of restoration.


(c) A producer may request a waiver of the qualifying minimum cost of restoration. The waiver request shall document how failure to grant the waiver will result in environmental damage or hardship to the producer and how the waiver will accomplish the goals of the program.


[69 FR 10302, Mar. 4, 2004; 69 FR 22377, Apr. 26, 2004. Redesignated and amended at 75 FR 70088, Nov. 17, 2010]


§ 701.111 Prohibition on duplicate payments.

(a) Duplicate payments. Participants are not eligible to receive funding under the ECP for land on which the participant has or will receive funding under:


(1) The Wetland Reserve Program (WRP) provided for in 7 CFR part 1467;


(2) The Emergency Wetland Reserve Program (EWRP) provided for in 7 CFR part 623;


(3) The Emergency Watershed Protection Program (EWP), provided for in 7 CFR part 624, for the same or similar expenses.


(4) Any other program that covers the same or similar expenses so as to create duplicate payments, or, in effect, a higher rate of cost share than is allowed under this part.


(b) Refund. Participants who receive any duplicate funds, payments, or benefits shall refund any ECP payments received.


[69 FR 10302, Mar. 4, 2004, as amended at 71 FR 30265, May 26, 2006. Redesignated at 75 FR 70088, Nov. 17, 2010]


§ 701.112 Eligible ECP practices.

(a) Cost-share assistance may be offered for ECP practices to replace or restore farmland, fences, or conservation structures to a condition similar to that existing before the natural disaster. No relief under this subpart shall be allowed to address conservation problems existing before the disaster.


(b) The practice or practices made available when the ECP is implemented shall be only those practices authorized by FSA for which cost-share assistance is essential to permit accomplishment of the program goals.


(c) Cost-share assistance may be provided for permanent vegetative cover, including establishment of the cover where needed, only in conjunction with eligible structures or installations where cover is needed to prevent erosion and/or siltation or to accomplish some other ECP purpose.


(d) Practice specifications shall represent the minimum levels of performance needed to address the ECP need.


[69 FR 10302, Mar. 4, 2004. Redesignated and amended at 75 FR 70088, Nov. 17, 2010]


§§ 701.113-701.116 [Reserved]

§ 701.117 Average adjusted gross income limitation.

To be eligible for payments issued from the $16 million provided under the U.S. Troop Readiness, Veterans’ Care, Katrina Recovery, and Iraq Accountability Appropriations Act, 2007 (Pub. L. 110-28, section 9003), each applicant must meet the provisions of the Adjusted Gross Income Limitations at 7 CFR part 1400 subpart G.


[72 FR 45880, Aug. 16, 2007. Redesignated at 75 FR 70088, Nov. 17, 2010]


§§ 701.118-701.125 [Reserved]

§ 701.126 Maximum cost-share percentage.

(a) In addition to other restrictions that may be applied by FSA, an ECP participant shall not receive more than 75 percent of the total allowable costs, as determined by this part, to perform the practice.


(b) However, notwithstanding paragraph (a) of this section, a producer who is a limited resource, socially disadvantaged, or beginning farmer or rancher that participates in ECP may receive up to 90 percent of the total allowable costs expended to perform the practice as determined under this part.


(c) In addition to other limitations that apply, in no case will the ECP payment exceed 50 percent of what the Deputy Administrator has determined is the agricultural value of the affected land.


[69 FR 10302, Mar. 4, 2004. Redesignated and amended at 75 FR 70088, Nov. 17, 2010; 84 FR 32841, July 10, 2019]


§ 701.127 Maximum ECP payments per person or legal entity.

A person or legal entity, as defined in part 1400 of this title, is limited to a maximum ECP cost-share of $500,000 per person or legal entity, per natural disaster.


[75 FR 7088, Nov. 17, 2010, as amended at 84 FR 32841, July 10, 2019]


§ 718.128 Repair or replacement of fencing.

(a) With respect to a payment to an agricultural producer for the repair or replacement of fencing, the agricultural producer has the option of receiving up to 25 percent of the projected payment, determined based on the applicable percentage of the fair market value of the cost of the repair or replacement, as determined by FSA before the agricultural producer carries out the repair or replacement.


(b) If the funds provided under paragraph (a) of this section are not spent by the agricultural producer within 60 calendar days of the date on which the agricultural producer receives those funds, the funds must be returned to FSA by a date determined by FSA.


(c) Payments made under this section are subject to the availability of funds.


[84 FR 32841, July 10, 2019]


§§ 701.129-701.149 [Reserved]

§ 701.150 2005 hurricanes.

In addition benefits elsewhere allowed by this part, claims related to calendar year 2005 hurricane losses may be allowed to the extent provided for in §§ 701.150 through 701.157. Such claims under those sections will be limited to losses in counties that were declared disaster counties by the President or the Secretary because of 2005 hurricanes and to losses to oyster reefs. Claims under §§ 701.151 through 701.157 shall be subject to all normal ECP limitations and provisions except as explicitly provided in those sections.


[71 FR 30265, May 26, 2006. Redesignated and amended at 75 FR 70088, 70089, Nov. 17, 2010]


§ 701.151 Definitions.

The following definitions apply to §§ 701.152 through 701.157:


Above-ground irrigation facilities means irrigation pipes, sprinklers, pumps, emitters, and any other integral part of the above ground irrigation system.


Barn means a structure used for the housing of animals or farm equipment.


Commercial forest land means forest land with trees intended to be harvested for commercial purposes that has a productivity potential greater than or equal to 20 cubic feet per year of merchantable timber.


Date of loss means the date the hurricane damage occurred in calendar year 2005.


Eligible county means any county that was declared a disaster county by the President or the Secretary because of a calendar year 2005 hurricane, that otherwise meets the eligibility requirements of this part.


Forest management plan means a plan of action and direction on forest lands to achieve a set of results usually specified as goals or objectives consistent with program policies prepared or approved by a natural resource professional, such as a State forestry agency representative.


Poultry house means a building used to house live poultry for the purpose of commercial food production.


Private non-industrial forest land means rural commercial forest lands with existing tree cover, or which are suitable for growing trees, that are owned by a private non-industrial forest landowner as defined in this section.


Private non-industrial forest landowner means, for purposes of the ECP for forestry, an individual, group, association, corporation, Indian tribe, or other legal private entity owning non-industrial private forest land or who receives concurrence from the landowner for making the claim in lieu of the owner, and for practice implementation and who holds a lease on the land for a minimum of 10 years. Owners or lessees principally engaged in the primary processing of raw wood products are excluded from this definition. Owners of land leased to lessees who would be excluded under the previous sentence are also excluded.


Shade house means a metal or wood structure covered by a material used for shade purposes.


[71 FR 30265, May 26, 2006. Redesignated and amended at 75 FR 70088, 70089, Nov. 17, 2010]


§ 701.152 Availability of funding.

Payments under §§ 1701.53 through 701.157 are subject to the availability of funds under Public Law 109-148.


[71 FR 30265, May 26, 2006. Redesignated and amended at 75 FR 70088, Nov. 17, 2010]


§ 701.153 Debris removal and water for livestock.

Subject to the other eligibility provisions of this part, an ECP participant addressing damage in an eligible county from hurricanes during calendar year 2005 may be allowed up to 90 percent of the participant’s actual cost or of the total allowable cost for cleaning up structures such as barns, shade houses and above-ground irrigation facilities, for removing poultry house debris, including carcasses, and for providing water for livestock.


[71 FR 30265, May 26, 2006. Redesignated and amended at 75 FR 70088, 70089, Nov. 17, 2010]


§ 701.154 [Reserved]

§ 701.155 Nursery.

(a) Subject to the other eligibility provisions of this part except as provided explicitly in this section, assistance may be made available in an eligible county under this section for the cost of removing nursery debris such as nursery structures, shade houses, and above ground irrigation facilities, where such debris was created in calendar year 2005 by a 2005 hurricane.


(b) Notwithstanding § 701.126, an otherwise eligible ECP participant may be allowed up to 90 percent of the participant’s actual cost or of the total allowable cost for losses described in paragraph (a) of this section.


[71 FR 30265, May 26, 2006. Redesignated and amended at 75 FR 70088, 70089, Nov. 17, 2010]


§ 701.156 Poultry.

(a) Subject to the other eligibility provisions of this part except as provided explicitly in this section, assistance may be allowed under this section for uninsured losses in calendar year 2005 to a poultry house in an eligible county due to a 2005 hurricane.


(b) Claimants under this section may be allowed an amount up to the lesser of:


(1) The lesser of 50 percent of the participant’s actual or the total allowable cost of the reconstruction or repair of a poultry house, or


(2) $50,000 per poultry house.


(c) The total amount of assistance provided under this section and any indemnities for losses to a poultry house paid to a poultry grower, may not exceed 90 percent of the total costs associated with the reconstruction or repair of a poultry house.


(d) Poultry growers must provide information on insurance payments on their poultry houses. Copies of contracts between growers and poultry integrators may be required.


(e) Assistance under this section is limited to amounts necessary for reconstruction and/or repair of a poultry house to the same size as before the hurricane.


(f) Assistance is limited to poultry houses used to house poultry for commercial enterprises. A commercial poultry enterprise is one with a dedicated structure for poultry and a number of poultry that exceeds actual non-commercial uses of poultry and their products at all times, and from which poultry or related products are actually, and routinely, sold in commercial quantities for food, fiber, or eggs. Unless otherwise approved by FSA, a commercial quantity is a quantity per week that would normally exceed $100 in sales.


(g) Poultry houses with respect to which claims are made under this section must be reconstructed or repaired to meet current building standards.


[71 FR 30265, May 26, 2006. Redesignated at 75 FR 70088, Nov. 17, 2010]


§ 701.157 Private non-industrial forest land.

(a) Subject to the other eligibility provisions of this part except as provided explicitly in this section, assistance made available under this section with respect to private, non-industrial forest land in an eligible county for costs related to reforestations, rehabilitation, and related measures undertaken because of losses in calendar year 2005 caused by a 2005 hurricane. To be eligible, a non-industrial private forest landowner must have suffered a loss of, or damage to, at least 35 percent of forest acres on commercial forest land of the forest landowner in a designated disaster county due to a 2005 hurricane or related condition. The 35 percent loss shall be determined based on the value of the land before and after the hurricane event.


(b) During the 5-year period beginning on the date of the loss, the eligible private non-industrial forest landowner must:


(1) Reforest the eligible damaged forest acres in accordance with a forest management plan approved by FSA that is appropriate for the forest type where the forest management plan is developed by a person or legal entity with appropriate forestry credentials, as determined by the Deputy Administrator;


(2) Use the best management practices included in the forest management plan; and


(3) Exercise good stewardship on the forest land of the landowner while maintaining the land in a forested state.


(c) Notwithstanding § 701.126, an ECP participant shall not receive under this section more than 75 percent of the participant’s actual cost or of the total allowable cost of reforestation, rehabilitation, and related measures.


(d) Payments under this section shall not exceed a maximum of $150 per acre for any acre.


(e) Requests will be prioritized based upon planting tree species best suited to the site as stated in the forest management plan.


[71 FR 30265, May 26, 2006. Redesignated and amended at 75 FR 70088, 70089, Nov. 17, 2010]


Subpart C – Emergency Forest Restoration Program


Source:75 FR 70889, Nov. 17, 2010, unless otherwise noted.

§§ 701.200-701.202 [Reserved]

§ 701.203 Eligible measures, objectives, and assistance.

(a) Subject to the availability of funds and only for areas, natural disasters, and time periods for the natural disaster and rehabilitation approved by the Deputy Administrator, FSA will provide financial assistance to owners of nonindustrial private forest land who carry out emergency measures to restore land damaged by a natural disaster as determined by FSA.


(b) The objective of EFRP is to make financial assistance available to eligible participants on eligible land for certain practices to restore nonindustrial private forest land that has been damaged by a natural disaster.


[75 FR 70889, Nov. 17, 2010, as amended at 84 FR 32841, July 10, 2019]


§ 701.204 Participant eligibility.

(a) To be eligible to participate in EFRP, a person or legal entity must be an owner of nonindustrial private forest land affected by a natural disaster, and must be liable for or have the expense that is the subject of the financial assistance. The owner must be a person or legal entity (including an Indian tribe) with full decision-making authority over the land, as determined by FSA, or with such waivers as may be needed from lenders or others as may be required, to undertake program commitments.


(b) Federal agencies and States, including all agencies and political subdivisions of a State, are ineligible for EFRP.


(c) An application may be denied for any reason.


§ 701.205 Land eligibility.

(a) For land to be eligible, it must be nonindustrial private forest land and must, as determined by FSA:


(1) Have existing tree cover or have had tree cover immediately before the natural disaster and be suitable for growing trees;


(2) Have damage to natural resources caused by a natural disaster that, if not treated, would impair or endanger the natural resources on the land and would materially affect future use of the land; and


(3) Be physically located in a county in which EFRP has been implemented.


(b) Land is ineligible for EFRP if FSA determines that the land is any of the following:


(1) Owned or controlled by the United States; or


(2) Owned or controlled by States, including State agencies or political subdivisions of a State.


[75 FR 70889, Nov. 17, 2010, as amended at 84 FR 32841, July 10, 2019]


§§ 701.206-701.209 [Reserved]

§ 701.210 Qualifying minimum cost of restoration.

(a) FSA will establish the minimum qualifying cost of restoration, which may vary by State or region.


(b) An applicant may request a waiver of the qualifying minimum cost of restoration. The waiver request must document how failure to grant the waiver will result in environmental damage or hardship to the person or legal entity, and how the waiver will accomplish the goals of the program.


§ 701.211 Prohibition on duplicate payments.

(a) Participants are not eligible to receive funding under EFRP for land on which FSA determines that the participant has or will receive funding for the same or similar expenses under:


(1) The Emergency Conservation Program provided for in subpart B of this part;


(2) The Wetland Reserve Program (WRP) provided for in part 1467 of this title;


(3) The Emergency Wetland Reserve Program (EWRP) provided for in part 623 of this chapter;


(4) The Emergency Watershed Protection Program (EWP), provided for in part 624 of this chapter; or


(5) Any other program that covers the same or similar expenses so as to create duplicate payments, or, have the effect of creating in total, otherwise, a higher rate of financial assistance than is allowed on its own under this part.


(b) Participants who receive any duplicate funds, payments, or benefits must refund any EFRP payments received, except the Deputy Administrator may reduce the refund amount to the amount determined appropriate by the Deputy Administrator to ensure that the total amount of assistance received by the owner of the land under all programs does not exceed an amount otherwise allowed in this part.


§ 701.212 Eligible EFRP practices.

(a) Financial assistance may be offered to eligible persons or legal entities for EFRP practices to restore forest health and forest-related resources on eligible land.


(b) Practice specifications must represent the minimum level of performance needed to restore the land to the applicable FSA, NRCS, Forest Service, or State forestry standard.


§§ 701.213-701.225 [Reserved]

§ 701.226 Maximum financial assistance.

(a) In addition to other restrictions that may be applied by FSA, an EFRP participant will not receive more than 75 percent of the lesser of the participant’s total actual cost or of the total allowable costs, as determined by this subpart, to perform the practice.


(b) A person, or legal entity, as defined in part 1400 of this title, is limited to a maximum cost-share of $500,000 per person or legal entity, per natural disaster.


[75 FR 70889, Nov. 17, 2010, as amended at 84 FR 32841, July 10, 2019]


PART 707 – PAYMENTS DUE PERSONS WHO HAVE DIED, DISAPPEARED, OR HAVE BEEN DECLARED INCOMPETENT


Authority:7 U.S.C. 1385 and 8786.


Source:30 FR 6246, May 5, 1965, unless otherwise noted.

§ 707.1 Applicability.

This part applies to all programs in title 7 of the Code of Federal Regulations which are administered by the Farm Service Agency under which payments are made to eligible program participants. This part also applies to all other programs to which this part is applicable by the individual program regulations.


§ 707.2 Definitions.

“Person” when relating to one who dies, disappears, or becomes incompetent, prior to receiving payment, means a person who has earned a payment in whole or in part pursuant to any of the programs to which this part is applicable. “Children” shall include legally adopted children who shall be entitled to share in any payment in the same manner and to the same extent as legitimate children of natural parents. “Brother” or “sister”, when relating to one who, pursuant to the regulations in this part, is eligible to apply for the payment which is due a person who dies, disappears, or becomes incompetent prior to the receipt of such payment, shall include brothers and sisters of the half blood who shall be considered the same as brothers and sisters of the whole blood. “Payment” means a payment by draft, check or certificate pursuant to any of the Programs to which this part is applicable. Payments shall not be considered received for the purposes of this part until such draft, check or certificate has been negotiated or used.


§ 707.3 Death.

(a) Where any person who would otherwise be eligible to receive a payment dies before the payment is received, payment may be released in accordance with this section so long as, and only if, a timely program application has been filed by the deceased before the death or filed in a timely way before or after the death by a person legally authorized to act for the deceased. Timeliness will be determined under the relevant program regulations. All program conditions for payment under the relevant program regulations must have been met for the deceased to be considered otherwise eligible for the payment. However, the payment will not be made under this section unless, in addition, a separate release application is filed in accordance with § 707.7. If these conditions are met, payment may be released without regard to the claims of creditors other than the United States, in accordance with the following order of precedence:


(1) To the administrator or executor of the deceased person’s estate.


(2) To the surviving spouse, if there is no administrator or executor and none is expected to be appointed, or if an administrator or executor was appointed but the administration of the estate is closed (i) prior to application by the administrator or executor for such payment or (ii) prior to the time when a check, draft, or certificate issued for such payment to the administrator or executor is negotiated or used.


(3) If there is no surviving spouse, to the sons and daughters in equal shares. Children of a deceased son or daughter of a deceased person shall be entitled to their parent’s share of the payment, share and share alike. If there are no surviving direct descendants of a deceased son or daughter of such deceased person, the share of the payment which otherwise would have been made to such son or daughter shall be divided equally among the surviving sons and daughters of such deceased person and the estates of any deceased sons or daughters where there are surviving direct descendants.


(4) If there is no surviving spouse and no direct descendant, payment shall be made to the father and mother of the deceased person in equal shares, or the whole thereof to the surviving father or mother.


(5) If there is no surviving spouse, no direct descendant, and no surviving parent, payment shall be made to the brothers and sisters of the deceased person in equal shares. Children of a deceased brother or sister shall be entitled to their parent’s share of the payment, share and share alike. If there are no surviving direct descendants of the deceased brother or sister of such deceased person, the share of the payment which otherwise would have been made to such brother or sister shall be divided equally among the surviving brothers and sisters of such deceased person and the estates of any deceased brothers or sisters where there are surviving direct descendants.


(6) If there is no surviving spouse, direct descendant, parent, or brothers or sisters or their descendants, the payment shall be made to the heirs-at-law in accordance with the law of the State of domicile of the deceased person.


(b) If any person who is entitled to payment under the above order of precedence is a minor, payment of his share shall be made to his legal guardian, but if no legal guardian has been appointed payment shall be made to his natural guardian or custodian for his benefit, unless the minor’s share of the payment exceeds $1,000, in which event payment shall be made only to his legal guardian.


(c) Any payment which the deceased person could have received may be made jointly to the persons found to be entitled to such payment or shares thereof under this section or, pursuant to instructions issued by the Farm Service Agency, a separate payment may be issued to each person entitled to share in such payment.


[30 FR 6246, May 5, 1965, as amended at 75 FR 81835, Dec. 29, 2010]


§ 707.4 Disappearance.

(a) Where any person who would otherwise be eligible to receive a payment disappears before the payment is received, payment may be released in accordance with this section so long as, and only if, a timely program application has been filed by that person before the disappearance or filed timely before or after the disappearance by someone legally authorized to act for the person involved. Timeliness will be determined under the relevant program regulations. All program conditions for payment under the relevant program regulations must have been met for the person involved to be considered otherwise eligible for the payment. However, the payment will not be made unless, in addition, a separate release application is filed in accordance with § 707.7. If these conditions are met, payment may be released without regard to the claims of creditors other than the United States, in accordance with the following order of precedence:


(1) The conservator or liquidator of his estate, if one be duly appointed.


(2) The spouse.


(3) An adult son or daughter or grandchild for the benefit of his estate.


(4) The mother or father for the benefit of his estate.


(5) An adult brother or sister for the benefit of his estate.


(6) Such person as may be authorized under State law to receive payment for the benefit of his estate.


(b) A person shall be deemed to have disappeared if (1) he has been missing for a period of more than 3 months, (2) a diligent search has failed to reveal his whereabouts, and (3) such person has not communicated during such period with other persons who would be expected to have heard from him. Evidence of such disappearance must be presented to the county committee in the form of a statement executed by the person making the application for payment, setting forth the above facts, and must be substantiated by a statement from a disinterested person who was well acquainted with the person who has disappeared.


[30 FR 6246, May 5, 1965, as amended at 75 FR 81835, Dec. 29, 2010]


§ 707.5 Incompetency.

(a) Where any person who would otherwise be eligible to receive a payment is adjudged incompetent by a court of competent jurisdiction before the payment is received, payment may be released in accordance with this section so long as, and only if, a timely and binding program application has been filed by the person involved while capable or by someone legally authorized to file an application for the person involved. Timeliness is determined under the relevant program regulations. In all cases, the payment application must have been timely under the relevant program regulations and all program conditions for payment must have been met by or on behalf of the person involved. However, the payment will not be made unless, in addition, a separate release application is filed in accordance with § 707.7. If these conditions are met, payment may be released without regard to the claims of creditors other than the United States, to the guardian or committee legally appointed for the person involved. In case no guardian or committee had been appointed, payment, if for not more than $1,000, may be released without regard to claims of creditors other than the United States, to one of the following in the following order for the benefit of the person who was the subject of the adjudication:


(1) The spouse.


(2) An adult son, daughter, or grandchild.


(3) The mother or father.


(4) An adult brother or sister.


(5) Such person as may be authorized under State law to receive payment for the person (see standard procedure prescribed for the respective region).


(b) In case payment is more than $1,000, payment may be released only to such person as may be authorized under State law to receive payment for the incompetent, so long as all conditions for other payments specified in paragraph (a) of this section and elsewhere in the applicable regulations have been met. Those requirements include the filing of a proper and timely and legally authorized program application by or for the person adjudged incompetent. The release of funds under this paragraph will be made without regard to claims of creditors other than the United States unless the agency determines otherwise.


[75 FR 81836, Dec. 30, 2010]


§ 707.6 Death, disappearance, or incompetency of one eligible to apply for payment pursuant to the regulations in this part.

In case any person entitled to apply for a release of a payment pursuant to the provisions of § 707.3, § 707.4, § 707.5, or this section, dies, disappears, or is adjudged incompetent, as the case may be, after he has applied for such payment but before the payment is received, payment may be made upon proper application therefor, without regard to claims of creditors other than the United States, to the person next entitled thereto in accordance with the order of precedence set forth in § 707.3, § 707.4, or § 707.5, as the case may be.


[30 FR 6246, May 5, 1965, as amended at 75 FR 81836, Dec. 29, 2010]


§ 707.7 Release application.

No payment may be made under this part unless a proper program application was filed in accordance with the rules for the program that generated the payment. That application must have been timely and filed by someone legally authorized to act for the deceased, disappeared, or declared-incompetent person. The filer can be the party that earned the payment themselves – such as the case of a person who filed a program application before they died – or someone legally authorized to act for the party that earned the payment. All program conditions for payment must have been met before the death, disappearance, or incompetency except for the timely filing of the application for payment by the person legally authorized to act for the party earning the payment. But, further, for the payment to be released under the rules of this part, a second application must be filed. That second application is a release application filed under this section. In particular, as to the latter, where all other conditions have been met, persons desiring to claim payment for themselves or an estate in accordance with this part 707 must do so by filing a release application on Form FSA-325, “Application for Payment of Amounts Due Persons Who Have Died, Disappeared or Have Been Declared Incompetent.If the person who died, disappeared, or was declared incompetent did not apply for payment by filing the applicable program application for payment form, such program application for payment must also be filed in accordance with applicable regulations. If the payment is made under the Naval Stores Conservation Program, Part II of the Form FSA-325 shall be executed by the local District Supervisor of the U.S. Forest Service. In connection with applications for payment under all other programs itemized in § 707.1, Form FSA-325, and program applications for payments where required, shall be filed with the FSA county office where the person who earned the payment would have been required to file his application.


[30 FR 6246, May 5, 1965, as amended at 75 FR 81836, Dec. 29, 2010]


PART 708 – RECORD RETENTION REQUIREMENTS – ALL PROGRAMS


Authority:Sec. 4, 49 Stat. 164, secs. 7-17, 49 Stat. 1148, as amended; 16 U.S.C. 590d, 590g-590q.

§ 708.1 Record retention period.

For the purposes of the programs in this chapter, no receipt, invoice, or other record required to be retained by any agricultural producer as evidence tending to show performance of a practice under any such program needs to be retained by such producer more than two years following the close of the program year of the program.


[25 FR 105, Jan. 7, 1960. Redesignated at 26 FR 5788, June 29, 1961]

SUBCHAPTER B – FARM MARKETING QUOTAS, ACREAGE ALLOTMENTS, AND PRODUCTION ADJUSTMENT

PART 714 – REFUNDS OF PENALTIES ERRONEOUSLY, ILLEGALLY, OR WRONGFULLY COLLECTED


Authority:Secs. 372, 375, 52 Stat. 65, as amended, 66, as amended; 7 U.S.C. 1372, 1375.


Source:35 FR 12098, July 29, 1970, unless otherwise noted.

§ 714.35 Basis, purpose, and applicability.

(a) Basis and purpose. The regulations set forth in this part are issued pursuant to the Agricultural Adjustment Act of 1938, as amended, for the purpose of prescribing the provisions governing refunds of marketing quota penalties erroneously, illegally, or wrongfully collected with respect to all commodities subject to marketing quotas under the Act.


(b) Applicability. This part shall apply to claims submitted for refunds of marketing quota penalties erroneously, illegally, or wrongfully collected on all commodities subject to marketing quotas under the Act. It shall not apply to the refund of penalties which are deposited in a special deposit account pursuant to sections 314(b), 346(b), 356(b), or 359 of the Agricultural Adjustment Act of 1938, as amended, or paragraph (3) of Pub. L. 74, 77th Congress, available for the refund of penalties initially collected which are subsequently adjusted downward by action of the county committee, review committee, or appropriate court, until such penalties have been deposited in the general fund of the Treasury of the United States after determination that no downward adjustment in the amount of penalty is warranted. All prior regulations dealing with refunds of penalties which were contained in this part are superseded upon the effective date of the regulations in this part.


§ 714.36 Definitions.

(a) General terms. In determining the meaning of the provisions of this part, unless the context indicates otherwise, words imparting the singular include and apply to several persons or things, words imparting the plural include the singular, words imparting the masculine gender include the feminine as well, and words used in the present tense include the future as well as the present. The definitions in part 719 of this chapter shall apply to this part. The provisions of part 720 of this chapter concerning the expiration of time limitations shall apply to this part.


(b) Other terms applicable to this part. The following terms shall have the following meanings:


(1) “Act” means the Agricultural Adjustment Act of 1938, and any amendments or supplements thereto.


(2) “Claim” means a written request for refund of penalty.


(3) “Claimant” means a person who makes a claim for refund of penalty as provided in this part.


(4) “County Office” means the office of the Agricultural Stabilization and Conservation County Committee.


(5) “Penalty” means an amount of money collected, including setoff, from or on account of any person with respect to any commodity to which this part is applicable, which has been covered into the general fund of the Treasury of the United States, as provided in section 372(b) of the Act.


(6) “State office” means the office of the Agricultural Stabilization and Conservation State Committee.


§ 714.37 Instructions and forms.

The Deputy Administrator shall cause to be prepared and issued such instructions and forms as are necessary for carrying out the regulations in the part.


§ 714.38 Who may claim refund.

Claim for refund may be made by:


(a) Any person who was entitled to share in the price or consideration received by the producer with respect to the marketing of a commodity from which a deduction was made for the penalty and bore the burden of such deduction in whole or in part.


(b) Any person who was entitled to share in the commodity or the proceeds thereof, paid the penalty thereon in whole or in part and has not been reimbursed therefor.


(c) Any person who was entitled to share in the commodity or the proceeds thereof and bore the burden of the penalty because he has reimbursed the person who paid such penalty.


(d) Any person who, as buyer, paid the penalty in whole or in part in connection with the purchase of a commodity, was not required to collect or pay such penalty, did not deduct the amount of such penalty from the price paid the producer, and has not been reimbursed therefor.


(e) Any person who paid the penalty in whole or in part as a surety on a bond given to secure the payment of penalties and has not been reimbursed therefor.


(f) Any person who paid the whole or any part of the sum paid as a penalty with respect to a commodity included in a transaction which in fact was not a marketing of such commodity and has not been reimbursed therefor.


§ 714.39 Manner of filing.

Claim for refund shall be filed in the county office on a form prescribed by the Deputy Administrator. If more than one person is entitled to file a claim, a joint claim may be filed by all such persons. If a separate claim is filed by a person who is a party to a joint claim, such separate claim shall not be approved until the interest of each person involved in the joint claim has been determined.


§ 714.40 Time of filing.

Claim shall be filed within 2 years after the date payment was made to the Secretary. The date payment was made shall be deemed to be the date such payment was deposited in the general fund of the Treasury as shown on the certificate of deposit on which such payment was scheduled.


§ 714.41 Statement of claim.

The claim shall show fully the facts constituting the basis of the claim; the name and address of and the amount claimed by every person who bore or bears any part or all of the burden of such penalty; and the reasons why such penalty is claimed to have been erroneously, illegally, or wrongfully collected. It shall be the responsibility of the county committee to determine that any person who executes a claim as agent or fiduciary is properly authorized to act in such capacity. There should be attached to the claim all pertinent documents with respect to the claim or duly authenticated copies thereof.


§ 714.42 Designation of trustee.

Where there is more than one claimant and all the claimants desire to appoint a trustee to receive and disburse any payment to be made to them with respect to the claim, they shall be permitted to appoint a trustee. The person designated as trustee shall execute the declaration of trust.


§ 714.43 Recommendation by county committee.

Immediately upon receipt of a claim, the date of receipt shall be recorded on the face thereof. The county committee shall determine, on the basis of all available information, if the data and representations on the claim are correct. The county committee shall recommend approval or disapproval of the claim, and attach a statement to the claim, signed by a member of the committee, giving the reasons for their action. After the recommendation of approval or disapproval is made by the county committee, the claim shall be promptly sent to the State committee.


§ 714.44 Recommendation by State committee.

A representative of the State committee shall review each claim referred by the county committee. If a claim is sent initially to the State committee, it shall be referred to the appropriate county committee for recommendation as provided in § 714.43 prior to action being taken by the State committee. Any necessary investigation shall be made. The State committee shall recommend approval or disapproval of the claim, attaching a statement giving the reasons for their action, which shall be signed by a representative of the State committee. After recommending approval or disapproval, the claim shall be promptly sent to the Deputy Administrator.


§ 714.45 Approval by Deputy Administrator.

The Deputy Administrator shall review each claim forwarded to him by the State committee to determine whether, (a) the penalty was erroneously, illegally, or wrongfully collected, (b) the claimant bore the burden of the payment of the penalty, (c) the claim was timely filed, and (d) under the applicable law and regulations the claimant is entitled to a refund. If a claim is filed initially with the Deputy Administrator, he shall obtain the recommendations of the county committee and the State committee if he deems such action necessary in arriving at a proper determination of the claim. The claimant shall be advised in writing of the action taken by the Deputy Administrator. If disapproved, the claimant shall be notified with an explanation of the reasons for such disapproval.


§ 714.46 Certification for payment.

An officer or employee of the Department of Agriculture authorized to certify public vouchers for payment shall, for and on behalf of the Secretary of Agriculture, certify to the Secretary of the Treasury of the United States for payment all claims for refund which have been approved.


PART 718 – PROVISIONS APPLICABLE TO MULTIPLE PROGRAMS


Authority:7 U.S.C. 1501-1531, 1921-2008v, 7201-7334, and 15 U.S.C. 714b.



Source:61 FR 37552, July 18, 1996, unless otherwise noted.

Subpart A – General Provisions


Source:68 FR 16172, Apr. 3, 2003, unless otherwise noted.

§ 718.1 Applicability.

(a) This part is applicable to all programs specified in chapters VII and XIV of this title that are administered by the Farm Service Agency (FSA) and to any other programs that adopt this part by reference. This part governs how FSA administers marketing quotas, allotments, base acres, and acreage reports for those programs to which this part applies. The regulations to which this part applies are those that establish procedures for measuring allotments and program eligible acreage, for determining program compliance, farm reconstitutions, application of finality, and equitable relief from compliance or ineligibility.


(b) For all programs, except for those administered under parts 761 through 774 of this chapter:


(1) The provisions of this part will be administered under the general supervision of the Administrator, FSA, and carried out in the field by State and county FSA committees (State and county committees);


(2) State and county committees, and representatives and employees thereof, do not have authority to modify or waive any regulations in this part;


(3) No provisions or delegation herein to a State or county committee will preclude the Administrator, FSA, or a designee, from determining any question arising under the program or from reversing or modifying any determination made by a State or county committee;


(4) The Deputy Administrator, FSA, may authorize State and county committees to waive or modify deadlines and other requirements in cases where lateness or failure to meet such other requirements does not adversely affect the operation of the program.


(c) The programs under parts 761 through 774 will be administered according to the part, or parts, applicable to the specific program.


[72 FR 63284, Nov. 8, 2007, as amended at 80 FR 41994, July 16, 2015]


§ 718.2 Definitions.

Except as provided in individual parts of chapters VII and XIV of this title, the following terms shall be as defined herein:


Administrative variance (AV) means the amount by which the determined acreage of tobacco may exceed the effective allotment and be considered in compliance with program regulations.


Allotment means an acreage for a commodity allocated to a farm in accordance with the Agricultural Adjustment Act of 1938, as amended.


Allotment crop means any tobacco crop for which acreage allotments are established pursuant to part 723 of this chapter.


Barley means barley that follows the standard planting and harvesting practice of barley for the area in which the barley is grown.


Base acres means, with respect to a covered commodity on a farm, the number of acres in effect on September 30, 2013, as defined in the regulations in part 1412, subpart B, of this title that were in effect on that date, subject to any reallocation, adjustment, or reduction. The term “base acres” includes any generic base acres as specified in part 1412 planted to a covered commodity as specified in part 1412.


Beginning farmer or rancher means a person or legal entity (for legal entities to be considered a beginning farmer or rancher, all members must be related by blood or marriage and all members must be beginning farmers or ranchers) for which both of the following are true for the farmer or rancher:


(1) Has not operated a farm or ranch for more than 10 years; and


(2) Materially and substantially participates in the operation.


CCC means the Commodity Credit Corporation.


Combination means consolidation of two or more farms or parts of farms, having the same operator, into one farm.


Common land unit means the smallest unit of land that has an identifiable border located in one physical location (county), as defined in this part, and all of the following in common:


(1) Owner;


(2) Management;


(3) Cover; and


(4) Where applicable, producer association.


Common ownership unit means a distinguishable parcel of land consisting of one or more tracts of land with the same owners, as determined by FSA.


Constitution means the make-up of the farm before any change is made because of change in ownership or operation.


Contiguous means sharing any part of a boundary but not overlapping.


Contiguous county means a county contiguous to the reference county or counties.


Contiguous county office means the FSA county office that is in a contiguous county.


Controlled environment means, with respect to those crops for which a controlled environment is required or expected to be provided, including but not limited to ornamental nursery, aquaculture (including ornamental fish), and floriculture, as applicable under the particular program, an environment in which everything that can practicably be controlled with structures, facilities, growing media (including but not limited to water, soil, or nutrients) by the producer, is in fact controlled by the producer.


Controlled substances means the term set forth in 21 CFR part 1308.


Corn means field corn or sterile high-sugar corn that follows the standard planting and harvesting practices for corn for the area in which the corn is grown. Popcorn, corn nuts, blue corn, sweet corn, and corn varieties grown for decoration uses are not corn.


County means the county or parish of a state. For Alaska, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, a county shall be an area designated by the State committee with the concurrence of the Deputy Administrator.


County committee means the FSA county committee.


Crop reporting date means the latest date upon which the Administrator, FSA will allow the farm operator, owner, or their agent to submit a crop acreage report in order for the report to be considered timely.


Cropland. (a) Means land which the county committee determines meets any of the following conditions:


(1) Is currently being tilled for the production of a crop for harvest. Land which is seeded by drilling, broadcast or other no-till planting practices shall be considered tilled for cropland definition purposes;


(2) Is not currently tilled, but it can be established that such land has been tilled in a prior year and is suitable for crop production;


(3) Is currently devoted to a one-row or two-row shelter belt planting, orchard, or vineyard;


(4) Is in terraces that, were cropped in the past, even though they are no longer capable of being cropped;


(5) Is in sod waterways or filter strips planted to a perennial cover;


(6) Is preserved as cropland in accordance with part 1410 of this title; or


(7) Is land that has newly been broken out for purposes of being planted to a crop that the producer intends to, and is capable of, carrying through to harvest, using tillage and cultural practices that are consistent with normal practices in the area; provided further that, in the event that such practices are not utilized other than for reasons beyond the producer’s control, the cropland determination shall be void retroactive to the time at which the land was broken out.


(b) Land classified as cropland shall be removed from such classification upon a determination by the county committee that the land is:


(1) No longer used for agricultural production;


(2) No longer suitable for production of crops;


(3) Subject to a restrictive easement or contract that prohibits its use for the production of crops unless otherwise authorized by the regulation of this chapter;


(4) No longer preserved as cropland in accordance with the provisions of part 1410 of this title and does not meet the conditions in paragraphs (a)(1) through (a)(6) of this definition; or


(5) Converted to ponds, tanks or trees other than those trees planted in compliance with a Conservation Reserve Program contract executed pursuant to part 1410 of this title, or trees that are used in one-or two-row shelterbelt plantings, or are part of an orchard or vineyard.


Current year means the year for which allotments, quotas, acreages, and bases, or other program determinations are established for that program. For controlled substance violations, the current year is the year of the actual conviction.


Deputy Administrator means Deputy Administrator for Farm Programs, Farm Service Agency, U.S. Department of Agriculture or their designee.


Determination means a decision issued by a State, county or area FSA committee or its employees that affects a participant’s status in a program administered by FSA.


Determined acreage means that acreage established by a representative of the Farm Service Agency by use of official acreage, digitizing or planimetering areas on the photograph or other photographic image, or computations from scaled dimensions or ground measurements.


Direct and counter-cyclical program (DCP) cropland means land that currently meets the definition of cropland, land that was devoted to cropland at the time it was enrolled in a production flexibility contract in accordance with part 1413 of this title and continues to be used for agricultural purposes, or land that met the definition of cropland on or after April, 4, 1996, and continues to be used for agricultural purposes and not for nonagricultural commercial or industrial use.


Division means the division of a farm into two or more farms or parts of farms.


Double cropping means, as determined by the Deputy Administrator on a regional basis, consecutive planting of two specific crops that have the capability to be planted and carried to maturity for the intended uses, as reported by the producer, on the same acreage within a 12-month period. To be considered double cropping, the planting of two specific crops must be in an area where such double cropping is considered normal, or could be considered normal, for all growers under normal growing conditions and growers are typically able to repeat the same cycle successfully in a subsequent 12-month period.


Entity means a corporation, joint stock company, association, limited partnership, limited liability partnership, limited liability company, irrevocable trust, estate, charitable organization, or other similar organization, including any such organization participating in the farming operation as a partner in a general partnership, a participant in a joint venture, or a participant in a similar organization.


Extra Long Staple (ELS) Cotton means cotton that follows the standard planting and harvesting practices of the area in which the cotton is grown, and meets all of the following conditions:


(1) American-Pima, Sea Island, Sealand, all other varieties of the Barbandense species of cotton and any hybrid thereof, and any other variety of cotton in which 1 or more of these varieties is predominant; and,


(2) The acreage is grown in a county designated as an ELS county by the Secretary; and,


(3) The production from the acreage is ginned on a roller-type gin.


Family member means an individual to whom a person is related as spouse, lineal ancestor, lineal descendant, or sibling, including:


(1) Great grandparent;


(2) Grandparent;


(3) Parent;


(4) Child, including a legally adopted child;


(5) Grandchild


(6) Great grandchildren;


(7) Sibling of the family member in the farming operation; and


(8) Spouse of a person listed in paragraphs (1) through (7) of this definition.


Farm means a tract, or tracts, of land that are considered to be a separate operation under the terms of this part provided further that where multiple tracts are to be treated as one farm, the tracts must have the same operator and must also have the same owner except that tracts of land having different owners may be combined if all owners agree to the treatment of the multiple tracts as one farm for these purposes.


Farm inspection means an inspection by an authorized FSA representative using aerial or ground compliance to determine the extent of producer adherence to program requirements.


Farm number means a number assigned to a farm by the county committee for the purpose of identification.


Farmland means the sum of the DCP cropland, forest, acreage planted to an eligible crop acreage as specified in 1437.3 of this title and other land on the farm.


Field means a part of a farm which is separated from the balance of the farm by permanent boundaries such as fences, permanent waterways, woodlands, and croplines in cases where farming practices make it probable that such cropline is not subject to change, or other similar features.


GIS means Geographic Information System or a system that stores, analyzes, and manipulates spatial or geographically referenced data. GIS computes distances and acres using stored data and calculations.


GPS means Global Positioning System or a positioning system using satellites that continuously transmit coded information. The information transmitted from the satellites is interpreted by GPS receivers to precisely identify locations on earth by measuring distance from the satellites.


Grain sorghum means grain sorghum of a feed grain or dual purpose variety (including any cross that, at all stages of growth, having characteristics of a feed grain or dual purpose variety) that follows the standard planting and harvesting practice for grain sorghum for the area in which the grain sorghum was planted. Sweet sorghum is not considered a grain sorghum.


Ground measurement means the distance between 2 points on the ground, obtained by actual use of a chain tape, GPS with a minimum accuracy level as determined by the Deputy Administrator, or other measuring device.


Intended use means for a crop or a commodity, the end use for which it is grown and produced.


Joint operation means a general partnership, joint venture, or other similar business organization.


Landlord means one who rents or leases farmland to another.


Limited resource farmer or rancher means a farmer or rancher who is both of the following:


(1) A person whose direct or indirect gross farm sales do not exceed $176,800 (2014 program year) in each of the 2 calendar years that precede the most immediately preceding complete taxable year before the relevant program year that corresponds to the relevant program year (for example, for the 2014 program year, the two years would be 2011 and 2012), adjusted upwards in later years for any general inflation; and


(2) A person whose total household income was at or below the national poverty level for a family of four in each of the same two previous years referenced in paragraph (1) of this definition. (Limited resource farmer or rancher status can be determined using a Web site available through the Limited Resource Farmer and Rancher Online Self Determination Tool through National Resource and Conservation Service at http://www.lrftool.sc.egov.usda.gov.)


(3) For legal entities, the sum of gross sales and household income must be considered for all members.


Measurement service means a measurement of acreage or farm-stored commodities performed by a representative of FSA and paid for by the producer requesting the measurement.


Measurement service after planting means determining a crop or designated acreage after planting but before the farm operator files a report of acreage for the crop.


Measurement service guarantee means a guarantee provided when a producer requests and pays for an authorized FSA representative to measure acreage for FSA and CCC program participation unless the producer takes action to adjust the measured acreage. If the producer has taken no such action, and the measured acreage is later discovered to be incorrect, the acreage determined pursuant to the measurement service will be used for program purposes for that program year.


Minor child means an individual who is under 18 years of age. For the purpose of programs under chapters VII and XIV of this title, State court proceedings conferring majority on an individual under 18 years of age will not change such an individual’s status as a minor.


Nonagricultural commercial or industrial use means land that is no longer suitable for producing annual or perennial crops, including conserving uses, or forestry products.


Normal planting period means that period during which the crop is normally planted in the county, or area within the county, with the expectation of producing a normal crop.


Normal row width means the normal distance between rows of the crop in the field, but not less than 30 inches for all crops.


Oats means oats that follows the standard planting and harvesting practice of oats for the area in which the oats are grown.


Operator means an individual, entity, or joint operation who is determined by the FSA county committee to be in control of the farming operations on the farm.


Owner means one who has legal ownership of farmland, including:


(1) Any agency of the Federal Government; however, such agency is not eligible to receive any program payment;


(2) One who is buying farmland under a contract for deed; or


(3) One who has a life-estate in the property.


Partial reconstitution means a reconstitution that is made effective in the current year for some crops, but is not made effective in the current year for other crops. This results in the same farm having two or more farm numbers in one crop year.


Participant means one who participates in, or receives payments or benefits in accordance with any of the programs administered by FSA.


Pasture means land that is used to, or has the potential to, produce food for grazing animals.


Person means an individual, or an individual participating as a member of a joint operation or similar operation, a corporation, joint stock company, association, limited stock company, limited partnership, irrevocable trust, revocable trust together with the grantor of the trust, estate, or charitable organization including any entity participating in the farming operation as a partner in a general partnership, a participant in a joint venture, a grantor of a revocable trust, or a participant in a similar entity, or a State, political subdivision or agency thereof. To be considered a separate person for the purpose of this part, the individual or other legal entity must:


(1) Have a separate and distinct interest in the land or the crop involved;


(2) Exercise separate responsibility for such interest; and


(3) Be responsible for the cost of farming related to such interest from a fund or account separate from that of any other individual or entity.


Physical location means the political county and State determined by FSA for identifying a tract or common land unit, as applicable, under this part. FSA will consider all the DCP cropland within an original tract to be in one single physical location county and State based upon 95 percent or more of the tract’s DCP cropland. For DCP cropland that FSA determines lies outside the physical location (county) of the original tract that is 10 acres or more and more than 5 percent of the original tract, FSA will divide that land from the original tract and establish a new tract for that area.


Planted and considered planted (P&CP) means with respect to an acreage amount, the sum of the planted and prevented planted acres on the farm approved by the FSA county committee for a crop. P&CP is limited to initially planted or prevented planted crop acreage, except for crops planted in an FSA approved double-cropping sequence. Subsequently planted crop acreage and replacement crop acreage are not included as P&CP.


Producer means an owner, operator, landlord, tenant, or sharecropper, who shares in the risk of producing a crop and who is entitled to share in the crop available for marketing from the farm, or would have shared had the crop been produced. A producer includes a grower of hybrid seed.


Quota means the pounds allocated to a farm for a commodity in accordance with the Agricultural Adjustment Act of 1938, as amended.


Random inspection means an examination of a farm by an authorized representative of FSA selected as a part of an impartial sample to determine the adherence to program requirements.


Reconstitution means a change in the land constituting a farm as a result of combination or division.


Reported acreage means the acreage reported by the farm operator, farm owner, farm producer, or their agent on a Form prescribed by the FSA.


Required inspection means an examination by an authorized representative of FSA of a farm specifically selected by application of prescribed rules to determine adherence to program requirements or to verify the farm operator’s, farm owner’s, farm producer, or agent’s report.


Rice means rice that follows the standard planting and harvesting practices of the area excluding sweet, glutinous, or candy rice such as Mochi Gomi.


Secretary means the Secretary of Agriculture of the United States, or a designee.


Sharecropper means one who performs work in connection with the production of a crop under the supervision of the operator and who receives a share of such crop for its labor.


Skip-row or strip-crop planting means a cultural practice in which strips or rows of the crop are alternated with strips of idle land or another crop.


Socially disadvantaged farmer or rancher means a farmer or rancher who is a member of a socially disadvantaged group whose members have been subjected to racial, ethnic, or gender prejudice because of their identity as members of a group without regard to their individual qualities. Socially disadvantaged groups include the following and no others unless approved in writing by the Deputy Administrator:


(1) American Indians or Alaskan Natives,


(2) Asians or Asian-Americans,


(3) Blacks or African-Americans,


(4) Hispanics or Hispanic-Americans,


(5) Native Hawaiians or other Pacific Islanders, and


(6) Women.


Staking and referencing means determining an acreage before planting by:


(1) Measuring or computing a delineated area from ground measurements and documenting the area measured; and, (2) Staking and referencing the area on the ground.


Standard deduction means an acreage that is excluded from the gross acreage in a field because such acreage is considered as being used for farm equipment turn-areas. Such acreage is established by application of a prescribed percentage of the area planted to the crop in lieu of measuring the turn area.


State committee means the FSA State committee.


Subdivision means a part of a field that is separated from the balance of the field by temporary boundary, such as a cropline which could be easily moved or will likely disappear.


Subsequent crop means a crop following an initial crop that is not in an approved double cropping combination.


Tenant means:


(1) One who rents land from another in consideration of the payment of a specified amount of cash or amount of a commodity; or


(2) One (other than a sharecropper) who rents land from another person in consideration of the payment of a share of the crops or proceeds therefrom.


Tolerance means a prescribed amount within which the reported acreage and/or production may differ from the determined acreage and/or production and still be considered as correctly reported.


Tract means a unit of contiguous land under one ownership located in one physical location (county), as defined in this part, which is operated as a farm, or part of a farm.


Tract combination means the combining of two or more tracts if the tracts have common ownership and are contiguous.


Tract division means the dividing of a tract into two or more tracts because of a change in ownership or operation.


Turn-area means the area across the ends of crop rows which is used for operating equipment necessary to the production of a row crop (also called turn row, headland, or end row).


United States means all 50 States of the United States, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico and any other territory or possession of the United States.


Upland cotton means planted and stub cotton that is not considered extra long staple cotton, and that follows the standard planting and harvesting practices of the area and is produced from other than pure strain varieties of the Barbadense species, any hybrid thereof, or any other variety of cotton in which one or more of these varieties predominate. For program purposes, brown lint cotton is considered upland cotton.


Veteran farmer or rancher means a farmer or rancher who has served in the United States Army, Navy, Marine Corps, Air Force, and Coast Guard, including the reserve components and who:


(1) Has not operated a farm or ranch;


(2) Has operated a farm or ranch for not more than 10 years; or


(3) Is a veteran (as defined as a person who served in the active duty or either active duty for training or inactive duty during which the individual was disabled, and who was discharged or released therefrom under conditions other than dishonorable) who has first obtained status as a veteran during the most recent 10-year period.


Wheat means wheat for feed or dual purpose variety that follows the standard planting and harvesting practice of wheat for the area in which the wheat is grown.


[68 FR 16172, Apr. 3, 2003; 69 FR 250, Jan. 5, 2004, as amended at 79 FR 74571, Dec. 15, 2014; 80 FR 41994, July 16, 2015; 84 FR 45886, Sept. 3, 2019]


§ 718.3 State committee responsibilities.

(a) The State committee shall, with respect to county committees:


(1) Take any action required of the county committee, which the county committee fails to take in accordance with this part;


(2) Correct or require the county committee to correct any action taken by such committee, which is not in accordance with this part; or


(3) Require the county committee to withhold taking any action which is not in accordance with this part.


(b) The State committee shall submit to the Deputy Administrator requests to deviate from deductions prescribed in § 718.109, or the error amount or percentage for refunds of redetermination costs as prescribed in § 718.112.


[61 FR 37552, July 18, 1996, as amended at 80 FR 41994, July 16, 2015]


§ 718.4 Authority for farm entry and providing information.

(a) This section applies to all farms that have a tobacco allotment or quota under part 723 of this chapter and all farms that are currently participating in programs administered by FSA.


(b) A representative of FSA may enter any farm that participates in an FSA or CCC program in order to conduct a farm inspection as defined in this part. A program participant may request that the FSA representative present written authorization for the farm inspection before granting access to the farm. If a farm inspection is not allowed within 30 days of written authorization:


(1) All FSA and CCC program benefits for that farm shall be denied;


(2) The person preventing the farm inspection shall pay all costs associated with the farm inspection;


(3) The entire crop production on the farm will be considered to be in excess of the quota established for the farm; and


(4) For tobacco, the farm operator must furnish proof of disposition of:


(i) All tobacco which is in addition to the production shown on the marketing card issued with respect to such farm; and


(ii) No credit will be given for disposing of excess tobacco other than that identified by a marketing card unless disposed of in the presence of FSA in accordance with § 718.109 of this part.


(c) If a program participant refuses to furnish reports or data necessary to determine benefits in accordance with paragraph (a) of this section, or FSA determines that the report or data was erroneously provided through the lack of good faith, all program benefits relating to the report or data requested will be denied.


(d) Program participants requesting program benefits as a beginning farmer or rancher, limited resource farmer or rancher, socially disadvantaged farmer or rancher, or veteran farmer or rancher must provide a certification of their status as a member of one of those groups as required by the applicable program provisions.


[68 FR 16172, Apr. 3, 2003, as amended at 84 FR 45886, Sept. 3, 2019]


§ 718.5 Rule of fractions.

(a) Fractions shall be rounded after completion of the entire associated computation. All mathematical calculations shall be carried to two decimal places beyond the number of decimal places required by the regulations governing each program. In rounding, fractional digits of 49 or less beyond the required number of decimal places shall be dropped; if the fractional digits beyond the required number of decimal places are 50 or more, the figure at the last required decimal place shall be increased by “1” as follows:


Required decimal
Computation
Result
Whole numbers6.49 (or less)

6.50 (or more)
6

7
Tenths7.649 (or less)

7.650 (or more)
7.6

7.7
Hundredths8.8449 (or less)

8.8450 (or more)
8.84

8.85
Thousandths9.63449 (or less)

9.63450 (or more)
9.634

9.635
0 thousandths10.993149 (or less)

10.993150 (or more)
10.9931

10.9932

(b) The acreage of each field or subdivision computed for tobacco and CCC disaster assistance programs shall be recorded in acres and hundredths of an acre, dropping all thousandths of an acre. The acreage of each field or subdivision computed for crops, except tobacco, shall be recorded in acres and tenths of an acre, rounding all hundredths of an acre to the nearest tenth.


§ 718.6 Controlled substance.

(a) The following terms apply to this section:


(1) USDA benefit means the issuance of any grant, contract, loan, or payment by appropriated funds of the United States.


(2) Person means an individual.


(b) Notwithstanding any other provision of law, any person convicted under Federal or State law of:


(1) Planting, cultivating, growing, producing, harvesting, or storing a controlled substance in any crop year is ineligible during the crop year of conviction and the four succeeding crop years, for any of the following USDA benefits:


(i) Any payments or benefits under part 1412 of this title;


(ii) Any payments or benefits for losses to crops or livestock covered under disaster programs administered by FSA;


(iii) Any price support loan available in accordance with part 1421 of this title;


(iv) Any price support made under the Commodity Credit Corporation Charter Act;


(v) A farm storage facility loan made under section 4(h) of the Commodity Credit Corporation Charter Act or any other Act;


(vi) Crop Insurance under the Federal Crop Insurance Act;


(vii) A loan made or guaranteed under the Consolidated Farm and Rural Development Act or any other law administered by FSA’s Farm Loan Programs.


(2) Possession or trafficking of a controlled substance, is ineligible for any or all USDA benefits:


(i) At the discretion of the court,


(ii) To the extent and for a period of time the court determines.


(c) If a person denied benefits under this section is a shareholder, beneficiary, or member of an entity or joint operation, benefits for which the entity or joint operation is eligible will be reduced, for the appropriate period, by a percentage equal to the total interest of the shareholder, beneficiary, or member.


[72 FR 63284, Nov. 8, 2007, as amended at 84 FR 45886, Sept. 3, 2019]


§ 718.7 Furnishing maps.

(a) A reasonable number, as determined by FSA, of reproductions of photographs, mosaic maps, and other maps will be made available to the owner of a farm, an insurance company reinsured by the Federal Crop Insurance Corporation (FCIC), or a private party contractor performing official duties on behalf of FSA, CCC, and other USDA agencies.


(b) For all others, reproductions will be made available at the rate FSA determines will cover the cost of making such items available.


[80 FR 41994, July 16, 2015]


§ 718.8 Administrative county and servicing FSA county office.

(a) FSA farm records are maintained in an administrative county determined by FSA. Generally, a farm’s administrative county is based on the physical location county of the farm. If all land on the farm is physically located in one physical location county, the farm’s records will be administratively located in that physical location county.


(b) In cases where there is no FSA office in the county in which the farm is physically located or where a servicing FSA county office is responsible for more than one administrative county, the farm records will be administratively located as specified in paragraph (a) of this section and with a servicing FSA county office that FSA as designated as responsible for that administrative county.


(c) Farm operators and owners can conduct their farm’s business in any FSA county office. FSA’s designation of a farm’s administrative county is based on where land of the farm is located as specified in paragraph (a) of this section or as might be required under paragraph (b) of this section.


(d) Farm operators and owners can request a change to their servicing FSA county office and that request may necessitate a change to the farm’s administrative county as specified in paragraph (a) or (b) of this section. If the requested servicing FSA county office is not responsible for and does not have an administrative county for the physical location of the farm according to paragraphs (a) or (b) of this section and FSA approves the request for change of servicing FSA county office, FSA will designate the administrative county for the farm from those available in the requested servicing FSA county office.


(e) If a county contiguous to the county in which the farm is physically located in the same State does not have a servicing FSA county office, the farm will be administratively located by FSA in a contiguous county in another contiguous State that is convenient to the farm operator and owner. Requests for changes to a farm’s servicing FSA county office, which may or may not result in a change to a farm’s administrative county under this section, must be submitted to FSA by August 1 of each year for the change to take effect that calendar year.


(f) When land on the farm is physically located in more than one county, the farm will be administered by a servicing FSA county office determined by FSA to be the administrative county responsibility for administration of programs for one or more of the physical counties involved in the farm’s constitution. Paragraph (b), (c), or (d) of this section applies if changes occur to the servicing FSA county office and administrative county.


(g) Farm operators and owners cannot request a change to a farm’s administrative county. The operator and owner of a farm serviced by an FSA county office responsible for a farm’s administrative county can request a change of servicing FSA county office to another FSA servicing county office in the same State by August 1 for the change to take effect that calendar year. Review and approval of any change to the servicing FSA county office is solely at the discretion of FSA. Requests for change in servicing FSA county office, which may or may not result in a change to a farm’s administrative county, will be reviewed and approved by county committee if all the following can be determined to apply:


(1) The requested change does not impact the constitution of a farm;


(2) The requested change will not result in increased program eligibility or additional benefits for the farm’s producers that would not be earned absent the change in servicing FSA county office and, if applicable, administrative county being made; and


(3) The change is not to circumvent any of the provisions of other program regulations to which this part applies.


(h) The State committee will submit all requests for exceptions from regulations specified in this section to the Deputy Administrator.


[84 FR 45886, Sept. 3, 2019]


§ 718.9 Signature requirements.

(a) When a program authorized by this chapter or chapter XIV of this title requires the signature of a producer, landowner, landlord, or tenant, then a spouse may sign all such FSA or CCC documents on behalf of the other spouse, except as otherwise specified in this section, unless such other spouse has provided written notification to FSA and CCC that such action is not authorized. The notification must be provided to FSA for each farm.


(b) A spouse may not sign a document on behalf of the other spouse with respect to:


(1) Program document required to be executed in accordance with part 3 of this title;


(2) Easements entered into under part 1410 of this title;


(3) Power of attorney;


(4) Such other program documents as determined by FSA or CCC.


(c) An individual; duly authorized officer of a corporation; duly authorized partner of a partnership; executor or administrator of an estate; trustee of a trust; guardian; or conservator may delegate to another the authority to act on their behalf with respect to FSA and CCC programs administered by USDA service center agencies by execution of a Power of Attorney, or such other form as approved by the Deputy Administrator. FSA and CCC may, at their discretion, allow the delegations of authority by other individuals through use of the Power of Attorney or such other form as approved by the Deputy Administrator.


(d) Notwithstanding another provision of this regulation or any other FSA or CCC regulation in this title, a parent may execute documents on behalf of a minor child unless prohibited by a statute or court order.


(e) Notwithstanding any other provision in this title, an authorized agent of the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) of the United States Department of Interior may sign as agent for landowners with properties affiliated with or under the management or trust of the BIA. For collection purposes, such payments will be considered as being made to the persons who are the beneficiaries of the payment or may, alternatively, be considered as an obligation of all persons on the farm in general. In the event of a need for a refund or other claim may be collected, among other means, by other monies due such persons or the farm.


(f) Documents that were previously acted on and approved by the FSA county office or county committee will not subsequently be determined inadequate or invalid because of the lack of signature authority of any person signing the document on behalf of the applicant or any other individual, entity, general partnership, or joint venture, unless the person signing the program document knowingly and willfully falsified the evidence of signature authority or a signature. However, FSA may require affirmation of the document by those parties deemed appropriate for an affirmation, as determined by the Deputy Administrator. Nothing in this paragraph relieves participants of any other program requirements.


[68 FR 16172, Apr. 3, 2003; 69 FR 250, Jan. 5, 2004, as amended at 80 FR 41995, July 16, 2015]


§ 718.10 Time limitations.

Whenever the final date prescribed in any of the regulations in this title for the performance of any act falls on a Saturday, Sunday, national holiday, State holiday on which the office of the county or State Farm Service Agency committee having primary cognizance of the action required to be taken is closed, or any other day on which the cognizant office is not open for the transaction of business during normal working hours, the time for taking required action shall be extended to the close of business on the next working day. Or in case the action required to be taken may be performed by mailing, the action shall be considered to be taken within the prescribed period if the mailing is postmarked by midnight of such next working day. Where the action required to be taken is with a prescribed number of days after the mailing of notice, the day of mailing shall be excluded in computing such period of time.


§ 718.11 Disqualification due to Federal crop insurance violation.

(a) Section 515(h) of the Federal Crop Insurance Act (FCIA) provides that a person who willfully and intentionally provides false or inaccurate information to the Federal Crop Insurance Corporation (FCIC) or to an approved insurance provider with respect to a policy or plan of FCIC insurance, after notice and an opportunity for a hearing on the record, will be subject to one or more of the sanctions described in section 515(h)(3). In section 515(h)(3), the FCIA specifies that in the case of a violation committed by a producer, the producer may be disqualified for a period of up to 5 years from receiving any monetary or non-monetary benefit under a number of programs. The list includes, but is not limited to, benefits under:


(1) The FCIA.


(2) The Agricultural Market Transition Act (7 U.S.C. 7201 et seq.), including the Noninsured Crop Disaster Assistance Program under section 196 of that Act (7 U.S.C. 7333).


(3) The Agricultural Act of 1949 (7 U.S.C. 1421 et seq.).


(4) The Commodity Credit Corporation Charter Act (15 U.S.C. 714 et seq.).


(5) The Agricultural Adjustment Act of 1938 (7 U.S.C. 1281 et seq.).


(6) Title XII of the Food Security Act of 1985 (16 U.S.C. 3801 et seq.).


(7) The Consolidated Farm and Rural Development Act (7 U.S.C. 1921 et seq.).


(8) Any law that provides assistance to a producer of an agricultural commodity affected by a crop loss or a decline in prices of agricultural commodities.


(b) Violation determinations are made by FCIC. However, upon notice from FCIC to FSA that a producer has been found to have committed a violation to which paragraph (a) of this section applies, that person will be ineligible for payments under the programs specified in paragraph (a) of this section that are funded by FSA for the same period of time for which, as determined by FCIC, the producer will be ineligible for crop insurance benefits of the kind referred to in paragraph (a)(1) of this section. Appeals of the determination of ineligibility will be administered under the rules set by FCIC.


(c) Other sanctions may also apply.


[72 FR 63284, Nov. 8, 2007]


Subpart B – Determination of Acreage and Compliance


Source:68 FR 16176, Apr. 3, 2003, unless otherwise noted.

§ 718.101 Measurements.

(a) Measurement services include, but are not limited to, measuring land and crop areas, measuring quantities of farm-stored commodities, and appraising the yields of crops in the field when required for program administration purposes. The county committee will provide measurement service if the producer requests such service and pays the cost, except that measurement service is not available and will not be provided to determine total acreage or production of a crop when the request is made:


(1) For acreage, after the established final reporting date for the applicable crop, unless a late filed report is accepted as provided in § 718.104; or


(2) After the farm operator has furnished production evidence when required for program administration purposes except as provided in this subpart.


(b) Except for measurements and determinations performed by FSA in accordance with late-filed acreage reports filed in accordance with § 718.104, when a producer requests, pays for, and receives written notice that measurement services have been furnished, the measured acreage is guaranteed to be correct and used for all program purposes for the current year even though an error is later discovered in the measurement.


[84 FR 45887, Sept. 3, 2019]


§ 718.102 Acreage reports.

(a) In order to be eligible for benefits, participants in the programs specified in paragraphs (b)(1) through (b)(6) of this section must submit accurate information annually as required by these provisions.


(b)(1) Participants in programs for which eligibility for benefits is tied to base acres must report the acreage of fruits and vegetables planted for harvest on a farm enrolled in such program;


(2) Participants in the programs governed by parts 1421 and 1427 of this title must report the acreage planted to a commodity for harvest for which a marketing assistance loan or loan deficiency payment is requested;


(3) Participants in the programs governed by part 1410 of this title must report the intended use of land enrolled in such programs;


(4) All participants in the programs governed by part 1437 of this title must report all acreage and intended use of the eligible crop in the country in which the producer has a share;


(5) Participants in the programs governed by part 723 of this chapter and part 1464 of this title must report the acreage planted to tobacco by kind on all farms that have an effective allotment or quota greater than zero;


(6) All participants in the programs governed by parts 1412, 1421, and 1427 of this title must report the use of all cropland on the farm.


(7) All producers reporting acreage as prevented planted acreage or failed acreage must provide documentation that meets the provisions of § 718.103 to the FSA county office where the farm is administered.


(c) The annual acreage reports required in paragraph (a) of this section must be filed with the county committee by the farm operator, farm owner, producer of the crop on the farm, or duly authorized representative by the final reporting date applicable to the crop as established by the Deputy Administrator.


(d) Participants in programs to which this part is applicable must report all crops, in all counties, in which they have an interest. This includes crops on cropland and noncropland, including native or improved grass that will be hayed or grazed.


[68 FR 16176, Apr. 3, 2003, as amended at 71 FR 13741, Mar. 17, 2006; 79 FR 74571, Dec. 15, 2014; 80 FR 41995, July 16, 2015]


§ 718.103 Prevented planted and failed acreage.

(a) Prevented planting is the inability to plant an eligible crop with proper equipment during the planting period as a result of an eligible cause of loss, as determined by CCC. The eligible cause of loss that prevented the planting must have:


(1) Occurred after a previous planting period for the crop;


(2) Occurred before the final planting date for the crop in the applicable crop year or, in the case of multiple plantings, the harvest date of the first planting in the applicable planting period, and


(3) Similarly affected other producers in the area, as determined by CCC.


(b) FSA may approve acreage as “prevented planted acreage” if all other conditions for such approval are met and provided the conditions in paragraphs (b)(1) through (6) of this section are met.


(1) Except as specified in paragraph (b)(2) of this section, producers must report the acreage, on forms specified by FSA, within 15 calendar days after the final planting date determined for the crop by FSA.


(2) If the acreage is reported after the period identified in paragraph (b)(1) of this section, the application must be filed in time to permit:


(i) The county committee or its authorized representative to make a farm visit to verify eligible disaster conditions that prevented the specified acreage or crop from being planted; or


(ii) The county committee or its authorized representative the opportunity to determine, based on visual inspection, that the acreage or crop in question was affected by eligible disaster conditions such as damaging weather or other adverse natural occurrences that prevented the acreage or crop from being planted.


(3) A farm visit to inspect the acreage or crop is required for all late-filed acreage reports where prevented planting credit is sought. Under no circumstance may acreage reported after the 15-day period referenced in paragraph (b)(1) of this section be deemed acceptable unless the criteria in paragraph (b)(2) of this section are met. State and county committees do not have the authority to waive the field inspection and verification provisions for late-filed reports.


(4) All determinations made during field inspections must be documented on each late-filed acreage report, with results also recorded in county committee minutes to support the documentation.


(5) The acreage must have been prevented from being planted as the result of a natural disaster and not a management decision.


(6) The prevented planted acreage report was approved by the county committee. The county committee may disapprove prevented planted acreage credit if it is not satisfied with the documentation provided.


(c) To receive prevented planted credit for acreage, the producer must show to the satisfaction of FSA that the producer intended to plant the acreage. Documentation supporting such intent includes documents related to field preparation, seed purchase, and any other information that shows the acreage could and would have been planted and harvested absent the natural disaster or eligible cause of loss that prevented the planting.


(d) Prevented planted acreage credit will not be given to crops where the prevented-planted acreage was affected by drought, unless:


(1) On the final planting date for non-irrigated acreage, the area that is prevented from being planted has insufficient soil moisture for germination of seed and progress toward crop maturity because of a prolonged period of dry weather, as determined by CCC; and


(2) Prolonged precipitation deficiencies exceeded the D2 level as determined using the U.S. Drought Monitor; and


(3) Verifiable information is collected from sources whose business or purpose it is to record weather conditions, as determined by CCC, and including but not limited to the local weather reporting stations of the U.S. National Weather Service.


(e) Prevented planted acreage credit under this part applies to irrigated crops where the acreage was prevented from being planted due to a lack of water resulting from drought conditions or contamination by saltwater intrusion of an irrigation supply resulting from drought conditions if there was not a reasonable probability of having adequate water to carry out an irrigation practice.


(f) Acreage ineligible for prevented planting coverage includes, but is not limited to, acreage:


(1) With respect to which the planting history or conservation plans indicate it would remain fallow for crop rotation purposes;


(2) Used for conservation purposes or intended to be or considered to have been left unplanted under any program administered by USDA, including the Conservation Reserve and Wetland Reserve Programs;


(3) Not planted because of a management decision;


(4) Affected by the containment or release of water by any governmental, public, or private dam or reservoir project, if an easement exists on the acreage affected for the containment or release of water;


(5) Where any other person receives a prevented planted payment for any crop for the same crop year, unless the acreage meets all the requirements for double cropping under this part;


(6) Where pasture or other forage crop is in place on the acreage during the time that planting of the crop generally occurs in the area;


(7) Where another crop is planted (previous or subsequent) that does not meet the double cropping definition;


(8) Where any volunteer or cover crop is hayed, grazed, or otherwise harvested on the acreage for the same crop year;


(9) Where there is an inadequate supply of irrigation water beginning on the Federal crop insurance sale closing date for the previous crop year or the Noninsured Crop Disaster Assistance Program (NAP) application closing date for the crop as specified in part 1437 of this title through the final planting date of the current year;


(10) On which a failure or breakdown of irrigation equipment or facilities, unless the failure or breakdown is due to a natural disaster;


(11) That is under quarantine imposed by a county, State, or Federal government agency;


(12) That is affected by chemical or herbicide residue, unless the residue is due to a natural disaster;


(13) That is affected by drifting herbicide;


(14) On which a crop was produced, but the producer was unable to obtain a market for the crop;


(15) Involving a planned planting of a “value loss crop” as that term is defined for NAP as specified in part 1437 of this title, including, but not limited to, Christmas trees, aquaculture, or ornamental nursery, for which NAP assistance is provided under value loss procedure;


(16) For which the claim for prevented planted credit relates to trees or other perennials unless the producer can prove resources were available to plant, grow, and harvest the crop, as applicable;


(17) That is affected by wildlife damage;


(18) Upon which, the reduction in the water supply for irrigation is due to participation in an electricity buy-back program, or the sale of water under a water buy-back or legislative changes regarding water usage, or any other cause which is not a natural disaster; or


(19) That is devoted to non-cropland.


(g) CCC may allow exceptions to acreage ineligible for prevented planting coverage when surface water or ground water is reduced because of a natural disaster (as determined by CCC).


(h) Failed acreage is acreage that was planted with the proper equipment during the planting period but failed as a result of an eligible cause of loss, as determined by CCC.


(i) To be approved by CCC as failed acreage the acreage must have been reported as failed acreage before disposition of the crop, and the acreage must have been planted under normal conditions but failed as the result of a natural disaster and not a management decision. Producers who file a failed acreage report must have the request acted on by the county committee. The county committee will deny the acreage report if it is not satisfied with the documentation provided.


(j) To receive failed acreage credit the producer must show all of the following:


(1) That the acreage was planted under normal conditions using the proper equipment with the intent to harvest the acreage.


(2) Provide documentation that the crop was planted using farming practices consistent for the crop and area, but could not be brought to harvest because of disaster-related conditions.


(k) The eligible cause for failed acreage must have:


(1) Occurred after the crop was planted, and


(2) Before the normal harvest date for the crop in the applicable crop year or in the case of multiple plantings, the harvest date of the first planting in the applicable planting period, and


(3) Other producers in the area were similarly affected as determined by CCC.


(l) Eligible failed acreage will be determined on the basis of the producer planting the crop under normal conditions with the expectation to take the crop to harvest.


(m) Acreage ineligible for failed acreage credit includes, but is not limited to acreage:


(1) Which was planted using methods that could not be considered normal for the area and without the expectation of harvest;


(2) Used for conservation purposes or intended to be or considered to have been un-harvested under any program administered by USDA, including the Conservation Reserve and Wetland Reserve Programs; or


(3) That failed because of a management decision.


[71 FR 13741, Mar. 17, 2006, as amended at 80 FR 41995, July 16, 2015; 84 FR 45887, Sept. 3, 2019]


§ 718.104 Late-filed and revised acreage reports.

(a) Late-filed acreage reports may be accepted after the final reporting date through the crop’s immediately subsequent crop year’s final reporting date and processed by FSA if both of the following apply:


(1) The crop or identifiable crop residue remains in the field, permitting FSA to verify and determine the acreage and


(2) The crop acreage and common land unit for which the reported crop acreage report is being filed has not already been determined by FSA.


(b) Acreage reports submitted later than the date specified in paragraph (a) of this section will not be processed by FSA and will not be used for program purposes.


(c) The person or legal entity filing a report late must pay the cost of a farm inspection and measurement unless FSA determines that failure to report in a timely manner was beyond the producer’s control. The cost of the inspection and measurement is equal to the amount FSA would charge for measurement service; however, FSA’s determination of acreage as a result of the inspection and measurement is not considered a paid for measurement service under § 718.101. The acreage measured will be entered as determined acres.


(d) When an acceptable late-filed acreage report is filed in accordance with this section, the reported crop acreage will be entered for the amount that was actually reported to FSA before FSA determined acres, and the determined crop acreage will be entered as it was determined and established by FSA.


(e) Revised acreage reports may be filed to change the acreage reported if:


(1) The acreage has not already been determined by FSA; and


(2) Actual crop or residue is present in the field.


(f) Revised reports will be filed and accepted:


(1) At any time for all crops if the crop or residue still exists in the field for inspection to verify the existence and use made of the crop, the lack of the crop, or a disaster condition affecting the crop; and


(2) If the producer was in compliance with all other program requirements at the reporting date.


[71 FR 13742, Mar. 17, 2006, as amended as 80 FR 41996, July 16, 2015; 84 FR 45887, Sept. 3, 2019]


§ 718.105 Tolerances and adjustments.

(a) Tolerance is the amount by which the determined acreage for a crop may differ from the reported acreage or allotment for the crop and still be considered in compliance with program requirements under §§ 718.102(b)(1), (b)(3) and (b)(5).


(b) Tolerance rules apply to those fields for which a staking and referencing was performed but such acreage was not planted according to those measurements or when a measurement service is not requested for acreage destroyed to meet program requirements.


(c) Tolerance rules do not apply to:


(1) Program requirements of §§ 718.102(b)(2), (b)(4) and (b)(6);


(2) Official fields upon which the entire field is devoted to one crop;


(3) Those fields for which staking and referencing was performed and such acreage was planted according to those measurements; or


(4) The adjusted acreage for farms using measurement after planting which have a determined acreage greater than the marketing quota crop allotment.


(d) If the acreage report for a crop is outside the tolerance for that crop:


(1) FSA may consider the requirements of §§ 718.102 (b)(1), (b)(3) and (b)(5) not to have been met;


(2) Participants may be ineligible for all or a portion of payments or benefits subject to the requirements of §§ 718.102 (b)(1), (b)(3) and (b)(5); and


(3) Participants may be ineligible for all or a portion of payments or benefits under a program that requires accurate crop acreage reports under rules governing the program.


[68 FR 16176, Apr. 3, 2003, as amended at 80 FR 41996, July 16, 2015; 84 FR 45887, Sept. 3, 2019]


§ 718.106 Non-compliance and false acreage reports.

(a) Participants who provide false or inaccurate acreage reports may be ineligible for some or all payments or benefits, subject to the requirements of § 718.102(b)(1) and (3).


(b) [Reserved]


[80 FR 41996, July 16, 2015]


§ 718.107 Acreages.

(a) If an acreage has been established by FSA for an area delineated on an aerial photograph or within a GIS, such acreage will be recognized by the county committee as the acreage for the area until such time as the boundaries of such area are changed. When boundaries not visible on the aerial photograph are established from data furnished by the producer, such acreage shall not be recognized as official acreage until an authorized representative of FSA verifies the boundaries.


(b) Measurements of any row crop shall extend beyond the planted area by the larger of 15 inches or one-half the distance between the rows.


(c) The entire acreage of a field or subdivision of a field devoted to a crop shall be considered as devoted to the crop subject to a deduction or adjustment except as otherwise provided in this part.


§ 718.108 Measuring acreage including skip row acreage.

(a) When one crop is alternating with another crop, whether or not both crops have the same growing season, only the acreage that is actually planted to the crop being measured will be considered to be acreage devoted to the measured crop.


(b) Subject to the provisions of this paragraph and section, whether planted in a skip row pattern or without a pattern of skipped rows, the entire acreage of the field or subdivision may be considered as devoted to the crop only where the distance between the rows, for all rows, is 40 inches or less. If there is a skip that creates idle land wider than 40 inches, or if the distance between any rows is more than 40 inches, then the area planted to the crop shall be considered to be that area which would represent the smaller of; a 40 inch width between rows, or the normal row spacing in the field for all other rows in the field – those that are not more than 40 inches apart. The allowance for individual rows would be made based on the smaller of actual spacing between those rows or the normal spacing in the field. For example, if the crop is planted in single, wide rows that are 48 inches apart, only 20 inches to either side of each row (for a total of 40 inches between the two rows) could, at a maximum, be considered as devoted as the crop and normal spacing in the field would control. Half the normal distance between rows will also be allowed beyond the outside planted rows not to exceed 20 inches and will reflect normal spacing in the field.


(c) In making calculations under this section, further reductions may be made in the acreage considered planted if it is determined that the acreage is more sparsely planted than normal using reasonable and customary full production planting techniques.


(d) The Deputy Administrator has the discretionary authority to allow row allowances other than those specified in this section in those instances in which crops are normally planted with spacings greater or less than 40 inches, such as in case of tobacco, or where other circumstances are present which the Deputy Administrator finds justifies that allowance.


(e) Paragraphs (a) through (d) of this section shall apply with respect to the 2003 and subsequent crops. For preceding crops, the rules in effect on January 1, 2002, shall apply.


§ 718.109 Deductions.

(a) Any contiguous area which is not devoted to the crop being measured and which is not part of a skip-row pattern under § 718.108 shall be deducted from the acreage of the crop if such area meets the following minimum national standards or requirements:


(1) A minimum width of 30 inches;


(2) For tobacco – three-hundredths (.03) acre. Turn areas, terraces, permanent irrigation and drainage ditches, sod waterways, non-cropland, and subdivision boundaries each of which is at least 30 inches in width may be combined to meet the 0.03-acre minimum requirement; or


(3) For all other crops and land uses – one-tenth (.10) acre. Turn areas, terraces, permanent irrigation and drainage ditches, sod waterways, non-cropland, and subdivision boundaries each of which is at least 30 inches in width and each of which contain 0.1 acre or more may be combined to meet any larger minimum prescribed for a State in accordance with this subpart.


(b) If the area not devoted to the crop is located within the planted area, the part of any perimeter area that is more than 217.8 feet (33 links) in width will be considered to be an internal deduction if the standard deduction is used.


(c) A standard deduction of 3 percent of the area devoted to a row crop and zero percent of the area devoted to a close-sown crop may be used in lieu of measuring the acreage of turn areas.


§ 718.110 Adjustments.

(a) The farm operator or other interested producer having excess tobacco acreage (other than flue-cured or burley) may adjust an acreage of the crop in order to avoid a marketing quota penalty if such person:


(1) Notifies the county committee of such election within 15 calendar days after the date of mailing of notice of excess acreage by the county committee; and


(2) Pays the cost of a farm inspection to determine the adjusted acreage prior to the date the farm visit is made.


(b) The farm operator may adjust an acreage of tobacco (except flue-cured and burley) by disposing of such excess tobacco prior to the marketing of any of the same kind of tobacco from the farm. The disposition shall be witnessed by a representative of FSA and may take place before, during, or after the harvesting of the same kind of tobacco grown on the farm. However, no credit will be allowed toward the disposition of excess acreage after the tobacco is harvested but prior to marketing, unless the county committee determines that such tobacco is representative of the entire crop from the farm of the kind of tobacco involved.


§ 718.111 Notice of measured acreage.

(a) FSA will provide notice of measured acreage and mail it to the farm operator. This notice constitutes notice to all parties who have ownership, leasehold interest, or other interest in such farm.


(b) [Reserved]


[80 FR 41996, July 16, 2015]


§ 718.112 Redetermination.

(a) A redetermination of crop acreage, appraised yield, or farm-stored production for a farm may be initiated by the county committee, State committee, or Deputy Administrator at any time. Redetermination may be requested by a producer with an interest in the farm if the producer pays the cost of the redetermination. The request must be submitted to FSA within 5 calendar days after the initial appraisal of the yield of a crop, or before the farm-stored production is removed from storage. A redetermination will be undertaken in the manner prescribed by the Deputy Administrator. A redetermination will be used in lieu of any prior determination unless it is determined by the representative of the Deputy Administrator that there is good cause not to do so.


(b) FSA will refund the payment of the cost for a redetermination when, because of an error in the initial determination:


(1) The appraised yield is changed by at least the larger of:


(i) Five percent or 5 pounds for cotton;


(ii) Five percent or 1 bushel for wheat, barley, oats, and rye; or


(iii) Five percent or 2 bushels for corn and grain sorghum; or


(2) The farm stored production is changed by at least the smaller of 3 percent or 600 bushels; or


(3) The acreage of the crop is:


(i) Changed by at least the larger of 3 percent or 0.5 acre; or


(ii) Considered to be within program requirements.


[68 FR 16176, Apr. 3, 2003, as amended at 80 FR 41996, July 16, 2015]


Subpart C – Reconstitution of Farms, Allotments, Quotas, and Base Acres


Source:68 FR 16178, Apr. 3, 2003, unless otherwise noted.

§ 718.201 Farm constitution.

(a) In order to implement FSA programs and monitor compliance with regulations, FSA must have records on what land is being farmed by a particular producer. This is accomplished by a determination of what land or group of lands “constitute” an individual unit or farm. Land that was properly constituted under prior regulations will remain so constituted until a reconstitution is required by paragraph (c) of this section. The constitution and identification of land as a “farm” for the first time and the subsequent reconstitution of a farm made thereafter will include all land operated by an individual entity or joint operation as a single farming unit except that it may not include:


(1) Land under separate ownership unless the owners agree in writing or have previously agreed in writing and the labor, equipment, accounting system, and management are operated in common by the operator, but separate from other tracts;


(2) Land under a lease agreement of less than 1 year duration;


(3) Federally owned land unless it is rangeland on which no crops are planted and on which there are no crop base acres established;


(4) State-owned wildlife lands unless the former owner has possession of the land under a leasing agreement;


(5) Land constituting a farm that is declared ineligible to be enrolled in a program under the regulations governing the program;


(6) For base acre crops, land located in counties that are not contiguous except where:


(i) Counties are divided by a river;


(ii) Counties do not share a common border because of a correction line adjustment; or


(iii) The land is within 20 miles, by road, of other land that will be a part of the farming unit;


(7) Land subject to either a default election or a valid election made under part 1412 of this title for each and all covered commodities constituted with land that has a different default election or valid election for each and all covered commodities, irrespective of whether or not any of the land has base acres; or


(8) Land subject to an election of individual coverage under the Agriculture Risk Coverage Program (ARC-IC) in any State constituted with any land in another State.


(b)(1) If all land on the farm is physically located in one county, the farm shall be administratively located in such county. If there is no FSA office in the county or the county offices have been consolidated, the farm shall be administratively located in the contiguous county most convenient for the farm operator.


(2) If the land on the farm is located in more than one county, the farm shall be administratively located in either of such counties as the county committees and the farm operator agree. If no agreement can be reached, the farm shall be administratively located in the county where the principal dwelling is situated, or where the major portion of the farm is located if there is no dwelling.


(c) A reconstitution of a farm either by division or by combination is required whenever:


(1) A change has occurred in the operation of the land since the last constitution or reconstitution and as a result of such change the farm does not meet the conditions for constitution of a farm as specified in paragraph (a) of this section, except that no reconstitution will be made if the county committee determines that the primary purpose of the change in operation is to establish eligibility to transfer allotments subject to sale or lease, or increase the amount of program benefits received;


(2) The farm was not properly constituted the previous time;


(3) An owner requests in writing that the land no longer be included in a farm composed of tracts under separate ownership;


(4) The county committee determines that the farm was reconstituted on the basis of false information;


(5) The county committee determines that tracts included in a farm are not being operated as a single farming unit.


(d) An owner can file a written request to have FSA reconstitute from original tracts areas that are less than 10 DCP cropland acres and less than 5 percent of the original tract, if such request is accompanied by sufficient data from which FSA can determine the political county and State of land in both the original tract and the proposed tract. Any owner-initiated requests for tract divisions for physical location will be performed and effective prospectively from date of request and approval by FSA.


(e) Reconstitution shall not be approved if the county committee determines that the primary purpose of the reconstitution is to:


(1) Circumvent the provisions of part 12 of this title; or


(2) Circumvent any other chapter of this title.


[68 FR 16178, Apr. 3, 2003, as amended at 80 FR 41996, July 16, 2015; 84 FR 45887, Sept. 3, 2019]


§ 718.202 Determining the land constituting a farm.

(a) In determining the constitution of a farm, consideration shall be given to provisions such as ownership and operation. For purposes of this part, the following rules shall be applicable to determining what land is to be included in a farm.


(b) A minor shall be considered to be the same owner or operator as the parent, court-appointed guardian, or other person responsible for the minor child, unless the parent or guardian has no interest in the minor’s farm or production from the farm, and the minor:


(1) Is a producer on a farm;


(2) Maintains a separate household from the parent or guardian;


(3) Personally carries out the farming activities; and


(4) Maintains a separate accounting for the farming operation.


(c) A minor shall not be considered to be the same owner or operator as the parent or court-appointed guardian if the minor’s interest in the farming operation results from being the beneficiary of an irrevocable trust and ownership of the property is vested in the trust or the minor.


(d) A life estate tenant shall be considered to be the owner of the property for their life.


(e) A trust shall be considered to be an owner with the beneficiary of the trust; except a trust can be considered a separate owner or operator from the beneficiary, if the trust:


(1) Has a separate and distinct interest in the land or crop involved;


(2) Exercises separate responsibility for the separate and distinct interest; and


(3) Maintains funds and accounts separate from that of any other individual or entity for the interest.


(f) The county committee shall require specific proof of ownership.


(g) Land owned by different persons of an immediate family living in the same household and operated as a single farming unit shall be considered as being under the same ownership in determining a farm.


(h) All land operated as a single unit and owned and operated by a parent corporation and subsidiary corporations of which the parent corporation owns more than 50 percent of the value of the outstanding stock, or where the parent is owned and operated by subsidiary corporations, shall be constituted as one farm.


§ 718.203 County committee action to reconstitute a farm.

Action to reconstitute a farm may be initiated by the county committee, the farm owner, or the operator with the concurrence of the owner of the farm. Any request for a farm reconstitution shall be filed with the county committee.


§ 718.204 Reconstitution of base acres.

(a) Farms will be reconstituted in accordance with this subpart when it is determined that the land areas are not properly constituted and, to the extent practicable as determined by county committee, the reconstitution will be based on the facts and conditions existing at the time the change requiring the reconstitution occurred.


(b) Reconstitutions will be effective for the calendar year if initiated by August 1 of that year. Any reconstitution initiated after August 1 will not be effective for that year; it will be effective for the subsequent year.


(c) The Deputy Administrator may approve an exception to permit a reconstitution initiated after August 1 to be effective for the same year, if FSA determines that the failure is due to administrative problems as determined by FSA at the local or national level. Producers have no right to seek an exception under this paragraph. When such situations exist, FSA will establish procedures under which reconstitutions will be accepted and when those reconstitutions will become effective.


[79 FR 57714, Sept. 26, 2014, as amended at 84 FR 45887, Sept. 3, 2019]


§ 718.205 Substantive change in farming operation, and changes in related legal entities.

(a) Land that is properly constituted as a farm shall not be reconstituted if:


(1) The reconstitution request is based upon the formation of a newly established legal entity which owns or operates the farm or any part of the farm and the county committee determines there is not a substantive change in the farming operation;


(2) The county committee determines that the primary purpose of the request for reconstitution is to:


(i) Obtain additional benefits under one or more commodity programs;


(ii) Avoid damages or penalties under a contract or statute;


(iii) Correct an erroneous acreage report; or


(iv) Circumvent any other program provisions. In addition, no farm shall remain as constituted when the county committee determines that a substantive change in the farming operation has occurred which would require a reconstitution, except as otherwise approved by the State committee with the concurrence of the Deputy Administrator.


(b) In determining whether a substantive change has occurred with respect to a farming operation, the county committee shall consider factors such as the composition of the legal entities having an interest in the farming operation with respect to management, financing, and accounting. The county committee shall also consider the use of land, labor, and equipment available to the farming operations and any other relevant factors that bear on the determination.


(c) Unless otherwise approved by the State committee with the concurrence of the Deputy Administrator, when the county committee determines that a corporation, trust, or other legal entity is formed primarily for the purpose of obtaining additional benefits under the commodity programs of this title, the farm shall remain as constituted, or shall be reconstituted, as applicable, when the farm is owned or operated by:


(1) A corporation having more than 50 percent of the stock owned by members of the same family living in the same household;


(2) Corporations having more than 50 percent of the stock owned by stockholders common to more than one corporation; or


(3) Trusts in which the beneficiaries and trustees are family members living in the same household.


(d) Application of the provisions of paragraph (c) of this section shall not limit or affect the application of paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section.


§ 718.206 Determining farms, tracts, and base acres when reconstitution is made by division.

(a) The methods for dividing farms, tracts, and base acres are, in order of precedence: Estate, designation by landowner, cropland, and default. The proper method will be determined on a crop-by-crop basis.


(b) The estate method for reconstitution is the pro-rata distribution of base acres for a parent farm among the heirs in settling an estate. If the estate sells a tract of land before the farm is divided among the heirs, the base acres for that tract will be determined according to paragraphs (c) through (e) of this section.


(1) Base acres must be divided in accordance with a will, but only if the county committee determines that the terms of the will are such that a division can reasonably be made by the estate method.


(2) If there is no will or the county committee determines that the terms of a will are not clear as to the division of base acres, the base acres will be apportioned in the manner agreed to in writing by all interested heirs or devisees who acquire an interest in the property for which base acres have been established. An agreement by the administrator or executor will not be accepted in lieu of an agreement by the heirs or devisees.


(3) If base acres are not apportioned as specified in paragraph (b)(1) or (2) of this section, the base acres must be divided as specified in paragraph (d) or (e) of this section, as applicable.


(c) If the ownership of a tract of land is transferred from a parent farm, the transferring owner may request that the county committee divide the base acres, including historical acreage that has been double cropped, between the parent farm and the transferred tract, or between the various tracts if the entire farm is sold to two or more purchasers.


(1) If the county committee determines that base acres cannot be divided in the manner designated by the owner because the owner’s designation does not meet the requirements of paragraph (c)(2) of this section, FSA will notify the owner and permit the owner to revise the designation to meet the requirements. If the owner does not furnish a revised designation of base acres within a reasonable time after such notification, or if the revised designation does not meet the requirements, the county committee will divide the base acres in a pro-rata manner in accordance with paragraph (d) or (e) of this section.


(2) The landowner may designate a manner in which base acres are divided by filing a signed written memorandum of understanding of the designation of base acres with the county committee before the transfer of ownership of the land. Both the transferring owner and transferee must sign the written designation of base acres.


(i) Within 30 days after a prescribed form, letter, or notice of base acres is issued by FSA following the reconstitution of a farm but before any subsequent transfer of ownership of the land, all owners in existence at time of the reconstitution request may seek a different manner of base acre designation by agreeing in writing by executing a form CCC-517 or other designated form.


(ii) The landowner must designate the base acres that will be permanently reduced when the sum of the base acres exceeds the effective cropland plus double-cropped acres for the farm.


(iii) When the part of the farm from which the ownership is being transferred was owned for less than 3 years, the designation by landowner method of designating base acres cannot be used unless the county committee determines that the primary purpose of the ownership transfer was other than to retain or to sell base acres. In the absence of such a determination, and if the farm contains land that has been owned for less than 3 years, the part of the farm that has been owned for less than 3 years will be considered as a separate farm and the base acres must be assigned to that farm in accordance with paragraph (d) or (e) of this section. Such apportionment will be made prior to any designation of base acres with respect to the part that has been owned for 3 years or more.


(3) The designation by landowner method may be applied, at the owner’s request, to land owned by an Indian Tribal Council that is leased to two or more producers for the production of any crop of a commodity for which base acres have been established. If the land is leased to two or more producers, an Indian Tribal Council may request that the county committee divide the base acres between the applicable tracts in the manner designated by the Council. The use of this method is not subject to the requirements specified in paragraph (c)(2) of this section.


(d) The cropland method for reconstitution is the pro-rata distribution of base acres to the resulting tracts in the same proportion that each resulting tract bears to the cropland for the parent tract. This method of division will be used if paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section do not apply.


(e) The default method for reconstitution is the separation of tracts from a farm with each tract maintaining the base acres attributed to the tract when the reconstitution is initiated.


(f) Farm program payment yields calculated for the resulting farms of a division may be increased or decreased if the county committee determines the method used did not provide an equitable distribution considering available land, cultural operations, and changes in the type of farming conducted on the farm. Any increase in the farm program payment yield on a resulting farm will be offset by a corresponding decrease on another resulting farm of the division.


[80 FR 41997, July 16, 2015]


§ 718.207 Determining base acres when reconstitution is made by combination.

(a) When two or more farms or tracts are combined for a year, that year’s base acres, with respect to the combined farm or tract, as required by applicable program regulations, will not be greater than the sum of the base acres for each of the farms or tracts comprising the combination, subject to the provisions of § 718.204.


(b) [Reserved]


[80 FR 41998, July 16, 2015]


Subpart D – Equitable Relief From Ineligibility


Source:67 FR 66307, Oct. 31, 2002, unless otherwise noted.

§ 718.301 Applicability.

(a) This subpart is applicable to programs administered by the Farm Service Agency under chapters VII and XIV of this title, except for an agricultural credit program carried out under the Consolidated Farm and Rural Development Act (7 U.S.C. 1921 et seq.), as amended. Administration of this subpart shall be under the supervision of the Deputy Administrator, except that such authority shall not limit the exercise of authority allowed State Executive Directors of the Farm Service agency as provided for in § 718.307.


(b) Section 718.306 does not apply to a function performed under either section 376 of the Consolidated Farm and Rural Development Act (7 U.S.C. 1921 et seq.), or a conservation program administered by the Natural Resources Conservation Service of the United States Department of Agriculture.


(c) The relief provisions of this part cannot be used to extend a benefit or assistance not otherwise available under law or not otherwise available to others who have satisfied or complied with every eligibility or compliance requirement of the provisions of law or regulations governing the program benefit or assistance.


[67 FR 66307, Oct. 31, 2002, as amended at 80 FR 41998, July 16, 2015]


§ 718.302 Definitions and abbreviations.

In addition to the definitions provided in § 718.2 of this part, the following terms apply to this subpart:


Covered program means a program specified in § 718.301 of this subpart.


FSA means the Farm Service Agency of the United States Department of Agriculture.


OGC means the Office of the General Counsel of the United States Department of Agriculture.


SED means, for activities within a particular state, the State Executive Director of the United States Department of Agriculture, FSA, for that state.


[67 FR 66307, Oct. 31, 2002, as amended at 80 FR 41998, July 16, 2015]


§ 718.303 Reliance on incorrect actions or information.

(a) Notwithstanding any other law, if an action or inaction by a participant is based upon good faith reliance on the action or advice of an authorized representative of an FSA county or State committee, and that action or inaction results in the participant’s noncompliance with the requirements of a covered program that is to the detriment of the participant, then that action or inaction still may be approved by the Deputy Administrator as meeting the requirements of the covered program, and benefits may be extended or payments made in as specified in § 718.305.


(b) This section applies only to a participant who:


(1) Relied in good faith upon the action of, or information provided by, an FSA county or State committee or an authorized representative of such committee regarding a covered program;


(2) Acted, or failed to act, as a result of the FSA action or information; and


(3) Was determined to be not in compliance with the requirements of that covered program.


(c) This section does not apply to cases where the participant had sufficient reason to know that the action or information upon which they relied was improper or erroneous or where the participant acted in reliance on their own misunderstanding or misinterpretation of program provisions, notices or information.


[80 FR 41998, July 16, 2015]


§ 718.304 Failure to fully comply.

(a) When the failure of a participant to fully comply with the terms and conditions of a covered program precludes the providing of payments or benefits, relief may be authorized as specified in § 718.305 if the participant made a good faith effort to comply fully with the requirements of the covered program.


(b) This section only applies to participants who are determined by FSA to have made a good faith effort to comply fully with the terms and conditions of the covered program and have performed substantial actions required for program eligibility.


[80 FR 41998, July 16, 2015]


§ 718.305 Forms of relief.

(a) The Administrator of FSA, Executive Vice President of CCC, or their designee, may authorize a participant in a covered program to:


(1) Retain loans, payments, or other benefits received under the covered program;


(2) Continue to receive loans, payments, and other benefits under the covered program;


(3) Continue to participate, in whole or in part, under any contract executed under the covered program;


(4) In the case of a conservation program, re-enroll all or part of the land covered by the program; and


(5) Receive such other equitable relief as determined to be appropriate.


(b) As a condition of receiving relief under this subpart, the participant may be required to remedy their failure to meet the program requirement, or mitigate its affects.


§ 718.306 Finality.

(a) A determination by an FSA State or county committee (or employee of such committee) becomes final on an application for benefits and binding 90 days from the date the application for benefits has been filed, and supporting documentation required to be supplied by the producer as a condition for eligibility for the particular program has been filed, unless any of the following exceptions exist:


(1) The participant has requested an administrative review of the determination in accordance with part 780 of this chapter;


(2) The determination was in any way based on erroneous, innocent, or purposeful misrepresentation; false statement; fraud; or willful misconduct by or on behalf of the participant;


(3) The determination was modified by the Administrator, FSA, or in the case of CCC programs conducted under Chapter XIV of this title, the Executive Vice President, CCC; or


(4) The participant knew or had reason to know that the determination was erroneous.


(b) Should an erroneous determination become final under the provisions of this section, the erroneous decision will be corrected according to paragraph (c) of this section.


(1) If, as a result of the erroneous decision, payment was issued, no action will be taken by FSA, CCC, or a State or county committee to recover unearned payment amounts unless one or more of the exceptions in paragraph (a) of this section applies;


(2) If payment was not issued before the error was discovered, the payment will not be issued. FSA and CCC are under no obligation to issue payments or render decisions that are contrary to law or regulation.


(c) FSA and CCC will modify and correct determinations when errors are discovered. As specified in paragraph (b) of this section, FSA or CCC may be precluded from recovering unearned payments that issued as a result of the erroneous decision. FSA or CCC’s inability to recover or demand refunds of unearned amounts as specified in paragraph (b) will only be effective through the year in which the error was found and communicated to the participant.


[67 FR 66307, Oct. 31, 2002, as amended at 80 FR 41998, July 16, 2015]


§ 718.307 Special relief approval authority for State Executive Directors.

(a) General nature of the special authority. Notwithstanding provisions in this subpart providing supervision and relief authority to other officials, an SED, after consultation with and approval from OGC but without further review by other officials (other than the Secretary) may grant relief to a participant under the provisions of §§ 718.303 through 718.305 as if the SED were the final arbiter within the agency of such matters so long as:


(1) The program matter with respect to which the relief is sought is a program matter in a covered program which is operated within the State under the control of the SED;


(2) The total amount of relief which will be provided to the participant (that is, to the individual or entity that applies for the relief) by that SED under this special authority for errors during that year is less than $20,000 (including in that calculation, any loan amount or other benefit of any kind payable for that year and any other year);


(3) The total amount of such relief which has been previously provided to the participant using this special authority for errors, as calculated above, is not more than $5,000;


(4) The total amount of loans, payments, and benefits of any kind for which relief is provided to similarly situated participants by an SED for errors for any year under the authority provided in this section, as calculated above, is not more than $1,000,000.


(b) Report of the exercise of the power. A grant of relief shall be considered to be under this section and subject to the special finality provided in this section only if the SED grants the relief in writing when granting the relief to the party who will receive the benefit of such relief and only if, in that document, the SED declares that they are exercising that power. The SED must report the exercise of that power to the Deputy Administrator so that a full accounting may be made in keeping with the limitations of this section. Absent such a report, relief will not be considered to have been made under this section.


(c) Additional limits on the authority. The authority provided under this section does not extend to:


(1) The administration of payment limitations under part 1400 of this chapter (§§ 1001 to 1001F of 7 U.S.C. 1308 et seq.);


(2) The administration of payment limitations under a conservation program administered by the Secretary; or


(3) Highly erodible land and wetland conservation requirements under subtitles B or C of Title XII of the Food Security Act of 1985 (16 U.S.C. 3811 et seq.) as administered under 7 CFR part 12.


(d) Relief may not be provided by the SED under this section until a written opinion or written acknowledgment is obtained from OGC that grounds exist for determination that requirements for granting relief under § 718.303 or § 718.304 have been met, that the form of relief is authorized under § 718.305, and that the granting of the relief is within the lawful authority of the SED.


(e) Relation to other authorities. The authority provided under this section is in addition to any other applicable authority that may allow relief.


[67 FR 66307, Oct. 31, 2002, as amended at 80 FR 41998, July 16, 2015]


SUBCHAPTER C [RESERVED]

SUBCHAPTER D – SPECIAL PROGRAMS

PART 750 – SOIL BANK


Editorial Note:Part 750 (formerly part 485 of title 6), published at 21 FR 6289, Aug. 22, 1956, and redesignated at 26 FR 5788, June 29, 1961, is no longer carried in the Code of Federal Regulations. This deletion does not relieve any person of any obligation or liability incurred under these regulations, nor deprive any person of any rights received or accrued under the provisions of this part. For Federal Register citations affecting this part, see the “List of CFR Sections Affected, 1949-1963, 1964-1972, and 1973-1985,” published in seven separate volumes.

PART 755 – REIMBURSEMENT TRANSPORTATION COST PAYMENT PROGRAM FOR GEOGRAPHICALLY DISADVANTAGED FARMERS AND RANCHERS


Authority:7 U.S.C. 8792.


Source:75 FR 34340, June 17, 2010, unless otherwise noted.

§ 755.1 Administration.

(a) This part establishes the terms and conditions under which the Reimbursement Transportation Cost Payment (RTCP) Program for geographically disadvantaged farmers and ranchers will be administered.


(b) The RTCP Program will be administered under the general supervision of the FSA Administrator, or a designee, and will be carried out in the field by FSA State and county committees and FSA employees.


(c) FSA State and county committees, and representatives and employees thereof, do not have the authority to modify or waive any of the provisions of the regulations of this part, except as provided in paragraph (e) of this section.


(d) The FSA State committee will take any action required by the provisions of this part that has not been taken by the FSA county committee. The FSA State committee will also:


(1) Correct or require an FSA county committee to correct any action taken by the county committee that is not in compliance with the provisions of this part.


(2) Require an FSA county committee to not take an action or implement a decision that is not in compliance with the provisions of this part.


(e) No provision or delegation of this part to an FSA State committee or a county committee will preclude the FSA Administrator, or a designee, from determining any question arising under the program or from reversing or modifying any determination made by a State committee or a county committee.


(f) The Deputy Administrator for Farm Programs, FSA, may waive or modify program requirements of this part in cases where failure to meet requirements does not adversely affect the operation of the program and where the requirement is not statutorily mandated.


§ 755.2 Definitions.

The following definitions apply to this part. The definitions in parts 718 and 1400 of this title also apply, except where they may conflict with the definitions in this section.


Actual transportation rate means the transportation rate that reflects the actual transportation costs incurred and can be determined by supporting documentation.


Agricultural commodity means any agricultural commodity (including horticulture, aquaculture, and floriculture), food, feed, fiber, livestock (including elk, reindeer, bison, horses, or deer), or insects, and any product thereof.


Agricultural operation means a parcel or parcels of land; or body of water applicable to aquaculture, whether contiguous or noncontiguous, constituting a cohesive management unit for agricultural purposes. An agricultural operation will be regarded as located in the county in which the principal dwelling is situated, or if there is no dwelling thereon, it will be regarded to be in the county in which the major portion of the land or applicable body of water is located.


Application period means the period established by the Deputy Administrator for geographically disadvantaged farmers and ranchers to apply for program benefits.


County office or FSA county office means the FSA offices responsible for administering FSA programs in a specific area, sometimes encompassing more than one county, in a State.


Department or USDA means the U.S. Department of Agriculture.


Eligible reimbursement amount means the reported costs incurred to transport an agricultural commodity or input used to produce an agricultural commodity in an insular area, Alaska, or Hawaii, over a distance of more than 30 miles. The amount is calculated by multiplying the number of units of the reported transportation amount times the applicable transportation fixed, set, or actual rate times the applicable FY allowance (COLA).


Farm Service Agency or FSA means the Farm Service Agency of the USDA.


Fiscal year or FY means the year beginning October 1 and ending the following September 30. The fiscal year will be designated for this part by year reference to the calendar year in which it ends. For example, FY 2010 is from October 1, 2009, through September 30, 2010 (inclusive).


Fixed transportation rate means the per unit transportation rate determined by FSA to reflect the transportation cost applicable to an agricultural commodity or input used to produce an agricultural commodity in a particular region.


FY allowance (COLA) means the nonforeign area cost of living allowance or post differential, as applicable, for that FY set by Office of Personnel Management for Federal employees stationed in Alaska, Hawaii, and other insular areas, as authorized by 5 U.S.C. 5941 and E.O. 10000 and specified in 5 CFR part 591, subpart B, appendices A and B.


Geographically disadvantaged farmer or rancher means a farmer or rancher in an insular area, Alaska, or Hawaii.


Input transportation costs means those transportation costs of inputs used to produce an agricultural commodity including, but not limited to, air freight, ocean freight, and land freight of chemicals, feed, fertilizer, fuel, seeds, plants, supplies, equipment parts, and other inputs as determined by FSA.


Insular area means the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico; Guam; American Samoa; the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands; the Federated States of Micronesia; the Republic of the Marshall Islands; the Republic of Palau; and the Virgin Islands of the United States.


Payment amount means the amount due a producer that is the sum of all eligible reimbursement amounts, as calculated by FSA subject to the availability of funds, and subject to an $8,000 cap per producer per FY.


Producer means any geographically disadvantaged farmer or rancher who is an individual, group of individuals, partnership, corporation, estate, trust, association, cooperative, or other business enterprise or other legal entity, as defined in § 1400.3 of this title, who is, or whose members are, a citizen of or legal resident alien in the United States, and who, as determined by the Secretary, shares in the risk of producing an agricultural commodity in substantial commercial quantities, and who is entitled to a share of the agricultural commodity from the agricultural operation.


Reported transportation amount means the reported number of units (such as pounds, bushels, pieces, or parts) applicable to an agricultural commodity or input used to produce an agricultural commodity, which is used in calculating the eligible reimbursement amount.


Set transportation rate means the transportation rate established by FSA for a commodity or input for which there is not a fixed transportation rate or supporting documentation of the actual transportation rate.


United States means the 50 States of the United States of America, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealths of Puerto Rico and the Northern Mariana Islands, and any other territory or possession of the United States.


Verifiable records means evidence that is used to substantiate the amount of eligible reimbursements by geographically disadvantaged farmers and ranchers in an agricultural operation that can be verified by FSA through an independent source.


§ 755.3 Time and method of application.

(a) To be eligible for payment, producers must obtain and submit a completed application for payment and meet other eligibility requirements specified in this part. Producers may obtain an application in person, by mail, or by facsimile from any county FSA office. In addition, producers may download a copy of the application at http://www.sc.egov.usda.gov.


(b) An application for payment must be submitted on a completed application form. Applications and any other supporting documentation must be submitted to the FSA county office serving the county where the agricultural operation is located, but, in any case, must be received by the FSA county office by the close of business on the last day of the application period established by the Deputy Administrator.


(c) All producers who incurred transportation costs for eligible reimbursements and who share in the risk of an agricultural operation must certify to the information on the application before the application will be considered complete. FSA may require the producer to provide documentation to support all verifiable records.


(d) Each producer requesting payment under this part must certify to the accuracy and truthfulness of the information provided in their application and any supporting documentation. All information provided is subject to verification by FSA. Refusal to allow FSA or any other agency of the Department of Agriculture to verify any information provided will result in a denial of eligibility. Furnishing the information is voluntary; however, without it program benefits will not be approved. Providing a false certification to the Federal Government may be punishable by imprisonment, fines and other penalties or sanctions.


(e) To ensure all producers are provided an opportunity to submit actual costs for reimbursement at the actual cost rate, applicants will have 30 days after the end of the FY to provide supporting documentation of actual transportation costs to the FSA County Office. The actual costs documented in supporting documentation will override previously reported costs of eligible reimbursable costs at the fixed or set rate made during the application period.


(f) If verifiable records are not provided to FSA, the producer will be ineligible for payment.


(g) If supporting documentation is provided within 30 days after the end of the FY, but an application was not submitted to the applicable FSA County Office before the end of the application period, the producer is not eligible for payment.


(h) Producers who submit applications after the application period are not entitled to any payment consideration or determination of eligibility. Regardless of the reason why an application is not submitted to or received by FSA, any application received after the close of business on such date will not be eligible for benefits under this program.


§ 755.4 Eligibility.

(a) To be eligible to receive payments under this part, a geographically disadvantaged farmer or rancher must:


(1) Be a producer of an eligible agricultural commodity in substantial commercial quantities;


(2) Incur transportation costs for the transportation of the agricultural commodity or input used to produce the agricultural commodity;


(3) Submit an accurate and complete application for payment as specified in § 755.3; and


(4) Be in compliance with the wetland and highly erodible conservation requirements in part 12 of this title and meet the adjusted gross income and pay limit eligibility requirements in part 1400 of this title, as applicable, except that the $8,000 cap provided for in this rule is a per producer cap, not a per person cap. For example, a partnership of four individuals would be considered one producer, not four persons, for the purposes of this cap and thus the partnership could only generate a single $8,000 payment under this program if the cap holds because of full subscription of the program.


(b) Individual producers in an agricultural operation that is an entity are only eligible for a payment based on their share of the operation. A producer is not eligible for payment based on the share of production of any other producer.


(c) Multiple producers, such as the buyer and seller of a commodity (for example, a producer of hay and a livestock operation that buys the hay), are not eligible for payments for the same eligible transportation cost. Unless the multiple producers agree otherwise, only the last buyer will be eligible for the payment.


(d) A person or entity determined to be a “foreign person” under part 1400 of this title is not eligible to receive benefits under this part, unless that person provides land, capital, and a substantial amount of active personal labor in the production of crops on such farm.


(e) State and local governments and their political subdivisions and related agencies are not eligible for RTCP payments.


§ 755.5 Proof of eligible reimbursement costs incurred.

(a) To be eligible for reimbursement based on FSA fixed or set rates as specified in § 755.7, the requirements specified in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section must be met at the time of the application. To be eligible for reimbursement of actual costs, the requirements of paragraph (d) must also be met, within 30 days after the end of the applicable fiscal year.


(b) Eligible verifiable records to support eligible reimbursement costs include, but are not limited to:


(1) Invoices;


(2) Account statements;


(3) Contractual Agreements; or


(4) Bill of Lading.


(c) Verifiable records must show:


(1) Name of producer(s);


(2) Commodity and unit of measure;


(3) Type of input(s) associated with transportation costs;


(4) Date(s) of service;


(5) Name of person or entity providing the service, as applicable, and;


(6) Retail sales receipts with verifiable records handwritten as applicable.


(d) To be eligible for reimbursement based on actual costs, the producer must provide supporting documentation that documents the specific costs incurred for transportation of each commodity or input. Such documentation must:


(1) Show transportation costs for each specific commodity or input, and


(2) Show the units of measure for each commodity or input, such that FSA can determine the transportation cost per unit.


§ 755.6 Availability of funds.

(a) Payments under this part are subject to the availability of funds.


(b) A reserve will be created to handle appeals and errors.


§ 755.7 Transportation rates.

(a) Payments may be based on fixed, set, or actual transportation rates. Fixed and set transportation rates will be established by FSA, based on available data for transportation costs for that commodity or input in the applicable State or insular region.


(b) Fixed transportation rates will establish per unit transportation costs for each eligible commodity or input used to produce the eligible commodity.


(c) Set transportation rates will be established for those transportation costs that are not on the FSA list of fixed rates and for which an actual rate cannot be documented. The set transportation rate will be set by FSA, based on available data of transportation costs for similar commodities and inputs.


(d) Actual transportation rates will be determined based on supporting documentation.


§ 755.8 Calculation of individual payments.

(a) Transportation cost for each commodity or input will be calculated by multiplying the number of reported eligible units (the reported transportation amount) times the fixed, set, or actual transportation rate, as applicable.


(b) Eligible reimbursement amounts will be calculated by multiplying the result of paragraph (a) of this section times the appropriate FY COLA percentage, as provided in this part.


(c) If transported inputs are used for both eligible and ineligible commodities, the eligible reimbursable costs will be determined on a revenue share of eligible commodities times input cost, as determined by FSA, and transportation may be allowed only for those commodities which were produced for the commercial market.


(d) The total payment amount for a producer is the sum of all eligible reimbursable amounts determined in paragraph (b) of this section for all commodities and inputs used to produce the eligible commodities listed on the application.


(e) Payment amounts are subject to $8,000 cap per FY per producer as defined in this part, not per “person” or “legal entity” as those terms might be defined in part 1400 of this title.


(f) In the event that approval of all calculated payment amounts would result in expenditures in excess of the amount available, FSA will recalculate the payment amounts in a manner that FSA determines to be fair and reasonable.


§ 755.9 Misrepresentation and scheme or device.

(a) In addition to other penalties, sanctions or remedies as may apply, a producer will be ineligible to receive payments under this part if the producer is determined by FSA to have:


(1) Adopted any scheme or device that tends to defeat the purpose of this part;


(2) Made any fraudulent representation; or


(3) Misrepresented any fact affecting a program determination.


(b) Any payment to any producer engaged in a misrepresentation, scheme, or device, must be refunded with interest together with such other sums as may become due. Any producer engaged in acts prohibited by this section and receiving payment under this part will be jointly and severally liable with other producers involved in such claim for benefits for any refund due under this section and for related charges. The remedies provided in this part will be in addition to other civil, criminal, or administrative remedies that may apply.


§ 755.10 Death, incompetence, or disappearance.

(a) In the case of the death, incompetency, or disappearance of a person or the dissolution of an entity that is eligible to receive a payment in accordance with this part, such alternate person or persons specified in part 707 of this chapter may receive such payment, as determined appropriate by FSA.


(b) Payments may be made to an otherwise eligible producer who is now deceased or to a dissolved entity if a representative who currently has authority to enter into an application for the producer or the producer’s estate signs the application for payment. Proof of authority over the deceased producer’s estate or a dissolved entity must be provided.


(c) If a producer is now a dissolved general partnership or joint venture, all members of the general partnership or joint venture at the time of dissolution or their duly authorized representatives must be identified in the application for payment.


§ 755.11 Maintaining records.

Persons applying for payment under this part must maintain records and accounts to document all eligibility requirements specified in this part. Such records and accounts must be retained for 3 years after the date of payment to the producer under this part.


§ 755.12 Refunds; joint and several liability.

(a) Any producer that receives excess payment, payment as the result of erroneous information provided by any person, or payment resulting from a failure to comply with any requirement or condition for payment under this part, must refund the amount of that payment to FSA.


(b) Any refund required will be due from the date of the disbursement by the agency with interest determined in accordance with paragraph (d) of this section and late payment charges as provided in part 1403 of this title.


(c) Each producer that has an interest in the agricultural operation will be jointly and severally liable for any refund and related charges found to be due to FSA.


(d) Interest will be applicable to any refunds to FSA required in accordance with parts 792 and 1403 of this title except as otherwise specified in this part. Such interest will be charged at the rate that the U.S. Department of the Treasury charges FSA for funds, and will accrue from the date FSA made the payment to the date the refund is repaid.


(e) FSA may waive the accrual of interest if it determines that the cause of the erroneous payment was not due to any action of the person or entity, or was beyond the control of the person or entity committing the violation. Any waiver is at the discretion of FSA alone.


§ 755.13 Miscellaneous provisions and appeals.

(a) Offset. FSA may offset or withhold any amount due to FSA from any benefit provided under this part in accordance with the provisions of part 1403 of this title.


(b) Claims. Claims or debts will be settled in accordance with the provisions of part 1403 of this title.


(c) Other interests. Payments or any portion thereof due under this part will be made without regard to questions of title under State law and without regard to any claim or lien against the eligible reimbursable costs thereof, in favor of the owner or any other creditor except agencies and instrumentalities of the U.S. Government.


(d) Assignments. Any producer entitled to any payment under this part may assign any payments in accordance with the provisions of part 1404 of this title.


(e) Violations regarding controlled substances. The provisions of § 718.6 of this chapter, which generally limit program payment eligibility for persons who have engaged in certain offenses with respect to controlled substances, will apply to this part.


(f) Appeals. The appeal regulations specified in parts 11 and 780 of this chapter apply to determinations made under this part.


PART 756 – ORIENTAL FRUIT FLY PROGRAM


Authority:Sec. 778, Pub. L. 116-6, 133 Stat. 91.



Source:86 FR 70699, Dec. 13, 2021, unless otherwise noted.

§ 756.1 Applicability.

(a) The Oriental Fruit Fly (OFF) Program will provide payments to eligible producers who suffered losses due to the Oriental fruit fly quarantine in Miami-Dade County, Florida, in accordance with Public Law 116-6 (the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2019).


(b) The regulations in this part are applicable to crops affected by the Oriental fruit fly quarantine.


(c) In any case in which money must be refunded to the Farm Service Agency (FSA) in connection with this part, interest will be due to run from the date of disbursement of the sum to be refunded. This paragraph (c) will apply, unless waived by the Deputy Administrator for Farm Programs, FSA, irrespective of any other regulation in this part.


§ 756.2 Administration.

(a) The OFF Program will be administered under the general supervision of the Administrator, FSA, and the Deputy Administrator for Farm Programs, FSA. The OFF Program is carried out by FSA State committees and FSA county committees with instructions issued by the Deputy Administrator.


(b) FSA State committees and FSA county committees, and representatives and their employees, do not have authority to modify or waive any of the provisions of the regulations in this part, except as provided in paragraph (e) of this section.


(c) The FSA State committee will take any required action not taken by the FSA county committee. The FSA State committee will also:


(1) Correct or require correction of an action taken by an FSA county committee that is not in compliance with this part; or


(2) Require an FSA county committee to not take an action or implement a decision that is not under the regulations of this part.


(d) The Deputy Administrator for Farm Programs, FSA, or a designee, may determine any question arising under these programs, or reverse or modify a determination made by an FSA State committee or FSA county committee.


(e) The Deputy Administrator for Farm Programs, FSA, may authorize FSA State committees and FSA county committees to waive or modify non-statutory deadlines and other program requirements in cases where lateness or failure to meet such other requirements does not adversely affect the operation of the OFF Program.


(f) A representative of FSA may execute applications and related documents only under the terms and conditions determined and announced by FSA. Any document not executed under such terms and conditions, including any purported execution before the date authorized by FSA, will be null and void.


(g) Items of general applicability to program participants, including, but not limited to, application periods, application deadlines, internal operating guidelines issued to State and county offices, prices, and payment factors established by the OFF Program, are not subject to appeal.


§ 756.3 Definitions.

The definitions in this section apply for all purposes of OFF Program administration.


Administrative county office is the FSA county office where a producer’s FSA records are maintained.


APHIS means Animal Plant Health and Inspection Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture.


Application period means the dates established by the Deputy Administrator for producers to apply for OFF Program benefits.


Calendar year means January 1st through December 31st.


Deputy Administrator means the Deputy Administrator for Farm Programs, FSA.


FSA means the Farm Service Agency, U.S. Department of Agriculture.


NAP means Non-insured Crop Disaster Assistance Program.


OFF Program means the Oriental Fruit Fly Program.


OFF quarantine period means August 28, 2015, through February 13, 2016.


Oriental fruit fly quarantine means the quarantine put in place during the OFF quarantine period in the quarantine area to protect against the entry and spread of the Oriental fruit fly by requiring strict adherence to treatment or destruction of the host crop.


Prevented planting means when producers chose not to plant an annual crop during the 2015 through 2016 season due to the Oriental fruit fly quarantine.


Producer means a person, partnership, association, corporation, estate, trust, or other legal entity that produces an eligible crop as a landowner, landlord, tenant, or sharecropper.


Program year means the relevant application year. The program year for OFF will be 2015 and include total revenue losses for calendar year 2015 and calendar year 2016.


Quarantine area means the area mapped by The Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services Division, Division of Plant Industry (FDACS-DPI). The map identifies areas where the Oriental Fruit Fly was detected and the associated boundaries of the area quarantined by APHIS. The map is available by contacting FDACS-DPI, The Doyle Conner Building, 1911 SW 34th St., Gainesville, FL 32608-7100 or https://www.fdacs.gov/Divisions-Offices/Plant-Industry.


Reliable documentation means evidence provided by the participant that is used to substantiate the amount of revenue reported when verifiable documentation is not available, including copies of receipts, ledgers of income, income statements of deposit slips, register tapes, invoices for custom harvesting, and records to verify production costs, contemporaneous measurements truck scale tickets, and contemporaneous diaries that are determined acceptable by the FSA county committee. To determine whether the records are acceptable, the FSA county committee will consider whether they are consistent with the records of other producers of the crop in that area.


Revenue means the gross income from crop sales received during the applicable calendar years for the crops that suffered a loss due to the Oriental fruit fly quarantine. Revenue does not mean revenue received for crops grown under contract for crop owners unless the grower had an ownership share of the crop.


RMA means Risk Management Agency.


Secretary means the Secretary of the United States Department of Agriculture, or the Secretary’s delegate.


Verifiable documentation means evidence that can be verified by FSA through an independent source.


§ 756.4 Qualifying disaster event.

The OFF Program will provide assistance to eligible producers who suffered revenue losses due to the State of Florida and APHIS implemented quarantine that took place from August 28, 2015, through February 13, 2016, in Miami-Dade County, Florida.


§ 756.5 Eligible producers.

(a) To be an eligible producer, the producer must:


(1) Be an individual person that is a U.S. Citizen or Resident Alien, or a partnership, association, corporation, estate, trust, or other legal entity consisting solely of U.S. Citizens or Resident Aliens that produces an eligible crop as a landowner, landlord, tenant, or sharecropper; and


(2) Comply with all provisions of this part and, as applicable:


(i) 7 CFR part 3 – Debt Management;


(ii) 7 CFR part 12 – Highly Erodible Land and Wetland Conservation;


(iii) 7 CFR 400.680, Controlled substance;


(iv) 7 CFR part 1400, adjusted gross income (AGI) provisions:


(A) Program year 2015 will be used to determine AGI for the OFF Program, therefore the AGI will be the average of tax years 2013, 2012, and 2011; and


(B) The OFF Program allows an exception to the $900,000 average AGI limitation if at least 75 percent of the average AGI was derived from farming, ranching, or forestry operations. CCC-942 is used to collect the producer and certified public accountant (CPA) or attorney certification statements;


(v) 7 CFR part 707 – Payments Due Persons Who Have Died, Disappeared, or Have Been Declared Incompetent;


(vi) 7 CFR part 718 – Provisions Applicable to Multiple Programs; and


(vii) 7 CFR part 1400 – Payment Limitation and Payment Eligibility.


(b) A receiver or trustee of an insolvent or bankrupt debtor’s estate, an executor or an administrator of a deceased person’s estate, a guardian of an estate of a ward or an incompetent person, and trustees of a trust is considered to represent the insolvent or bankrupt debtor, the deceased person, the ward or incompetent, and the beneficiaries of a trust, respectively. The production of the receiver, executor, administrator, guardian, or trustee is the production of the person or estate represented by the receiver, executor, administrator, guardian, or trustee. OFF Program documents executed by any such person will be accepted by FSA only if they are legally valid and such person has the authority to sign the applicable documents.


(c) A minor who is otherwise an eligible producer is eligible to receive an OFF Program payment only if the minor meets one of the following requirements:


(1) The right of majority has been conferred on the minor by court proceedings or by statute.


(2) A guardian has been appointed to manage the minor’s property and the applicable OFF Program documents are signed by the guardian.


(3) Any OFF Program application signed by the minor is cosigned by a person determined by the FSA county committee to be financially responsible.


(d) Foreign person rules in 7 CFR part 1400, subpart E, are not applicable to the OFF Program.


(e) Producers will not be required to be in the business of producing and marketing agricultural products at the time of OFF Program application.


(f) The producer must have been actively producing and marketing agricultural products during the OFF quarantine period.


§ 756.6 Eligible and ineligible causes of revenue loss.

(a) To be eligible for payments under this part the producer must have suffered a loss of revenue due to the Oriental fruit fly quarantine of one or more of the following types:


(1) Revenue loss on crop(s) planted or prevented from being planted within the Oriental Fruit Fly quarantine area during the OFF quarantine period. Crops that suffered a revenue loss due to prevented planting must have a prior history of being planted or be able to provide verifiable or reliable documentation demonstrating legitimate intent to plant the crop during the OFF quarantine period;


(2) Pre or post-harvest treatment costs;


(3) Transportation costs to a post-harvest treatment facility;


(4) Crop quality loss;


(5) Crop spoilage;


(6) Crop drop; or


(7) Reduced post-harvest shelf life.


(b) An ineligible cause of revenue loss under this part will apply to the following:


(1) Losses determined by FSA to be the result of poor management decisions or poor farming practices, such as using non-optimal chemical application, over-tilling, monoculture (growing of same crop year after year), allowing soil erosion, nonoptimal planting time, or poor quality seed selection.


(2) Losses due to conditions or events occurring outside of the applicable growing season for the crop.


(3) Losses due to failure of a power supply or lack of irrigation.


(4) Losses to crops not intended for harvest.


(5) Losses to home gardens for personal use and not intended to market.


(6) Losses to non-fruit bearing ornamental nursery.


(7) Losses caused by theft.


(8) Losses caused by disease or pest infestation other than the Oriental fruit fly.


(9) Losses to purchased crops.


§ 756.7 Time and method of application.

(a) An application for OFF Program payment under this part must be submitted in person, by mail, email, or facsimile to the FSA county office serving as the farm’s administrative county office by the close of business 60 calendar days after the signup start date announced by FSA. A National Special Program (SP) Notice will be issued providing OFF program details including signup start date and program requirements.


(b) An application will include only the producer’s share of revenue for the crops negatively affected by the Oriental fruit fly quarantine for the applicable calendar years.


(c) Once signed by a producer, the application for payment is considered to contain information and certifications of and pertaining to the producer regardless of who entered the information on the application.


(d) The producer applying for the OFF Program under this part certifies the accuracy and truthfulness of the information provided in the application as well as any documentation filed with or in support of the application.


(1) All information is subject to verification or spot check by FSA at any time, either before or after payment is issued. Refusal to allow FSA or any agency of the Department of Agriculture to verify any information provided will result in the participant’s forfeiting eligibility for the OFF Program. FSA may at any time, including before, during, or after processing and paying an application, require the producer to submit any additional information necessary to implement or determine any eligibility provision of this part. Furnishing required information is voluntary; however, without it, FSA is under no obligation to act on the application or approve payment.


(2) Providing a false certification will result in ineligibility and can also be punishable by imprisonment, fines, and other penalties.


(e) The application submitted in accordance with paragraph (a) of this section is not considered valid and complete for issuance of payment under this part unless FSA determines all the applicable eligibility provisions have been satisfied and the participant has submitted all required documentation by the application deadline date announced by FSA.


(f) Applicants must submit all eligibility forms as listed on the FSA-438 Oriental Fruit Fly Program (OFF) Application within 60 calendar days from the date of submitting the application if not already on file with FSA.


§ 756.8 Calculating OFF Program payments.

(a) A revenue loss calculation and factor will determine the OFF Program payment.


(1) A factor will be applied to reduce the participant’s payment to ensure that total OFF Program payments are no more than 70 percent of the total revenue losses by all eligible OFF Program participants.


(2) If necessary, at the close of the OFF Program sign-up period, a national payment factor may be determined by the Secretary and announced if full payment of all approved OFF Program applications would result in payments in excess of available OFF Program funds, less a reserve amount of 3 percent. A Price Support Division SP Notice will be issued to announce the issuance of OFF and, if applicable, the factored rate.


(b)(1) The OFF Program payment calculation is:



(Calendar year 2014 producer certified gross revenue

− Calendar year 2015 producer certified gross revenue)

+ (Calendar year 2014 producer certified gross revenue

− Calendar year 2016 producer certified gross revenue)

= Total revenue loss for calendar year 2015 and calendar year 2016

× 70%

= OFF Program payment (subject to proration after sign-up, see paragraph (a)(2) of this section)

(2) If the producer did not have 2014 revenue, then 2019 revenue will be used, and the calculation will be:



(Calendar year 2019 producer certified gross revenue

− Calendar year 2015 producer certified gross revenue)

+ (Calendar year 2019 producer certified gross revenue

− Calendar year 2016 producer certified gross revenue)

= Total revenue loss for calendar year 2015 and calendar year 2016

× 70%

= OFF Program Payment (subject to proration after sign-up, see paragraph (a)(2) of this section)

(c) If there is no gross revenue loss determined for calendar year 2015 or calendar year 2016, the payment will be zero.


§ 756.9 Availability of funds and timing of payments.

The total available program funds are $9 million as provided by Public Law 116-6 (the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2019). OFF Program payments will be issued after all applications are received and FSA has approved the application.


§ 756.10 Miscellaneous provisions.

(a) Producers who are approved for OFF Program payment will not be required to purchase future NAP or crop insurance for those crops affected by the quarantine as is often required by other disaster programs, because the Oriental fruit fly quarantine was not an eligible covered loss by NAP, and RMA does not offer quarantine as an endorsement in Florida.


(b) All persons with a financial interest in a legal entity receiving payments under this part are jointly and severally liable for any refund, including related charges, that is determined to be due to FSA for any reason.


(c) In the event that any application under this part resulted from erroneous information or a miscalculation, the payment will be recalculated and any excess refunded to FSA with interest to be calculated from the date of disbursement.


(d) Any payment to any participant under this part will be made without regard to questions of title under State law, and without regard to any claim or lien against the commodity, or proceeds in favor of the owner or any other creditor except agencies of the U.S. Government. The regulations governing offsets and withholding in part 3 of this title apply to payments under this part.


(e) Any participant entitled to any payment may assign any payment(s) in accordance with regulations governing the assignment of payment in part 3 of this title.


(f) The regulations in part 11 of this title and part 780 of this chapter apply to determinations under this part.


§ 756.12 Payment limitation.

(a) For the program year 2015, direct or indirect payments made to an eligible person or legal entity, other than a joint venture or general partnership, will not exceed $125,000.


(b) The attribution of payment provisions in 7 CFR 1400.105 will be used to attribute payments to persons and legal entities for payment limitation determinations.


§ 756.13 Estates and trusts; minors.

(a) A receiver of an insolvent debtor’s estate and the trustee of a trust estate will, for the purpose of this part, be considered to represent the insolvent affected producer or manufacturer and the beneficiaries of the trust, respectively.


(1) The production of the receiver or trustee will be considered to be the production of the represented person.


(2) Program documents executed by any such person will be accepted only if they are legally valid and such person has the authority to sign the applicable documents.


(b) [Reserved]


§ 756.14 Misrepresentation, scheme, or device.

(a) A producer will be ineligible to receive assistance under the OFF Program if the producer is determined by the FSA State committee or FSA county committee to have knowingly:


(1) Adopted any scheme or device that tends to defeat the purpose of the OFF Program;


(2) Made any fraudulent representation; or


(3) Misrepresented any fact affecting a determination under the OFF Program, then FSA will notify the appropriate investigating agencies of the United States and take steps deemed necessary to protect the interests of the Government.


(b) Any funds disbursed pursuant to this part to any person or operation engaged in a misrepresentation, scheme, or device, will be refunded to FSA. The remedies provided in this part are in addition to other civil, criminal, or administrative remedies that may apply.


§ 756.15 Death, incompetency, or disappearance.

In the case of the death, incompetency, or disappearance of any affected producer who would otherwise receive an OFF Program payment, such payment may be made to the person or persons specified in the regulations in part 707 of this chapter. The person requesting such payment must file Form FSA-325, “Application for Payment of Amounts Due Persons Who Have Died, Disappeared, or Have Been Declared Incompetent,” as provided in part 707.


§ 756.16 Maintenance and inspection of records.

(a) Producers randomly selected for compliance spot checks by FSA must, in accordance with program notice instructions issued by the Deputy Administrator, provide adequate reports of revenue as applicable. The producer must report documentary evidence of crop revenue to FSA together with any supporting documentation to verify information entered on the application. Verifiable documentation is preferred. If verifiable documentation is not available, FSA will accept reliable documentation, if determined to be acceptable by the FSA county committee.


(b) If supporting documentation is not presented to the county FSA office requesting the information within 30 calendar days of the request, producers will be determined ineligible for OFF Program benefits.


(c) The producer must maintain any existing books, records, and accounts supporting any information furnished in an approved OFF Program application for 3 years following the end of the year during which the application for payment was filed.


(d) The producer must permit authorized representatives of the Department of Agriculture and the General Accounting Office, during regular business hours, to inspect, examine, and make copies of such books, records, and accounts.


§ 756.17 Appeals.

Any producer who is dissatisfied with a determination made pursuant to this part may make a request for reconsideration or appeal of such determination in accordance with the appeal regulations in 7 CFR parts 11 and 780.


PART 759 – DISASTER DESIGNATIONS AND NOTIFICATIONS


Authority:5 U.S.C. 301, 7 U.S.C. 1961 and 1989.


Source:77 FR 41254, July 13, 2012, unless otherwise noted.

§ 759.1 Administration.

(a) This part will be administered under the general supervision and direction of the Administrator, Farm Service Agency (FSA).


(b) FSA representatives do not have authority to modify or waive any of the provisions of the regulations of this part as amended or supplemented.


(c) The Administrator will take any action required by the regulations of this part that the Administrator determines has not already been taken. The Administrator will also:


(1) Correct or require correction of any action taken that is not in accordance with the regulations of this part; or


(2) Require withholding taking any action that is not in accordance with this part.


(d) No provision or delegation in these regulations will preclude the Administrator or a designee or other such person, from determining any question arising under this part, or from reversing or modifying any determination made under this part.


(e) Absent a delegation to the contrary, this part will be administered by the Deputy Administrator for Farm Programs of FSA on behalf of the Administrator of FSA or the Secretary, but nothing in this part will inhibit the ability of the Administrator of FSA or the person holding the equivalent position in the event of a reorganization to delegate the functions of DAFP under these regulations to another person. Likewise, nothing shall inhibit the ability of the Secretary to reassign any duties with respect to the designations of disasters under this part.


§ 759.2 Purpose.

(a) This part specifies the types of incidents that can result in an area being determined a disaster area, which under other regulations makes qualified farmers in such areas eligible for Emergency loans (EM) or eligible for such other assistance that may be available, based on Secretarial disaster designations. Nothing in this part overrides provision of those regulations that govern the actual administration and availability of the disaster assistance regulations.


(b) This part specifies the responsibility of the County Emergency Board (CEB), State Emergency Board (SEB), and the State Executive Director (SED) in regard to Secretarial Designations with regards to disasters. It also addresses matters relating to the handling of a Presidential declaration of disaster or the imposition of a USDA quarantine by the Secretary with respect to triggering the availability of EM loans.


§ 759.3 Abbreviations and definitions.

(a) Abbreviations. The following abbreviations apply to this part.


CEB means the County Emergency Board.


CED means the County Executive Director.


DAFP means the Deputy Administrator for Farm Programs of the Farm Service Agency.


EM means Emergency loan administered under 7 CFR part 764.


FSA means the Farm Service Agency.


LAR means the Loss Assessment Report.


SEB means the State Emergency Board.


SED means the State Executive Director.


USDA means the United States Department of Agriculture.


(b) Definitions. The following definitions apply to this part.


Administrator means the Administrator of FSA.


Contiguous county is used in reference to a primary county as defined in this section. A contiguous county is any county whose boundary touches at any point with that of the primary county. For programs other than the EM Program, disaster assistance regulations will specify whether benefits will be available only in the primary counties or also in the contiguous counties. For the EM Program that issue is addressed in § 759.6, unless specified otherwise in the disaster assistance regulations for other programs or in § 759.6 for the EM Program, only the “primary” county will be considered the qualifying “disaster county.” Therefore, if the disaster assistance regulations specify that they cover the disaster area and contiguous counties, then the only eligible counties would be the primary county and those contiguous to that county. Coverage would not include coverage of those counties that are in turn contiguous to those counties that are contiguous to the primary county.


County is used when referring to a geographical area, a local administrative subdivision of a State or a similar political subdivision of the United States generally considered to be in county usage, for example, it includes an area referred to as a “county” or “parish.” Except where otherwise specified, the use of the term county or similar political subdivision is for administrative purposes only.


CEB is comprised of the representatives of several USDA agencies that have responsibilities for reporting the occurrence of, and assessing the damage caused by, a natural disaster, and for requesting approval in declaring a county a disaster area.


CED is the person in charge of administering the local FSA county office for a particular county.


Disaster area is the county or counties declared or designated as a disaster area as a result of natural disaster related losses. The disaster area only includes the primary counties, but benefits may be available in the counties contiguous to the primary county if so provided by the disaster assistance regulations or, in the case of the EM Program, in § 759.6.


LAR is a loss assessment report prepared by the CEB relating to the State and county where the potential disaster occurred and for which county or counties the CEB is responsible. The LAR includes as applicable, but is not limited to, starting and ending dates of the disaster, crop year affected, type of disaster incident, area of county affected by disaster; total number of farms affected, crop loss or pasture loss data associated with the applicable disaster (or both types of losses), livestock destroyed, and other property losses.


Natural disaster is a disaster in which unusual and adverse weather conditions or other natural phenomena have substantially affected farmers by causing severe physical losses, severe production losses, or both.


Primary county is a county determined to be a disaster area.


Presidential declaration is a declaration of a disaster by the President under the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. 5121-2) requiring Federal emergency assistance to supplement State and local efforts to save lives and protect property, public health and safety, or to avert or lessen the threat of a disaster.


Production losses (severe) within a county are those in which there has been a reduction county-wide of at least a 30 percent or more loss of production of at least one crop in the county.


SEB means the State Emergency Board which is comprised of the representatives of several USDA agencies having emergency program responsibilities at the State level. The board is required to respond to emergencies and carry out the Secretary’s emergency preparedness responsibilities.


SED is the person who serves as the Chairperson of the USDA SEB in each State, is responsible for providing the leadership and coordination for all USDA emergency programs at the State level, and is subject to the supervision of DAFP.


Severe physical losses means, for the purpose of determining an Administrator’s declaration of physical loss, losses that consist of severe damage to, or destruction of: Physical farm property including farmland (except sheet erosion); structures on the land including, but not limited to, building, fences, dams; machinery, equipment, supplies, and tools; livestock, livestock products, poultry and poultry products; harvested crops and stored crops.


Substantially affected when used to refer to producers and to the relationship of a particular producer to a particular disaster means a producer who has sustained qualifying physical or production losses, as defined in this section, as a result of the natural disaster.


U.S. Drought Monitor is a system for classifying drought severity according to a range of abnormally dry to exceptional drought. It is a collaborative effort between Federal and academic partners that is produced on a weekly basis to synthesize multiple indices, outlooks, and drought impacts on a map and in narrative form. This synthesis of indices is reported by the National Drought Mitigation Center.


United States means each of the several States, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands of the United States, Guam, American Samoa, and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands. Extension of disaster assistance, following a disaster designation, to insular areas of the United States not covered by this definition of “United States” will be only as authorized by law, and as determined by the Administrator on behalf of the Secretary to be appropriate.


§ 759.5 Secretarial disaster area determination and notification process.

(a) U.S. Drought Monitor. With respect to drought and without requiring an LAR:


(1) If any portion of a county is physically located in an area with a Drought Monitor Intensity Classification value of D3 (drought-extreme) or higher during any part of the growing season of the crops affected by the disaster in the county, then the county will be designated a disaster area by the Secretary.


(2) If any portion of a county meets the threshold Drought Monitor Intensity Classification value of D2 (drought-severe) for at least 8 consecutive weeks during the growing season of affected crops, then the county will be designated a disaster area by the Secretary.


(b) CEB and SEB recommendations. In instances where counties have been impacted by a disaster but the county has not been designated a disaster area under the provisions of paragraph (a) of this section, CEB will make a disaster designation recommendation request to SEB when a disaster has resulted in severe production losses. The determination of the sufficiency of the production losses will be governed by the provisions in paragraph (c) of this section. The CEB may make such efforts as are needed to identify counties that have been impacted and had such production losses. A farmer, Indian Tribal Council, or local governing body may initiate the process by reporting production losses or drought conditions to CEB and suggesting that there be a recommendation in favor of designating a county as a disaster area. Recommendations by a CEB in favor of a disaster designation by a CEB under this paragraph are subject to the following:


(1) A LAR is required as part of a CEB disaster designation request. CEB will submit a disaster designation request with a LAR to SEB for review and recommendation for approval by the Secretary. CEB’s written request and SEB recommendation must be submitted within three months of the last day of the occurrence of a natural disaster.


(2) If SEB determines a qualifying natural disaster and loss have occurred, SEB will forward the recommendation to the Administrator. The natural disaster may include drought conditions that were not sufficiently severe to meet the criteria in paragraph (a) of this section. Since the U.S. Drought Monitor tracks only drought conditions, not specifically agricultural losses resulting from those conditions, it is possible for a drought that does not meet the criteria in paragraph (a) of this section to result in production losses that constitute a natural disaster.


(3) The Secretary or the Secretary’s designee will make disaster area determinations. The Secretary may delegate the authority to the SED. In such case, the SED will act on behalf of the Secretary, subject to review by DAFP as may be appropriate and consistent with the delegation. The delegation of authority to the SED may be revoked by the authority making that delegation or by other authorized person. In all cases, DAFP may reverse any SED determination made in accordance with this section unless the delegation to the SED specifies that such review is not allowed.


(c) Eligible production losses. For purposes of making determinations under paragraph (b) of this section, in order for an area to be declared a disaster area under paragraph (b) of this section based on production losses, the county must have had production losses of 30 percent of at least one crop in the county as the result of a natural disaster.


(d) Discretionary exception to production losses for designating a county as a disaster county. For purposes of the EM program only, unless otherwise specified in the designation, a county may be designated by DAFP as a designated disaster county even though the conditions specified in paragraphs (a) through (c) of this section are not present so long as the disaster has otherwise produced such significant production losses, or other such extenuating circumstances so as to justify, in the opinion of the Secretary, the designation of a county as a disaster area. In making this determination, the Secretary may consider all relevant factors including such factors as the nature and extent of production losses; the number of farmers who have sustained qualifying production losses; the number of farmers that other lenders in the county indicate they will not be in position to provide emergency financing; whether the losses will cause undue hardship to a certain segment of farmers in the county; whether damage to particular crops has resulted in undue hardship; whether other Federal or State benefit programs, which are being made available due to the same disaster, will consequently lessen undue hardship and the demand for EM; and any other factors considered relevant.


§ 759.6 EM to be made available.

(a) For purposes of the EM Program under part 764, subpart I, of this chapter, a county will be considered an eligible disaster area as designated by FSA for coverage of the EM Program as follows:


(1) Secretarial designations. When production losses meet the requirements in § 759.5 and the county has been designated as a disaster area for that reason, or when the discretionary exception to production losses for EM under § 759.5(d) has been exercised, the primary and contiguous counties will be areas in which otherwise eligible producers can receive EM loans.


(2) Physical loss notification. When only qualifying physical losses occur, the SED will submit a request to the FSA Administrator to make a determination that a natural disaster has occurred in a county, resulting in severe physical losses. If the FSA Administrator determines that such a natural disaster has occurred, then EM can be made available to eligible farmers for physical losses only in the primary county (the county that was the subject of that determination) and the counties contiguous to that county.


(3) USDA quarantine. Any quarantine imposed by the Secretary of Agriculture under the Plant Protection Act or the animal quarantine laws, as defined in section 2509 of the Food, Agriculture, Conservation, and Trade Act of 1990, automatically authorizes EM for production and physical losses resulting from the quarantine in a primary county (the county in which the quarantine was in force) and (where the quarantine effects extend beyond that county) the counties contiguous to that primary county.


(4) Presidential declaration. Whenever the President declares a Major Disaster Declaration or an Emergency Declaration, FSA will make EM available to eligible applicants in declared and contiguous counties, provided:


(i) The Presidential declaration is not solely for Category A or Category B Public Assistance or Hazard Mitigation Grant Assistance, and


(ii) The Presidential Major Disaster declaration is for losses due to severe, general disaster conditions including but not limited to conditions such as flood, hurricane, or earthquake.


(b) [Reserved]


PART 760 – INDEMNITY PAYMENT PROGRAMS


Authority:7 U.S.C. 4501 and 1531; 16 U.S.C. 3801, note; 19 U.S.C. 2497; Title III, Pub. L. 109-234, 120 Stat. 474; Title IX, Pub. L. 110-28, 121 Stat. 211; Sec. 748, Pub. L. 111-80, 123 Stat. 2131; Title I, Pub. L. 115-123, 132 Stat. 65; Title I, Pub. L. 116-20, 133 Stat. 871; and Division B, Title VII, Pub. L. 116-94, 133 Stat. 2658.

Subpart A – Dairy Indemnity Payment Program


Authority:7 U.S.C. 450j-l.


Source:43 FR 10535, Mar. 14, 1978, unless otherwise noted.

Program Operations

§ 760.1 Administration.

This indemnity payment program will be carried out by FSA under the direction and supervision of the Deputy Administrator. In the field, the program will be administered by the State and county committees.


§ 760.2 Definitions.

For purposes of this subject, the following terms shall have the meanings specified:


Affected farmer means a person who produces whole milk which is removed from the commercial market any time from:


(1) Pursuant to the direction of a public agency because of the detection of pesticide residues in such whole milk by tests made by a public agency or under a testing program deemed adequate for the purpose by a public agency, or


(2) Pursuant to the direction of a public agency because of the detection of other residues of chemicals or toxic substances residues, or contamination from nuclear radiation or fallout in such whole milk by tests made by a public agency or under a testing program deemed adequate for the purpose by a public agency.


Affected manufacturer means a person who manufactures dairy products which are removed from the commercial market pursuant to the direction of a public agency because of the detection of pesticide residue in such dairy products by tests made by a public agency or under a testing program deemed adequate for the purpose by a public agency.


Application period means any period during which an affected farmer’s whole milk is removed from the commercial market pursuant to direction of a public agency for a reason specified in paragraph (k) of this section and for which application for payment is made.


Base period means the calendar month or 4-week period immediately preceding removal of milk from the market.


Chemicals or Toxic Substances means any chemical substance or mixture as defined in the Toxic Substances Control Act (15 U.S.C. 2602).


Commercial market means (1) the market to which the affected farmer normally delivers his whole milk and from which it was removed because of detection therein of a residue of a violating substance(s) or (2) the market to which the affected manufacturer normally delivers his dairy products and from which they were removed because of detection therein of pesticide residue.


Contaminated milk means milk containing elevated levels of any violating substance that may affect public health based on tests made by the applicable public agency and resulting in the removal of the milk from the commercial market.


County committee means the FSA county committee.


Depopulation means, consistent with the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA)
1
definition, the rapid destruction of a population of cows with as much consideration given to the welfare of the animals as practicable.




1 The AVMA Guidelines for the Depopulation of Animals is available at: https://www.avma.org/sites/default/files/resources/AVMA-Guidelines-for-the-Depopulation-of-Animals.pdf.


Deputy Administrator means the Deputy Administrator for Farm Programs, FSA.


FSA means the Farm Service Agency, U.S. Department of Agriculture.


Milk handler means the marketing agency to or through which the affected dairy farmer marketed his whole milk at the time he was directed by the public agency to remove his whole milk from the commercial market.


Not marketable means no commercial market is available for affected cows to be slaughtered, processed, and marketed through the food chain system as determined by the Deputy Administrator.


Nuclear Radiation or Fallout means contamination from nuclear radiation or fallout from any source.


Pay period means (1) in the case of an affected farmer who markets his whole milk through a milk handler, the period used by the milk handler in settling with the affected farmer for his whole milk, usually biweekly or monthly, or (2) in the case of an affected farmer whose commercial market consists of direct retail sales to consumers, a calendar month.


Payment subject to refund means a payment which is made by a milk handler to an affected farmer, and which such farmer is obligated to refund to the milk handler.


Person means an individual, partnership, association, corporation, trust, estate, or other legal entity.


Pesticide means an economic poison which was registered pursuant to the provisions of the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act, as amended (7 U.S.C. 135 through 135k), and approved for use by the Federal Government.


Public agency means any Federal, State or local public regulatory agency.


Removed from the commercial market means (1) produced and destroyed or fed to livestock, (2) produced and delivered to a handler who destroyed it or disposed of it as salvage (such as separating whole milk, destroying the fat, and drying the skim milk), or (3) produced and otherwise diverted to other than the commercial market.


Same loss means the event or trigger that caused the milk to be removed from the commercial market. For example, if milk is contaminated, the original cause of the contamination was the trigger and any loss related to that contamination would be considered the same loss.


Secretary means the Secretary of Agriculture of the United States or any officer or employee of the U.S. Department of Agriculture to whom he has delegated, or to whom he may hereafter delegate, authority to act in his stead.


State committee means the FSA State committee.


Violating substance means one or more of the following, as defined in this section: Pesticide, chemicals or toxic substances, or nuclear radiation or fallout.


Whole milk means milk as it is produced by cows.


[43 FR 10535, Mar. 14, 1978, as amended by Amdt. 1, 44 FR 36360, July 22, 1979; 52 FR 17935, May 13, 1987; 53 FR 44001, Nov. 1, 1988; 56 FR 1358, Jan. 14, 1991; 61 FR 18485, Apr. 26, 1996; 71 FR 27190, May 10, 2006; 84 FR 28176, June 18, 2019; 86 FR 70702, Dec. 13, 2021]


Payments to Dairy Farmers for Milk

§ 760.3 Indemnity payments on milk.

(a) The amount of an indemnity payment for milk, including, but not limited to organic milk, made to an affected farmer who is determined by the county committee to be in compliance with all the terms and conditions of this subpart will be in the amount of the fair market value of the farmer’s normal marketings for the application period, as determined in accordance with §§ 760.4 and 760.5, less:


(1) Any amount the affected farmer received for whole milk marketed during the application period; and


(2) Any payment not subject to refund that the affected farmer received from a milk handler with respect to milk removed from the commercial market during the application period.


(b) The eligible period for Dairy Indemnity Payment Program (DIPP) benefits for milk for the same loss is limited to 3 calendar months from when the first claim for milk benefits is approved. Upon written request from an affected farmer on the milk indemnity form authorized by the Deputy Administrator, the Deputy Administrator may authorize, at the Deputy Administrator’s discretion, additional months of benefits for the affected farmer for milk due to extenuating circumstances, which may include allowing additional time for public agency approval of a removal plan for cow indemnification and confirmation of site disposal for affected cows. Additionally, the Deputy Administrator has discretion to approve additional months based on issues that are beyond the control of the affected farmer who is seeking cow indemnification, as well as when the affected farmer is following a plan to reduce chemical residues in milk, cows, and heifers to marketable levels.


[86 FR 70703, Dec. 13, 2021]


§ 760.4 Normal marketings of milk.

(a) The county committee shall determine the affected farmer’s normal marketings which, for the purposes of this subpart, shall be the sum of the quantities of whole milk which such farmer would have sold in the commercial market in each of the pay periods in the application period but for the removal of his whole milk from the commercial market because of the detection of a residue of a violating substance.


(b) Normal marketings for each pay period are based on the average daily production during the base period.


(c) Normal marketings determined in paragraph (b) of this section are adjusted for any change in the daily average number of cows milked during each pay period the milk is off the market compared with the average number of cows milked daily during the base period.


(d) If only a portion of a pay period falls within the application period, normal marketings for such pay period shall be reduced so that they represent only that part of such pay period which is within the application period.


[43 FR 10535, Mar. 14, 1978, as amended by Amdt. 1, 44 FR 36360, July 22, 1979]


§ 760.5 Fair market value of milk.

(a) The county committee shall determine the fair market value of the affected farmer’s normal marketings, which, for the purposes of this subpart, shall be the sum of the net proceeds such farmer would have received for his normal marketings in each of the pay periods in the application period.


(b) The county committee shall determine the net proceeds the affected farmer would have received in each of the pay periods in the application period (1) in the case of an affected farmer who markets his whole milk through a milk handler, by multiplying the affected farmer’s normal marketings for each such pay period by the average net price per hundred-weight of whole milk paid during the pay period by such farmer’s milk handler in the same area for whole milk similar in quality and butterfat test to that marketed by the affected farmer in the base period used to determine his normal marketings, or (2) in the case of an affected farmer whose commercial market consists of direct retail sales to consumers, by multiplying the affected farmer’s normal marketings for each such pay period by the average net price per hundredweight of whole milk, as determined by the county committee, which other producers in the same area who marketed their whole milk through milk handlers received for whole milk similar in quality and butterfat test to that marketed by the affected farmer during the base period used to determine his normal marketings.


(c) In determining the net price for whole milk, the county committee shall deduct from the gross price therefor any transportation, administrative, and other costs of marketing which it determines are normally incurred by the affected farmer but which were not incurred because of the removal of his whole milk from the commercial market.


§ 760.6 Information to be furnished.

The affected farmer shall furnish to the county committee complete and accurate information sufficient to enable the county committee or the Deputy Administrator to make the determinations required in this subpart. Such information shall include, but is not limited to:


(a) A copy of the notice from, or other evidence of action by, the public agency which resulted in the removal of the affected farmer’s whole milk from the commercial market.


(b) The specific name of the violating substance causing the removal of his whole milk from the commercial market, if not included in the notice or other evidence of action furnished under paragraph (a) of this section.


(c) The quantity and butterfat test of whole milk produced and marketed during the base period. This information must be a certified statement from the affected farmer’s milk handler or any other evidence the county committee accepts as an accurate record of milk production and butterfat tests during the base period.


(d) The average number of cows milked during the base period and during each pay period in the application.


(e) If the affected farmer markets his whole milk through a milk handler, a statement from the milk handler showing, for each pay period in the application period, the average price per hundred-weight of whole milk similar in quality to that marketed by the affected farmer during the base period used to determine his normal marketings. If the milk handler has information as to the transportation, administrative, and other costs of marketing which are normally incurred by producers who market through the milk handler but which the affected farmer did not incur because of removal of his whole milk from the market, the average price stated by the milk handler shall be the average gross price paid producers less any such costs. If the milk handler does not have such information, the affected farmer shall furnish a statement setting forth such costs, if any.


(f) The amount of proceeds, if any, received by the affected farmer from the marketing of whole milk produced during the application period.


(g) The amount of any payments not subject to refund made to the affected farmer by the milk handler with respect to the whole milk produced during the application period and remove from the commercial market.


(h) To the extent that such information is available to the affected farmer, the name of any pesticide, chemical, or toxic substance used on the farm within 24 months prior to the application period, the use made of the pesticide, chemical, or toxic substance, the approximate date of such use, and the name of the manufacturer and the registration number, if any, on the label on the container of the pesticide, chemical, or toxic substance.


(i) To the extent possible, the source of the pesticide, chemical, or toxic substance that caused the contamination of the whole milk, the results of any laboratory tests on the feed supply, and the monthly milk testing results that detail the chemical residue levels.


(j) Such other information as the county committee may request to enable the county committee or the Deputy Administrator to make the determinations required in this subpart.


[43 FR 10535, Mar. 14, 1978, as amended by Amdt. 1, 44 FR 36360, June 22, 1979; 86 FR 70703, Dec. 13, 2021]


§ 760.7 Conditions required for milk or cow indemnity.

(a) An indemnity payment for milk or cows (dairy cows including, but not limited to, bred and open heifers) may be made under this subpart to an affected farmer under the conditions in this section.


(b) If the pesticide, chemical, or toxic substance, in the contaminated milk was used by the affected farmer, the affected farmer must establish that each of the conditions in this section are met:


(1) That the pesticide, chemical, or toxic substance, when used, was registered (if applicable) and approved for use as provided in § 760.2(f);


(2) That the contaminated milk was not the result of the affected farmer’s failure to use the pesticide, chemical, or toxic substance, according to the directions and limitations stated on the label; and


(3) That the contaminated milk was not otherwise the affected farmer’s fault.


(c) If the violating substance in the contaminated milk was not used by the affected farmer, the affected farmer must establish that each of the conditions in this section are met:


(1) The affected farmer did not know or have reason to believe that any purchased feed contained a violating substance;


(2) None of the milk was produced by dairy cattle that the affected farmer knew, or had reason to know at the time they were acquired, had elevated levels of a violating substance; and


(3) The contaminated milk was not otherwise the affected farmer’s fault.


(d) The affected farmer has adopted recommended practices and taken action to eliminate or reduce chemical residues of violating substances from the milk as soon as practicable following the initial discovery of the contaminated milk.


[86 FR 70703, Dec. 13, 2021]


§ 760.8 Application for payments for milk.

The affected farmer or his legal representative, as provided in §§ 760.25 and 760.29, must sign and file an application for payment on a form which is approved for that purpose by the Deputy Administrator. The form must be filed with the county FSA office for the county where the farm headquarters are located no later than December 31 following the end of the fiscal year in which the loss occurred, or such later date as the Deputy Administrator may specify. The application for payment shall cover application periods of at least 28 days, except that, if the entire application period, or the last application period, is shorter than 28 days, applications for payment may be filed for such shorter period. The application for payment shall be accompanied by the information required by § 760.6 as well as any other information which will enable the county committee to determine whether the making of an indemnity payment is precluded for any of the reasons set forth in § 760.7. Such information shall be submitted on forms approved for the purpose by the Deputy Administrator.


[43 FR 10535, Mar. 14, 1978, as amended at 51 FR 12986, Apr. 17, 1986; 52 FR 17935, May 13, 1987]


§ 760.9 Payments for the same loss.

(a) No indemnity payment shall be made for contaminated milk resulting from residues of chemicals or toxic substances if, within 30 days after receiving a complete application, the Deputy Administrator determines that other legal recouse is available to the farmer. An application shall not be deemed complete unless it contains all information necessary to make a determination as to whether other legal recourse is available to the farmer. However, notwithstanding such a determination, the Deputy Administrator may reopen the case at a later date and make a new determination on the merits of the case as may be just and equitable.


(b) In the event that a farmer receives an indemnity payment under this subpart, and such farmer is later compensated for the same loss by the person (or the representative or successor in interest of such person) responsible for such loss, the indemnity payment shall be refunded by the farmer to the Department of Agriculture: Provided, That the amount of such refund shall not exceed the amount of other compensation received by the farmer.


(c) For any affected farmer that exceeded 3 months of milk indemnity payments before December 13, 2021 no further payments for milk indemnity will be made for the same loss except as provided in § 760.3(b) and the affected farmer may apply for cow indemnity as specified in this subpart.


(d) An affected farmer that has an approved application for cow indemnity is no longer eligible for milk indemnity payments for the same loss.


(e) Cows purchased or bred after the initial discovery of the milk contamination are not eligible for DIPP benefits due to the same loss.


[Amdt. 1, 44 FR 36361, June 22, 1979, as amended at 84 FR 28176, June 18, 2019; 86 FR 70703, Dec. 13, 2021]


§ 760.10 Indemnity payments for cows.

(a) The Deputy Administrator for Farm Programs (DAFP) will determine eligibility for DIPP indemnification based on if the cows of the affected farmer are likely to be not marketable for 3 months or longer [from the date the affected farmer submits an application for cow indemnification per § 760.13]. The Deputy Administrator will review the following factors in making that determination:


(1) Milk testing results;


(2) Non marketability of affected cows through commercial marketing facilities;


(3) Type and source of chemical residues impacting the milk and animal tissues; and


(4) Projected duration for chemical residue reduction including the actions taken by the affected farmer to reduce the chemical residues to marketable levels since the affected cows were discovered.


(b) See § 760.11 for indemnity payment eligibility for bred and open heifers.


(c) Affected farmers applying for indemnification of cows, including heifers, must develop a removal plan both to permanently remove the affected cows by depopulating the cows.


(1) The removal plan for affected cows for which an affected farmer applies for indemnification under DIPP must be approved by the applicable public agency where the cows are located and must be in accordance with any applicable Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and public agency depopulation and animal disposal requirements and guidelines, including contaminant disposal requirements, in the State where the affected cows are located.


(2) The approved removal plan must be submitted with the application for indemnification.


(d) The amount of an indemnity payment for cows to an affected farmer who is determined by the Deputy Administrator to be eligible for indemnification and by the county committee to be in compliance with all the terms and conditions of this subpart will be based on the national average fair market value of the cows. DIPP cow indemnification will be based on the 100 percent value of the Livestock Indemnity Program (LIP) rates as applicable for the calendar year for milk indemnification established for dairy cows, per head. For example, for a 100-cow farm: 100 cows multiplied by $1,300 (2021 LIP rate based on 100 percent value of average cow) = $130,000 payment.


(e) For any cow indemnification payment under this section or § 760.11, the affected farmer has the option to receive 50 percent of calculated payment in advance after application approval with the remaining fifty percent paid after the affected cows have been depopulated and removed. Otherwise, the affected farmer may choose to receive 100 percent of payment after cows have been depopulated and removed. Documented records of depopulation and removal of affected cows must be provided to FSA to the satisfaction of the county committee, before the final payment will be made.


(f) Upon written request from an affected farmer on a form authorized by the Deputy Administrator, the Deputy Administrator may approve, at the Deputy Administrator’s discretion, indemnification of additional affected cows as specified in paragraphs (f)(1) through (3) of this section.


(1) The affected cows were depopulated or died above normal mortality rates for cows between approval of the affected farmer’s application for the first month of milk indemnity and public agency approval of the affected farmer’s removal plan for cow indemnification. Normal mortality rates established annually by the FSA State committee for their state for the following cow and heifer weight groups will be used:


(i) Dairy, nonadult less than 400 pounds;


(ii) Dairy, nonadult 400 pounds or more; and


(iii) Dairy, adult cow.


(2) This request may include both cows that were included in applications for milk indemnity and heifers that were affected from the same loss.


(3) An affected farmer making such a request must submit the information specified in § 760.12(c).


(g) Affected cows that are marketed as cull or for breeding are not eligible for indemnification.


[86 FR 70703, Dec. 13, 2021]


§ 760.11 Indemnity payments for bred and open heifers.

(a) Bred (young dairy female in gestation) and open (young dairy female not in gestation) heifers that contain elevated levels of chemical residues as the result of the same loss may be eligible for indemnification through DIPP. For affected bred and open heifers participating affected farmers may receive indemnification if the farmer’s dairy cows were determined to be likely not marketable for three months or longer according to § 760.10(a) and the Deputy Administrator determines the bred and open heifers to be eligible under paragraph (b) of this section. Except as provided in this section or otherwise stated in this subpart, the provisions in this subpart for cow indemnity apply equally to bred and open heifers, for example the removal requirements in § 760.10(b).


(b) The county committee will make the recommendation to the Deputy Administrator to determine if eligible bred and open heifers that have been affected by the same loss will likely be not marketable for 3 months or longer from the date the affected farmer submits an application for cow indemnification per § 760.13 because of elevated levels of chemical residues that will pass through milk once lactating. Affected farmers must provide the information specified in § 760.12(a) and (b) for the county committee to make a recommendation of eligibility to the Deputy Administrator. The Deputy Administrator will take into consideration the recommendation of the county committee in making its eligibility determination.


(c) The amount of the cow indemnity for bred and open heifers will be based on the national average fair market value of the non-adult heifers. DIPP bred and open heifer indemnification will be based on the 100 percent value of the Livestock Indemnity Program (LIP) rates as applicable for the calendar year of milk indemnification established for non-adult dairy, by weight range, per head. For example, for an affected farmer with 40 bred or open heifers at different weight ranges: 10 bred heifers at 800 pounds or more multiplied by $986.13 ($9861.30), 10 bred or open heifers at 400 to 799 pounds multiplied by $650.00 ($6500.00), 10 open heifers at 250 to 399 pounds multiplied by $325.00 ($3250.00), and 10 open heifers 250 pounds or less multiplied by $57.65 ($576.50) = $20,187.80 payment.


[86 FR 70704, Dec. 13, 2021]


§ 760.12 Information to be furnished for payment on dairy cows, and bred and open heifers.

(a) To apply for DIPP for affected cows, the affected farmer must provide the county committee complete and accurate information to enable the Deputy Administrator to make the determinations required in this subpart in addition to providing the information requested in § 760.6(a), (b), (h), and (i), if not previously provided to FSA in a milk indemnity application. The information specified in this section must be submitted as part of the cow indemnity application and includes, but is not limited to, the following items:


(1) An inventory of all dairy cows as of the date of application including lactating cows, bred heifers, and open heifers on the farm;


(2) A detailed description and timeline of how, where, and when cows will be depopulated and permanently removed from the farm (the removal plan);


(3) Documentation of public agency approval of the removal plan for cow depopulation and cow and contaminate disposal in accordance with any applicable EPA and public agency disposal requirements and guidelines;


(4) Documentation from 2 separate commercial markets stating that such market declined to accept the affected cows through a cull cow market, slaughter facility, or processing facility due to elevated levels of chemical residues;


(5) Documentation of any projected timelines for reducing chemical residues, any actions the affected farmer has taken to reduce chemical residues to marketable levels including any documents verifying steps undertaken, and any professional assistance obtained, including, discussion of strategy with the public agencies; and


(6) Any other documentation that may support the determination that the affected cows or milk from such cows is likely to be not marketable for longer than 3 months; and other documentation as requested or determined to be necessary by the county committee or the Deputy Administrator.


(b) To apply for DIPP for bred and open heifers the affected farmer must provide the information specified in paragraph (a) of this section and: veterinarian records, blood test results, and other testing information requested by the county committee for the recommendation specified in § 760.11(b) and eligibility for indemnification.


(c) To request consideration for indemnification of affected cows and heifers under § 760.10(e), the affected farmer must submit the information specified in paragraphs (c)(1) and (2) of this section to provide an accounting of affected cows and heifers that were depopulated or died above normal mortality rates for cows between approval of the affected farmer’s application for the first month of milk indemnity and the public agency approval of the affected farmer’s removal plan for cow indemnification.


(1) Herd health record documenting cow and heifer deaths; and


(2) Farm inventory or other record identifying the loss of dairy cows and heifers.


(d) The affected farmer certifies at application that once the cow indemnity application is approved, the affected farmer will dry off all lactating cows in a reasonable timeframe and discontinue milking.


[86 FR 70704, Dec. 13, 2021]


§ 760.13 Application for payment of cows.

(a) Any affected farmer may apply for cow indemnity under §§ 760.10 and 760.11. To apply for DIPP for affected cows, the affected farmer must sign and file an application for payment on a form that is approved for that purpose by the Deputy Administrator and provide the information described in § 760.12.


(b) The form must be filed with the FSA county office for the county where the farm headquarters is located by December 31 following the fiscal year end in which the affected farmer’s milk was removed from the commercial market, except that affected farmers that have received 3 months of milk indemnity payments prior to December 13, 2021, must file the form within 120 days after December 13, 2021. Upon written request from an affected farmer and at Deputy Administrator’s discretion, the deadline for that affected farmer may be extended.


[86 FR 70705, Dec. 13, 2021]


Payments to Manufacturers Affected by Pesticides

§ 760.20 Payments to manufacturers of dairy products.

An indemnity payment may be made to the affected manufacturer who is determined by the Deputy Administrator to be in compliance with all the terms and conditions of this subpart in the amount of the fair market value of the product removed from the commercial market because of pesticide residues, less any amount the manufacturer receives for the product in the form of salvage.



Note:

Manufacturers are not eligible for payment when dairy products are contaminated by chemicals, toxic substances (other than pesticides) or nuclear radiation or fallout.


[43 FR 10535, Mar. 14, 1978, as amended at 47 FR 24689, June 8, 1982]


§ 760.21 Application for payments by manufacturers.

The affected manufacturer, or his legal representatives, shall file an application for payment with the Deputy Administrator, FSA, Washington, D.C., through the county office serving the county where the contaminated product is located. The application for payment may be in the form of a letter or memorandum. Such letter or memorandum, however, must be accompanied by acceptable documentation to support such application for payment.


§ 760.22 Information to be furnished by manufacturer.

The affected manufacturer shall furnish the Deputy Administrator, through the county committee, complete and accurate information sufficient to enable him to make the determination as to the manufacturer’s eligibility to receive an indemnity payment. Such information shall include, but is not limited to:


(a) A copy of the notice or other evidence of action by the public agency which resulted in the product being removed from the commercial market.


(b) The name of the pesticide causing the removal of the product from the commercial market and, to the extent possible, the source of the pesticide.


(c) A record of the quantity of milk or butterfat used to produce the product for which an indemnity payment is requested.


(d) The identity of any pesticide used by the affected manufacturer.


(e) Such other information as the Deputy Administrator may request to enable him to make the determinations required in this subpart.


§ 760.23 Other requirements for manufacturers.

An indemnity payment may be made under this subpart to an affected manufacturer only under the following conditions:


(a) If the pesticide contaminating the product was used by the affected manufacturer, he establishes each of the following: (1) That the pesticide, when used, was registered and recommended for such use as provided in § 760.2(f); (2) that the contamination of his product was not the result of his failure to use the pesticide in accordance with the directions and limitations stated on the label of the pesticide; and (3) that the contamination of his product was not otherwise his fault.


(b) If the pesticide contaminating the product was not used by the affected manufacturer: (1) He did not know or have reason to believe that the milk from which the product was processed contained a harmful level of pesticide residue, and (2) the contamination of his product was not otherwise his fault.


(c) In the event that a manufacturer receives an indemnity payment under this subpart, and such manufacturer is later compensated for the same loss by the person (or the representative or successor in interest of such person) responsible for such loss, the indemnity payment shall be refunded by the manufacturer to the Department of Agriculture: Provided, That the amount of such refund shall not exceed the amount of other compensation received by the manufacturer.


[43 FR 10535, Mar. 14, 1978, as amended at 47 FR 24689, June 8, 1982; 51 FR 12987, Apr. 17, 1986; 52 FR 17935, May 13, 1987]


General Provisions

§ 760.24 Limitation of authority.

(a) County executive directors and State and county committees do not have authority to modify or waive any of the provisions of the regulations in this subpart.


(b) The State committee may take any action authorized or required by the regulations in this subpart to be taken by the county committee when such action has not been taken by the county committee. The State committee may also:


(1) Correct, or require a county committee to correct, any action taken by such county committee which is not in accordance with the regulations in this subpart, or (2) require a county committee to withhold taking any action which is not in accordance with the regulations in this subpart.


(c) No delegation herein to a State or county committee shall preclude the Deputy Administrator or his designee from determining any question arising under the regulations in this subpart or from reversing or modifying any determination made by a State or county committee.


§ 760.25 Estates and trusts; minors.

(a) A receiver of an insolvent debtor’s estate and the trustee of a trust estate shall, for the purpose of this subpart, be considered to represent an insolvent affected farmer or manufacturer and the beneficiaries of a trust, respectively, and the production of the receiver or trustee shall be considered to be the production of the person or manufacturer he represents. Program documents executed by any such person will be accepted only if they are legally valid and such person has the authority to sign the applicable documents.


(b) An affected dairy farmer or manufacturer who is a minor shall be eligible for indemnity payments only if he meets one of the following requirements:


(1) The right of majority has been conferred on him by court proceedings or by statute;


(2) A guardian has been appointed to manage his property and the applicable program documents are signed by the guardian; or


(3) A bond is furnished under which the surety guarantees any loss incurred for which the minor would be liable had he been an adult.


§ 760.26 Appeals.

The appeal regulations issued by the Administrator, FSA, part 780 of this chapter, shall be applicable to appeals by dairy farmers or manufacturers from determinations made pursuant to the regulations in this subpart.


§ 760.27 Setoffs.

(a) If the affected farmer or manufacturer is indebted to any agency of the United States and such indebtedness is listed on the county debt record, indemnity payments due the affected farmer or manufacturer under the regulations in this part shall be applied, as provided in the Secretary’s setoff regulations, part 13 of this title, to such indebtedness.


(b) Compliance with the provisions of this section shall not deprive the affected farmer or manufacturer of any right he would otherwise have to contest the justness of the indebtedness involved in the setoff action, either by administrative appeal or by legal action.


§ 760.28 Overdisbursement.

If the indemnity payment disbursed to an affected farmer or to a manufacturer exceeds the amount authorized under the regulations in this subpart, the affected farmer or manufacturer shall be personally liable for repayment of the amount of such excess.


§ 760.29 Death, incompetency, or disappearance.

In the case of the death, incompetency, or disappearance of any affected farmer or manufacturer who would otherwise receive an indemnity payment, such payment may be made to the person or persons specified in the regulations contained in part 707 of this chapter. The person requesting such payment shall file Form FSA-325, “Application for Payment of Amounts Due Persons Who Have Died, Disappeared, or Have Been Declared Incompetent,” as provided in that part.


[43 FR 10535, Mar. 14, 1978, as amended at 47 FR 24689, June 8, 1982]


§ 760.30 Records and inspection thereof.

(a) The affected farmer, as well as his milk handler and any other person who furnished information to such farmer or to the county committee for the purpose of enabling such farmer to receive a milk indemnity payment under this subpart, shall maintain any existing books, records, and accounts supporting any information so furnished for 3 years following the end of the year during which the application for payment was filed. The affected farmer, his milk handler, and any other person who furnishes such information to the affected farmer or to the county committee shall permit authorized representatives of the Department of Agriculture and the General Accounting Office, during regular business hours, to inspect, examine, and make copies of such books, records, and accounts.


(b) The affected manufacturer or any other person who furnishes information to the Deputy Administrator for the purposes of enabling such manufacturer to receive an indemnity payment under this subpart shall maintain any books, records, and accounts supporting any information so furnished for 3 years following the end of the year during which the application for payment was filed. The affected manufacturer or any other person who furnishes such information to the Deputy Administrator shall permit authorized representatives of the Department of Agriculture and the General Accounting Office, during regular business hours, to inspect, examine, and make copies of such books, records, and accounts.


§ 760.31 Assignment.

No assignment shall be made of any indemnity payment due or to come due under the regulations in this subpart. Any assignment or attempted assignment of any indemnity payment due or to come due under this subpart shall be null and void.


§ 760.32 Instructions and forms.

The Deputy Administrator shall cause to be prepared such forms and instructions as are necessary for carrying out the regulations in this subpart. Affected farmers and manufacturers may obtain information necessary to make application for a dairy indemnity payment from the county FSA office. Form FSA-373 – Application for Indemnity Payment, is available at the county ASC office.


[43 FR 10535, Mar. 14, 1978, as amended at 47 FR 24689, June 8, 1982]


§ 760.33 Availability of funds.

(a) Payment of indemnity claims will be contingent upon the availability of FSA funds to pay such claims. Claims will be, to the extent practicable within funding limits, paid from available funds, on a first-come, first-paid basis, based on the date FSA approves the application, until funds available in that fiscal year have been expended.


(b) DIPP claims received in a fiscal year after all available funds have been expended will not receive payment for such claims.


[75 FR 41367, July 16, 2010]


Subpart B – General Provisions for Supplemental Agricultural Disaster Assistance Programs


Source:74 FR 31571, July 2, 2009, unless otherwise noted.

§ 760.101 Applicability.

(a) This subpart establishes general conditions for this subpart and subparts C through H of this part and applies only to those subparts. Subparts C through H cover the following programs provided for in the “2008 Farm Bill” (Pub. L. 110-246):


(1) Emergency Assistance for Livestock, Honey Bees, and Farm-Raised Fish Program (ELAP);


(2) Livestock Forage Disaster Program (LFP);


(3) Livestock Indemnity Payments Program (LIP);


(4) Supplemental Revenue Assistance Payments Program (SURE); and


(5) Tree Assistance Program (TAP).


(b) To be eligible for payments under these programs, participants must comply with all provisions under this subpart and the relevant particular subpart for that program. All other provisions of law also apply.


§ 760.102 Administration of ELAP, LFP, LIP, SURE, and TAP.

(a) The programs in subparts C through H of this part will be administered under the general supervision and direction of the Administrator, Farm Service Agency (FSA), and the Deputy Administrator for Farm Programs, FSA (who is referred to as the “Deputy Administrator” in this part).


(b) FSA representatives do not have authority to modify or waive any of the provisions of the regulations of this part as amended or supplemented, except as specified in paragraph (e) of this section.


(c) The State FSA committee will take any action required by the regulations of this part that the county FSA committee has not taken. The State FSA committee will also:


(1) Correct, or require a county FSA committee to correct, any action taken by such county FSA committee that is not in accordance with the regulations of this part or


(2) Require a county FSA committee to withhold taking any action that is not in accordance with this part.


(d) No provision or delegation to a State or county FSA committee will preclude the Administrator, the Deputy Administrator for Farm Programs, or a designee or other such person, from determining any question arising under the programs of this part, or from reversing or modifying any determination made by a State or county FSA committee.


(e) The Deputy Administrator for Farm Programs may authorize State and county FSA committees to waive or modify non-statutory deadlines, or other program requirements of this part in cases where lateness or failure to meet such requirements does not adversely affect operation of the programs in this part. Participants have no right to seek an exception under this provision. The Deputy Administrator’s refusal to consider cases or circumstances or decision not to exercise this discretionary authority under this provision will not be considered an adverse decision and is not appealable.


§ 760.103 Eligible producer.

(a) In general, the term “eligible producer” means, in addition to other requirements as may apply, an individual or entity described in paragraph (b) of this section that, as determined by the Secretary, assumes the production and market risks associated with the agricultural production of crops or livestock on a farm either as the owner of the farm, when there is no contract grower, or a contract grower of the livestock when there is a contract grower.


(b) To be eligible for benefits, an individual or entity must be a:


(1) Citizen of the United States;


(2) Resident alien; for purposes of this part, resident alien means “lawful alien” as defined in 7 CFR part 1400;


(3) Partnership of citizens of the United States; or


(4) Corporation, limited liability corporation, or other farm organizational structure organized under State law.


§ 760.104 Risk management purchase requirements.

(a) To be eligible for program payments under:


(1) ELAP, SURE, and TAP, eligible producers for any commodity at any location for which the producer seeks benefits must have for every commodity on every farm in which the producer has an interest for the relevant program year:


(i) In the case of an “insurable commodity,” (which for this part means a commodity for which the Deputy Administrator determines catastrophic coverage is available from the USDA Risk Management Agency (RMA)) obtained catastrophic coverage or better under a policy or plan of insurance administered by RMA under the Federal Crop Insurance Act (FCIA) (7 U.S.C. 1501-1524), except that this obligation will not include crop insurance pilot programs so designated by RMA or to forage crops intended for grazing, and


(ii) In the case of a “noninsurable commodity,” (which is any commodity for which, as to the particular production in question, is not an “insurable commodity,” but for which coverage is available under the Noninsured Crop Disaster Assistance Program (NAP) operated under 7 CFR part 1437), have obtained NAP coverage by filing the proper paperwork and fee within the relevant deadlines, except that this requirement will not include forage on grazing land.


(2) LFP, with respect to those grazing lands incurring losses for which assistance is being requested, eligible livestock producers must have:


(i) Obtained a policy or plan of insurance for the forage crop under FCIA, or


(ii) Filed the required paperwork and paid the administrative fee by the applicable State filing deadline for NAP coverage for that grazing land.


(b) Producers who did not purchase a policy or plan of insurance administered by RMA in accordance with FCIA (7 U.S.C. 1501-1524), or NAP coverage for their applicable crops, will not be eligible for assistance under ELAP, LFP, SURE, and TAP, as provided in paragraph (a) of this section unless the producer is one of the classes of farmers for which an exemption under § 760.107 apply, is exempt under the “buy-in” provisions of this subpart, or is granted relief from that requirement by the Deputy Administrator under some other provision of this part.


(c) Producers who have obtained insurance by a written agreement as specified in § 400.652(d) of this title even though that production would not normally be considered an “insurable commodity” under the rules of this subpart, will be considered to have met the risk management purchase requirement of this subpart with respect to such production. The commodity to which the agreement applies will be considered for purposes of this subpart to be an “insurable commodity.”


(d) Producers by an administrative process who were granted NAP coverage for the relevant period as a form of relief in an administrative proceeding, or who were awarded NAP coverage for the relevant period through an appeal through the National Appeals Division (NAD), will be considered as having met the NAP eligibility criteria of this section for that crop as long as the applicable NAP service fee has been paid.


(e) The risk management purchase requirement for programs specified under this part will be determined based on the initial intended use of a crop at the time a policy or plan of insurance or NAP coverage was purchased and as reported on the acreage report.


[74 FR 31571, July 2, 2009, as amended at 74 FR 46673, Sept. 11, 2009]


§ 760.105 Waiver for certain crop years; buy-in.

(a) For the 2008 crop year, the insurance or NAP purchase requirements of § 760.104 (this is referred to as the “purchase” requirement) will be waived for eligible producers for losses during the 2008 crop year if the eligible producer paid a fee (buy-in fee) equal to the applicable NAP service fee or catastrophic risk protection plan fee to the Secretary by September 16, 2008. Payment of a buy-in fee under this section is for the sole purpose of becoming eligible for participation in ELAP, LFP, SURE, and TAP. Payment of a buy-in fee does not provide any actual insurance or NAP coverage or assistance.


(b) For the 2009 crop year, the purchase requirement will be waived for purchases where the closing date for coverage occurred prior to August 14, 2008, so long as the buy-in fee set by the Secretary of Agriculture was paid by January 12, 2009.


(c) Any producer of 2008 commodities who is otherwise ineligible because of the purchase requirement and who did not meet the conditions of paragraph (a) of this section may still be covered for ELAP, SURE, or TAP assistance if the producer paid the applicable fee described in paragraph (d) of this section no later than May 18, 2009, provided that in the case of each:


(1) Insurable commodity, excluding grazing land, the eligible producers on the farm agree to obtain a policy or plan of insurance under FCIA (7 U.S.C. 1501-1524), excluding a crop insurance pilot program under that subtitle, for the next insurance year for which crop insurance is available to the eligible producers on the farm at a level of coverage equal to 70 percent or more of the recorded or appraised average yield indemnified at 100 percent of the expected market price, or an equivalent coverage, and


(2) Noninsurable commodity, the eligible producers on the farm must agree to file the required paperwork, and pay the administrative fee by the applicable State filing deadline, for NAP for the next year for which a policy is available.


(d) For producers seeking eligibility under paragraph (c) of this section, the applicable buy-in fee for the 2008 crop year was the catastrophic risk protection plan fee or the applicable NAP service fee in effect prior to NAP service fee adjustments specified in the 2008 Farm Bill.


§ 760.106 Equitable relief.

(a) The Secretary may provide equitable relief on a case-by-case basis for the purchase requirement to eligible participants that:


(1) Are otherwise ineligible or provide evidence, satisfactory to FSA, that the failure to meet the requirements of § 760.104 for one or more eligible crops on the farm was unintentional and not because of any fault of the participant, as determined by the Secretary, or


(2) Failed to meet the requirements of § 760.104 due to the enactment of the 2008 Farm Bill after the:


(i) Applicable sales closing date for a policy or plan of insurance in accordance with the FCIA (7 U.S.C. 1501-1524) or


(ii) Application closing date for NAP.


(b) Equitable relief will not be granted to participants in instances of:


(1) A scheme or device that had the effect or intent of defeating the purposes of a program of insurance, NAP, or any other program administered under this part or elsewhere in this title,


(2) An intentional decision to not meet the purchase or buy-in requirements,


(3) Producers against whom sanctions have been imposed by RMA or FSA prohibiting the purchase of coverage or prohibiting the receipt of payments otherwise payable under this part,


(4) Violations of highly erodible land and wetland conservation provisions of 7 CFR part 12,


(5) Producers who are ineligible under any provisions of law, including regulations, relating to controlled substances (see for example 7 CFR 718.6), or


(6) A producer’s debarment by a federal agency from receiving any federal government payment if such debarment included payments of the type involved in this matter.


(c) In general, no relief that is discretionary will be allowed except upon a finding by the Deputy Administrator or the Deputy Administrator’s designee that the person seeking the relief acted in good faith as determined in accordance with such rules and procedures as may be set by the Deputy Administrator.


[74 FR 31571, July 2, 2009, as amended at 76 FR 54075, Aug. 31, 2011]


§ 760.107 Socially disadvantaged, limited resource, or beginning farmer or rancher.

(a) Risk management purchase requirements, as provided in § 760.104, will be waived for a participant who, as specified in paragraphs (b)(1) through (3) of this section, is eligible to be considered a “socially disadvantaged farmer or rancher,” a “limited resource farmer or rancher,” or a “beginning farmer or rancher.”


(b) To qualify for this section as a “socially disadvantaged farmer or rancher,” “limited resource farmer or rancher,” or “beginning farmer or rancher,” participants must meet eligibility criteria as follows:


(1) A “socially disadvantaged farmer or rancher” is, for this section, a farmer or rancher who is a member of a socially disadvantaged group whose members have been subjected to racial or ethnic prejudice because of their identity as members of a group without regard to their individual qualities. Gender is not included as a covered group. Socially disadvantaged groups include the following and no others unless approved in writing by the Deputy Administrator:


(i) American Indians or Alaskan Natives,


(ii) Asians or Asian-Americans,


(iii) Blacks or African Americans,


(iv) Native Hawaiians or other Pacific Islanders, and


(v) Hispanics.


(2) A “limited resource farmer or rancher” means for this section a producer who is both:


(i) A producer whose direct or indirect gross farm sales do not exceed $100,000 in both of the two calendar years that precede the calendar year that corresponds to the relevant program year, adjusted upwards for any general inflation since fiscal year 2004, inflation as measured using the Prices Paid by Farmer Index compiled by the National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS), and


(ii) A producer whose total household income is at or below the national poverty level for a family of four, or less than 50 percent of the county median household income for the same two calendar years referenced in paragraph (b)(2)(i) of this section, as determined annually using Commerce Department data. (Limited resource farmer or rancher status can be determined using a Web site available through the Limited Resource Farmer and Rancher Online Self Determination Tool through the National Resource and Conservation Service at http://www.lrftool.sc.egov.usda.gov/tool.asp.)


(3) A “beginning farmer or rancher” means for this section a person or legal entity who for a program year both:


(i) Has never previously operated a farm or ranch, or who has not operated a farm or ranch in the previous 10 years, applicable to all members (shareholders, partners, beneficiaries, etc., as fits the circumstances) of an entity, and


(ii) Will have or has had for the relevant period materially and substantially participated in the operation of a farm or ranch.


(c) If a legal entity requests to be considered a “socially disadvantaged,” “limited resource,” or “beginning” farmer or rancher, at least 50 percent of the persons in the entity must in their individual capacities meet the definition as provided in paragraphs (b)(1) through (3) of this section and it must be clearly demonstrated that the entity was not formed for the purposes of avoiding the purchase requirements or formed after the deadline for the purchase requirement.


[74 FR 31571, July 2, 2009, as amended at 76 FR 54075, Aug. 31, 2011]


§ 760.108 Payment limitation.

(a) For 2008, no person, as defined and determined under the provisions in part 1400 of this title in effect for 2008 may receive more than:


(1) $100,000 total for the 2008 program year under ELAP, LFP, LIP, and SURE combined or


(2) $100,000 for the 2008 program year under TAP.


(b) For 2009 and subsequent program years, no person or legal entity, excluding a joint venture or general partnership, as determined by the rules in part 1400 of this title may receive, directly or indirectly, more than:


(1) $100,000 per program year total under ELAP, LFP, LIP, and SURE combined; or


(2) $100,000 per program year under TAP.


(c) The Deputy Administrator may take such actions as needed, whether or not specifically provided for, to avoid a duplication of benefits under the multiple programs provided for in this part, or duplication of benefits received in other programs, and may impose such cross-program payment limitations as may be consistent with the intent of this part.


(1) FSA will review ELAP payments after the funding factor as specified in § 760.208 is determined to be 100 percent. FSA will ensure that total ELAP payments provided to a participant in a year, together with any amount provided to the same participant for the same loss as a result of any Federal crop insurance program, the Noninsured Crop Disaster Assistance Program, or any other Federal disaster program, plus the value of the commodity that was not lost, is not more than 95 percent of the value of the commodity in the absence of the loss, as estimated by FSA.


(2) [Reserved]


(d) In applying the limitation on average adjusted gross income (AGI) for 2008, an individual or entity is ineligible for payment under ELAP, LFP, LIP, SURE, and TAP if the individual’s or entity’s average adjusted gross income (AGI) exceeds $2.5 million for 2007, 2006, and 2005 under the provisions in part 1400 of this title in effect for 2008.


(e) For 2009 through 2011, the average AGI limitation provisions in part 1400 of this title relating to limits on payments for persons or legal entities, excluding joint ventures and general partnerships, with certain levels of average adjusted gross income (AGI) will apply under this subpart and will apply to each applicant for ELAP, LFP, LIP, SURE, and TAP. Specifically, for 2009 through 2011, a person or legal entity with an average adjusted gross nonfarm income, as defined in § 1404.3 of this title, that exceeds $500,000 will not be eligible to receive benefits under this part.


(f) The direct attribution provisions in part 1400 of this title apply to ELAP, LFP, LIP, SURE, and TAP for 2009 and subsequent years. Under those rules, any payment to any legal entity will also be considered for payment limitation purposes to be a payment to persons or legal entities with an interest in the legal entity or in a sub-entity. If any such interested person or legal entity is over the payment limitation because of direct payment or their indirect interests or a combination thereof, then the payment to the actual payee will be reduced commensurate with the amount of the interest of the interested person in the payee. Likewise, by the same method, if anyone with a direct or indirect interest in a legal entity or sub-entity of a payee entity exceeds the AGI levels that would allow a participant to directly receive a payment under this part, then the payment to the actual payee will be reduced commensurately with that interest. For all purposes under this section, unless otherwise specified in part 1400 of this title, the AGI figure that will be relevant for a person or legal entity will be an average AGI for the three taxable years that precede the most immediately preceding complete taxable year, as determined by CCC.


[74 FR 31571, July 2, 2009, as amended at 74 FR 46673, Sept. 11, 2009]


§ 760.109 Misrepresentation and scheme or device.

(a) A participant who is determined to have deliberately misrepresented any fact affecting a program determination made in accordance with this part, or otherwise used a scheme or device with the intent to receive benefits for which the participant would not otherwise be entitled, will not be entitled to program payments and must refund all such payments received, plus interest as determined in accordance with part 792 of this chapter. The participant will also be denied program benefits for the immediately subsequent period of at least 2 crop years, and up to 5 crop years. Interest will run from the date of the original disbursement by FSA.


(b) A participant will refund to FSA all program payments, plus interest, as determined in accordance with part 792 of this chapter, provided however, that in any case it will run from the date of the original disbursement, received by such participant with respect to all contracts or applications, as may be applicable, if the participant is determined to have knowingly done any of the following:


(1) Adopted any scheme or device that tends to defeat the purpose of the program,


(2) Made any fraudulent representation, or


(3) Misrepresented any fact affecting a program determination.


§ 760.110 Appeals.

(a) Appeals. Appeal regulations set forth at parts 11 and 780 of this title apply to this part.


(b) Determinations not eligible for administrative review or appeal. FSA determinations that are not in response to a specific individual participant’s application are not to be construed to be individual program eligibility determinations or adverse decisions and are, therefore, not subject to administrative review or appeal under parts 11 or 780 of this title. Such determinations include, but are not limited to, application periods, deadlines, coverage periods, crop years, fees, prices, general statutory or regulatory provisions that apply to similarly situated participants, national average payment prices, regions, crop definition, average yields, and payment factors established by FSA for any of the programs for which this subpart applies or similar matters requiring FSA determinations.


§ 760.111 Offsets, assignments, and debt settlement.

(a) Any payment to any participant under this part will be made without regard to questions of title under State law, and without regard to any claim or lien against the commodity, or proceeds, in favor of the owner or any other creditor except agencies of the U.S. Government. The regulations governing offsets and withholdings in part 792 of this title apply to payments made under this part.


(b) Any participant entitled to any payment may assign any payment(s) in accordance with regulations governing the assignment of payments in part 1404 of this title.


§ 760.112 Records and inspections.

(a) Any participant receiving payments under any program in ELAP, LFP, LIP, SURE, or TAP, or any other legal entity or person who provides information for the purposes of enabling a participant to receive a payment under ELAP, LFP, LIP, SURE, or TAP, must:


(1) Maintain any books, records, and accounts supporting the information for 3 years following the end of the year during which the request for payment was submitted, and


(2) Allow authorized representatives of USDA and the Government Accountability Office, during regular business hours, to inspect, examine, and make copies of such books or records, and to enter the farm and to inspect and verify all applicable livestock and acreage in which the participant has an interest for the purpose of confirming the accuracy of information provided by or for the participant.


(b) [Reserved]


§ 760.113 Refunds; joint and several liability.

(a) In the event that the participant fails to comply with any term, requirement, or condition for payment or assistance arising under ELAP, LFP, LIP, SURE, or TAP and if any refund of a payment to FSA will otherwise become due in connection with this part, the participant must refund to FSA all payments made in regard to such matter, together with interest and late-payment charges as provided for in part 792 of this chapter provided that interest will in all cases run from the date of the original disbursement.


(b) All persons with a financial interest in an operation or in an application for payment will be jointly and severally liable for any refund, including related charges, that is determined to be due FSA for any reason under this part.


§ 760.114 Minors.

A minor child is eligible to apply for program benefits under ELAP, LFP, LIP, SURE, or TAP if all the eligibility requirements are met and the provision for minor children in part 1400 of this title are met.


§ 760.115 Deceased individuals or dissolved entities.

(a) Payments may be made for eligible losses suffered by an eligible participant who is now a deceased individual or is a dissolved entity if a representative, who currently has authority to enter into a contract, on behalf of the participant, signs the application for payment.


(b) Legal documents showing proof of authority to sign for the deceased individual or dissolved entity must be provided.


(c) If a participant is now a dissolved general partnership or joint venture, all members of the general partnership or joint venture at the time of dissolution or their duly authorized representatives must sign the application for payment.


§ 760.116 Miscellaneous.

(a) As a condition to receive benefits under ELAP, LFP, LIP, SURE, or TAP, a participant must have been in compliance with the provisions of parts 12 and 718 of this title, and must not otherwise be precluded from receiving benefits under those provisions or under any law.


(b) Rules of the Commodity Credit Corporation that are cited in this part will be applied to this subpart in the same manner as if the programs covered in this subpart were programs funded by the Commodity Credit Corporation.


Subpart C – Emergency Assistance for Livestock, Honeybees, and Farm-Raised Fish Program


Source:74 FR 46673, Sept. 11, 2009, unless otherwise noted.

§ 760.201 Applicability.

(a) This subpart establishes the terms and conditions under which the Emergency Assistance for Livestock, Honeybees, and Farm-Raised Fish Program (ELAP) will be administered.


(b) Eligible producers of livestock, honeybees, and farm-raised fish will be compensated to reduce eligible losses that occurred in the calendar year for which the producer requests benefits. The eligible loss must have been a direct result of eligible adverse weather or eligible loss conditions as determined by the Deputy Administrator, including, but not limited to, blizzards, wildfires, disease, and insect infestation. ELAP does not cover losses that are covered under LFP, LIP, or SURE.


§ 760.202 Definitions.

The following definitions apply to this subpart and to the administration of ELAP. The definitions in parts 718 and 1400 of this title also apply, except where they conflict with the definitions in this section.


Adult beef bull means a male beef breed bovine animal that was used for breeding purposes that was at least 2 years old before the beginning date of the eligible adverse weather or eligible loss condition.


Adult beef cow means a female beef breed bovine animal that had delivered one or more offspring before the beginning date of the eligible adverse weather or eligible loss condition. A first-time bred beef heifer is also considered an adult beef cow if it was pregnant on or by the beginning date of the eligible adverse weather or eligible loss condition.


Adult buffalo and beefalo bull means a male animal of those breeds that was used for breeding purposes and was at least 2 years old before the beginning date of the eligible adverse weather or eligible loss condition.


Adult buffalo and beefalo cow means a female animal of those breeds that had delivered one or more offspring before the beginning date of the eligible adverse weather or eligible loss condition. A first-time bred buffalo or beefalo heifer is also considered an adult buffalo or beefalo cow if it was pregnant by the beginning date of the eligible adverse weather or eligible loss condition.


Adult dairy bull means a male dairy breed bovine animal that was used primarily for breeding dairy cows and was at least 2 years old by the beginning date of the eligible adverse weather or eligible loss condition.


Adult dairy cow means a female bovine dairy breed animal used for the purpose of providing milk for human consumption that had delivered one or more offspring by the beginning date of the eligible adverse weather or eligible loss condition. A first-time bred dairy heifer is also considered an adult dairy cow if it was pregnant by the beginning date of the eligible adverse weather or eligible loss condition.


Agricultural operation means a farming operation.


Application means FSA form used to apply for either the emergency loss assistance for livestock or emergency loss assistance for farm-raised fish or honeybees.


Aquatic species means any species of aquatic organism grown as food for human consumption, fish raised as feed for fish that are consumed by humans, or ornamental fish propagated and reared in an aquatic medium by a commercial operator on private property in water in a controlled environment. Catfish and crawfish are both defined as aquatic species for ELAP. However, aquatic species do not include reptiles or amphibians.


Bait fish means small fish caught for use as bait to attract large predatory fish. For ELAP, it also must meet the definition of aquatic species and not be raised as food for fish; provided, however, that only bait fish produced in a controlled environment can generate claims under ELAP.


Buck means a male goat.


Commercial use means used in the operation of a business activity engaged in as a means of livelihood for profit by the eligible producer.


Contract means, with respect to contracts for the handling of livestock, a written agreement between a livestock owner and another individual or entity setting the specific terms, conditions, and obligations of the parties involved regarding the production of livestock or livestock products.


Controlled environment means an environment in which everything that can practicably be controlled by the participant with structures, facilities, and growing media (including, but not limited to, water and nutrients) was in fact controlled by the participant at the time of the eligible adverse weather or eligible loss condition.


County committee or county office means the respective FSA committee or office.


Deputy Administrator or DAFP means the Deputy Administrator for Farm Programs, Farm Service Agency, U.S. Department of Agriculture or the designee.


Eligible adverse weather or eligible loss condition means any disease, adverse weather, or other loss condition as determined by the Deputy Administrator. The eligible adverse weather or eligible loss condition would have resulted in agricultural losses not covered by other programs in this part for which the Deputy Administrator determines financial assistance needs to be provided to producers. The disease, adverse weather, or other conditions may include, but are not limited to, blizzards, wildfires, water shortages, and other factors. Specific eligible adverse weather and eligible loss conditions may vary based on the type of loss. Identification of eligible adverse weather and eligible loss conditions will include locations (National, State, or county-level) and start and end dates.


Equine animal means a domesticated horse, mule, or donkey.


Ewe means a female sheep.


Farming operation means a business enterprise engaged in producing agricultural products.


Farm-raised fish means any aquatic species that is propagated and reared in a controlled environment.


FSA means the Farm Service Agency.


Game or sport fish means fish pursued for sport by recreational anglers; provided, however, that only game or sport fish produced in a controlled environment can generate claims under ELAP.


Goat means a domesticated, ruminant mammal of the genus Capra, including Angora goats. Goats are further delineated into categories by sex (bucks and nannies) and age (kids).


Kid means a goat less than 1 year old.


Lamb means a sheep less than 1 year old.


Livestock owner, for death loss purposes, means one having legal ownership of the livestock for which benefits are being requested on the day such livestock died due to an eligible adverse weather or eligible loss condition. For all other purposes of loss under ELAP, “livestock owner” means one having legal ownership of the livestock for which benefits are being requested during the 60 days prior to the beginning date of the eligible adverse weather or eligible loss condition.


Nanny means a female goat.


Non-adult beef cattle means a beef breed bovine animal that does not meet the definition of adult beef cow or bull. Non-adult beef cattle are further delineated by weight categories of either less than 400 pounds or 400 pounds or more at the time they died. For a loss other than death, means a bovine animal less than 2 years old that that weighed 500 pounds or more on or before the beginning date of the eligible adverse weather or eligible loss condition.


Non-adult buffalo or beefalo means an animal of those breeds that does not meet the definition of adult buffalo or beefalo cow or bull. Non-adult buffalo or beefalo are further delineated by weight categories of either less than 400 pounds or 400 pounds or more at the time of death. For a loss other than death, means an animal of those breeds that is less than 2 years old that weighed 500 pounds or more on or before the beginning date of the eligible adverse weather or eligible loss condition.


Non-adult dairy cattle means a bovine dairy breed animal used for the purpose of providing milk for human consumption that does not meet the definition of adult dairy cow or bull. Non-adult dairy cattle are further delineated by weight categories of either less than 400 pounds or 400 pounds or more at the time they died. For a loss other than death, means a bovine dairy breed animal used for the purpose of providing milk for human consumption that is less than 2 years old that weighed 500 pounds or more on or before the beginning date of the eligible adverse weather or eligible loss condition.


Normal grazing period, with respect to a county, means the normal grazing period during the calendar year with respect to each specific type of grazing land or pastureland in the county.


Normal mortality means the numerical amount, computed by a percentage, as established for the area by the FSA State Committee, of expected livestock deaths, by category, that normally occur during a calendar year for a producer.


Poultry means domesticated chickens, turkeys, ducks, and geese. Poultry are further delineated into categories by sex, age, and purpose of production as determined by FSA.


Ram means a male sheep.


Secretary means the Secretary of Agriculture or a designee of the Secretary.


Sheep means a domesticated, ruminant mammal of the genus Ovis. Sheep are further defined by sex (rams and ewes) and age (lambs) for purposes of dividing into categories for loss calculations.


State committee, State office, county committee, or county office means the respective FSA committee or office.


Swine means a domesticated omnivorous pig, hog, or boar. Swine for purposes of dividing into categories for loss calculations are further delineated into categories by sex and weight as determined by FSA.


United States means all 50 States of the United States, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands of the United States, Guam, and the District of Columbia.


§ 760.203 Eligible losses, adverse weather, and other loss conditions.

(a) An eligible loss covered under this subpart is a loss that an eligible producer or contract grower of livestock, honeybees, or farm-raised fish incurs due to an eligible adverse weather or eligible loss condition, as determined by the Deputy Administrator, (including, but not limited to, blizzards and wildfires).


(b) A loss covered under LFP, LIP, or SURE is not eligible for ELAP.


(c) To be eligible, the loss must have occurred:


(1) During the calendar year for which payment is being requested and


(2) Due to an eligible adverse weather event or loss condition that occurred on or after January 1, 2008, and before October 1, 2011.


(d) For a livestock feed loss to be considered an eligible loss, the livestock feed loss must be one of the following:


(1) Loss of purchased forage or feedstuffs that was intended for use as feed for the participant’s eligible livestock that was physically located in the county where the eligible adverse weather or eligible loss condition occurred on the beginning date of the eligible adverse weather or eligible loss condition. The loss must be due to an eligible adverse weather or eligible loss condition, as determined by the Deputy Administrator, including, but not limited to, blizzard, flood, hurricane, tidal surge, tornado, volcanic eruption, wildfire on non-Federal land, or lightning;


(2) Loss of mechanically harvested forage or feedstuffs intended for use as feed for the participant’s eligible livestock that was physically located in the county where the eligible adverse weather or eligible loss condition occurred on the beginning date of the eligible adverse weather or eligible loss condition. The loss must have occurred after harvest due to an eligible adverse weather or eligible loss condition, as determined by the Deputy Administrator, including, but not limited to, blizzard, flood, hurricane, tidal surge, tornado, volcanic eruption, wildfire on non-Federal land, or lightning;


(3) A loss resulting from the additional cost incurred for providing or transporting livestock feed to eligible livestock due to an eligible adverse weather or eligible loss condition as determined by the Deputy Administrator, including, but not limited to, costs associated with equipment rental fees for hay lifts and snow removal. The additional costs incurred must have been incurred for losses suffered in the county where the eligible adverse weather or eligible loss condition occurred;


(4) A loss resulting from the additional cost of purchasing additional livestock feed, above normal quantities, required to maintain the eligible livestock during an eligible adverse weather or eligible loss condition, until additional livestock feed becomes available, as determined by the Deputy Administrator. To be eligible, the additional feed purchased above normal quantities must be feed that is fed to maintain livestock in the county where the eligible adverse weather or eligible loss condition occurred.


(e) For a grazing loss to be considered eligible, the grazing loss must have been incurred on eligible grazing lands physically located in the county where the eligible adverse weather or eligible loss condition occurred. The grazing loss must be due to an eligible adverse weather or eligible loss condition, as determined by the Deputy Administrator, including, but not limited to, flood, freeze, hurricane, hail, tidal surge, volcanic eruption, and wildfire on non-Federal land. The grazing loss will not be eligible if it is due to an adverse weather condition covered by LFP as specified in subpart D, such as drought or wildfire on federally managed land where the producer is prohibited by the Federal agency from grazing the normally permitted livestock on the managed rangeland due to a fire.


(f) For a loss due to livestock death to be considered eligible, the livestock death must have occurred in the county where the eligible loss condition occurred. The livestock death must be due to an eligible loss condition determined as eligible by the Deputy Administrator and not related to an eligible adverse weather event as specified in Subpart E for LIP.


(g) For honeybee or farm-raised fish feed losses to be considered eligible, the honeybee or farm-raised fish feed producer must have incurred the loss in the county where the eligible adverse weather or eligible loss condition occurred. The honeybee or farm-raised fish feed losses must be for feed that was intended as feed for the honeybees or farm-raised fish that was damaged or destroyed due to an eligible adverse weather or eligible loss condition, as determined by the Deputy Administrator, including, but not limited to, earthquake, excessive wind, flood, hurricane, tidal surge, tornado, volcanic eruption, and wildfire.


(h) For honeybee colony or honeybee hive losses to be considered eligible, the honeybee colony or honeybee hive producer must have incurred the loss in the county where the eligible adverse weather or eligible loss condition occurred. The honeybee colony or honeybee hive losses must be due to an eligible adverse weather or eligible loss condition, as determined by the Deputy Administrator, including, but not limited to, earthquake, excessive wind, flood, hurricane, tornado, volcanic eruption, and wildfire. To be eligible for a loss of honeybees due to colony collapse disorder, the eligible honeybee producer must provide acceptable documentation to support that the loss was due to colony collapse disorder. Except for 2008 and 2009 honeybee losses, acceptable documentation must include an acceptable colony collapse disorder certification by an independent third party as determined by the Deputy Administrator, plus any other documentation requested by FSA. For 2008 and 2009 honeybee losses such an independent certification is not required in all cases, but rather a self-certification by the honeybee producer as determined acceptable by the Deputy Administrator may be allowed in addition to whatever other documentation might be requested.


(i) For a death loss for bait fish or game fish to be considered eligible, the producer must have incurred the loss in the county where the eligible adverse weather or eligible loss condition occurred. The bait fish or game fish death must be due to an eligible adverse weather or eligible loss condition as determined by the Deputy Administrator including, but not limited to, an earthquake, flood, hurricane, tidal surge, tornado, and volcanic eruption.


[74 FR 46673, Sept. 11, 2009, as amended at 75 FR 19188, Apr. 14, 2010; 76 FR 54075, Aug. 31, 2010]


§ 760.204 Eligible livestock, honeybees, and farm-raised fish.

(a) To be considered eligible livestock for livestock feed losses and grazing losses, livestock must meet all the following conditions:


(1) Be alpacas, adult or non-adult dairy cattle, adult or non-adult beef cattle, adult or non-adult buffalo, adult or non-adult beefalo, deer, elk, emus, equine, goats, llamas, poultry, reindeer, sheep, or swine;


(2) Be livestock that would normally have been grazing the eligible grazing land or pastureland during the normal grazing period for the specific type of grazing land or pastureland for the county;


(3) Be livestock that is owned, cash-leased, purchased, under contract for purchase, or been raised by a contract grower or an eligible livestock producer, during the 60 days prior to the beginning date of the eligible adverse weather or eligible loss condition;


(4) Be livestock that has been maintained for commercial use as part of the producer’s farming operation on the beginning date of the eligible adverse weather or eligible loss condition;


(5) Be livestock that has not been produced and maintained for reasons other than commercial use as part of a farming operation; and


(6) Be livestock that was not in a feedlot, on the beginning date of the eligible adverse weather or eligible loss condition, as a part of the normal business operation of the producer, as determined by the Deputy Administrator.


(b) The eligible livestock types for feed losses and grazing losses are:


(1) Adult beef cows or bulls,


(2) Adult buffalo or beefalo cows or bulls,


(3) Adult dairy cows or bulls,


(4) Alpacas,


(5) Deer,


(6) Elk,


(7) Emus,


(8) Equine,


(9) Goats,


(10) Llamas,


(11) Non-adult beef cattle,


(12) Non-adult buffalo or beefalo,


(13) Non-adult dairy cattle,


(14) Poultry,


(15) Reindeer,


(16) Sheep, and


(17) Swine;


(c) Ineligible livestock for feed losses and grazing losses include, but are not limited to:


(1) Livestock that were or would have been in a feedlot, on the beginning date of the eligible adverse weather or eligible loss condition, as a part of the normal business operation of the producer, as determined by FSA;


(2) Yaks;


(3) Ostriches;


(4) All beef and dairy cattle, and buffalo and beefalo that weighed less than 500 pounds on the beginning date of the eligible adverse weather or eligible loss condition;


(5) Any wild free roaming livestock, including horses and deer;


(6) Livestock produced or maintained for reasons other than commercial use as part of a farming operation, including, but not limited to, livestock produced or maintained exclusively for recreational purposes, such as:


(i) Roping,


(ii) Hunting,


(iii) Show,


(iv) Pleasure,


(v) Use as pets, or


(vi) Consumption by owner.


(d) For death losses for livestock owners to be eligible, the livestock must meet all of the following conditions:


(1) Be alpacas, adult or non-adult dairy cattle, beef cattle, beefalo, buffalo, deer, elk, emus, equine, goats, llamas, poultry, reindeer, sheep, or swine, and meet all the conditions in paragraph (f) of this section.


(2) Be one of the following categories of animals for which calculations of eligibility for payments will be calculated separately for each producer with respect to each category:


(i) Adult beef bulls;


(ii) Adult beef cows;


(iii) Adult buffalo or beefalo bulls;


(iv) Adult buffalo or beefalo cows;


(v) Adult dairy bulls;


(vi) Adult dairy cows;


(vii) Alpacas;


(viii) Chickens, broilers, pullets;


(ix) Chickens, chicks;


(x) Chickens, layers, roasters;


(xi) Deer;


(xii) Ducks;


(xiii) Ducks, ducklings;


(xiv) Elk;


(xv) Emus;


(xvi) Equine;


(xvii) Geese, goose;


(xviii) Geese, gosling;


(xix) Goats, bucks;


(xx) Goats, nannies;


(xxi) Goats, kids;


(xxii) Llamas;


(xxiii) Non-adult beef cattle;


(xxiv) Non-adult buffalo or beefalo;


(xxv) Non-adult dairy cattle;


(xxvi) Reindeer;


(xxvii) Sheep, ewes;


(xxviii) Sheep, lambs;


(xxix) Sheep, rams;


(xxx) Swine, feeder pigs under 50 pounds;


(xxxi) Swine, sows, boars, barrows, gilts 50 to 150 pounds;


(xxxii) Swine, sows, boars, barrows, gilts over 150 pounds;


(xxxiii) Turkeys, poults; and


(xxxiv) Turkeys, toms, fryers, and roasters.


(e) Under ELAP, “contract growers” will only be deemed to include producers of livestock, other than feedlots, whose income is dependent on the actual weight gain and survival of the livestock. For death losses for contract growers to be eligible, the livestock must meet all of the following conditions:


(1) Be poultry or swine, as defined in § 760.202, and meet all the conditions in paragraph (f) of this section.


(2) Be one of the following categories of animals for which calculations of eligibility for payments will be calculated separately for each contract grower with respect to each category:


(i) Chickens, broilers, pullets;


(ii) Chickens, layers, roasters;


(iii) Geese, goose;


(iv) Swine, boars, sows;


(v) Swine, feeder pigs;


(vi) Swine, lightweight barrows, gilts;


(vii) Swine, sows, boars, barrows, gilts; and


(viii) Turkeys, toms, fryers, and roasters.


(f) For livestock death losses to be considered eligible livestock for the purpose of generating payments under this subpart, livestock must meet all of the following conditions:


(1) They must have died:


(i) On or after the beginning date of the eligible loss condition; and


(ii) On or after January 1, 2008, and no later than 60 calendar days from the ending date of the eligible loss condition, but before November 30, 2011; and


(iii) As a direct result of an eligible loss condition that occurs on or after January 1, 2008, and before October 1, 2011; and


(iv) In the calendar year for which payment is being requested; and


(2) Been maintained for commercial use as part of a farming operation on the day the livestock died; and


(3) Before dying, not have been produced or maintained for reasons other than commercial use as part of a farming operation, such non-eligible uses being understood to include, but not be limited to, any uses of wild free roaming animals or use of the animals for recreational purposes, such as pleasure, hunting, roping, pets, or for show.


(g) For honeybee losses to be eligible, the honeybee colony must meet the following conditions:


(1) Been maintained for the purpose of producing honey or pollination for commercial use in a farming operation on the beginning date of the eligible adverse weather or eligible loss condition;


(2) Been physically located in the county where the eligible adverse weather or eligible loss condition occurred on the beginning date of the eligible adverse weather or eligible loss condition;


(3) Been a honeybee colony in which the participant has a risk in the honey production or pollination farming operation on the beginning date of the eligible adverse weather or eligible loss condition;


(4) Been a honeybee colony for which the producer had an eligible loss of a honeybee colony, honeybee hive, or honeybee feed; the feed must have been intended as feed for honeybees.


(h) For fish to be eligible to generate payments under ELAP, the fish must be produced in a controlled environment so to be considered “farm raised fish” as defined in this subpart, and the farm-raised fish must:


(1) For feed losses:


(i) Be an aquatic species that is propagated and reared in a controlled environment;


(ii) Be maintained and harvested for commercial use as part of a farming operation; and


(iii) Be physically located in the county where the eligible adverse weather or eligible loss condition occurred on the beginning date of the eligible adverse weather or eligible loss condition.


(2) For death losses:


(i) Be bait fish or game fish that are propagated and reared in a controlled environment;


(ii) Been maintained for commercial use as part of a farming operation; and


(iii) Been physically located in the county where the eligible loss adverse weather or eligible loss condition occurred on the beginning date of the eligible adverse weather or eligible loss condition.


[74 FR 46673, Sept. 11, 2009, as amended at 76 FR 54075, Aug. 31, 2011]


§ 760.205 Eligible producers, owners, and contract growers.

(a) To be considered an eligible livestock producer for livestock feed losses and to receive payments, the participant must have owned, cash-leased, purchased, entered into a contract to purchase, or been a contract grower of eligible livestock during the 60 days prior to the beginning date of the eligible adverse weather or eligible loss condition and must have had a loss that is determined to be eligible as specified in § 760.203(d), and the producer’s eligible livestock must have been livestock that would normally have been grazing the eligible grazing land or pastureland during the normal grazing period for the specific type of grazing land or pastureland for the county as specified in paragraph (b)(1)(i) or (ii) of this section.


(b) To be considered an eligible livestock producer for grazing losses and to receive payments, the participant must have:


(1) Owned, cash-leased, purchased, entered into a contract to purchase, or been a contract grower of eligible livestock during the 60 days prior to the beginning date of the eligible adverse weather or eligible loss condition, must have had a loss that is determined to be eligible as specified in § 760.203(e), and the loss must have occurred on land that is:


(i) Native or improved pastureland with permanent vegetative cover or


(ii) Planted to a crop planted specifically for the purpose of providing grazing for covered livestock;


(2) Have had eligible livestock that would normally have been grazing the eligible grazing land or pastureland during the normal grazing period for the specific type of grazing land or pastureland for the county as specified in paragraph (b)(1)(i) or (ii) of this section;


(3) Provided for the eligible livestock pastureland or grazing land, including cash leased pastureland or grazing land for covered livestock that is physically located in the county where the eligible adverse weather or loss condition occurred during the normal grazing period for the county.


(c) For livestock death losses to be eligible the producer must have had a loss that is determined to be eligible as specified in § 760.203(f) and in addition to other eligibility rules that may apply to be eligible as a:


(1) Livestock owner for the payment with respect to the death of an animal under this subpart, the applicant must have had legal ownership of the livestock on the day the livestock died and under conditions in which no contract grower could have been eligible for ELAP payment with respect to the animal. Eligible types of animal categories for which losses can be calculated for an owner are specified in § 760.204(d).


(2) Contract grower for ELAP payment with respect to the death of an animal, the animal must be in one of the categories specified in § 760.204(e), and the contract grower must have had:


(i) A written agreement with the owner of eligible livestock setting the specific terms, conditions, and obligations of the parties involved regarding the production of livestock;


(ii) Control of the eligible livestock on the day the livestock died; and


(iii) A risk of loss in the animal.


(d) To be considered an eligible honeybee producer, a participant must have an interest and risk in an eligible honeybee colony, as specified in § 760.204(g), for the purpose of producing honey or pollination for commercial use as part of a farming operation and must have had a loss that is determined to be eligible as specified in § 760.203(g) or (h).


(e) To be considered an eligible farm-raised fish producer for feed loss purposes, the participant must have produced eligible farm-raised fish, as specified in § 760.204(h)(1), with the intent to harvest for commercial use as part of a farming operation and must have had a loss that is determined to be eligible as specified in § 760.203(g);


(f) A producer seeking payments must not be ineligible under the restrictions applicable to foreign persons contained in § 760.103(b) and must meet all other requirements of subpart B and other applicable USDA regulations.


§ 760.206 Notice of loss and application process.

(a) To apply for ELAP, the participant that suffered eligible livestock, honeybee, or farm-raised fish losses must submit, to the FSA administrative county office that maintains the participant’s farm records for the agricultural operation, the following:


(1) A notice of loss to FSA as specified in § 760.207(a),


(2) A completed application as specified in § 760.207(b) for one or both of the following:


(i) For livestock feed, grazing and death losses, the participant must submit a completed Emergency Loss Assistance for Livestock Application;


(ii) For honeybee feed, honeybee colony, honeybee hive, or farm-raised fish feed or death losses, the participant must submit a completed Emergency Loss Assistance for Farm-Raised Fish or Honeybees Application;


(3) A report of acreage;


(4) A copy of the participant’s grower contract, if the participant is a contract grower; and


(5) Other supporting documents required for FSA to determine eligibility of the participant, livestock, and loss.


(b) For livestock, honeybee, or farm-raised fish feed losses, participant must provide verifiable documentation of:


(1) Purchased feed intended as feed for livestock, honeybees, or farm-raised fish that was lost, or additional feed purchased above normal quantities to sustain livestock, honeybees, and farm-raised fish for a short period of time until additional feed becomes available, due to an eligible adverse weather or eligible loss condition. To be considered acceptable documentation, the participant must provide original feed receipts and each feed receipt must include the date of feed purchase, name, address, and telephone number of feed vendor, type and quantity of feed purchased, cost of feed purchased, and signature of feed vendor if the vendor does not have a license to conduct this type of transaction.


(2) Harvested feed intended as feed for livestock, honeybees, or farm-raised fish that was lost due to an eligible adverse weather or eligible loss condition. Documentation may include, but is not limited to, weight tickets, truck scale tickets, contemporaneous diaries used to verify that the crop was stored with the intent to feed the crop to livestock, honeybees, or farm-raised fish, and custom harvest documents that clearly identify the amount of feed produced from the applicable acreage. Documentation must clearly identify the acreage from which the feed was produced.


(c) For eligible honeybee colony and honeybee hive losses and eligible farm-raised fish losses, the participant must also provide documentation of inventory on the beginning date of the eligible adverse weather or loss condition and the ending inventory. Documentation may include, but is not limited to, any combination of the following:


(1) A report of acreage,


(2) Loan records,


(3) Private insurance documents,


(4) Property tax records,


(5) Sales and purchase receipts,


(6) State colony registration documentation, and


(7) Chattel inspections.


(d) For the loss of honeybee colonies due to colony collapse disorder, the participant must also provide acceptable documentation or certification that the loss of the honeybee colony was due to colony collapse disorder. Except for 2008 and 2009 honeybee colony losses, acceptable documentation must include an independent third party certification determined acceptable by the Deputy Administrator, plus such additional information and documentation as may be requested. For 2008 and 2009 honeybee colony losses a self-certification may be accepted by FSA together with any additional information demanded by FSA as determined appropriate by the Deputy Administrator.


(e) For livestock death losses, the participant must provide evidence of loss, current physical location of livestock in inventory, and physical location of claimed livestock at the time of death. The participant must provide:


(1) Documentation listing the quantity and kind of livestock that died as a direct result of the eligible loss condition during the calendar year for which payment is being requested, which must include: Purchase records, veterinarian records, bank or other loan papers, rendering truck receipts, Federal Emergency Management Agency records, National Guard records, written contracts, production records, Internal Revenue Service records, property tax records, private insurance documents, or other similar verifiable documents as determined by FSA.


(2) Adequate proof that the death of the eligible livestock occurred as a direct result of an eligible loss condition in the calendar year for which payment is requested.


(3) If adequate verifiable proof of death documentation is not available, the participant must provide reliable records, in conjunction with verifiable beginning and ending inventory records, as proof of death. Reliable records may include: Contemporaneous producer records, dairy herd improvement records, brand inspection records, vaccination records, pictures, and other similar reliable documents, as determined by FSA.


(4) Certification of livestock deaths by third parties will be acceptable for eligibility determination only if verifiable proof of death records or reliable proof of death records in conjunction with verifiable beginning and ending inventory records are not available and both of the following conditions are met:


(i) The livestock owner or livestock contract grower, as applicable, certifies in writing:


(A) That there is no other verifiable or reliable documentation of death available;


(B) The number of livestock, by category as determined by FSA, was in inventory at the time the applicable loss condition occurred;


(C) The physical location of the livestock, by category, in inventory when the deaths occurred; and


(D) Any other details required for FSA to determine the certification acceptable; and


(ii) The third party is an independent source who is not affiliated with the farming operation such as a hired hand and is not a “family member,” defined as a person to whom a member in the farming operation or their spouse is related as a lineal ancestor, lineal descendant, sibling, spouse, or otherwise by marriage, and provides their telephone number, address, and a written statement containing specific details about:


(A) Their knowledge of the livestock deaths;


(B) Their affiliation with the livestock owner;


(C) The accuracy of the deaths claimed by the livestock owner or contract grower including, but not limited to, the number and kind or type of the participant’s livestock that died because of the eligible loss condition; and


(D) Any other information required for FSA to determine the certification acceptable.


(f) FSA will use the data furnished by the participant and the third party to determine eligibility for program payment. Furnishing the data is voluntary; however, without all required data program, payment will not be approved or provided.


[74 FR 46673, Sept. 11, 2009, as amended at 75 FR 19188, Apr. 14, 2010]


§ 760.207 Notice of loss and application period.

(a) In addition to submitting an application for payment at the appropriate time, the participant that suffered eligible livestock, honeybee, or farm-raised fish losses that create or could create a claim for benefits must:


(1) For losses during calendar year 2008 and in calendar year 2009 prior to September 11, 2009, provide a notice of loss to FSA no later than December 10, 2009;


(2) For losses on or after September 11, 2009, the participant must provide a notice of loss to FSA within the earlier of:


(i) 30 calendar days of when the loss is apparent to the participant or


(ii) 30 calendar days after the end of the calendar year in which the loss occurred.


(3) The participant must submit the notice of loss required in paragraphs (a)(1) and (a)(2) of this section to the administrative FSA county office


(b) In addition to the notices of loss required in paragraph (a) of this section, a participant must also submit a completed application for payment no later than:


(1) 30 calendar days after the end of the calendar year in which the loss occurred or


(2) December 10, 2009 for losses that occurred during 2008.


§ 760.208 Availability of funds.

By law, “up to” $50 million per year for the years in question may be approved for use by the Secretary and accordingly, within that cap, the only funds that will be considered available to pay claims will be that amount approved by the Secretary. Nothing in these regulations will limit the ability of the Secretary to restrict the availability of funds for the program as permitted by the relevant legislation. Payments will not be made for claims arising out of a particular year until, for all claims for that year, the time for applying for a payment has passed. In the event that, within the limits of the funding made available by the Secretary within the statutory cap, approval of eligible applications would result in expenditures in excess of the amount available, FSA will prorate the available funds by a national factor to reduce the total expected payments to the amount made available by the Secretary. FSA will make payments based on the factor for the national rate determined by FSA. FSA will prorate the payments in such manner as it determines appropriate and reasonable. Claims that are unpaid or prorated for a calendar year for any reason will not be carried forward for payment under other funds for later years or otherwise, but will be considered, as to any unpaid amount, void and nonpayable.


§ 760.209 Livestock payment calculations.

(a) Payments for an eligible livestock producer will be calculated based on losses for no more than 90 days during the calendar year. Payment calculations for feed losses will be based on 60 percent of the producer’s actual cost for:


(1) Livestock feed that was purchased forage or feedstuffs intended for use as feed for the participant’s eligible livestock that was physically damaged or destroyed due to the direct result of an eligible adverse weather or eligible loss condition, as provided in § 760.203(d)(1);


(2) Livestock feed that was mechanically harvested forage or feedstuffs intended for use as feed for the participant’s eligible livestock that was physically damaged or destroyed after harvest due to the direct result of an eligible adverse weather or eligible loss condition, as provided in § 760.203(d)(2);


(3) The additional cost incurred for providing or transporting livestock feed to eligible livestock due to an eligible adverse weather or eligible loss condition, as provided in § 760.203(d)(3); or


(4) The additional cost of purchasing additional livestock feed above normal, to maintain the eligible livestock during an eligible adverse weather or eligible loss condition until additional livestock feed becomes available, as provided in § 760.203(d)(4).


(b) Payments for an eligible livestock producer for grazing losses, except for losses due to wildfires on non-Federal land, will be calculated based on 60 percent of the lesser of:


(1) The total value of the feed cost for all covered livestock owned by the eligible livestock producer based on the number of days grazing was lost, not to exceed 90 days of daily feed cost for all covered livestock, or


(2) The total value of grazing lost for all eligible livestock based on the normal carrying capacity, as determined by the Secretary, of the eligible grazing land of the eligible livestock producer for the number of grazing days lost, not to exceed 90 days of lost grazing.


(c) The total value of feed cost to be used in the calculation for paragraph (b)(1) of this section is based on the number of days grazing was lost and equals the product obtained by multiplying:


(1) A payment quantity equal to the feed grain equivalent, as determined in paragraph (d) of this section;


(2) A payment rate equal to the corn price per pound, as determined in paragraph (e) of this section;


(3) The number of all covered livestock owned by the eligible producer converted to an animal unit basis;


(4) The number of days grazing was lost, not to exceed 90 calendar days during the normal grazing period for the specific type of grazing land; and


(5) The producer’s ownership share in the livestock.


(d) The feed grain equivalent to be used in the calculation for paragraph (c)(1) of this section equals, in the case of:


(1) An adult beef cow, 15.7 pounds of corn per day or


(2) Any other type or weight of livestock, an amount determined by the Secretary that represents the average number of pounds of corn per day necessary to feed that specific type of livestock.


(e) The corn price per pound to be used in the calculation for paragraph (c)(2) of this section equals the quotient obtained by dividing:


(1) The higher of:


(i) The national average corn price per bushel of corn for the 12-month period immediately preceding March 1 of the calendar year for which payments are calculated; or


(ii) The national average corn price per bushel of corn for the 24-month period immediately preceding March 1 of the calendar year for which payments are calculated; by


(2) 56.


(f) The total value of grazing lost to be used in the calculation for paragraph (b)(2) of this section equals the product obtained by multiplying:


(1) A payment quantity equal to the feed grain equivalent of 15.7 pounds of corn per day;


(2) A payment rate equal to the corn price per pound, as determined in paragraph (e) of this section;


(3) The number of animal units the eligible livestock producer’s grazing land or pastureland can sustain during the normal grazing period in the county for the specific type of grazing land or pastureland, in the absence of an eligible adverse weather or eligible loss condition, determined by dividing the:


(i) Number of eligible grazing land or pastureland acres of the specific type of grazing land or pastureland by


(ii) The normal carrying capacity of the specific type of eligible grazing land or pastureland; and


(4) The number of days grazing was lost, not to exceed 90 calendar days during the normal grazing period for the specific type of grazing land.


(g) Payments for an eligible livestock producer for grazing losses due to a wildfire on non-Federal land will be calculated by multiplying:


(1) The result of dividing:


(i) The number of acres of grazing land or pastureland acres affected by the fire by


(ii) The normal carrying capacity of the specific type of eligible grazing land or pastureland; times


(2) The daily value of grazing as calculated by FSA under this section; times


(3) The number of days grazing was lost due to fire, not to exceed 180 calendar days; times


(4) 50 percent.


(h) Payments for an eligible livestock producer for eligible livestock death losses due to an eligible loss condition will be based on the following:


(1) Payments will be calculated by multiplying:


(i) The national payment rate for each livestock category times


(ii) The number of eligible livestock that died in each category as a result of an eligible loss condition in excess of normal mortality, as determined in paragraph (d)(2) of this section;


(2) Normal mortality for each livestock category as determined by FSA on a statewide basis using local data sources including, but not limited to, State livestock organizations and the Cooperative Extension Service for the State.


(3) National payment rates to be used in the calculation for paragraph (b)(1) of this section for eligible livestock owners and eligible livestock contract growers are:


(i) A national payment rate for eligible livestock owners that is based on 75 percent of the average fair market value of the applicable livestock as computed using nationwide prices for the previous calendar year unless some other price is approved by the Deputy Administrator.


(ii) A national payment rate for eligible livestock contract growers that is based on 75 percent of the relevant average income loss sustained by the contract grower, with respect to the dead livestock.


(i) Payments calculated in this section are subject to the adjustments and limits provided for in this part.


§ 760.210 Honeybee payment calculations.

(a) An eligible honeybee producer may receive payments for honeybee feed losses due to an eligible adverse weather or loss condition, as provided in § 760.203(g), based on 60 percent of the producer’s actual cost for honeybee feed that was:


(1) Damaged or destroyed due to an eligible adverse weather or eligible loss condition and


(2) Intended as feed for an eligible honeybee colony, as provided in § 760.204(g);


(b) An eligible honeybee producer may receive payments for honeybee colony losses due to an eligible adverse weather or eligible loss condition, as provided in § 760.203(h), based on 60 percent of the average fair market value for the number of honeybee colonies that were damaged or destroyed due to an eligible adverse weather or eligible loss condition, as computed using nationwide prices unless some other price data is approved for use by the Deputy Administrator, for losses in excess of normal honeybee mortality, as determined by the Deputy Administrator.


(c) An eligible honeybee producer may receive payments for honeybee hive losses due to an eligible adverse weather or eligible loss condition, as provided in § 760.203(h), based on 60 percent of the average fair market value for the number of honeybee hives that were damaged or destroyed due to an eligible adverse weather or eligible loss condition, as computed using nationwide prices unless some other price data is approved for use by the Deputy Administrator.


(d) Payments calculated in this section are subject to the adjustments and limits provided for in this part.


[74 FR 46673, Sept. 11, 2009, as amended at 75 FR 19188, Apr. 14, 2010]


§ 760.211 Farm-raised fish payment calculations.

(a) An eligible farm-raised fish producer may receive payments for fish feed losses due to an eligible adverse weather or eligible loss condition, as provided in § 760.203(g), based on 60 percent of the producer’s actual replacement cost for the fish feed that was:


(1) Damaged or destroyed due to an eligible adverse weather or eligible loss condition and


(2) Intended as feed for the eligible farm-raised fish, as provided in § 760.204(h)(1).


(b) An eligible producer of farm-raised game or sport fish may receive payments for death losses of farm-raised fish due to an eligible adverse weather or eligible loss condition, as provided in § 760.203(i), based on 60 percent of the average fair market value of the game fish or sport fish that died as a direct result of an eligible adverse weather or eligible loss condition, as computed using nationwide prices unless some other price data is approved for use by the Deputy Administrator.


(c) Payments calculated in this section or elsewhere with respect to ELAP are subject to the adjustments and limits provided for in this part and are also subject to the payment limitations and average adjusted gross income limitations that are contained in subpart B.


[74 FR 46673, Sept. 11, 2009, as amended at 75 FR 19189, Apr. 14, 2010]


Subpart D – Livestock Forage Disaster Program


Source:74 FR 46680, Sept. 11, 2009, unless otherwise noted.

§ 760.301 Applicability.

(a) This subpart establishes the terms and conditions under which the Livestock Forage Disaster Program (LFP) will be administered.


(b) Eligible livestock producers will be compensated for eligible grazing losses for covered livestock that occur due to a qualifying drought or fire that occurs:


(1) On or after January 1, 2008, and before October 1, 2011, and


(2) In the calendar year for which benefits are being requested.


§ 760.302 Definitions.

The following definitions apply to this subpart and to the administration of LFP. The definitions in parts 718 and 1400 of this title also apply, except where they conflict with the definitions in this section.


Adult beef bull means a male beef breed bovine animal that was at least 2 years old and used for breeding purposes on or before the beginning date of a qualifying drought or fire.


Adult beef cow means a female beef breed bovine animal that had delivered one or more offspring. A first-time bred beef heifer is also considered an adult beef cow if it was pregnant on or before the beginning date of a qualifying drought or fire.


Adult buffalo and beefalo bull means a male animal of those breeds that was at least 2 years old and used for breeding purposes on or before the beginning date of a qualifying drought or fire.


Adult buffalo and beefalo cow means a female animal of those breeds that had delivered one or more offspring. A first-time bred buffalo or beefalo heifer is also considered an adult buffalo or beefalo cow if it was pregnant on or before the beginning date of a qualifying drought or fire.


Adult dairy bull means a male dairy breed bovine animal at least 2 years old used primarily for breeding dairy cows on or before the beginning date of a qualifying drought or fire.


Adult dairy cow means a female dairy breed bovine animal used for the purpose of providing milk for human consumption that had delivered one or more offspring. A first-time bred dairy heifer is also considered an adult dairy cow if it was pregnant on or before the beginning date of a qualifying drought or fire.


Agricultural operation means a farming operation.


Application means the “Livestock Forage Disaster Program” form.


Commercial use means used in the operation of a business activity engaged in as a means of livelihood for profit by the eligible livestock producer.


Contract means, with respect to contracts for the handling of livestock, a written agreement between a livestock owner and another individual or entity setting the specific terms, conditions, and obligations of the parties involved regarding the production of livestock or livestock products.


Covered livestock means livestock of an eligible livestock producer that, during the 60 days prior to the beginning date of a qualifying drought or fire, the eligible livestock producer owned, leased, purchased, entered into a contract to purchase, was a contract grower of, or sold or otherwise disposed of due to a qualifying drought during the current production year. It includes livestock that the producer otherwise disposed of due to drought in one or both of the two production years immediately preceding the current production year as determined by the Secretary. Notwithstanding the foregoing portions of this definition, covered livestock for “contract growers” will not include livestock in feedlots. “Contract growers” under LFP will only include producers of livestock not in feedlots whose income is dependent on the actual weight gain and survival of the livestock.


Equine animal means a domesticated horse, mule, or donkey.


Farming operation means a business enterprise engaged in producing agricultural products.


Federal Agency means, with respect to the control of grazing land, an agency of the Federal government that manages rangeland on which livestock is generally permitted to graze. For the purposes of this section, it includes, but is not limited to, the U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), DOI Bureau of Land Management (BLM), and USDA Forest Service (FS).


Goat means a domesticated, ruminant mammal of the genus Capra, including Angora goats.


Non-adult beef cattle means a beef breed bovine animal that weighed 500 pounds or more on or before the beginning date of a qualifying drought or fire but that does not meet the definition of adult beef cow or bull.


Non-adult buffalo or beefalo means an animal of those breeds that weighed 500 pounds or more on or before the beginning date of a qualifying drought or fire, but does not meet the definition of adult buffalo or beefalo cow or bull.


Non-adult dairy cattle means a bovine animal, of a breed used for the purpose of providing milk for human consumption, that weighed 500 pounds or more on or before the beginning date of a qualifying drought or fire, but that does not meet the definition of adult dairy cow or bull.


Normal carrying capacity means, with respect to each type of grazing land or pastureland in a county, the normal carrying capacity that would be expected from the grazing land or pastureland for livestock during the normal grazing period in the county, in the absence of a drought or fire that diminishes the production of the grazing land or pastureland.


Normal grazing period means, with respect to a county, the normal grazing period during the calendar year with respect to each specific type of grazing land or pastureland in the county served by the applicable county committee.


Owner means one who had legal ownership of the livestock for which benefits are being requested during the 60 days prior to the beginning of a qualifying drought or fire.


Poultry means a domesticated chicken, turkey, duck, or goose. Poultry are further delineated by sex, age, and purpose of production, as determined by FSA.


Sheep means a domesticated, ruminant mammal of the genus Ovis.


Swine means a domesticated omnivorous pig, hog, or boar. Swine are further delineated by sex and weight, as determined by FSA.


U.S. Drought Monitor is a system for classifying drought severity according to a range of abnormally dry to exceptional drought. It is a collaborative effort between Federal and academic partners, produced on a weekly basis, to synthesize multiple indices, outlooks, and drought impacts on a map and in narrative form. This synthesis of indices is reported by the National Drought Mitigation Center at http://www.drought.unl.edu/dm/monitor.html.


§ 760.303 Eligible livestock producer.

(a) To be considered an eligible livestock producer, the eligible producer on a farm must:


(1) During the 60 days prior to the beginning date of a qualifying drought or fire, own, cash or share lease, or be a contract grower of covered livestock or


(2) Provide pastureland or grazing land for covered livestock, including cash-leased pastureland or grazing land, that is:


(i) Physically located in a county affected by a qualifying drought during the normal grazing period for the county or


(ii) Rangeland managed by a Federal agency for which the otherwise eligible livestock producer is prohibited by the Federal agency from grazing the normal permitted livestock due to a qualifying fire.


(b) The eligible livestock producer must have certified that the livestock producer has suffered a grazing loss due to a qualifying drought or fire to be eligible for LFP payments.


(c) An eligible livestock producer does not include any owner, cash or share lessee, or contract grower of livestock that rents or leases pastureland or grazing land owned by another person on a rate-of-gain basis. (That is, where the lease or rental agreement calls for payment based in whole or in part on the amount of weight gained by the animals that use the pastureland or grazing land.)


(d) A producer seeking payment must not be ineligible for payments under the restrictions applicable to foreign persons contained in § 760.103(b) and must meet all other requirements of subpart B and other applicable USDA regulations.


(e) If a contract grower is an eligible livestock producer for covered livestock, the owner of that livestock is not eligible for payment.


§ 760.304 Covered livestock.

(a) To be considered covered livestock for LFP payments, livestock must meet all the following conditions:


(1) Be adult or non-adult beef cattle, adult or non-adult beefalo, adult or non-adult buffalo, adult or non-adult dairy cattle, alpacas, deer, elk, emus, equine, goats, llamas, poultry, reindeer, sheep, or swine;


(2) Be livestock that would normally have been grazing the eligible grazing land or pastureland in the county:


(i) During the normal grazing period for the specific type of grazing land or pastureland for the county or


(ii) When the Federal agency prohibited the eligible livestock producer from using the managed rangeland for grazing due to a fire;


(3) Be livestock that the eligible livestock producer:


(i) During the 60 days prior to the beginning date of a qualifying drought or fire:


(A) Owned,


(B) Leased,


(C) Purchased,


(D) Entered into a contract to purchase, or


(E) Was a contract grower of; or


(ii) Sold or otherwise disposed of due to qualifying drought during:


(A) The current production year or


(B) 1 or both of the 2 production years immediately preceding the current production year;


(4) Been maintained for commercial use as part of the producer’s farming operation on the beginning date of the qualifying drought or fire;


(5) Not have been produced and maintained for reasons other than commercial use as part of a farming operation. Such excluded uses include, but are not limited to, any uses of wild free roaming animals or use of the animals for recreational purposes, such as pleasure, roping, hunting, pets, or for show; and


(6) Not have been livestock that were or would have been in a feedlot, on the beginning date of the qualifying drought or fire, as a part of the normal business operation of the eligible livestock producer, as determined by the Secretary.


(b) The covered livestock categories are:


(1) Adult beef cows or bulls,


(2) Adult buffalo or beefalo cows or bulls,


(3) Adult dairy cows or bulls,


(4) Alpacas,


(5) Deer,


(6) Elk,


(7) Emu,


(8) Equine,


(9) Goats,


(10) Llamas,


(11) Non-adult beef cattle,


(12) Non-adult buffalo or beefalo,


(13) Non-adult dairy cattle,


(14) Poultry,


(15) Reindeer,


(16) Sheep, and


(17) Swine.


(c) Livestock that are not covered include, but are not limited to:


(1) Livestock that were or would have been in a feedlot, on the beginning date of the qualifying drought or fire, as a part of the normal business operation of the eligible livestock producer, as determined by the Secretary;


(2) Yaks;


(3) Ostriches;


(4) All beef and dairy cattle, and buffalo and beefalo that weighed less than 500 pounds on the beginning date of the qualifying drought or fire;


(5) Any wild free roaming livestock, including horses and deer; and


(6) Livestock produced or maintained for reasons other than commercial use as part of a farming operation, including, but not limited to, livestock produced or maintained for recreational purposes, such as:


(i) Roping,


(ii) Hunting,


(iii) Show,


(iv) Pleasure,


(v) Use as pets, or


(vi) Consumption by owner.


[74 FR 46680, Sept. 11, 2009, as amended at 75 FR 19189, Apr. 14, 2010]


§ 760.305 Eligible grazing losses.

(a) A grazing loss due to drought is eligible for LFP only if the grazing loss for the covered livestock occurs on land that:


(1) Is native or improved pastureland with permanent vegetative cover or


(2) Is planted to a crop planted specifically for the purpose of providing grazing for covered livestock; and


(3) Is grazing land or pastureland that is owned or leased by the eligible livestock producer that is physically located in a county that is, during the normal grazing period for the specific type of grazing land or pastureland for the county, rated by the U.S. Drought Monitor as having a:


(i) D2 (severe drought) intensity in any area of the county for at least 8 consecutive weeks during the normal grazing period for the specific type of grazing land or pastureland for the county, as determined by the Secretary, or


(ii) D3 (extreme drought) or D4 (exceptional drought) intensity in any area of the county at any time during the normal grazing period for the specific type of grazing land or pastureland for the county, as determined by the Secretary. (As specified elsewhere in this subpart, the amount of potential payment eligibility will be higher than under (a)(3)(i) of this section where the D4 trigger applies or where the D3 condition as determined by the Secretary lasts at least 4 weeks during the normal grazing period for the specific type of grazing land or pastureland for the county.)


(b) A grazing loss is not eligible for LFP if the grazing loss due to drought on land used for haying or grazing under the Conservation Reserve Program established under subchapter B of chapter 1 of subtitle D of title XII of the Food Security Act of 1985 (16 U.S.C. 3831-3835a).


(c) A fire qualifies for LFP only if:


(1) The grazing loss occurs on rangeland that is managed by a Federal agency and


(2) The eligible livestock producer is prohibited by the Federal agency from grazing the normal permitted livestock on the managed rangeland due to a fire.


(d) An eligible livestock producer may be eligible for LFP payments only on those grazing lands incurring losses for which the livestock producer:


(1) Meets the risk management purchase requirements specified in § 760.104; or


(2) Does not meet the risk management purchase requirements specified in § 760.104 because the risk management purchase requirement is waived according to §§ 760.105, 760.106, or 760.107.


§ 760.306 Application for payment.

(a) To apply for LFP, the participant that suffered eligible grazing losses:


(1) During 2008, must submit a completed application for payment and required supporting documentation to the administrative FSA county office no later than December 10, 2009 or


(2) During 2009 and later years, must submit a completed application for payment and required supporting documentation to the administrative FSA county office no later than 30 calendar days after the end of the calendar year in which the grazing loss occurred.


(b) A participant must also provide a copy of the grower contract, if a contract grower, and other supporting documents required for determining eligibility as an applicant at the time the participant submits the completed application for payment. Supporting documents must include:


(1) Evidence of loss,


(2) Current physical location of livestock in inventory,


(3) Evidence of meeting risk management purchase requirements as specified in subpart B,


(4) Evidence that grazing land or pastureland is owned or leased,


(5) A report of acreage according to part 718 of this chapter for the grazing lands incurring losses for which assistance is being requested under this subpart;


(6) Adequate proof, as determined by FSA that the grazing loss:


(i) Was for the covered livestock;


(ii) If the loss of grazing occurred as the result of a fire that the:


(A) Loss was due to a fire and


(B) Participant was prohibited by the Federal agency from grazing the normal permitted livestock on the managed rangeland due to a fire;


(iii) Occurred on or after January 1, 2008, and before October 1, 2011; and


(iv) Occurred in the calendar year for which payments are being requested;


(7) Adequate proof, absent an appropriate waiver (if there is a waiver, it itself must be documented by the producer), as determined by FSA, that the participant had obtained, for the grazing land incurring the losses for which assistance is being requested, one or both of the following:


(i) A policy or plan of insurance under the Federal Crop Insurance Act (7 U.S.C. 1501-1524); or


(ii) Filed the required paperwork, and paid the administrative fee by the applicable State filing deadline, for the noninsured crop disaster assistance program;


(8) Any other supporting documentation as determined by FSA to be necessary to make a determination of eligibility of the participant. Supporting documents include, but are not limited to: Verifiable purchase and sales records; grower contracts; veterinarian records; bank or other loan papers; rendering truck receipts; Federal Emergency Management Records; National Guard records; written contracts; production records; private insurance documents; sales records; and similar documents determined acceptable to FSA.


(c) Data furnished by the participant will be used to determine eligibility for program benefits. Furnishing the data is voluntary; however, without all required data, program benefits will not be approved or provided.


§ 760.307 Payment calculation.

(a) An eligible livestock producer will be eligible to receive payments for grazing losses for qualifying drought as specified in § 760.305(a) equal to one, two, or three times the monthly payment rate specified in paragraphs (e) or (f) of this section. Total LFP payments to an eligible livestock producer in a calendar year for grazing losses due to qualifying drought will not exceed three monthly payments for the same livestock. Payments calculated in this section or elsewhere with respect to LFP are subject to the adjustments and limits provided for in this part and are also subject to the payment limitations and average adjusted gross income provisions that are contained in subpart B. Payment may only be made to the extent that eligibility is specifically provided for in this subpart. Hence, with respect to drought, payments will be made only as a “one month” payment, a “two month” payment, or a “three month” payment based on the provisions of paragraphs (b), (c), and (d) of this section.


(b) To be eligible to receive a one month payment, that is a payment equal to the monthly feed cost as determined under paragraph (g) of this section, the eligible livestock producer must own or lease grazing land or pastureland that is physically located in a county that is rated by the U.S. Drought Monitor as having at least a D2 severe drought (intensity) in any area of the county for at least 8 consecutive weeks during the normal grazing period for the specific type of grazing land or pastureland in the county.


(c) To be eligible to receive a two month payment, that is a payment equal to twice the monthly feed cost as determined under paragraph (g) of this section, the eligible livestock producer must own or lease grazing land or pastureland that is physically located in a county that is rated by the U.S. Drought Monitor as having at least a D3 (extreme drought) intensity in any area of the county at any time during the normal grazing period for the specific type of grazing land or pastureland for the county.


(d) To be eligible to receive a three month payment, that is a payment equal to three times the monthly feed cost as determined under paragraph (g) of this section, the eligible livestock producer must own or lease grazing land or pastureland that is physically located in a county that is rated by the U.S. Drought Monitor as having at least a D3 (extreme drought) intensity in any area of the county for at least 4 weeks during the normal grazing period for the specific type of grazing land or pastureland for the county, or is rated as having a D4 (exceptional drought) intensity in any area of the county at any time during the normal grazing period for the specific type of grazing land or pastureland for the county.


(e) The monthly payment rate for LFP for grazing losses due to a qualifying drought, except as provided in paragraph (f) of this section, will be equal to 60 percent of the lesser of:


(1) The monthly feed cost for all covered livestock owned or leased by the eligible livestock producer, as determined in paragraph (g) of this section or


(2) The monthly feed cost calculated by using the normal carrying capacity of the eligible grazing land of the eligible livestock producer, as determined in paragraph (j) of this section.


(f) In the case of an eligible livestock producer that sold or otherwise disposed of covered livestock due to a qualifying drought in 1 or both of the 2 production years immediately preceding the current production year, the payment rate is 80 percent of the monthly payment rate calculated in paragraph (e) of this section.


(g) The monthly feed cost for covered livestock equals the product obtained by multiplying:


(1) 30 days;


(2) A payment quantity equal to the amount referred to in paragraph (h) of this section as the “feed grain equivalent”, as determined under paragraph (h) of this section; and


(3) A payment rate equal to the corn price per pound, as determined in paragraph (i) of this section.


(h) The feed grain equivalent equals, in the case of:


(1) An adult beef cow, 15.7 pounds of corn per day or


(2) In the case of any other type or weight of covered livestock, an amount determined by the Secretary that represents the average number of pounds of corn per day necessary to feed that specific type of livestock.


(i) The corn price per pound equals the quotient obtained by dividing:


(1) The higher of:


(i) The national average corn price per bushel for the 12-month period immediately preceding March 1 of the calendar year for which LFP payment is calculated or


(ii) The national average corn price per bushel for the 24-month period immediately preceding March 1 of the calendar year for which LFP payment is calculated


(2) By 56.


(j) The monthly feed cost using the normal carrying capacity of the eligible grazing land equals the product obtained by multiplying:


(1) 30 days;


(2) A payment quantity equal to the feed grain equivalent of 15.7 pounds of corn per day;


(3) A payment rate equal to the corn price per pound, as determined in paragraph (i) of this section; and


(4) The number of animal units the eligible livestock producer’s grazing land or pastureland can sustain during the normal grazing period in the county for the specific type of grazing land or pastureland, in the absence of a drought or fire, determined by dividing the:


(i) Number of eligible grazing land or pastureland acres of the specific type of grazing land or pastureland by


(ii) The normal carrying capacity of the specific type of eligible grazing land or pastureland as determined under this subpart.


(k) An eligible livestock producer will be eligible to receive payments for grazing losses due to a fire as specified in § 760.305(c):


(1) For the period, subject to paragraph (l)(2) of this section:


(i) Beginning on the date on which the Federal Agency prohibits the eligible livestock producer from using the managed rangeland for grazing and


(ii) Ending on the earlier of the last day of the Federal lease of the eligible livestock producer or the day that would make the period a 180 day period and


(2) For grazing losses that occur on not more than 180 days per calendar year.


(3) For 50 percent of the monthly feed cost, as determined under § 760.308(g), pro-rated to a daily rate, for the total number of livestock covered by the Federal lease of the eligible livestock producer.


Subpart E – Livestock Indemnity Program


Source:74 FR 31575, July 2, 2009, unless otherwise noted.

§ 760.401 Applicability.

(a) This subpart establishes the terms and conditions under which the Livestock Indemnity Program (LIP) will be administered under Titles XII and XV of the 2008 Farm Bill (Pub. L. 110-246).


(b) Eligible livestock owners and contract growers will be compensated in accordance with § 760.406 for eligible livestock deaths in excess of normal mortality that occurred in the calendar year for which benefits are being requested as a direct result of an eligible adverse weather event. An “eligible adverse weather event” is one, as determined by the Secretary, occurring in the program year that could and did, even when normal preventative or corrective measures were taken and good farming practices were followed, directly result in the death of livestock. Because feed can be purchased or otherwise obtained in the event of a drought, drought is not an eligible adverse weather event except when anthrax, resulting from drought, causes the death of eligible livestock.


§ 760.402 Definitions.

The following definitions apply to this subpart. The definitions in parts 718 and 1400 of this title also apply, except where they conflict with the definitions in this section.


Adult beef bull means a male beef breed bovine animal that was at least 2 years old and used for breeding purposes before it died.


Adult beef cow means a female beef breed bovine animal that had delivered one or more offspring before dying. A first-time bred beef heifer is also considered an adult beef cow if it was pregnant at the time it died.


Adult buffalo and beefalo bull means a male animal of those breeds that was at least 2 years old and used for breeding purposes before it died.


Adult buffalo and beefalo cow means a female animal of those breeds that had delivered one or more offspring before dying. A first-time bred buffalo or beefalo heifer is also considered an adult buffalo or beefalo cow if it was pregnant at the time it died.


Adult dairy bull means a male dairy breed bovine animal at least 2 years old used primarily for breeding dairy cows before it died.


Adult dairy cow means a female bovine dairy breed animal used for the purpose of providing milk for human consumption that had delivered one or more offspring before dying. A first-time bred dairy heifer is also considered an adult dairy cow if it was pregnant at the time it died.


Adverse weather means damaging weather events, including, but not limited to, hurricanes, floods, blizzards, disease, wildfires, extreme heat, and extreme cold.


Agricultural operation means a farming operation.


Application means the “Livestock Indemnity Program” form.


Buck means a male goat.


Commercial use means used in the operation of a business activity engaged in as a means of livelihood for profit by the eligible producer.


Contract means, with respect to contracts for the handling of livestock, a written agreement between a livestock owner and another individual or entity setting the specific terms, conditions, and obligations of the parties involved regarding the production of livestock or livestock products.


Deputy Administrator or DAFP means the Deputy Administrator for Farm Programs, Farm Service Agency, U.S. Department of Agriculture or the designee.


Equine animal means a domesticated horse, mule, or donkey.


Ewe means a female sheep.


Farming operation means a business enterprise engaged in producing agricultural products.


FSA means the Farm Service Agency.


Goat means a domesticated, ruminant mammal of the genus Capra, including Angora goats. Goats are further defined by sex (bucks and nannies) and age (kids).


Kid means a goat less than 1 year old.


Lamb means a sheep less than 1 year old.


Livestock owner means one having legal ownership of the livestock for which benefits are being requested on the day such livestock died.


Nanny means a female goat.


Non-adult beef cattle means a beef breed bovine animal that does not meet the definition of adult beef cow or bull. Non-adult beef cattle are further delineated by weight categories of either less than 400 pounds or 400 pounds or more at the time they died.


Non-adult buffalo or beefalo means an animal of those breeds that does not meet the definition of adult buffalo or beefalo cow or bull. Non-adult buffalo or beefalo are further delineated by weight categories of either less than 400 pounds or 400 pounds or more at the time of death.


Non-adult dairy cattle means a dairy breed bovine animal, of a breed used for the purpose of providing milk for human consumption, that does not meet the definition of adult dairy cow or bull. Non-adult dairy cattle are further delineated by weight categories of either less than 400 pounds or 400 pounds or more at the time they died.


Normal mortality means the numerical amount, computed by a percentage, as established for the area by the FSA State Committee, of expected livestock deaths, by category, that normally occur during a calendar year for a producer.


Poultry means domesticated chickens, turkeys, ducks, and geese. Poultry are further delineated by sex, age, and purpose of production as determined by FSA.


Ram means a male sheep.


Secretary means the Secretary of Agriculture or a designee of the Secretary.


Sheep means a domesticated, ruminant mammal of the genus Ovis. Sheep are further defined by sex (rams and ewes) and age (lambs) for purposes of dividing into categories for loss calculations.


State committee, State office, county committee, or county office means the respective FSA committee or office.


Swine means a domesticated omnivorous pig, hog, or boar. Swine for purposes of dividing into categories for loss calculations are further delineated by sex and weight as determined by FSA.


United States means all fifty States of the United States, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Guam, and the District of Columbia.


§ 760.403 Eligible owners and contract growers.

(a) In addition to other eligibility rules that may apply, to be eligible as a:


(1) Livestock owner for benefits with respect to the death of an animal under this subpart, the applicant must have had legal ownership of the eligible livestock on the day the livestock died and under conditions in which no contract grower could have been eligible for benefits with respect to the animal. Eligible types of animal categories for which losses can be calculated for an owner are specified in § 760.404(a).


(2) Contract grower for benefits with respect to the death of an animal, the animal must be in one of the categories specified on § 760.404(b), and the contract grower must have had


(i) A written agreement with the owner of eligible livestock setting the specific terms, conditions, and obligations of the parties involved regarding the production of livestock;


(ii) Control of the eligible livestock on the day the livestock died; and


(iii) A risk of loss in the animal.


(b) A producer seeking payment must not be ineligible under the restrictions applicable to foreign persons contained in § 760.103(b) and must meet all other requirements of subpart B and other applicable USDA regulations.


§ 760.404 Eligible livestock.

(a) To be considered eligible livestock for livestock owners, the kind of livestock must be alpacas, adult or non-adult dairy cattle, beef cattle, buffalo, beefalo, elk, emus, equine, llamas, sheep, goats, swine, poultry, deer, or reindeer and meet all the conditions in paragraph (c) of this section.


(b) To be considered eligible livestock for contract growers, the kind of livestock must be poultry or swine as defined in § 760.402 and meet all the conditions in paragraph (c) of this section.


(c) To be considered eligible livestock for the purpose of generating payments under this subpart, livestock must meet all of the following conditions:


(1) Died as a direct result of an eligible adverse weather event that occurred on or after January 1, 2008, and before October 1, 2011;


(2) Died no later than 60 calendar days from the ending date of the applicable adverse weather event, but before November 30, 2011;


(3) Died in the calendar year for which benefits are being requested;


(4) Been maintained for commercial use as part of a farming operation on the day they died; and


(5) Before dying, not have been produced or maintained for reasons other than commercial use as part of a farming operation, such non-eligible uses being understood to include, but not be limited to, any uses of wild, free roaming animals or use of the animals for recreational purposes, such as pleasure, hunting, roping, pets, or for show.


(d) The following categories of animals owned by a livestock owner are eligible livestock and calculations of eligibility for payments will be calculated separately for each producer with respect to each category:


(1) Adult beef bulls;


(2) Adult beef cows;


(3) Adult buffalo or beefalo bulls;


(4) Adult buffalo or beefalo cows;


(5) Adult dairy bulls;


(6) Adult dairy cows;


(7) Alpacas;


(8) Chickens, broilers, pullets;


(9) Chickens, chicks;


(10) Chickens, layers, roasters;


(11) Deer;


(12) Ducks;


(13) Ducks, ducklings;


(14) Elk;


(15) Emus;


(16) Equine;


(17) Geese, goose;


(18) Geese, gosling;


(19) Goats, bucks;


(20) Goats, nannies;


(21) Goats, kids;


(22) Llamas;


(23) Non-adult beef cattle;


(24) Non-adult buffalo or beefalo;


(25) Non-adult dairy cattle;


(26) Reindeer;


(27) Sheep, ewes;


(28) Sheep, lambs;


(29) Sheep, rams;


(30) Swine, feeder pigs under 50 pounds;


(31) Swine, sows, boars, barrows, gilts 50 to 150 pounds;


(32) Swine, sows, boars, barrows, gilts over 150 pounds;


(33) Turkeys, poults; and


(34) Turkeys, toms, fryers, and roasters.


(e) The following categories of animals are eligible livestock for contract growers and calculations of eligibility for payments will be calculated separately for each producer with respect to each category:


(1) Chickens, broilers, pullets;


(2) Chickens, layers, roasters;


(3) Geese, goose;


(4) Swine, boars, sows;


(5) Swine, feeder pigs;


(6) Swine, lightweight barrows, gilts;


(7) Swine, sows, boars, barrows, gilts; and


(8) Turkeys, toms, fryers, and roasters.


[74 FR 31575, July 2, 2009, as amended at 76 FR 54075, Aug. 31, 2011]


§ 760.405 Application process.

(a) In addition to submitting an application for payment at the appropriate time, a producer or contract grower that suffered livestock losses that create or could create a claim for benefits must:


(1) For losses during 2008 and losses in 2009, prior to July 13, 2009, provide a notice of loss to FSA no later than September 13, 2009.


(2) For losses on or after July 13, 2009, provide a notice of loss to FSA within the earlier of:


(i) 30 calendar days of when the loss of livestock is apparent to the participant or


(ii) 30 calendar days after the end of the calendar year in which the loss of livestock occurred.


(3) The participant must submit the notice of loss required in paragraphs (a)(1) and (a)(2) to the FSA administrative county office that maintains the participant’s farm records for the agricultural operation.


(b) In addition to the notices of loss required in paragraph (a) of this section, a participant must also submit a completed application for payment no later than


(1) 30 calendar days after the end of the calendar year in which the loss of livestock occurred or


(2) September 13, 2009 for losses during 2008.


(c) Applicants must submit supporting documentation with their application. For contract growers, the information must include a copy of the grower contract and other documents establishing their status. In addition, for all applicants, including contract growers, supporting documents must show:


(1) Evidence of loss,


(2) Current physical location of livestock in inventory,


(3) Physical location of claimed livestock at the time of death, and


(4) Inventory numbers and other inventory information necessary to establish actual mortality as required by FSA.


(d) The participant must provide adequate proof that the death of the eligible livestock occurred as a direct result of an eligible adverse weather event in the calendar year for which benefits are requested. The quantity and kind of livestock that died as a direct result of the eligible adverse weather event during the calendar year for which benefits are being requested may be documented by: purchase records; veterinarian records; bank or other loan papers; rendering-plant truck receipts; Federal Emergency Management Agency records; National Guard records; written contracts; production records; Internal Revenue Service records; property tax records; private insurance documents; and other similar verifiable documents as determined by FSA.


(e) If adequate verifiable proof of death documentation is not available, the participant may provide reliable records, in conjunction with verifiable beginning and ending inventory records, as proof of death. Reliable records may include contemporaneous producer records, dairy herd improvement records, brand inspection records, vaccination records, pictures, and other similar reliable documents as determined by FSA.


(f) Certification of livestock deaths by third parties may be accepted only if verifiable proof of death records or reliable proof of death records in conjunction with verifiable beginning and ending inventory records are not available and both of the following conditions are met:


(1) The livestock owner or livestock contract grower, as applicable, certifies in writing:


(i) That there is no other verifiable or reliable documentation of death available;


(ii) The number of livestock, by category identified in this subpart and by FSA were in inventory at the time the applicable adverse weather event occurred;


(iii) The physical location of the livestock, by category, in inventory when the deaths occurred; and


(iv) Other details required for FSA to determine the certification acceptable; and


(2) The third party is an independent source who is not affiliated with the farming operation such as a hired hand and is not a “family member,” defined as a person whom a member in the farming operation or their spouse is related as lineal ancestor, lineal descendant, sibling, spouse, and provides their telephone number, address, and a written statement containing specific details about:


(i) Their knowledge of the livestock deaths;


(ii) Their affiliation with the livestock owner;


(iii) The accuracy of the deaths claimed by the livestock owner or contract grower including, but not limited to, the number and kind or type of the participant’s livestock that died because of the eligible adverse weather event; and


(iv) Other information required by FSA to determine the certification acceptable.


(g) Data furnished by the participant and the third party will be used to determine eligibility for program benefits. Furnishing the data is voluntary; however, without all required data program benefits will not be approved or provided.


§ 760.406 Payment calculation.

(a) Under this subpart, separate payment rates for eligible livestock owners and eligible livestock contract growers are specified in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section, respectively. Payments for LIP are calculated by multiplying the national payment rate for each livestock category by the number of eligible livestock in excess of normal mortality in each category that died as a result of an eligible adverse weather event. Normal mortality for each livestock category will be determined by FSA on a State-by-State basis using local data sources including, but not limited to, State livestock organizations and the Cooperative Extension Service for the State. Adjustments will be applied as specified in paragraph (d) of this section.


(b) The LIP national payment rate for eligible livestock owners is based on 75 percent of the average fair market value of the applicable livestock as computed using nationwide prices for the previous calendar year unless some other price is approved by the Deputy Administrator.


(c) The LIP national payment rate for eligible livestock contract growers is based on 75 percent of the average income loss sustained by the contract grower with respect to the dead livestock.


(d) The LIP payment calculated for eligible livestock contract growers will be reduced by the amount the participant received from the party who contracted with the producer to raise the livestock for the loss of income from the dead livestock.


Subpart F – Tree Assistance Program


Source:75 FR 25108, May 7, 2010, unless otherwise noted.

§ 760.500 Applicability.

(a) This subpart establishes the terms and conditions under which the Tree Assistance Program (TAP) will be administered under Titles XII and XV of the Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008 (Pub. L. 110-246, the 2008 Farm Bill).


(b) Eligible orchardists and nursery tree growers will be compensated as specified in § 760.506 for eligible tree, bush, and vine losses in excess of 15 percent mortality, or, where applicable, 15 percent damage, adjusted for normal mortality and normal damage, that occurred in the calendar year for which benefits are being requested and as a direct result of a natural disaster.


§ 760.501 Administration.

The program will be administered as specified in § 760.102 and in this subpart.


§ 760.502 Definitions.

The following definitions apply to this subpart. The definitions in parts 718 and 1400 of this title also apply, except where they conflict with the definitions in this section.


Bush means, a low, branching, woody plant, from which at maturity of the bush, an annual fruit or vegetable crop is produced for commercial purposes, such as a blueberry bush. The definition does not cover plants that produce a bush after the normal crop is harvested such as asparagus.


Commercial use means used in the operation of a business activity engaged in as a means of livelihood for profit by the eligible producer.


County committee means the respective FSA committee.


County office means the FSA or U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Service Center that is responsible for servicing the farm on which the trees, bushes, or vines are located.


Cutting means a piece of a vine which was planted in the ground to propagate a new vine for the commercial production of fruit, such as grapes, kiwi fruit, passion fruit, or similar fruit.


Deputy Administrator or DAFP means the Deputy Administrator for Farm Programs, FSA, USDA, or the designee.


Eligible nursery tree grower means a person or legal entity that produces nursery, ornamental, fruit, nut, or Christmas trees for commercial sale.


Eligible orchardist means a person or legal entity that produces annual crops from trees, bushes, or vines for commercial purposes.


FSA means the Farm Service Agency.


Lost means, with respect to the extent of damage to a tree or other plant, that the plant is destroyed or the damage is such that it would, as determined by FSA, be more cost effective to replace the tree or other plant than to leave it in its deteriorated, low-producing state.


Natural disaster means plant disease, insect infestation, drought, fire, freeze, flood, earthquake, lightning, or other natural occurrence of such magnitude or severity so as to be considered disastrous, as determined by the Deputy Administrator.


Normal damage means the percentage, as established for the area by the FSA State Committee, of trees, bushes, or vines in the individual stand that would normally be damaged during a calendar year for a producer.


Normal mortality means percentage, as established for the area by the FSA State Committee, of expected lost trees, bushes, or vines in the individual stand that normally occurs during a calendar year for a producer. This term refers to the number of whole trees, bushes, or vines that are destroyed or damaged beyond rehabilitation. Mortality does not include partial damage such as lost tree limbs.


Seedling means an immature tree, bush, or vine that was planted in the ground or other growing medium to grow a new tree, bush, or vine for commercial purposes.


Stand means a contiguous acreage of the same type of trees (including Christmas trees, ornamental trees, nursery trees, and potted trees), bushes (including shrubs), or vines.


State committee means the respective FSA committee.


Tree means a tall, woody plant having comparatively great height, and a single trunk from which an annual crop is produced for commercial purposes, such as a maple tree for syrup, papaya tree, or orchard tree. Trees used for pulp or timber are not considered eligible trees under this subpart.


Vine means a perennial plant grown under normal conditions from which an annual fruit crop is produced for commercial market for human consumption, such as grape, kiwi, or passion fruit, and that has a flexible stem supported by climbing, twining, or creeping along a surface. Perennials that are normally propagated as annuals such as tomato plants, biennials such as the plants that produce strawberries, and annuals such as pumpkins, squash, cucumbers, watermelon, and other melons, are excluded from the term vine in this subpart.


§ 760.503 Eligible losses.

(a) To be considered an eligible loss under this subpart:


(1) Eligible trees, bushes, or vines must have been lost or damaged as a result of natural disaster as determined by the Deputy Administrator;


(2) The individual stand must have sustained a mortality loss or damage, as the case may be, loss in excess of 15 percent after adjustment for normal mortality or damage;


(3) The loss could not have been prevented through reasonable and available measures; and


(4) The trees, bushes, or vines, in the absence of a natural disaster, would not normally have required rehabilitation or replanting within the 12-month period following the loss.


(b) The damage or loss must be visible and obvious to the county committee representative. If the damage is no longer visible, the county committee may accept other evidence of the loss as it determines is reasonable.


(c) The county committee may require information from a qualified expert, as determined by the county committee, to determine extent of loss in the case of plant disease or insect infestation.


(d) The Deputy Administrator will determine the types of trees, bushes, and vines that are eligible.


(e) An individual stand that did not sustain a sufficient loss as specified in paragraph (a)(2) of this section is not eligible for payment, regardless of the amount of loss sustained.


§ 760.504 Eligible orchardists and nursery tree growers.

(a) To be eligible for TAP payments, the eligible orchardist or nursery tree grower must:


(1) Have planted, or be considered to have planted (by purchase prior to the loss of existing stock planted for commercial purposes) trees, bushes, or vines for commercial purposes, or have a production history, for commercial purposes, of planted or existing trees, bushes, or vines;


(2) Have suffered eligible losses of eligible trees, bushes, or vines occurring between January 1, 2008, and September 30, 2011, as a result of a natural disaster or related condition;


(3) Meet the risk management purchase requirement as specified in § 760.104 or the waiver requirements in § 760.105 or § 760.107; and


(4) Have continuously owned the stand from the time of the disaster until the time that the TAP application is submitted.


(b) A new owner of an orchard or nursery who does not meet the requirements of paragraph (a) of this section may receive TAP payments approved for the previous owner of the orchard or nursery and not paid to the previous owner, if the previous owner of the orchard or nursery agrees to the succession in writing and if the new owner:


(1) Acquires ownership of trees, bushes, or vines for which benefits have been approved;


(2) Agrees to complete all approved practices that the original owner has not completed; and


(3) Otherwise meets and assumes full responsibility for all provisions of this part, including refund of payments made to the previous owner, if applicable.


(c) A producer seeking payment must not be ineligible under the restrictions applicable to citizenship and foreign corporations contained in § 760.103(b) and must meet all other requirements of subpart B of this part.


(d) Federal, State, and local governments and agencies and political subdivisions thereof are not eligible for payment under this subpart.


§ 760.505 Application.

(a) To apply for TAP, a producer that suffered eligible tree, bush, or vine losses that occurred:


(1) During calendar years 2008, 2009, or 2010, prior to May 7, 2010, must provide an application for payment and supporting documentation to FSA no later than July 6, 2010.


(2) On or after May 7, 2010, must provide an application for payment and supporting documentation to FSA within 90 calendar days of the disaster event or date when the loss of trees, bushes, or vines is apparent to the producer.


(b) The producer must submit the application for payment within the time specified in paragraph (a) of this section to the FSA administrative county office that maintains the producer’s farm records for the agricultural operation.


(c) A complete application includes all of the following:


(1) A completed application form provided by FSA;


(2) An acreage report for the farming operation as specified in part 718, subpart B, of this chapter;


(3) Subject to verification and a loss amount determined appropriate by the county committee, a written estimate of the number of trees, bushes, or vines lost or damaged that is certified by the producer or a qualified expert, including the number of acres on which the loss occurred; and


(4) Sufficient evidence of the loss to allow the county committee to calculate whether an eligible loss occurred.


(d) Before requests for payment will be approved, the county committee:


(1) Must make an eligibility determination based on a complete application for assistance;


(2) Must verify actual qualifying losses and the number of acres involved by on-site visual inspection of the land and the trees, bushes, or vines;


(3) May request additional information and may consider all relevant information in making its determination; and


(4) Must verify actual costs to complete the practices, as documented by the producer.


§ 760.506 Payment calculations.

(a) Payment to an eligible orchardist or nursery tree grower for the cost of replanting or rehabilitating trees, bushes, or vines damaged or lost due to a natural disaster, in excess of 15 percent damage or mortality (adjusted for normal damage or mortality), will be calculated as follows:


(1) For the cost of planting seedlings or cuttings, to replace lost trees, bushes, or vines, the lesser of:


(i) 70 percent of the actual cost of the practice, or


(ii) The amount calculated using rates established by the Deputy Administrator for the practice.


(2) For the cost of pruning, removal, and other costs incurred for salvaging damaged trees, bushes, or vines, or in the case of mortality, to prepare the land to replant trees, bushes, or vines, the lesser of:


(i) 50 percent of the actual cost of the practice, or


(ii) The amount calculated using rates established by the Deputy Administrator for the practice.


(b) An orchardist or nursery tree grower that did not plant the trees, bushes, or vines, but has a production history for commercial purposes on planted or existing trees and lost the trees, bushes, or vines as a result of a natural disaster, in excess of 15 percent damage or mortality (adjusted for normal damage or mortality), will be eligible for the salvage, pruning, and land preparation payment calculation as specified in paragraph (a)(2) of this section. To be eligible for the replanting payment calculation as specified in paragraph (a)(1) of this section, the orchardist or nursery grower who did not plant the stock must be a new owner who meets all of the requirements of § 760.504(b) or be considered the owner of the trees under provisions appearing elsewhere in this subpart.


(c) Eligible costs for payment calculation include costs for:


(1) Seedlings or cuttings, for tree, bush, or vine replanting;


(2) Site preparation and debris handling within normal horticultural practices for the type of stand being re-established, and necessary to ensure successful plant survival;


(3) Pruning, removal, and other costs incurred to salvage damaged trees, bushes, or vines, or, in the case of tree mortality, to prepare the land to replant trees, bushes, or vines;


(4) Chemicals and nutrients necessary for successful establishment;


(5) Labor to plant seedlings or cuttings as determined reasonable by the county committee; and


(6) Labor used to transplant existing seedlings established through natural regeneration into a productive tree stand.


(d) The following costs are not eligible:


(1) Costs for fencing, irrigation, irrigation equipment, protection of seedlings from wildlife, general improvements, re-establishing structures, and windscreens.


(2) Any other costs not listed in paragraphs (c)(1) through (c)(6) of this section, unless specifically determined eligible by the Deputy Administrator.


(e) Producers must provide the county committee documentation of actual costs to complete the practices, such as receipts for labor costs, equipment rental, and purchases of seedlings or cuttings.


(f) When lost stands are replanted, the types planted may be different from those originally planted. The alternative types will be eligible for payment if the new types have the same general end use, as determined and approved by the county committee. Payments for alternative types will be based on the lesser of rates established to plant the types actually lost or the cost to establish the alternative used. If the type of plantings, seedlings, or cuttings differs significantly from the types lost, the costs may not be approved for payment.


(g) When lost stands are replanted, the types planted may be planted on the same farm in a different location than the lost stand. To be eligible for payment, site preparation costs for the new location must not exceed the cost to re-establish the original stand in the original location.


(h) Eligible orchardists or nursery tree growers may elect not to replant the entire eligible stand. If so, the county committee will calculate payment based on the number of qualifying trees, bushes, or vines actually replanted.


(i) If a practice, such as site preparation, is needed to both replant and rehabilitate trees, bushes, or vines, the producer must document the expenses attributable to replanting versus rehabilitation. The county committee will determine whether the documentation of expenses detailing the amounts attributable to replanting versus rehabilitation is acceptable. In the event that the county committee determines the documentation does not include acceptable detail of cost allocation, the county committee will pro-rate payment based on physical inspection of the loss, damage, replanting, and rehabilitation.


(j) The cumulative total quantity of acres planted to trees, bushes, or vines for which a producer may receive payment under this part for losses that occurred between January 1, 2008, and September 30, 2011, will not exceed 500 acres.


§ 760.507 Obligations of a participant.

(a) Eligible orchardists and nursery tree growers must execute all required documents and complete the TAP-funded practice within 12 months of application approval.


(b) Eligible orchardist or nursery tree growers must allow representatives of FSA to visit the site for the purposes of certifying compliance with TAP requirements.


(c) Producers who do not meet all applicable requirements and obligations will not be eligible for payment.


Subpart G – Supplemental Revenue Assistance Payments Program


Source:74 FR 68490, Dec. 28, 2009, unless otherwise noted.

§ 760.601 Applicability.

(a) This subpart specifies the terms and conditions of the Supplemental Revenue Assistance Payments Program (SURE).


(b) Assistance in the form of SURE payments is available for crop losses occurring in the crop year 2008 through September 30, 2011, caused by disaster as determined by the Secretary. Crop losses must have occurred in crop year 2008 or subsequent crop years due to an eligible disaster event that occurs on or before September 30, 2011.


(c) SURE provides disaster assistance to eligible participants on farms in:


(1) Disaster counties designated by the Secretary, which also includes counties contiguous to such declared disaster counties, if the participant incurred actual production losses of at least 10 percent to at least one crop of economic significance on the farm; and


(2) Any county, if the participant incurred eligible total crop losses of greater than or equal to 50 percent of the normal production on the farm, as measured by revenue, including a loss of at least 10 percent to at least one crop of economic significance on the farm.


(d) Subject to the provisions in subpart B of this part, SURE payments will be issued on 60 percent of the difference between the SURE guarantee and total farm revenue, calculated using the National Average Market Price as specified in this subpart.


[74 FR 68490, Dec. 28, 2009, as amended at 76 FR 54075, Aug. 31, 2011]


§ 760.602 Definitions.

(a) The following definitions apply to all determinations made under this subpart.


(b) The terms defined in parts 718, 1400, and 1437 of this title and subpart B of this part will be applicable, except where those definitions conflict with the definitions set forth in this section In the event that a definition in any of those parts conflicts with the definitions set forth in this subpart, the definitions in this subpart apply. Any additional conflicts will be resolved by the Deputy Administrator.


Actual crop acreage means all acreage for each crop planted or intended to be planted on the farm.


Actual production history yield means the average of the actual production history yields for each insurable or noninsurable crop as calculated under the Federal Crop Insurance Act (FCIA) (7 U.S.C. 1501-1524) or Noninsured Crop Disaster Assistance Program (NAP) as set forth in part 1437 of this title, respectively. FSA will use the actual production history yield data provided for crop insurance or NAP, if available, in the SURE payment calculation.


Actual production on the farm means, unless the Deputy Administrator determines that the context requires otherwise, the sum obtained by adding:


(1) For each insurable crop on the farm, excluding value loss crops, the product obtained by multiplying:


(i) 100 percent of the per unit price for the crop used to calculate a crop insurance indemnity for the applicable crop insurance if a crop insurance indemnity is triggered. If a price is not available, then the price is 100 percent of the NAP established price for the crop, times


(ii) The relevant per unit quantity of the crop produced on the farm, adjusted for quality losses, plus


(2) For each noninsurable crop on the farm, excluding value loss crops, the product obtained by multiplying:


(i) 100 percent of the per unit NAP established price for the crop, times


(ii) The relevant per unit quantity of the crop produced on the farm, adjusted for quality losses, plus


(3) For value loss crops, the value of inventory immediately after the disaster.


Adjusted actual production history yield means a yield that will not be less than the participant’s actual production history yield for a year and:


(1) In the case of an eligible participant on a farm that has at least 4 years of actual production history for an insurable crop that are established other than pursuant to section 508(g)(4)(B) of FCIA, the average of the production history for the eligible participant without regard to any yields established under that section;


(2) In the case of an eligible participant on a farm that has less than 4 years of actual production history for an insurable crop, of which one or more were established pursuant to section 508(g)(4)(B) of FCIA, the average of the production history for the eligible participant as calculated without including the lowest of the yields established pursuant to section 508(g)(4)(B) of FCIA; or


(3) In all other cases, the actual production history yield of the eligible participant on a farm.


Adjusted NAP yield means a yield that will not be less than the participant’s actual production history yield for NAP for a year and:


(1) In the case of an eligible participant on a farm that has at least 4 years of actual production history under NAP that are not replacement yields, the average of the production history without regard to any replacement yields;


(2) In the case of an eligible participant on a farm that has less than 4 years of actual production history under NAP that are not replacement yields, the average of the production history without including the lowest of replacement yields; or


(3) In all other cases, the actual production history yield of the eligible participant on the farm under NAP.


Administrative fee means a fixed fee payable by a participant for NAP or crop insurance coverage, including buy-in fees, based on the number of covered crops under NAP or insurance under FCIA.


Appraised production means production determined by FSA, or an insurance provider approved by FCIC, that was unharvested, but which was determined to reflect the crop’s yield potential at the time of appraisal. An appraisal may be provided in terms of a potential value of the crop.


Aquaculture means the reproduction and rearing of aquatic species as specified in part 1437 of this title in controlled or selected environments.


Brownout means a disruption of electrical or other similar power source for any reason. A brownout, although it may indirectly have an adverse effect on crops, is not a disaster for the purposes of this subpart and losses caused by a brownout will not be considered a qualifying loss.


Catastrophic risk protection (CAT) means the minimum level of coverage offered by the Risk Management Agency (RMA) for crop insurance. CAT is further specified in parts 402 and 1437 of this title.


Counter-cyclical program payment yield means the weighted average payment yield established under part 1412, subpart C of this title.


County expected yield means an estimated yield, expressed in a specific unit of measure equal to the average of the most recent five years of official county yields established by FSA, excluding the years with the highest and lowest yields, respectively.


Crop insurance indemnity means, for the purpose of this subpart, the net payment to a participant excluding the value of the premium for crop losses covered under crop insurance administered in accordance with FCIA by RMA.


Crop of economic significance means any crop, as defined in this subpart that contributed, or, if the crop is not successfully produced, would have contributed or is expected to contribute, 5 percent or more of the total expected revenue from all of a participant’s crops on a farm.


Crop year means as determined by the Deputy Administrator for a commodity on a nationwide basis the calendar year in which the crop is normally harvested or, where more than one calendar year is involved, the calendar year in which the majority of the crop would have been harvested. For crops on which catastrophic risk protection, as defined in this section, is available, the crop year will be as defined as in such coverage. Crop year determinations by the Deputy Administrator will be final in all cases and, because these are matters of general applicability, will not considered by the Farm Service Agency to be subject to administrative appeal.


Determined acreage or determined production means the amount of acres or production for a farm established by a representative of FSA by use of appropriate means such as official acreage, digitizing and planimetering areas on the photograph or other photographic image, or computations from scaled dimensions or ground measurements. In the case of production, any production established by a representative of FSA through audit, review, measurement, appraisal, or other acceptable means of determining production, as determined by FSA.


Disaster means damaging weather, including drought, excessive moisture, hail, freeze, tornado, hurricane, typhoon, excessive wind, excessive heat, weather-related saltwater intrusion, weather-related irrigation water rationing, or any combination thereof and adverse natural occurrences such as earthquakes or volcanic eruptions. Disaster includes a related condition that occurs as a result of the damaging weather or adverse natural occurrence and exacerbates the condition of the crop, such as disease and insect infestation. It does not include brownouts or power failures.


Disaster county means a county included in the geographic area covered by a qualifying natural disaster designation under section 321(a) of the Consolidated Farm and Rural Development Act (7 U.S.C. 1961(a)) and for SURE, the term “disaster county” also includes a county contiguous to a county declared a disaster by the Secretary; however, farms not in a disaster county may qualify under SURE where for the relevant period, as determined under this subpart, the actual production on a farm is less than 50 percent of the normal production on the farm.


Double-cropping means, as determined by the Deputy Administrator on a regional basis, planting for harvest a crop of a different commodity on the same acres in cycle with another crop in a 12-month period in an area where such double-cropping is considered normal, or could be considered to be normal, for all growers and under normal growing conditions and normal agricultural practices for the region and being able to repeat the same cycle in the following 12-month period.


Farm means, for the purposes of determining SURE eligibility, the entirety of all crop acreage in all counties that a producer planted or intended to be planted for harvest for normal commercial sale or on-farm livestock feeding, including native and improved grassland intended for haying. In the case of aquaculture, except for species for which an Aquaculture Grant Program payment was received, the term “farm” includes all acreage used for all aquatic species being produced in all counties that the producer intended to harvest for normal commercial sale. In the case of honey, the term “farm” means all bees and beehives in all counties that the participant intended to be harvested for a honey crop for normal commercial sale.


FCIC means the Federal Crop Insurance Corporation, a wholly owned Government Corporation operated and managed by USDA RMA.


FSA means the Farm Service Agency.


Harvested means:


(1) For insurable crops, harvested is as defined according to the applicable crop insurance policy administered in accordance with FCIA by RMA;


(2) For NAP-covered single harvest crops, a mature crop that has been removed from the field, either by hand or mechanically;


(3) For noninsurable crops with potential multiple harvests in one year or one crop harvested over multiple years, that the participant has, by hand or mechanically, removed at least one mature crop from the field during the crop year; or


(4) For mechanically harvested noninsurable crops, that the mature crop has been removed from the field and placed in or on a truck or other conveyance, except hay is considered harvested when in the bale, whether removed from the field or not. Grazing of land will not be considered harvested for the purpose of determining an unharvested or prevented planting payment factor.


Initial crop means a first crop planted for which assistance is provided under this subpart.


Insurable crop means an agricultural commodity (excluding livestock) for which the participant on a farm is eligible to obtain a policy or plan of crop insurance administered in accordance with FCIA by RMA. Such a crop for which the participant purchased insurance from RMA is referred to as an insured crop.


Insurance is available means when crop information is contained in RMA’s county actuarial documents for a particular crop and a policy or plan of insurance administered in accordance with FCIA by RMA. If the Adjusted Gross Revenue Plan of crop insurance was the only plan of insurance available for the crop in the county in the applicable crop year, insurance is considered not available for that crop. If an AGR plan or a pilot plan was the only plan available, producers are not required to purchase it to meet the risk management purchase requirement, but it will satisfy the risk management purchase requirement. In that case, the other ways to meet the requirement would be, if all the requirements of this subpart are met, a buy-in or NAP.


Intended use means the original use for which a crop or a commodity is grown and produced.


Marketing year means the 12 months immediately following the established final harvest date of the crop of a commodity, as determined by the Deputy Administrator, and not an individual participant’s final harvest date. FSA will use the marketing year determined by NASS, when available.


Maximum average loss level means the maximum level of crop loss that will be used in calculating SURE payments for a participant without reliable or verifiable production records as defined in this section. Loss levels are expressed in either a percent of loss or a yield per acre, and reflect the amount of production that a participant should have produced considering the eligible disaster conditions in the area or county, as determined by the FSA county committee in accordance with instructions issued by the Deputy Administrator.


Multi-use crop means a crop intended for more than one use during the calendar year such as grass harvested for seed, hay, or grazing.


Multiple planting means the planting for harvest of the same crop in more than one planting period in a crop year on the same or different acreage. This is also sometimes referred in this rule as multiple cropping.


NAMP means the national average market price determined in accordance with §§ 760.640 and 760.641.


NASS is the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service.


Noninsurable crop means a commercially produced crop for which the eligible participants on a farm may obtain coverage under NAP.


Noninsured Crop Disaster Assistance Program or NAP means the FSA program carried out under 7 U.S.C. 7333, as specified in part 1437 of this title.


Normal production on the farm means, for purposes of the revenue calculations of this subpart, the sum of the expected revenue for all crops on the farm. It is stated in terms of revenue, because different crops may have different units of measure.


Planted acreage means land in which seed, plants, or trees have been placed, appropriate for the crop and planting method, at a correct depth, into a seed bed that has been properly prepared for the planting method and production practice normal to the area, as determined by the FSA county committee.


Prevented planting means the inability to plant an eligible crop with proper equipment during the planting period as a result of a disaster, as determined by FSA. All prevented planted cropland must meet conditions provided in § 718.103 of this chapter. Additionally, all insured crops must satisfy the provisions of prevented planting provided in § 457.8 of this title.


Price election means, for an insured crop, the crop insurance price elected by the participant multiplied by the percentage of price elected by the participant.


Production means quantity of a crop or commodity produced on the farm expressed in a specific unit of measure including, but not limited to, bushels or pounds and used to determine the normal production on a farm. Normal production for the whole farm is stated in terms of revenue, because different crops may have different units of measure.


Qualifying loss means a 10 percent loss of at least one crop of economic significance due to disaster and on a farm that is either:


(1) Located in a disaster county (a county for which a Secretarial disaster designation has been issued or in a county contiguous to a county that has received a Secretarial disaster designation), or


(2) If not located in any disaster county or county contiguous to such a county, but has an overall loss greater than or equal to 50 percent of normal production on the farm (expected revenue for all crops on the farm) due to disaster.


Qualifying natural disaster designation means a natural disaster designated by the Secretary for production losses under section 321(a) of the Consolidated Farm and Rural Development Act (7 U.S.C. 1961(a)).


Related condition means, with respect to a disaster, a condition that causes deterioration of a crop such as insect infestation, plant disease, or aflatoxin that is accelerated or exacerbated as a result of damaging weather, as determined by the Deputy Administrator.


Reliable production records means evidence provided by the participant to the FSA county office that FSA determines is adequate to substantiate the amount of production reported when verifiable records are not available, including copies of receipts, ledgers of income, income statements, deposit slips, register tapes, invoices for custom harvesting, records to verify production costs, contemporaneous measurements, truck scale tickets, and contemporaneous diaries. When the term “acceptable production records” is used in this rule, it may be either reliable or verifiable production records, as defined in this section.


Reported acreage or production means information obtained from the participant or the participant’s agent, on a form prescribed by FSA or through insurance records.


RMA means the Risk Management Agency.


Salvage value means the dollar amount or equivalent for the quantity of the commodity that cannot be marketed or sold in any recognized market for the crop.


Secretary means the Secretary of Agriculture.


State means a State; the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, and any other territory or possession of the United States.


Subsequent crop means any crop planted after an initial crop, on the same land, during the same crop year.


SURE means the Supplemental Revenue Assistance Payments Program.


Unit of measure means:


(1) For all insurable crops, the FCIC established unit of measure;


(2) For all noninsurable crops, if available, the established unit of measure used for the NAP price and yield;


(3) For aquatic species, a standard unit of measure such as gallons, pounds, inches or pieces, established by the FSA State committee for all aquatic species or varieties;


(4) For turfgrass sod, a square yard;


(5) For maple sap, a gallon; and


(6) For all other crops, the smallest unit of measure that lends itself to the greatest level of accuracy, as determined by the FSA State committee.


USDA means United States Department of Agriculture.


Value loss crop has the meaning specified in part 1437, subpart D of this title. Unless otherwise announced by FSA, value loss crops for SURE include aquaculture, floriculture, ornamental nursery, Christmas trees, mushrooms, ginseng, and turfgrass sod.


Verifiable production records mean evidence that is used to substantiate the amount of production reported and that can be verified by FSA through an independent source.


Volunteer stand means plants that grow from seed residue or are indigenous or are not planted. Volunteer plants may sprout from seeds left behind during a harvest of a previous crop; be unintentionally introduced to land by wind, birds, or fish; or be inadvertently mixed into a crop’s growing medium.


§ 760.610 Participant eligibility.

(a) In addition to meeting the eligibility requirements of § 760.103, a participant must meet all of the following conditions:


(1) All insurable crops on the participant’s farm must be covered by crop insurance administered by RMA in accordance with FCIA, and all noninsured crops must be covered under NAP, as specified in § 760.104, unless the participant meets the requirements in either § 760.105 or § 760.107. At the discretion of FSA, the equitable relief provisions in § 760.106 may apply.


(2) Crop losses must have occurred in crop year 2008 or subsequent crop years due to an eligible disaster event that occurred on or before September 30, 2011.


(i) For insured crops, the coverage period, as defined in the insurance policy, must have begun on or before September 30, 2011;


(ii) For NAP crops, the coverage period must have begun on or before September 30, 2011; and


(iii) The final planting date for that crop according to the Federal crop insurance or NAP policy must have been on or before September 30, 2011.


(3) A qualifying loss as defined in § 760.602 must have occurred.


(4) The participant must have been in compliance with the Highly Erodible Land Conservation and Wetland Conservation provisions of part 12 of this title, for 2008 and subsequent crop years through September 30, 2011, as applicable, and must not otherwise be barred from receiving benefits or payments under part 12 of this title or any other law.


(5) The participant must not be ineligible or otherwise barred from the requisite risk management insurance programs or NAP because of past violations where those insurance programs or NAP would otherwise be available absent such violations.


(6) The participant must have an entitlement to an ownership share of the crop and also assume production and market risks associated with the production of the crop. In the event the crop was planted but not produced, participants must have an ownership share of the crop that would have been produced.


(i) Any verbal or written contract that precludes the grower from having an ownership share renders the grower ineligible for payments under this subpart.


(ii) Growers growing eligible crops under contract are not eligible participants under this subpart unless the grower has an ownership share of the crop.


(b) In the event that a producer is determined not to be an eligible producer of a crop in accordance with this section, such crop will be disregarded in determining the producer’s production or eligibility for payments under this subpart. However, any insurance, farm program, or NAP payments received by the producer on such crop will count as farm revenue if that producer is an eligible participant as a producer of other crops.


(c) Participants may not receive payments with respect to volunteer stands of crops. Volunteer stands will not be considered in either the calculation of revenue or of the SURE guarantee.


(d) A deceased applicant or an applicant that is a dissolved entity that suffered losses prior to the death or the dissolution that met all eligibility criteria prior to death or dissolution may be eligible for payments for such losses if an authorized representative signs the application for payment. Proof of authority to sign for the deceased participant or dissolved entity must be provided. If a participant is now a dissolved general partnership or joint venture, all members of the general partnership or joint venture at the time of dissolution or their duly authorized representatives must sign the application for payment. Eligibility of such participant will be determined, as it is for other participants, based upon ownership share and risk in producing the crop.


(e) Participants receiving payments under the Emergency Assistance for Livestock, Honey Bees, and Farm-Raised Fish Program (ELAP) as specified in subpart C of this part are not eligible to receive payments under SURE for the same loss.


(f) Participants with a farming interest in multiple counties who apply for SURE payment based on a Secretarial disaster designation must have a 10 percent loss of a crop of economic significance located in at least one disaster county, as defined in this subpart, to be eligible for SURE.


[74 FR 68490, Dec. 28, 2009, as amended at 76 FR 54075, Aug. 31, 2011]


§ 760.611 Qualifying losses, eligible causes and types of loss.

(a) Eligible causes of loss are disasters which cause types of losses where the crop could not be planted or where crop production was adversely affected in quantity, quality, or both. A qualifying loss, as defined in this subpart, must be the result of a disaster.


(b) A loss will not be considered a qualifying loss if any of the following apply:


(1) The cause of the loss was not the result of disaster;


(2) The cause of loss was due to poor management decisions or poor farming practices, as determined by the FSA county committee on a case-by-case basis;


(3) The cause of loss was due to failure of the participant to re-seed or replant to the same crop in a county where it is customary to re-seed or replant after a loss before the final planting date;


(4) The cause of loss was due to water contained or released by any governmental, public, or private dam or reservoir project if an easement exists on the acreage affected by the containment or release of the water;


(5) The cause of loss was due to conditions or events occurring outside of the applicable crop year growing season; or


(6) The cause of loss was due to a brownout.


(c) The following types of loss, regardless of whether they were the result of a disaster, are not qualifying losses:


(1) Losses to crops not intended for harvest in the applicable crop year;


(2) Losses of by-products resulting from processing or harvesting a crop, such as, but not limited to, cotton seed, peanut shells, wheat or oat straw, or corn stalks or stovers;


(3) Losses to home gardens; or to a crop subject to a de minimis election according to § 760.613;


(4) Losses of crops that were grazed or, if prevented from being planted, had the intended use of grazing; or


(5) Losses of first year seeding for forage production, or immature fruit crops.


(d) The following losses of ornamental nursery stock are not a qualifying loss:


(1) Losses caused by a failure of power supply or brownout as defined in § 760.602;


(2) Losses caused by the inability to market nursery stock as a result of quarantine, boycott, or refusal of a buyer to accept production;


(3) Losses caused by fires that are not the result of disaster;


(4) Losses affecting crops where weeds and other forms of undergrowth in the vicinity of nursery stock have not been controlled; or


(5) Losses caused by the collapse or failure of buildings or structures.


(e) The following losses for honey, where the honey production by colonies or bees was diminished, are not a qualifying loss:


(1) Losses caused by the unavailability of equipment or the collapse or failure of equipment or apparatus used in the honey operation;


(2) Losses caused by improper storage of honey;


(3) Losses caused by bee feeding;


(4) Losses caused by the application of chemicals;


(5) Losses caused by theft or fire not caused by a natural condition including, but not limited to, arson or vandalism;


(6) Losses caused by the movement of bees by the participant or any other legal entity or person;


(7) Losses caused by disease or pest infestation of the colonies, unless approved by the Secretary;


(8) Losses of income from pollinators; or


(9) Losses of equipment or facilities.


§ 760.613 De minimis exception.

(a) Participants seeking the de minimis exception to the risk management purchase requirements of this subpart, must certify:


(1) That a specific crop on the farm is not a crop of economic significance on the farm; or


(2) That the administrative fee required for the purchase of NAP coverage for a crop exceeds 10 percent of the value of that coverage.


(b) To be eligible for a de minimis exception to the risk management purchase requirement in § 760.104, the participant must elect such exception at the same time the participant files the application for payment and the certification of interests, as specified in § 760.620, and specify the crop or crops for which the participant is requesting such exception.


(c) FSA will not consider the value of any crop elected under paragraph (b) of this section in calculating both the SURE guarantee and the total farm revenue.


(d) All provisions of this subpart apply in the event a participant does not obtain an exception according to this section.


§ 760.614 Lack of access.

In addition to other provisions for eligibility provided for in this part, the Deputy Administrator may provide assistance to participants who suffered 2008 production losses that meet the lack of access provisions in 19 U.S.C. 2497(g)(7)(F), where deemed appropriate, and consistent with the statutory provision. Such a determination to exercise that authority, and the terms on which to exercise that authority, will be considered to be a determination of general effect, not a “relief” determination, and will not be considered by the Farm Service Agency to be appealable administratively either within FSA or before the National Appeals Division.


§ 760.620 Time and method of application and certification of interests.

(a) Each producer interested in obtaining a SURE payment must file an application for payment and provide an accurate certification of interests. The application will be on a form prescribed by FSA and will require information or certifications from the producer regarding any other assistance, payment, or grant benefit the producer has received for any of the producer’s crops or interests on a farm as defined in this subpart; regardless of whether the crop or interest is covered in the farm’s SURE guarantee according to § 760.631. The producer’s certification of interests will help FSA establish whether the producer is an eligible participant.


(b) Eligible participants with a qualifying loss as defined in this subpart must submit an application for payment and certification of interests by March 1 of the calendar year that is two years after the relevant corresponding calendar year for the crop year which benefits are sought to be eligible for payment (for example, the final date to submit an application for a SURE payment for the 2009 crop year will be March 1, 2011). Producers who do not submit the application by that date will not be eligible for payment.


(c) To the extent available and practicable, FSA will assist participants with information regarding their interests in a farm, as of the date of certification, based on information already available to FSA from various sources. However, the participant is solely responsible for providing an accurate certification from which FSA can determine the participant’s farm interests for the purposes of this program. As determined appropriate by FSA, failure of a participant to provide an accurate certification of interests as part of the application may render the participant ineligible for any assistance under SURE.


(d) To elect a de minimis exception to the risk management purchase requirement for a crop or crops, the participant must meet the requirements specified in § 760.613. When electing a de minimis exception, the participant must specify the crops for which the exception is requested and provide the certification and supporting documentation for that exception at the time the application and certification of interests is filed with FSA.


§ 760.621 Requirement to report acreage and production.

(a) As a condition of eligibility for payment under this subpart, participants must submit an accurate and timely report of all cropland, non-cropland, prevented planting, and subsequent crop acreage and production for the farm in all counties.


(b) Acreage and production reports that have been submitted to FSA for NAP or to RMA for crop insurance purposes may satisfy the requirement of paragraph (a) of this section provided that the participant’s certification of interests submitted as required by § 760.620 corresponds to the report requirements in paragraph (a) of this section, as determined by the FSA county committee.


(c) Reports of production submitted for NAP or FCIA purposes must satisfy the requirements of NAP or FCIA, as applicable. In all other cases, in order for production reports or appraisals to be considered acceptable for SURE, production reports and appraisals must meet the requirements set forth in part 1437 of this title.


(d) In any case where production reports or an appraisal is not acceptable, maximum loss provisions apply as specified in § 760.637.


§ 760.622 Incorrect or false producer production evidence.

(a) If production evidence, including but not limited to acreage and production reports, provided by a participant is false or incorrect, as determined by the FSA county committee at any time after an application for payment is made, the FSA county committee will determine whether:


(1) The participant submitting the production evidence acted in good faith or took action to defeat the purposes of the program, such that the information provided was intentionally false or incorrect.


(2) The same false, incorrect, or unacceptable production evidence was submitted for payment(s) under crop insurance or NAP, and if so, for NAP covered crops, make any NAP program adjustments according to § 1437.15 of this title.


(b) If the FSA county committee determines that the production evidence submitted is false, incorrect, or unacceptable, and the participant who submitted the evidence did not act in good faith or took action to defeat the purposes of the program, the provisions of § 760.109, including a denial of future program benefits, will apply. The Deputy Administrator may take further action, including, but not limited to, making further payment reductions or requiring refunds or taking other legal action.


(c) If the FSA county committee determines that the production evidence is false, incorrect, or unacceptable, but the participant who submitted the evidence acted in good faith, payment may be adjusted and a refund may be required.


§ 760.631 SURE guarantee calculation.

(a) Except as otherwise provided in this part, the SURE guarantee for a farm is the sum obtained by adding the dollar amounts calculated in paragraphs (a)(1) through (a)(3) of this section.


(1) For each insurable crop on the farm except for value loss crops, 115 percent of the product obtained by multiplying together:


(i) The price election. If a price election was not made or a participant is eligible as specified in §§ 760.105, 760.106, or 760.107, then the percentage of price will be 55 percent of the NAP established price;


(ii) The payment acres determined according to § 760.632;


(iii) The SURE yield as calculated according to § 760.638; and


(iv) The coverage level elected by the participant. If a coverage level was not elected or a participant is eligible as specified in § 760.105, § 760.106, or § 760.107, a coverage level of 50 percent will be used in the calculation.


(2) For each noninsurable crop on a farm except for value loss crops, 120 percent of the product obtained by multiplying:


(i) 100 percent of the NAP established price for the crop;


(ii) The payment acres determined according to § 760.632;


(iii) The SURE yield calculated according to § 760.638; and


(iv) 50 percent.


(3) The guarantee for value loss crops as calculated according to § 760.634.


(4) In the case of an insurable crop for which crop insurance provides for an adjustment in the guarantee liability, or indemnity, such as in the case of prevented planting, that adjustment will be used in determining the guarantee for the insurable crop.


(5) In the case of a noninsurable crop for which NAP provides for an adjustment in the level of assistance, such as in the case of unharvested crops, that adjustment will be used for determining the guarantee for the noninsurable crop.


(b) Those participants who are eligible according to § 760.105, § 760.106, or § 760.107 who do not have crop insurance or NAP coverage will have their SURE guarantee calculated based on catastrophic risk protection or NAP coverage available for those crops.


(c) FSA will not include in the SURE guarantee the value of any crop that has a de minimis exception, according to § 760.613.


(d) For crops where coverage may exist under both crop insurance and NAP, such as for pasture, rangeland, and forage, adjustments to the guarantee will be the product obtained by multiplying the county expected yield for that crop times:


(1) 115 percent;


(2) 100 percent of the NAP established price;


(3) The payment acres determined according to § 760.632;


(4) The SURE yield calculated according to § 760.638; and


(5) The coverage level elected by the participant.


(e) Participants who do not have a SURE yield as specified in § 760.638 will have a yield determined for them by the Deputy Administrator.


(f) The SURE guarantee may not be greater than 90 percent of the sum of the expected revenue for each of the crops on a farm, as determined by the Deputy Administrator.


§ 760.632 Payment acres.

(a) Payment acres as calculated in this section are used in determining both total farm revenue and the SURE guarantee for a farm. Payment acreage will be calculated using the lesser of the reported or determined acres shown to have been planted or prevented from being planted to a crop.


(b) Initial crop acreage will be the payment acreage for SURE, unless the provisions for subsequent crops in this section are met. Subsequently planted or prevented planted acre acreage is considered acreage for SURE only if the provisions of this section are met. All plantings of an annual or biennial crop are considered the same as a planting of an initial crop in tropical regions as defined in part 1437, subpart F, of this title.


(c) In cases where there is double cropped acreage, each crop may be included in the acreage for SURE only if the specific crops are either insured crops eligible for double cropping according to RMA or approved by the FSA State committee as eligible double cropping practices in accordance with procedures approved by the Deputy Administrator.


(d) Except for insured crops, participants with double cropped acreage not meeting the criteria in paragraph (c) of this section may have such acreage included in the acreage for SURE on more than one crop only if the participant submits verifiable records establishing a history of carrying out a successful double cropping practice on the specific crops for which payment is requested.


(e) Participants having multiple plantings may have each planting included in the SURE guarantee only if the planting meets the requirements of part 1437 of this title and all other provisions of this subpart are satisfied.


(f) Provisions of part 718 of this title specifying what is considered prevented planting and how it must be documented and reported will apply to this payment acreage for SURE.


(g) Subject to the provisions of this subpart, the FSA county committee will:


(1) Use the most accurate data available when determining planted and prevented planted acres; and


(2) Disregard acreage of a crop produced on land that is not eligible for crop insurance or NAP.


(h) For any crop acreage for which crop insurance or NAP coverage is canceled, those acres will no longer be considered the initial crop and will, therefore, no longer be eligible for SURE.


(i) Notwithstanding any other provisions of these or other applicable regulations that relate to tolerance in part 718 of this title, if a farm has a crop that has both FSA and RMA acreage for insured crops, payment acres for the SURE guarantee calculation will be based on acres for which an indemnity was received if RMA acres do not differ from FSA acres by more than the larger of 5 percent or 10 acres not to exceed 50 acres. If the difference between FSA and RMA acres is more than the larger of 5 percent or 10 acres not to exceed 50 acres, then the payment acres for the SURE guarantee will be calculated using RMA acres. In that case, the participant will be notified of the discrepancy and that refunds of unearned payments may be required after FSA and RMA reconcile acreage data.


§ 760.633 2008 SURE guarantee calculation.

(a) For a participant who is eligible due to the 2008 buy-in waiver for risk management purchase under the provisions of § 760.105(c), the SURE guarantee for their farm for the 2008 crop will be calculated according to § 760.631, or according to § 760.634 for value loss crops, with the exception that the:


(1) Price election in § 760.631(a)(1)(i) is 100 percent of the NAP established price for the crop;


(2) Coverage level in § 760.631(a)(1)(iv) is 70 percent; and


(3) The percent specified in § 760.631(a)(2)(iv) is 70 percent instead of 50 percent; and


(4) Coverage level used in § 760.634(a)(1)(ii) is 70 percent; and


(5) The percent specified in § 760.634(a)(2)(ii) is 70 percent instead of 50 percent.


(b) For those 2008 crops that meet the requirements of §§ 760.104, 760.105(a), 760.106, or 760.107, the SURE guarantee will be the higher of:


(1) The guarantee calculated according to § 760.631, or according to § 760.634 for value loss crops, with the exception that the percent specified in §§ 760.631(a)(1) and 760.634(a)(1) will be 120 percent instead of 115 percent;


(2) The guarantee calculated according to § 760.631, or according to § 760.634 for value loss crops, will be used with the exception that the:


(i) Price election in § 760.631(a)(1)(i) is 100 percent of the NAP established price for the crop; and


(ii) Coverage level in §§ 760.631(a)(1)(iv) and 760.634(a)(1)(ii) will be 70 percent; and


(iii) The percent specified in §§ 760.631(a)(2)(iv) and 760.634(a)(2)(ii) will be 70 percent instead of 50 percent.


§ 760.634 SURE guarantee for value loss crops.

(a) The SURE guarantee for value loss crops will be the sum of the amounts calculated in paragraphs (a)(1) and (a)(2) of this section, except as otherwise specified.


(1) For each insurable crop on the farm, 115 percent of the product obtained by multiplying:


(i) The value of inventory immediately prior to disaster, and


(ii) The coverage level elected by the participant. If a coverage level was not elected or a participant is eligible as specified in §§ 760.106 or 760.107, a coverage level of 27.5 percent will be used in the calculation.


(2) For each noninsurable crop on the farm, 120 percent of the product obtained by multiplying:


(i) The value of inventory immediately prior to a disaster, and


(ii) 50 percent.


(b) Aquaculture participants who received assistance under the Aquaculture Grant Program (Pub. L. 111-5) will not be eligible for SURE assistance on those species for which a grant benefit was received under the Aquaculture Grant Program for feed losses associated with that species.


(c) In the case of an insurable value loss crop for which crop insurance provides for an adjustment in the guarantee, liability, or indemnity, such as in the case of inventory exceeding peak inventory value, the adjustment will be used in determining the SURE guarantee for the insurable crop.


(d) In the case of a noninsurable value loss crop for which NAP provides for an adjustment in the level of assistance, such as in the case of unharvested field grown inventory, the adjustment will be used in determining the SURE guarantee for the noninsurable crop.


§ 760.635 Total farm revenue.

(a) For the purpose of SURE payment calculation, total farm revenue will equal the sum obtained by adding the amounts calculated in paragraphs (a)(1) through (a)(12) of this section.


(1) The estimated actual value for each crop produced on a farm, except for value loss crops, which equals the product obtained by multiplying:


(i) The actual production of the payment acres for each crop on a farm for purposes of determining losses under FCIA or NAP; and


(ii) NAMP, as calculated for the marketing year as specified in § 760.640 and as adjusted if required as specified in § 760.641.


(2) The estimated actual value for each value loss crop produced on a farm that equals the value of inventory immediately after disaster.


(3) 15 percent of the amount of any direct payments made to the participant under part 1412 of this title.


(4) The total amount of any counter-cyclical and average crop revenue election payments made to the participant under part 1412 of this title.


(5) The total amount of any loan deficiency payments, marketing loan gains, and marketing certificate gains made to the participant under parts 1421 and 1434 of this title.


(6) The amount of payments for prevented planting.


(7) The amount of crop insurance indemnities.


(8) The amount of NAP payments received.


(9) The value of any guaranteed payments made to a participant in lieu of production pursuant to an agreement or contract, if the crop is included in the SURE guarantee.


(10) Salvage value for any crops salvaged.


(11) The value of any other disaster assistance payments provided by the Federal Government for the same loss for which the eligible participant applied for SURE.


(12) For crops for which the eligible participant received a waiver under the provisions of § 760.105(c) or obtained relief according to § 760.106, the value determined by FSA based on what the participant would have received, irrespective of any other provision, if NAP or crop insurance coverage had been obtained.


(b) Sale of plant parts or by-products, such as straw, will not be counted as farm revenue.


(c) For value loss crops:


(1) Other inventory on hand or marketed at some time other than immediately prior to and immediately after the disaster event are irrelevant for revenue purposes and will not be counted as revenue for SURE.


(2) Revenue will not be adjusted for market loss.


(3) Quality losses will not be considered in determining revenue.


(4) In no case will market price declines in value loss crops, due to any cause, be considered in the calculation of payments for those crops.


§ 760.636 Expected revenue.

The expected revenue for each crop on a farm is:


(a) For each insurable crop, except value loss crops, the product obtained by multiplying:


(1) The SURE yield as specified in § 760.638;


(2) The payment acres as specified in § 760.632; and


(3) 100 percent of the price for the crop used to calculate a crop insurance indemnity for an applicable policy of insurance if a crop insurance indemnity is triggered. If a price is not available, then the price is 100 percent of the NAP established price for the crop, and


(b) For each noninsurable crop, except value loss crops, the product obtained by multiplying


(1) The SURE yield as specified in § 760.638;


(2) The payment acres as specified in § 760.632; and


(3) 100 percent of the NAP price.


(c) For each value loss crop, the value of inventory immediately prior to the disaster.


§ 760.637 Determination of production.

(a) Except for value loss crops, production for the purposes of this part includes all harvested, appraised, and assigned production for the payment acres determined according to § 760.632.


(b) The FSA county committee will use the best available data to determine production, including RMA and NAP loss records and yields for insured and noninsured crops.


(c) The production of any eligible crop harvested more than once in a crop year will include the total harvested production from all harvests.


(d) Crop production losses occurring in tropical regions, as defined in part 1437, subpart F of this chapter, will be based on a crop year beginning on January 1 and ending on December 31 of the same calendar year. All crop harvests in tropical regions that take place between those dates will be considered a single crop.


(e) Any record of an appraisal of crop production conducted by RMA or FSA through a certified loss adjustor will be used if available. Unharvested appraised production will be included in the calculation of revenue under SURE. If the unharvested appraised crop is subsequently harvested for the original intended use, the larger of the actual or appraised production will be used to determine payment.


(1) If no appraisal is available, the participant is required to submit verifiable or reliable production evidence.


(2) If the participant does not have verifiable or reliable production evidence, the FSA county committee will use the higher of the participant’s crop certification or the maximum average loss level to determine the participant’s crop production losses.


(f) Production will be adjusted based on a whole grain equivalent, as established by FSA, for all crops with an intended use of grain, but harvested as silage, cobbage, or hay, cracked, rolled, or crimped.


(g) For crops sold in a market that is not a recognized market for that crop and has no established county expected yield and NAMP, the quantity of such crops will not be considered production; rather, 100 percent of the salvage value will be included in the revenue calculation.


(h) Production from different counties that is commingled on the farm before it was a matter of record and cannot be separated by using records or other means acceptable to FSA will have the NAMP prorated to each respective county by FSA. Commingled production may be attributed to the applicable county, if the participant made the location of production of a crop a matter of record before commingling, if the participant does either of the following:


(1) Provides copies of verifiable documents showing that production of the crop was purchased, acquired, or otherwise obtained from the farm in that county; or


(2) Had the farm’s production in that county measured in a manner acceptable to the FSA county committee.


(i) The FSA county committee will assign production for the purpose of NAMP for the farm if the FSA county committee determines that the participant failed to provide verifiable or reliable production records.


(j) If RMA loss records are not available, or if the FSA county committee determines that the RMA loss records as reported by the insured participant appear to be questionable or incomplete, or if the FSA county committee makes inquiry, then participants are responsible for:


(1) Retaining and providing, when required, the best available verifiable and reliable production records available for the crops;


(2) Summarizing all the production evidence;


(3) Accounting for the total amount of production for the crop on a farm, whether or not records reflect this production;


(4) Providing the information in a manner that can be easily understood by the FSA county committee; and


(5) Providing supporting documentation if the FSA county committee has reason to question the disaster event or that all production has been taken into account.


(k) The participant must supply verifiable or reliable production records to substantiate production to the FSA county committee. If the eligible crop was sold or otherwise disposed of through commercial channels, acceptable production records include: Commercial receipts; settlement sheets; warehouse ledger sheets or load summaries; or appraisal information from a loss adjuster acceptable to FSA. If the eligible crop was farm-stored, sold, fed to livestock, or disposed of by means other than commercial channels, acceptable production records for these purposes include: Truck scale tickets; appraisal information from a loss adjuster acceptable to FSA; contemporaneous reliable diaries; or other documentary evidence, such as contemporaneous reliable measurements. Determinations of reliability with respect to this paragraph will take into account, as appropriate, the ability of the agency to verify the evidence as well as the similarity of the evidence to reports or data received by FSA for the crop or similar crops. Other factors deemed relevant may also be taken into account.


(l) If no verifiable or reliable production records are available, the FSA county committee will use the higher of the participant’s certification or the maximum average loss level to determine production.


(m) Participants must provide all records for any production of a crop that is grown with an arrangement, agreement, or contract for guaranteed payment.


(n) FSA may verify the production evidence submitted with records on file at the warehouse, gin, or other entity that received or may have received the reported production.


§ 760.638 Determination of SURE yield.

(a) Except for value loss crops as specified in § 760.634, a SURE yield will be determined for each crop, type, and intended use on a farm, using the higher of the participant’s weighted:


(1) Adjusted actual production history yield as determined in paragraph (b) of this section; or


(2) Counter-cyclical yield as determined in paragraph (c) of this section.


(b) The adjusted actual production history yield, as defined in § 760.602, will be weighted by the applicable crop year total planted and prevented planted acres, by crop, type, and intended use for each county. RMA data will be used for calculating the SURE yield for insured crops.


(c) The counter-cyclical yield for a crop on a SURE farm will be weighted in such manner as FSA deems fit taking into account a desire for a consistent system and FSA’s ability to make timely yield determinations.


(d) Participants who do not purchase crop insurance or NAP coverage, but who are otherwise eligible for payment, will have a SURE yield determined by the FSA county committee as follows:


(1) A weighted yield, based on planted and prevented planted acres, the location county, crop type, and intended use, will be determined at 65 percent of the county expected yield for each crop.


(2) The SURE yield will be the higher of the yield calculated using the method in paragraph (d)(1) of this section or 65 percent of the weighted counter-cyclical yield as determined in paragraph (c) of this section.


(e) For those participants with crop insurance but without an adjusted actual production history yield, a SURE yield will be determined by the applicable FSA county committee. This paragraph will apply in the case where the insurance policy does not require an actual production history yield, or where a participant has no production history.


[74 FR 68490, Dec. 28, 2009, as amended at 75 FR 19189, Apr. 14, 2010]


§ 760.640 National average market price.

(a) The Deputy Administrator will establish the National Average Market Price (NAMP) using the best sources available, as determined by the Deputy Administrator, which may include, but are not limited to, data from NASS, Cooperative Extension Service, Agricultural Marketing Service, crop insurance, and NAP.


(b) NAMP may be adjusted by the FSA State committee, in accordance with instructions issued by the Deputy Administrator and as specified in § 760.641, to recognize average quality loss factors that are reflected in the market by county or part of a county.


(c) With respect to a crop for which an eligible participant on a farm receives assistance under NAP, the NAMP will not exceed the price of the crop established under NAP.


(d) To the extent practicable, the NAMP will be established on a harvested basis without the inclusion of transportation, storage, processing, marketing, or other post-harvest expenses, as determined by FSA.


(e) NAMP may be adjusted by the FSA State committee, as authorized by The Deputy Administrator, to reflect regional variations in price consistent with those prices established under the FCIA or NAP.


§ 760.641 Adjustments made to NAMP to reflect loss of quality.

(a) The Deputy Administrator will authorize FSA county committees, with FSA State committee concurrence, to adjust NAMP for a county or part of a county:


(1) To reflect the average quality discounts applied to the local or regional market price of a crop due to a reduction in the intrinsic characteristics of the production resulting from adverse weather, as determined annually by the State office of the FSA; or


(2) To account for a crop for which the value is reduced due to excess moisture resulting from a disaster related condition.


(3) For adjustments specified in paragraphs (a)(1) and (a)(2) of this section, an adjustment factor that represents the regional or local price received for the crop in the county will be calculated by the FSA State committee. The adjustment factor will be based on the average actual market price compared to NAMP.


(b) For adjustments made under paragraph (a) of this section, participants must provide verifiable evidence of actual or appraised production, clearly indicating an average loss of value caused by poor quality or excessive moisture that meets or exceeds the quality adjustment for the county or part of a county established in paragraph (a)(3) of this section to be eligible to receive the quality-adjusted NAMP as part of their SURE payment calculation. In order to be considered at all for the purpose of quality adjustments, the verifiable evidence of production must itself detail the extent of the quality loss for a specific quantity. With regard to test evidence, in addition to meeting all the requirements of this section, tests must have been completed by January 1 of the year following harvest.


§ 760.650 Calculating SURE.

(a) Subject to the provision of this subpart, SURE payments for crop losses in crop year 2008 and subsequent crop years will be calculated as the amount equal to 60 percent of the difference between:


(1) The SURE guarantee, as specified in § 760.631, § 760.633 or § 760.634 of this subpart, and


(2) The total farm revenue, as specified in § 760.635.


(b) In addition to the other provisions of this subpart and subpart B of this part, SURE payments may be adjusted downward as necessary to insure compliance with the payment limitations in subpart B and to insure that payments do not exceed the maximum amount specified in § 760.108(a)(1) or (b)(1) or otherwise exceed the perceived intent of 19 U.S.C. 2497(j). Such adjustments can include, but are not limited to, adjustments to insure that there is no duplication of benefits as specified in § 760.108(c).


Subpart H – Crop Assistance Program


Authority:7 U.S.C. 612c.


Source:75 FR 65428, Oct. 25, 2010, unless otherwise noted.

§ 760.701 Applicability.

(a) This subpart specifies the eligibility requirements and payment calculations for the Crop Assistance Program (CAP), which will be administered using funds authorized by Section 32 of the Agricultural Adjustment Act of 1935 (7 U.S.C. 612c, as amended).


(b) CAP, within the limits of the funds made available by the Secretary for this program, is intended to help reestablish purchasing power to producers of long grain rice, medium or short grain rice, upland cotton, soybeans, and sweet potatoes who suffered a five percent or greater loss in the 2009 crop year due to disaster.


(c) Only producers who have a share in a farm located in a disaster county (a county that is the primary county that is the subject of a Secretarial disaster designation for 2009 crop year due to excessive moisture and related conditions, as determined by FSA) are eligible for CAP benefits.


§ 760.702 Definitions.

The following definitions apply to CAP. The definitions in parts 718, 760, and 1400 of this title also apply, except where they conflict with the definitions in this section.


Acceptable production records means verifiable or reliable production records deemed acceptable by FSA.


Application means the CAP application form.


Application period means the 45-day period established by the Deputy Administrator for producers on farms in disaster counties to apply for CAP that ends December 9, 2010.


Approved yield means the amount of production per acre, computed in accordance with FCIC’s Actual Production History (APH) Program at part 400, subpart G of this title or, for crops not included under part 400, subpart G of this title, the yield used to determine the guarantee. For crops covered under NAP, the approved yield is established according to part 1437 of this title.


Considered planted means acreage approved as prevented planted or failed in accordance with § 718.103 of this chapter.


Crop means the reported or determined 2009 crop year planted and considered planted acres of long grain rice, medium or short grain rice, upland cotton, soybean, or sweet potatoes as reflected on 2009 crop year form FSA-578, Report of Acreage, for a producer in a disaster county as of October 22, 2010. Subsequent crops, replacement crops, reseeded crops, and replanted crops are not eligible crops under this part and no revision of the Report of Acreage that would increase an eligibility for payment will be permitted to produce that effect.


Crop year means for 2009:


(1) For insurable crops, the crop year as defined according to the applicable crop insurance policy;


(2) For NAP covered crops, the crop year as provided in part 1437 of this title.


Disaster means excessive moisture or related condition, resulting from any of the following: flood, flash flooding, excessive rain, moisture, humidity, severe storms, thunderstorms, ground saturation or standing water, hail, winter storms, ice storms, snow, blizzard, hurricane, typhoons, tropical storms, and cold wet weather. A disaster does not include brownouts or power failures.


Disaster county means a county included in the geographic area covered by a qualifying natural disaster designation under section 321(a) of the Consolidated Farm and Rural Development Act (7 U.S.C. 1961(a)). For CAP, the term “disaster county” is limited to those primary counties declared a disaster by the Secretary for excessive moisture or a related condition, which are limited to designations based on any of the following: flood, flash flooding, excessive rain, moisture, humidity, severe storms, thunderstorms, ground saturation or standing water, hail, winter storms, ice storms, snow, blizzard, hurricane, typhoons, tropical storms, and cold wet weather.


Expected production means, for a producer on a farm who attempts to determine what the producer might produce for an eligible crop on a farm, the historic yield multiplied by the producer’s share of planted and considered planted acres of the crop for the farm. Expected production may be used to assist producers in determining whether the producer has a crop or crops that suffered a qualifying loss of five percent and to determine whether that crop is eligible for CAP benefits.


Historic yield means, for a producer on a farm, the higher of the county average yield or the producer’s approved yields for eligible crops on the farm.


(1) An insured producer’s yield will be the higher of the county average yield listed or the approved federal crop insurance APH, for the disaster year.


(2) A NAP producer’s yield will be the higher of the county average yield or NAP approved yield for the disaster year.


Replacement crop means the planting or approved prevented planting of any crop for harvest following the failed planting or prevented planting of a crop of long grain rice, medium or short grain rice, upland cotton, soybeans, or sweet potatoes not in a recognized double-cropping sequence. Replacement crops are not eligible for CAP.


Reseeded or replanted crop means the second planting of a crop of long grain rice, medium or short grain rice, upland cotton, soybeans, or sweet potatoes on the same acreage after the first planting of that same crop that failed.


§ 760.703 Producer eligibility requirements.

(a) A producer must meet all of the requirements in this subpart to be eligible for a CAP payment.


(b) To be eligible, a producer must be an individual or entity who is entitled to an ownership share of an eligible crop and who has the production and market risks associated with the agricultural production of the crop on a farm. An eligible producer must be a:


(1) Citizen of the United States;


(2) Resident alien, which for purposes of this subpart means “lawful alien” as defined in 7 CFR part 1400;


(3) Partnership of citizens of the United States; or


(4) Corporation, limited liability corporation, or other farm organizational structure organized under State law.


(c) To be eligible, a producer must have:


(1) Produced a 2009 crop year planted or considered planted long grain rice, medium or short grain rice, upland cotton, soybean, or sweet potato crop in a 2009 eligible disaster county, and


(2) Suffered a five percent or greater loss in an eligible disaster county in 2009. A list of the disaster counties for CAP is available on the FSA Web site and at FSA county offices.


§ 760.704 Time and method of application.

(a) To request a CAP payment, the producer must submit a CAP application on the form designated by FSA to the FSA county office responsible for administration of the farm.


(b) Producers submitting an application for a crop must certify that they suffered a five percent or greater loss of the crop on the farm in a disaster county and that they have documentation to support that certification as required in § 760.713.


(c) Once submitted by a producer, the application is considered to contain information and certifications of and pertaining to the producer’s crop and farm regardless of who entered the information on the application.


(d) Producers requesting benefits under CAP must certify the accuracy and truthfulness of the information provided in the application as well as with any documentation that may be provided with the application or documentation that will be provided to FSA in substantiation of the application. All certifications and information are subject to verification by FSA.


(e) Producers applying for CAP must certify that they have an eligible ownership share interest in the 2009 crop acreage that sustained a five percent or greater loss. The determination and certification by a producer that a crop suffered the requisite five percent or greater farm crop loss is the expected quantity of production of the crop less the actual production of the crop.


(f) In the event that the producer does not submit documentation in response to any request of FSA to support the producer’s application or documentation furnished does not show a crop loss of at least five percent as claimed, the application for that crop will be disapproved in its entirety. For quantity losses, producers need to apply a standard similar to the historic yield provisions used under previous ad hoc disaster programs. Those provisions provided that a historic yield was the higher of a county average yield or a producer’s approved yield. Thus, if an applicant is determining whether a farm has a crop that suffered a loss of five percent or greater on the farm’s planted and considered planted acreage, the applicant could compare the amount successfully produced in 2009 from those planted and considered planted acres to what the participant expected to produce from that acreage using either the county average yield (which may be obtained from FSA by request) or based on analysis of approved actual production history yields that may exist for producers of the crop on the farm.


(g) Unless otherwise determined necessary by FSA, producers will not be required to submit documentation of farm crop production or loss at time of application. FSA’s decision not to require proof, documentation, or evidence in support of any application at time of application is not to be construed as a determination of a producer’s eligibility.


(h) Producers who apply are required to retain documentation in support of their application for three years after the date of application in accordance with § 760.713.


(i) The application submitted in accordance with this section is not considered valid and complete for issuance of payment under this part unless FSA determines all the applicable eligibility provisions have been satisfied and the producer has submitted all the required forms. In addition to the completed, certified application form, if the information for the following forms or certifications is not on file in the FSA county office or is not current for 2009, the producer must also submit:


(1) Farm operating plan for individual or legal entity;


(2) Average adjusted gross income statement for 2009; and


(3) Highly erodible land conservation (HELC) and wetland conservation certification.


(j) Application approval and payment by FSA does not relieve a producer from having to submit any form, records, or documentation required, but not filed at the time of application or payment, according to paragraph (h) of this section.


§ 760.705 Payment rates and calculation of payments.

(a) CAP payments will be calculated by multiplying the total number of reported or determined acres of an eligible crop by the per acre payment rate for that crop. Payment rates are as follows:


(1) Long grain rice, $31.93 per acre;


(2) Medium or short grain rice, $52.46 per acre;


(3) Upland cotton, $17.70 per acre;


(4) Soybeans, $15.62 per acre; and


(5) Sweet potatoes, $155.41 per acre.


(b) Payments will be calculated based on the 2009 crop year reported or determined planted or considered planted acres of an eligible crop on a farm in a disaster county as reflected on a form FSA-578, Report of Acreage, on file in FSA as of October 22, 2010.


§ 760.706 Availability of funds.

(a) Payments specified in this subpart are subject to the availability of funds. The total available program funds are $550 million. In order to keep payments within available funds, the Deputy Administrator may pro-rate payments, to the extent the Deputy Administrator determines that necessary.


(b) Funds for CAP are being made available only for the 2009 crop year reported and determined eligible crop acreage in disaster counties as reflected on a form FSA-578, Report of Acreage, as of October 22, 2010.


§ 760.707 Proof of loss.

(a) All certifications, applications, and documentation are subject to spot check and verification by FSA. Producers must submit documentation to FSA if and when FSA requests documentation to substantiate any certified application.


(b) Producers are responsible for retaining or providing, when required, verifiable or reliable production or loss records available for the crop. Producers are also responsible for summarizing all the production or loss evidence and providing the information in a manner that can be understood by the county committee.


(c) Any producer receiving payment under this subpart agrees to maintain any books, records, and accounts supporting any information or certification made according to this part for 3 years after the end of the year following application.


(d) Producers receiving payments or any other person who furnishes such information to FSA must permit FSA or authorized representatives of USDA and the General Accounting Office during regular business hours to inspect, examine, and to allow such persons to make copies of such books, records or other items for the purpose of confirming the accuracy of the information provided by the producer.


§ 760.708 Miscellaneous provisions and limitations.

(a) A person ineligible under § 1437.15(c) of this title concerning violations of the Noninsured Crop Disaster Assistance Program for the 2009 crop year is ineligible for benefits under this subpart.


(b) A person ineligible under § 400.458 of this title for the 2009 crop year concerning violations of crop insurance regulations is ineligible for CAP.


(c) In the event that any request for CAP payment resulted from erroneous information or a miscalculation, the payment will be recalculated and the producer must refund any excess to FSA with interest to be calculated from the date of the disbursement to the producer. If for whatever reason the producer signing a CAP application overstates the loss level of the crop when the actual loss level determined by FSA for the crop is less than the level claimed, or where the CAP payment would exceed the producer’s actual loss, the application will be disapproved for the crop and the full CAP payment for that crop will be required to be refunded with interest from date of disbursement. The CAP payment cannot exceed the producer’s actual loss.


(d) The liability of anyone for any penalty or sanction under or in connection with this subpart, or for any refund to FSA or related charge is in addition to any other liability of such person under any civil or criminal fraud statute or any other provision of law including, but not limited to: 18 U.S.C. 286, 287, 371, 641, 651, 1001, and 1014; 15 U.S.C. 714; and 31 U.S.C. 3729.


(e) The regulations in parts 11 and 780 of this title apply to determinations under this subpart.


(f) Any payment to any person under this subpart will be made without regard to questions of title under State law and without regard to any claim or lien against the crop, or its proceeds.


(g) Any payment made under this subpart will be considered farm revenue for 2009 for the Supplemental Revenue Assistance Payments Program.


(h) The average AGI limitation provisions in part 1400 of this title relating to limits on payments for persons or legal entities, excluding joint ventures and general partnerships, with certain levels of average adjusted gross income (AGI) apply to each applicant for CAP. Specifically, a person or legal entity with an average adjusted gross nonfarm income, as defined in § 1404.3 of this title, that exceeds $500,000 is not eligible to receive CAP payments.


(i) No person or legal entity, excluding a joint venture or general partnership, as determined by the rules in part 1400 of this title may receive, directly or indirectly, more than $100,000 in payments under this subpart.


(j) The direct attribution provisions in part 1400 of this title apply to CAP. Under those rules, any payment to any legal entity will also be considered for payment limitation purposes to be a payment to persons or legal entities with an interest in the legal entity or in a sub-entity. If any such interested person or legal entity is over the payment limitation because of direct payment or their indirect interests or a combination thereof, then the payment to the actual payee will be reduced commensurate with the amount of the interest of the interested person in the payee. Likewise, by the same method, if anyone with a direct or indirect interest in a legal entity or sub-entity of a payee entity exceeds the AGI levels that would allow a producer to directly receive a CAP payment, then the payment to the actual payee will be reduced commensurately with that interest. For CAP, unless otherwise specified in part 1400 of this title, the AGI amount will be that person’s or legal entity’s average AGI for the three taxable years that precede the 2008 taxable year (that is 2005, 2006, and 2007).


(k) For the purposes of the effect of lien on eligibility for Federal programs (28 U.S.C. 3201(e)), FSA waives the restriction on receipt of funds under CAP but only as to beneficiaries who, as a condition of such waiver, agree to apply the CAP payments to reduce the amount of the judgment lien.


(l) For CAP, producers are either eligible or ineligible. Therefore, the provisions of § 718.304 of this chapter, “Failure to Fully Comply,” do not apply to this subpart.


(m) The regulations in subpart B apply to CAP. In addition to those regulations that specifically include subpart H or apply to this part, the following sections specifically apply to this subpart: §§ 760.113(a), 760.114, and 760.116(a).


Subpart I – 2005-2007 Crop Disaster Program


Source:72 FR 72867, Dec. 21, 2007, unless otherwise noted.

§ 760.800 Applicability.

This part sets forth the terms and conditions for the 2005-2007 Crop Disaster Program (2005-2007 CDP). CDP makes emergency financial assistance available to producers who have incurred crop losses in quantity or quality for eligible 2005, 2006, or 2007 crop years due to disasters as determined by the Secretary under provisions of Title IX of the U.S. Troop Readiness, Veterans’ Care, Katrina Recovery, and Iraq Accountability Appropriations Act, 2007 (Pub. L. 110-28). However, to be eligible for assistance, the crop subject to the loss must have been planted or existed before February 28, 2007, or, in the case of prevented planting, would have been planted before February 28, 2007.


§ 760.801 Administration.

(a) The program will be administered under the general supervision of the Deputy Administrator for Farm Programs and will be carried out in the field by FSA State and county committees.


(b) State and county committees and representatives do not have the authority to modify or waive any of the provisions of this part.


(c) The State committee will take any action required by this part that has not been taken by a county committee. The State committee will also:


(1) Correct, or require a county committee to correct, any action taken by that FSA county committee that is not in accordance with this part; and


(2) Require a county committee to withhold taking or reverse any action that is not in accordance with this part.


(d) No provision or delegation to a State or county committee will prevent the Deputy Administrator for Farm Programs from determining any question arising under the program or from reversing or modifying any determination made by a State or county committee.


(e) The Deputy Administrator for Farm Programs may authorize State and county committees to waive or modify non-statutory deadlines or other program requirements in cases where lateness or failure to meet such does not adversely affect the operation of the program.


§ 760.802 Definitions.

The following definitions apply to this part. The definitions in parts 718 and 1400 of this title also apply, except where they conflict with the definitions in this section.


Actual production means the total quantity of the crop appraised, harvested, or assigned, as determined by the FSA State or county committee in accordance with instructions issued by the Deputy Administrator for Farm Programs.


Administrative fee means an amount the producer must pay for Noninsured Crop Disaster Assistance Program (NAP) enrollment for non-insurable crops.


Affected production means, with respect to quality losses, the harvested production of an eligible crop that has a documented quality reduction of 25 percent or more on the verifiable production record.


Appraised production means production determined by FSA, or a company reinsured by the Federal Crop Insurance Corporation (FCIC), that was unharvested but was determined to reflect the crop’s yield potential at the time of appraisal.


Approved yield means the amount of production per acre, computed in accordance with FCIC’s Actual Production History (APH) Program at part 400, subpart G of this title or, for crops not included under part 400, subpart G of this title, the yield used to determine the guarantee. For crops covered under NAP, the approved yield is established according to part 1437 of this title. Only the approved yields based on production evidence submitted to FSA prior to May 25, 2007 will be used for purposes of the 2005-2007 CDP.


Aquaculture means a value loss crop for the reproduction and rearing of aquatic species in controlled or selected environments including, but not limited to, ocean ranching, except private ocean ranching of Pacific salmon for profit in those States where such ranching is prohibited by law.


Aquaculture facility means any land or structure including, but not limited to, a laboratory, concrete pond, hatchery, rearing pond, raceway, pen, incubator, or other equipment used in aquaculture.


Aquaculture species means any aquaculture species as defined in part 1437 of this title.


Average market price means the price or dollar equivalent on an appropriate basis for an eligible crop established by FSA, or CCC, or RMA, as applicable, for determining payment amounts. Such price will be based on historical data of the harvest basis excluding transportation, storage, processing, packing, marketing, or other post-harvesting expenses. Average market prices are generally applicable to all similarly situated participants and are not established in response to individual participants. Accordingly, the established average market prices are not appealable under parts 11 or 780 of this title.


Catastrophic risk protection means the minimum level of coverage offered by FCIC.


CCC means the Commodity Credit Corporation.


Controlled environment means, with respect to those crops for which a controlled environment is expected to be provided, including but not limited to ornamental nursery, aquaculture (including ornamental fish), and floriculture, an environment in which everything that can practicably be controlled with structures, facilities, growing media (including, but not limited to, water, soil, or nutrients) by the producer, is in fact controlled by the producer.


Crop insurance means an insurance policy reinsured by FCIC under the provisions of the Federal Crop Insurance Act, as amended.


Crop year means:


(1) For insured crops, the crop year as defined according to the applicable crop insurance policy;


(2) For NAP covered crops, as provided in part 1437 of this title.


Damaging weather means drought, excessive moisture, hail, freeze, tornado, hurricane, typhoon, excessive wind, excessive heat, weather-related saltwater intrusion, weather-related irrigation water rationing, and earthquake and volcanic eruptions, or any combination. It also includes a related condition that occurs as a result of the damaging weather and exacerbates the condition of the crop, such as crop disease, and insect infestation.


Deputy Administrator means the Deputy Administrator for Farm Programs, Farm Service Agency, U.S. Department of Agriculture or designee.


Eligible crop means a crop insured by FCIC as defined in part 400 of this title, or included under NAP as defined under part 1437 of this title for which insurance or NAP coverage was obtained timely for the year which CDP benefits are sought.


End use means the purpose for which the harvested crop is used, such as grain, hay, or seed.


Expected production means, for an agricultural unit, the historic yield multiplied by the number of planted or prevented acres of the crop for the unit.


FCIC means the Federal Crop Insurance Corporation, a wholly owned Government Corporation within USDA.


Final planting date means the latest date, established by the Risk Management Agency (RMA) for insured crops, by which the crop must initially be planted in order to be insured for the full production guarantee or amount of insurance per acre. For NAP covered crops, the final planting date is as provided in part 1437 of this title.


Flood prevention means:


(1) For aquaculture species, placing the aquaculture facility in an area not prone to flood;


(2) In the case of raceways, devices or structures designed for the control of water level; and


(3) With respect to nursery crops, placing containerized stock in a raised area above expected flood level and providing draining facilities, such as drainage ditches or tile, gravel, cinder, or sand base.


Good nursery growing practices means utilizing flood prevention, growing media, fertilization to obtain expected production results, irrigation, insect and disease control, weed, rodent and wildlife control, and over winterization storage facilities.


Ground water means aqueous supply existing in an aquifer subsurface that is brought to the surface and made available for irrigation by mechanical means such as by pumps and irrigation wells.


Growing media means:


(1) For aquaculture species, media that provides nutrients necessary for the production of the aquaculture species and protects the aquaculture species from harmful species or chemicals or


(2) For nursery crops, a well-drained media with a minimum 20 percent air pore space and pH adjustment for the type of plant produced designed to prevent “root rot.”


Harvested means:


(1) For insured crops, harvested as defined according to the applicable crop insurance policy;


(2) For NAP covered single harvest crops, that a crop has been removed from the field, either by hand or mechanically, or by grazing of livestock;


(3) For NAP covered crops with potential multiple harvests in 1 year or harvested over multiple years, that the producer has, by hand or mechanically, removed at least one mature crop from the field during the crop year;


(4) For mechanically-harvested NAP covered crops, that the crop has been removed from the field and placed in a truck or other conveyance, except hay is considered harvested when in the bale, whether removed from the field or not. Grazed land will not be considered harvested for the purpose of determining an unharvested or prevented planting payment factor. A crop that is intended for mechanical harvest, but subsequently grazed and not mechanically harvested, will have an unharvested factor applied.


Historic yield means, for a unit, the higher of the county average yield or the participant’s approved yield.


(1) An insured participant’s yield will be the higher of the county average yield listed or the approved federal crop insurance APH, for the disaster year.


(2) NAP participant’s yield will be the higher of the county average or approved NAP APH for the disaster year.


Insurable crop means an agricultural crop (excluding livestock) for which the producer on a farm is eligible to obtain a policy or plan of insurance under the Federal Crop Insurance Act (7 U.S.C. 1501-1524).


Marketing contract means a legally binding written contract between a purchaser and grower for the purpose of marketing a crop.


Market value means:


(1) The price(s) designated in the marketing contract; or


(2) If not designated in a marketing contract, the rate established for quantity payments under § 760.811.


Maximum average loss level means the maximum average level of crop loss to be attributed to a participant without acceptable production records (verifiable or reliable). Loss levels are expressed in either a percent of loss or yield per acre, and are intended to reflect the amount of production that a participant would have been expected to make if not for the eligible disaster conditions in the area or county, as determined by the county committee in accordance with instructions issued by the Deputy Administrator.


Multi-use crop means a crop intended for more than one end use during the calendar year such as grass harvested for seed, hay, and grazing.


Multiple cropping means the planting of two or more different crops on the same acreage for harvest within the same crop year.


Multiple planting means the planting for harvest of the same crop in more than one planting period in a crop year on different acreage.


NASS means the National Agricultural Statistics Service.


Net crop insurance indemnity means the indemnity minus the producer paid premium.


NAP covered means a crop for which the participants obtained assistance under section 196 of the Federal Agriculture Improvement and Reform Act of 1996 (7 U.S.C. 7333).


Normal mortality means the percentage of dead aquaculture species that would normally occur during the crop year.


Person means person as defined in part 1400 of this title, and all rules with respect to the determination of a person found in that part are applicable to this part. However, the determinations made in this part in accordance with part 1400, subpart B, Person Determinations, of this title will also take into account any affiliation with any entity in which an individual or entity has an interest, regardless of whether or not such entities are considered to be actively engaged in farming.


Planted acreage means land in which seed, plants, or trees have been placed, appropriate for the crop and planting method, at a correct depth, into a seedbed that has been properly prepared for the planting method and production practice normal to the USDA plant hardiness zone as determined by the county committee.


Prevented planting means the inability to plant an eligible crop with proper equipment during the planting period as a result of an eligible cause of loss, as determined by FSA.


Production means quantity of the crop or commodity produced expressed in a specific unit of measure including, but not limited to, bushels or pounds.


Rate means price per unit of the crop or commodity.


Recording county means, for a producer with farming interests in only one county, the FSA county office in which the producer’s farm is administratively located or, for a producer with farming interests that are administratively located in more than one county, the FSA county office designated by FSA to control the payments received by the producer.


Related condition means, with respect to a disaster, a condition that causes deterioration of a crop, such as insect infestation, plant disease, or aflatoxin, that is accelerated or exacerbated as a result of damaging weather, as determined in accordance with instructions issued by the Deputy Administrator.


Reliable production records means evidence provided by the participant that is used to substantiate the amount of production reported when verifiable records are not available, including copies of receipts, ledgers of income, income statements of deposit slips, register tapes, invoices for custom harvesting, and records to verify production costs, contemporaneous measurements, truck scale tickets, and contemporaneous diaries that are determined acceptable by the county committee.


Repeat crop means, with respect to production, a commodity that is planted or prevented from being planted in more than one planting period on the same acreage in the same crop year.


RMA means the Risk Management Agency.


Salvage value means the dollar amount or equivalent for the quantity of the commodity that cannot be marketed or sold in any recognized market for the crop.


Secondary use means the harvesting of a crop for a use other than the intended use.


Secondary use value means the value determined by multiplying the quantity of secondary use times the FSA or CCC-established price for that use.


State committee means the FSA State committee.


Surface irrigation water means aqueous supply anticipated for irrigation of agricultural crops absent an eligible disaster condition impacting either the aquifer or watershed. Surface irrigation water may result from feral sources or from irrigation districts.


Tropical crops has the meaning assigned in part 1437 of this title.


Tropical region has the meaning assigned in part 1437 of this title.


Unharvested factor means a percentage established for a crop and applied in a payment formula to reduce the payment for reduced expenses incurred because commercial harvest was not performed. Unharvested factors are generally applicable to all similarly situated participants and are not established in response to individual participants. Accordingly established unharvested factors are not appealable under parts 11 and 780 of this title.


Unit means, unless otherwise determined by the Deputy Administrator, basic unit as defined in part 457 of this title that, for ornamental nursery production, includes all eligible plant species and sizes.


Unit of measure means:


(1) For all insured crops, the FCIC-established unit of measure;


(2) For all NAP covered crops, the established unit of measure, if available, used for the 2005, 2006, or 2007 NAP price and yield;


(3) For aquaculture species, a standard unit of measure such as gallons, pounds, inches, or pieces, established by the State committee for all aquaculture species or varieties;


(4) For turfgrass sod, a square yard;


(5) For maple sap, a gallon;


(6) For honey, pounds; and


(7) For all other crops, the smallest unit of measure that lends itself to the greatest level of accuracy with minimal use of fractions, as determined by the State committee.


United States means all 50 States of the United States, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands of the United States, and to the extent the Deputy Administrator determines it to be feasible and appropriate, Guam, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, and the former Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands, which include Palau, Federated States of Micronesia, and the Marshall Islands.


USDA means the United States Department of Agriculture.


USDA Plant Hardiness Zone means 11 regions or planting zones as defined by a 10 degree Fahrenheit difference in the average annual minimum temperature.


Value loss crop has the meaning assigned in part 1437 of this title.


Verifiable production record means:


(1) For quantity losses, evidence that is used to substantiate the amount of production reported and that can be verified by FSA through an independent source; or


(2) For quality losses, evidence that is used to substantiate the amount of production reported and that can be verified by FSA through an independent source including determined quality factors and the specific quantity covered by those factors.


Yield means unit of production, measured in bushels, pounds, or other unit of measure, per area of consideration, usually measured in acres.


§ 760.803 Eligibility.

(a) Participants will be eligible to receive disaster benefits under this part only if they incurred qualifying quantity or quality losses for the 2005, 2006, or 2007 crops, as further specified in this part, as a result of damaging weather or any related condition. Participants may not receive benefits with respect to volunteer stands of crops.


(b) Payments may be made for losses suffered by an eligible participant who, at the time of application, is a deceased individual or is a dissolved entity if a representative, who currently has authority to enter into a contract for the participant, signs the 2005, 2006, or 2007 Crop Disaster Program application. Participants must provide proof of the authority to sign legal documents for the deceased individual or dissolved entity. If a participant is now a dissolved general partnership or joint venture, all members of the general partnership or joint venture at the time of dissolution or their duly authorized representatives must sign the application for payment.


(c) As a condition to receive benefits under this part, the Participant must have been in compliance with the Highly Erodible Land Conservation and Wetland Conservation provisions of part 12 of this title for the 2005, 2006, or 2007 crop year, as applicable, and must not otherwise be precluded from receiving benefits under parts 12 or 1400 of this title or any law.


§ 760.804 Time and method of application.

(a) The 2005, 2006, 2007 Crop Disaster Program application must be submitted on a completed FSA-840, or such other form designated for such application purpose by FSA, in the FSA county office in the participant’s control county office before the close of business on a date that will be announced by the Deputy Administrator.


(b) Once signed by a participant, the application for benefits is considered to contain information and certifications of and pertaining to the participant regardless of who entered the information on the application.


(c) The participant requesting benefits under this program certifies the accuracy and truthfulness of the information provided in the application as well as any documentation filed with or in support of the application. All information is subject to verification by FSA. For example, as specified in § 760.818(f), the participant may be required to provide documentation to substantiate and validate quality standards and marketing contract prices. Refusal to allow FSA or any agency of the Department of Agriculture to verify any information provided will result in the participant’s forfeiting eligibility under this program. Furnishing required information is voluntary; however without it, FSA is under no obligation to act on the application or approve benefits. Providing a false certification to the government is punishable by imprisonment, fines, and other penalties.


(d) FSA may require the participant to submit any additional information it deems necessary to implement or determine any eligibility provision of this part. For example, as specified in § 760.818(f), the participant may be required to provide documentation to substantiate and validate quality standards and marketing contract prices.


(e) The application submitted in accordance with paragraph (a) of this section is not considered valid and complete for issuance of payment under this part unless FSA determines all the applicable eligibility provisions have been satisfied and the participant has submitted all of following completed forms:


(1) If Item 16 on FSA-840 is answered “YES,” FSA-840M, Crop Disaster Program for Multiple Crop – Same Acreage Certification;


(2) CCC-502, Farm Operating Plan for Payment Eligibility;


(3) CCC-526, Payment Eligibility Average Adjusted Gross Income Certification;


(4) AD-1026, Highly Erodible Land Conservation (HELC) and Wetland Conservation Certification; and


(5) FSA-578, Report of Acreage.


(f) Application approval and payment by FSA does not relieve a participant from having to submit any form required, but not filed, according to paragraph (e) of this section.


§ 760.805 Limitations on payments and other benefits.

(a) A participant may receive benefits for crop losses for only one of the 2005, 2006, or 2007 crop years as specified under this part.


(b) Payments will not be made under this part for grazing losses.


(c) Payments determined to be issued are considered due and payable not later than 60 days after a participant’s application is completed with all information necessary for FSA to determine producer eligibility for benefits.


(d) FSA may divide and classify crops based on loss susceptibility, yield, and other factors.


(e) No person, as defined by part 1400 subpart B of this title, may receive more than a total of $80,000 in disaster benefits under this part. In applying the $80,000 per person payment limitation, regardless of whether 2005, 2006, or 2007 crop year benefits are at issue or sought, the most restrictive “person” determination for the participant in the years 2005, 2006, and 2007, will be used to limit benefits.


(f) No participant may receive disaster benefits under this part in an amount that exceeds 95 percent of the value of the expected production for the relevant period as determined by FSA. Accordingly, the sum of the value of the crop not lost, if any; the disaster payment received under this part; and any crop insurance payment or payments received under the NAP for losses to the same crop, cannot exceed 95 percent of what the crop’s value would have been if there had been no loss.


(g) An individual or entity whose adjusted gross income is in excess of $2.5 million, as defined by and determined under part 1400 subpart G of this title, is not eligible to receive disaster benefits under this part.


(h) Any participant in a county eligible for either of the following programs must complete a duplicate benefits certification. If the participant received a payment authorized by either of the following, the amount of that payment will be reduced from the calculated 2005-2007 CDP payment:


(1) The Hurricane Indemnity Program (subpart B of this part);


(2) The Hurricane Disaster Programs (subparts D, E, F, and G of part 1416 of this title);


(3) The 2005 Louisiana Sugarcane Hurricane Disaster Assistance Program; or


(4) The 2005 Crop Florida Sugarcane Disaster Program.


§ 760.806 Crop eligibility requirements.

(a) A participant on a farm is eligible for assistance under this section with respect to losses to an insurable commodity or NAP if the participant:


(1) In the case of an insurable commodity, obtained a policy or plan of insurance under the Federal Crop Insurance Act for the crop incurring the losses; or


(2) In the case of a NAP covered crop, filed the required paperwork and paid the administrative fee by the applicable filing deadline, for the noninsurable commodity under section 196 of the Federal Agriculture Improvement and Reform Act of 1996 for the crop incurring the losses.


(b) The reasons a participant either elected not to have coverage or did not have coverage mentioned in paragraphs (a)(1) or (2) of this section are not relevant to the determination of the participant’s ineligibility under this section. In addition, such reasons for not having crop insurance coverage have no bearing for consideration under part 718, subpart D of this chapter.


§ 760.807 Miscellaneous provisions.

(a) A person is not eligible to receive disaster assistance under this part if it is determined by FSA that the person has:


(1) Adopted any scheme or other device that tends to defeat the purpose of this part;


(2) Made any fraudulent representation;


(3) Misrepresented any fact affecting a program determination;


(4) Is ineligible under § 1400.5 of this title; or


(5) Does not have entitlement to an ownership share of the crop.


(i) Growers growing eligible crops under contract for crop owners are not eligible unless the grower can be determined to have a share of the crop.


(ii) Any verbal or written contract that precludes the grower from having an ownership share renders the grower ineligible for benefits under this part.


(b) A person ineligible under § 1437.15(c) of this title for any year is likewise ineligible for benefits under this part for that year or years.


(c) A person ineligible under § 400.458 of this title for any year is likewise ineligible for benefits under this part for that year or years.


(d) All persons with a financial interest in the operation receiving benefits under this part are jointly and severally liable for any refund, including related charges, which is determined to be due FSA for any reason.


(e) In the event that any request for assistance or payment under this part resulted from erroneous information or a miscalculation, the assistance or payment will be recalculated and any excess refunded to FSA with interest to be calculated from the date of the disbursement to the producer.


(f) The liability of anyone for any penalty or sanction under or in connection with this part, or for any refund to FSA or related charge is in addition to any other liability of such person under any civil or criminal fraud statute or any other provision of law including, but not limited to: 18 U.S.C. 286, 287, 371, 641, 651, 1001, and 1014; 15 U.S.C. 714; and 31 U.S.C. 3729.


(g) The regulations in parts 11 and 780 of this title apply to determinations under this part.


(h) Any payment to any person will be made without regard to questions of title under State law and without regard to any claim or lien against the crop, or its proceeds.


(i) For the purposes of the effect of lien on eligibility for Federal programs (28 U.S.C. 3201(e)), FSA waives the restriction on receipt of funds or benefits under this program but only as to beneficiaries who, as a condition of such waiver, agree to apply the benefits received under this part to reduce the amount of the judgment lien.


(j) Under this program, participants are either eligible or ineligible. Participants in general, do not render performance or need to comply. They either suffered eligible losses or they did not. Accordingly, the provisions of § 718.304 of this chapter do not apply to this part.


§ 760.808 General provisions.

(a) For calculations of loss, the participant’s existing unit structure will be used as the basis for the calculation established in accordance with:


(1) For insured crops, part 457 of this title; or


(2) For NAP covered crops, part 1437 of this title.


(b) County average yield for loss calculations will be the average of the 2001 through 2005 official county yields established by FSA, excluding the years with the highest and lowest yields, respectively.


(c) County committees will assign production or reduce the historic yield when the county committee determines:


(1) An acceptable appraisal or record of harvested production does not exist;


(2) The loss is due to an ineligible cause of loss or practices, soil type, climate, or other environmental factors that cause lower yields than those upon which the historic yield is based;


(3) The participant has a contract providing a guaranteed payment for all or a portion of the crop; or


(4) The crop was planted beyond the normal planting period for the crop.


(d) The county committee will establish a maximum average loss level that reflects the amount of production producers would have produced if not for the eligible damaging weather or related conditions in the area or county for the same crop. The maximum average loss level for the county will be expressed as either a percent of loss or yield per acre. The maximum average loss level will apply when:


(1) Unharvested acreage has not been appraised by FSA, or a company reinsured by FCIC; or


(2) Acceptable production records for harvested acres are not available from any source.


(e) Assignment of production or reduction in yield will apply for practices that result in lower yields than those for which the historic yield is based.


§ 760.809 Eligible damaging conditions.

(a) Except as provided in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section, to be eligible for benefits under this part the loss of the crop, or reduction in quality, or prevented planting must be due to damaging weather or related conditions as defined in § 760.802.


(b) Benefits are not available under this part for any losses in quantity or quality, or prevented planting due to:


(1) Poor farming practices;


(2) Poor management decisions; or


(3) Drifting herbicides.


(c) With the exception of paragraph (d) of this section, in all cases, the eligible damaging condition must have directly impacted the specific crop or crop acreage during its planting or growing period.


(d) If FSA has determined that there has been an eligible loss of surface irrigation water due to drought and such loss of surface irrigation water impacts eligible crop acreage, FSA may approve assistance to the extent permitted by section 760.814.


§ 760.810 Qualifying 2005, 2006, or 2007 quantity crop losses.

(a) To receive benefits under this part, the county committee must determine that because of eligible damaging weather or related condition specifically impacting the crop or crop acreage, the participant with respect to the 2005, 2006, or 2007 crop:


(1) Was prevented from planting a crop;


(2) Sustained a loss in excess of 35 percent of the expected production of a crop; or


(3) Sustained a loss in excess of 35 percent of the value for value loss crops.


(b) Qualifying losses under this part do not include losses:


(1) For the 2007 crop, those acres planted, or in the case of prevented planting, would have been planted, on or after February 28, 2007;


(2) That are determined by FSA to be the result of poor management decisions, poor farming practices, or drifting herbicides;


(3) That are the result of the failure of the participant to re-seed or replant the same crop in the county where it is customary to re-seed or replant after a loss;


(4) That are not as a result of a damaging weather or a weather related condition specifically impacting the crop or crop acreage;


(5) To crops not intended for harvest in crop year 2005, 2006, or 2007;


(6) Of by-products resulting from processing or harvesting a crop, such as cottonseed, peanut shells, wheat, or oat straw;


(7) To home gardens;


(8) That are a result of water contained or released by any governmental, public, or private dam or reservoir project if an easement exists on the acreage affected for the containment or release of the water; or


(9) If losses could be attributed to conditions occurring outside of the applicable crop year growing season.


(c) Qualifying losses under this part for nursery stock will not include losses:


(1) For the 2007 crop, that nursery inventory acquired on or after February 28, 2007;


(2) Caused by a failure of power supply or brownouts;


(3) Caused by the inability to market nursery stock as a result of lack of compliance with State and local commercial ordinances and laws, quarantine, boycott, or refusal of a buyer to accept production;


(4) Caused by fire unless directly related to an eligible natural disaster;


(5) Affecting crops where weeds and other forms of undergrowth in the vicinity of the nursery stock have not been controlled; or


(6) Caused by the collapse or failure of buildings or structures.


(d) Qualifying losses under this part for honey, where the honey production by colonies or bees was diminished, will not include losses:


(1) For the 2007 crop, for production from those bees acquired on or after February 28, 2007;


(2) Where the inability to extract was due to the unavailability of equipment, the collapse or failure of equipment, or apparatus used in the honey operation;


(3) Resulting from storage of honey after harvest;


(4) To honey production because of bee feeding;


(5) Caused by the application of chemicals;


(6) Caused by theft, fire, or vandalism;


(7) Caused by the movement of bees by the producer or any other person; or


(8) Due to disease or pest infestation of the colonies.


(e) Qualifying losses for other value loss crops, except nursery, will not include losses for the 2007 crop that were acquired on or after February 28, 2007.


(f) Loss calculations will take into account other conditions and adjustments provided for in this part.


§ 760.811 Rates and yields; calculating payments.

(a)(1) Payments made under this part to a participant for a loss of quantity on a unit with respect to yield-based crops are determined by multiplying the average market price times 42 percent, times the loss of production which exceeds 35 percent of the expected production, as determined by FSA, of the unit.


(2) Payments made under this part to a participant for a quantity loss on a unit with respect to value-based crops are determined by multiplying the payment rate established for the crop by FSA times the loss of value that exceeds 35 percent of the expected production value, as determined by FSA, of the unit.


(3) As determined by FSA, additional quality loss payments may be made using a 25 percent quality loss threshold. The quality loss threshold is determined according to § 760.817.


(b) Payment rates for the 2005, 2006, or 2007 year crop losses will be 42 percent of the average market price.


(c) Separate payment rates and yields for the same crop may be established by the State committee as authorized by the Deputy Administrator, when there is supporting data from NASS or other sources approved by FSA that show there is a significant difference in yield or value based on a distinct and separate end use of the crop. Despite potential differences in yield or values, separate rates or yields will not be established for crops with different cultural practices, such as those grown organically or hydroponically.


(d) Production from all end uses of a multi-use crop or all secondary uses for multiple market crops will be calculated separately and summarized together.


(e) Each eligible participant’s share of a disaster payment will be based on the participant’s ownership entitlement share of the crop or crop proceeds, or, if no crop was produced, the share of the crop the participant would have received if the crop had been produced. If the participant has no ownership share of the crop, the participant is ineligible for assistance under this part.


(f) When calculating a payment for a unit loss:


(1) An unharvested payment factor will be applied to crop acreage planted but not harvested;


(2) A prevented planting factor will be applied to any prevented planted acreage eligible for payment; and


(3) Unharvested payment factors may be adjusted if costs normally associated with growing the crop are not incurred.


§ 760.812 Production losses; participant responsibility.

(a) Where available and determined accurate by FSA, RMA loss records will be used for insured crops.


(b) If RMA loss records are not available, or if the FSA county committee determines the RMA loss records are inaccurate or incomplete, or if the FSA county committee makes inquiry, participants are responsible for:


(1) Retaining or providing, when required, the best verifiable or reliable production records available for the crop;


(2) Summarizing all the production evidence;


(3) Accounting for the total amount of unit production for the crop, whether or not records reflect this production;


(4) Providing the information in a manner that can be easily understood by the county committee; and


(5) Providing supporting documentation if the county committee has reason to question the damaging weather event or question whether all production has been accounted for.


(c) In determining production under this section, the participant must supply verifiable or reliable production records to substantiate production to the county committee. If the eligible crop was sold or otherwise disposed of through commercial channels, production records include: commercial receipts; settlement sheets; warehouse ledger sheets; load summaries; or appraisal information from a loss adjuster acceptable to FSA. If the eligible crop was farm-stored, sold, fed to livestock, or disposed of in means other than commercial channels, production records for these purposes include: truck scale tickets; appraisal information from a loss adjuster acceptable to FSA; contemporaneous diaries; or other documentary evidence, such as contemporaneous measurements.


(d) Participants must provide all records for any production of a crop that is grown with an arrangement, agreement, or contract for guaranteed payment.


§ 760.813 Determination of production.

(a) Production under this part includes all harvested production, unharvested appraised production, and assigned production for the total planted acreage of the crop on the unit.


(b) The harvested production of eligible crop acreage harvested more than once in a crop year includes the total harvested production from all these harvests.


(c) If a crop is appraised and subsequently harvested as the intended use, the actual harvested production must be taken into account to determine benefits. FSA will analyze and determine whether a participant’s evidence of actual production represents all that could or would have been harvested.


(d) For all crops eligible for loan deficiency payments or marketing assistance loans with an intended use of grain but harvested as silage, ensilage, cobbage, hay, cracked, rolled, or crimped, production will be adjusted based on a whole grain equivalent as established by FSA.


(e) For crops with an established yield and market price for multiple intended uses, a value will be calculated by FSA with respect to the intended use or uses for disaster purposes based on historical production and acreage evidence provided by the participant and FSA will determine the eligible acres for each use.


(f) For crops sold in a market that is not a recognized market for the crop with no established county average yield and average market price, 42 percent of the salvage value received will be deducted from the disaster payment.


(g) If a participant does not receive compensation based upon the quantity of the commodity delivered to a purchaser, but has an agreement or contract for guaranteed payment for production, the determination of the production will be the greater of the actual production or the guaranteed payment converted to production as determined by FSA.


(h) Production that is commingled between units before it was a matter of record or combination of record and cannot be separated by using records or other means acceptable to FSA will be prorated to each respective unit by FSA. Commingled production may be attributed to the applicable unit, if the participant made the unit production of a commodity a matter of record before commingling and does any of the following, as applicable:


(1) Provides copies of verifiable documents showing that production of the commodity was purchased, acquired, or otherwise obtained from beyond the unit;


(2) Had the production measured in a manner acceptable to the county committee; or


(3) Had the current year’s production appraised in a manner acceptable to the county committee.


(i) The county committee will assign production for the unit when the county committee determines that:


(1) The participant has failed to provide adequate and acceptable production records;


(2) The loss to the crop is because of a disaster condition not covered by this part, or circumstances other than natural disaster, and there has not otherwise been an accounting of this ineligible cause of loss;


(3) The participant carries out a practice, such as multiple cropping, that generally results in lower yields than the established historic yields;


(4) The participant has a contract to receive a guaranteed payment for all or a portion of the crop;


(5) A crop was late-planted;


(6) Unharvested acreage was not timely appraised; or


(7) Other appropriate causes exist for such assignment as determined by the Deputy Administrator.


(j) For peanuts, the actual production is all peanuts harvested for nuts, regardless of their disposition or use, as adjusted for low quality.


(k) For tobacco, the actual production is the sum of the tobacco: marketed or available to be marketed; destroyed after harvest; and produced but unharvested, as determined by an appraisal.


§ 760.814 Calculation of acreage for crop losses other than prevented planted.

(a) Payment acreage of a crop is limited to the lesser of insured acreage or NAP covered acreage of the crop, as applicable, or actual acreage of the crop planted for harvest.


(b) In cases where there is a repeat crop or a multiple planted crop in more than one planting period, or if there is multiple cropped acreage meeting criteria established in paragraph (c) or (d) of this section, each of these crops may be considered separate crops if the county committee determines that all of the following conditions are met:


(1) Were planted with the intent to harvest;


(2) Were planted within the normal planting period for that crop;


(3) Meet all other eligibility provisions of this part including good farming practices; and


(4) Could reach maturity if each planting was harvested or would have been harvested.


(c) In cases where there is multiple-cropped acreage, each crop may be eligible for disaster assistance separately if both of the following conditions are met:


(1) The specific crops are approved by the State committee as eligible multiple-cropping practices in accordance with procedures approved by the Deputy Administrator and separately meet all requirements, including insurance or NAP requirements ; and


(2) The farm containing the multiple-cropped acreage has a history of successful multiple cropping more than one crop on the same acreage in the same crop year, in the year previous to the disaster, or at least 2 of the 4 crop years immediately preceding the disaster crop year based on timely filed crop acreage reports.


(d) A participant with multiple-cropped acreage not meeting the criteria in paragraph (c) of this section may be eligible for disaster assistance on more than one crop if the participant has verifiable records establishing a history of carrying out a successful multiple-cropping practice on the specific crops for which assistance is requested. All required records acceptable to FSA as determined by the Deputy Administrator must be provided before payments are issued.


(e) A participant with multiple-cropped acreage not meeting the criteria in paragraphs (c) or (d) of this section must select the crop for which assistance will be requested. If more than one participant has an interest in the multiple cropped acreage, all participants must agree to the crop designated for payment by the end of the application period or no payment will be approved for any crop on the multiple-cropped acreage.


(f) Benefits under this part apply to irrigated crops where, in cases determined by the Deputy Administrator, acreage was affected by a lack of surface irrigation water due to drought or contamination of ground water or surface irrigation water due to saltwater intrusion. In no case is a loss of ground water, for any reason, an eligible cause of loss.


§ 760.815 Calculation of prevented planted acreage.

(a) When determining losses under this part, prevented planted acreage will be considered separately from planted acreage of the same crop.


(b) For insured crops, or NAP covered crops, as applicable, disaster payments under this part for prevented planted acreage will not be made unless RMA or FSA, as applicable, documentation indicates that the eligible participant received a prevented planting payment under either NAP or the RMA-administered program.


(c) The participant must prove, to the satisfaction of the county committee, an intent to plant the crop and that such crop could not be planted because of an eligible disaster. The county committee must be able to determine the participant was prevented from planting the crop by an eligible disaster that:


(1) Prevented other producers from planting on acreage with similar characteristics in the surrounding area;


(2) Occurred after the previous planting period for the crop; and


(3) Unless otherwise approved by the Deputy Administrator, began no earlier than the planting season for that crop.


(d) Prevented planted disaster benefits under this part do not apply to:


(1) Acreage not insured or NAP covered;


(2) Any acreage on which a crop other than a cover crop was harvested, hayed, or grazed during the crop year;


(3) Any acreage for which a cash lease payment is received for the use of the acreage the same crop year, unless the county committee determines the lease was for haying and grazing rights only and was not a lease for use of the land;


(4) Acreage for which the participant or any other person received a prevented planted payment for any crop for the same acreage, excluding share arrangements;


(5) Acreage for which the participant cannot provide verifiable proof to the county committee that inputs such as seed, chemicals, and fertilizer were available to plant and produce a crop with the expectation of producing at least a normal yield; and


(6) Any other acreage for which, for whatever reason, there is cause to question whether the crop could have been planted for a successful and timely harvest, or for which prevented planting credit is not allowed under the provisions of this part.


(e) Prevented planting payments are not provided on acreage that had either a previous or subsequent crop planted in the same crop year on the acreage, unless the county committee determines that all of the following conditions are met:


(1) There is an established practice of planting two or more crops for harvest on the same acreage in the same crop year;


(2) Both crops could have reached maturity if each planting was harvested or would have been harvested;


(3) Both the initial and subsequent planted crops were planted or prevented planting within the normal planting period for that crop;


(4) Both the initial and subsequent planted crops meet all other eligibility provisions of this part including good farming practices; and


(5) The specific crops meet the eligibility criteria for a separate crop designation as a repeat or approved multiple cropping practice set out in § 760.814.


(f)(1) Disaster benefits under this part do not apply to crops where the prevented planted acreage was affected by a disaster that was caused by drought unless on the final planting date or the late planting period for non-irrigated acreage, the area that was prevented from being planted had insufficient soil moisture for germination of seed and progress toward crop maturity because of a prolonged period of dry weather;


(2) Verifiable information collected by sources whose business or purpose is to record weather conditions, including, but not limited to, local weather reporting stations of the U.S. National Weather Service.


(g) Prevented planting benefits under this part apply to irrigated crops where adequate irrigation facilities were in place before the eligible disaster and the acreage was prevented from being planted due to a lack of water resulting from drought conditions or contamination by saltwater intrusion of an irrigation supply resulting from drought conditions.


(h) For NAP covered crops, prevented planting provisions apply according to part 718 of this chapter.


(i) Late-filed crop acreage reports for prevented planted acreage in previous years are not acceptable for CDP purposes.


§ 760.816 Value loss crops.

(a) Notwithstanding any other provisions of this part, this section applies to value loss crops and tropical crops. Unless otherwise specified, all the eligibility provisions of part 1437 of this title apply to value loss crops and tropical crops under this part.


(b) For value loss crops, benefits under this part are calculated based on the loss of value at the time of the damaging weather or related condition, as determined by FSA.


(c) For tropical crops:


(1) CDP benefits for 2005 are calculated according to general provisions of part 1437, but not subpart F, of this title.


(2) CDP benefits for 2006 and 2007 are calculated according to part 1437, subpart F of this title.


§ 760.817 Quality losses for 2005, 2006, and 2007 crops.

(a) Subject to other provisions of this part, assistance will be made available to participants determined eligible under this section for crop quality losses of 25 percent or greater of the value that all affected production of the crop would have had if the crop had not suffered a quality loss.


(b) The amount of payment for a quality loss will be equal to 65 percent of the quantity of the crop affected by the quality loss, not to exceed expected production based on harvested acres, multiplied by 42 percent of the per unit average market value based on percentage of quality loss for the crop as determined by the Deputy Administrator.


(c) This section applies to all crops eligible for 2005, 2006, and 2007 crop disaster assistance under this part, with the exceptions of value loss crops, honey, and maple sap, and applies to crop production that has a reduced economic value due to the reduction in quality.


(d) Participants may not be compensated under this section to the extent that such participants have received assistance under other provisions of this part, attributable in whole or in part to diminished quality.


§ 760.818 Marketing contracts.

(a) A marketing contract must meet all of the conditions outlined in paragraphs (b), (c), and (d) of this section.


(b) A marketing contract, at a minimum, must meet all of the following conditions:


(1) Be a legal contract in the State where executed;


(2) Specify the commodity under contract;


(3) Specify crop year;


(4) Be signed by both the participant, or legal representative, and the purchaser of the specified commodity;


(5) Include a commitment to deliver the contracted quantity;


(6) Include a commitment to purchase the contracted quantity that meets specified minimum quality standards and other criteria as specified;


(7) Define a determinable quantity by containing either a:


(i) Specified production quantity or


(ii) A specified acreage for which production quantity can be calculated;


(8) Define a determinable price by containing either a:


(i) Specified price or


(ii) Method to determine such a price;


(9) Contain a relationship between the price and the quality using either:


(i) Specified quality standards or


(ii) A method to determine such quality standards from published third party data; and


(10) Have been executed within 10 days after:


(i) End of insurance period for insured crops or


(ii) Normal harvest date for NAP covered crops as determined by FSA.


(c) The purchaser of the commodity specified in the marketing contract must meet at least one of the following:


(1) Be a licensed commodity warehouseman;


(2) Be a business enterprise regularly engaged in the processing of a commodity, that possesses all licenses and permits for marketing the commodity required by the State in which it operates, and that possesses or has contracted for facilities with enough equipment to accept and process the commodity within a reasonable amount of time after harvest; or


(3) Is able to physically receive the harvested production.


(d) In order for the commodity specified in the marketing contract to be considered sold pursuant to the marketing contract, the commodity must have been produced by the participant in the crop year specified in the contract, and at least one of the following conditions must be met:


(1) Commodity was sold under the terms of the contract or


(2) Participant attempted to deliver the commodity to the purchaser, but the commodity was rejected due to quality factors as specified in the contract.


(e) The amount of payment for affected production, as determined in § 760.817(b), sold pursuant to one or more marketing contracts will take into consideration the marketing contract price as determined by FSA.


(f) County committees have the authority to require a participant to provide necessary documentation, which may include, but is not limited to, previous marketing contracts fulfilled, to substantiate and validate quality standards in paragraph (b)(9) of this section and marketing contract price received for the commodity for which crop quality loss assistance is requested. In cases where the county committee has reason to believe the participant lacks the capacity or history to fulfill the quality provisions of the marketing contract the county committee will require such documentation.


§ 760.819 Misrepresentation, scheme, or device.

(a) A person is ineligible to receive assistance under this part if it is determined that such person has:


(1) Adopted any scheme or device that tends to defeat the purpose of this program;


(2) Made any fraudulent representation under this program;


(3) Misrepresented any fact affecting a program or person determination; or


(4) Has violated or been determined ineligible under § 1400.5 of this title.


§ 760.820 Offsets, assignments, and debt settlement.

(a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, any payment to any person will be made without regard to questions of title under State law and without regard to any claim or lien against the crop, or proceeds, in favor of the owner or any other creditor except agencies of the U.S. Government. The regulations governing offsets and withholdings found at part 1403 of this title apply to any payments made under this part.


(b) Any participant entitled to any payment may assign any payments in accordance with regulations governing the assignment of payments found at part 1404 of this title.


(c) A debt or claim may be settled according to part 792 of this chapter.


§ 760.821 Compliance with highly erodible land and wetland conservation.

(a) The highly erodible land and wetland conservation provisions of part 12 of this title apply to the receipt of disaster assistance for 2005, 2006, and 2007 crop losses made available under this authority.


(b) Eligible participants must be in compliance with the highly erodible land and wetland conservation compliance provisions for the year for which financial assistance is requested.


Subpart J – 2005-2007 Livestock Indemnity Program


Source:72 FR 72867, Dec. 21, 2007, unless otherwise noted.

§ 760.900 Administration.

(a) The regulations in this subpart specify the terms and conditions applicable to the 2005-2007 Livestock Indemnity Program (2005-2007 LIP), which will be administered under the general supervision and direction of the Administrator, FSA.


(b) FSA representatives do not have authority to modify or waive any of the provisions of the regulations of this subpart.


(c) The State FSA committee will take any action required by the regulations of this subpart that the county FSA committee has not taken. The State FSA committee will also:


(1) Correct, or require a county committee to correct, any action taken by such county committee that is not in accordance with the regulations of this subpart; or


(2) Require a county committee to withhold taking any action that is not in accordance with this subpart.


(d) No delegation to a State or county FSA committee will preclude the Deputy Administrator for Farm Programs from determining any question arising under the program or from reversing or modifying any determination made by a State or county FSA committee.


§ 760.901 Applicability.

(a) This subpart establishes the terms and conditions under which the 2005-2007 LIP will be administered under Title IX of the U.S. Troop Readiness, Veterans’ Care, Katrina Recovery, and Iraq Accountability Appropriations Act, 2007 (Pub. L. 110-28) for eligible counties as specified in § 760.902(a).


(b) Eligible livestock owners and contract growers will be compensated in accordance with § 760.909 for eligible livestock deaths that occurred in eligible counties as a direct result of an eligible disaster event. Drought is not an eligible disaster event except when anthrax, as a related condition that occurs as a result of drought, results in the death of eligible livestock.


§ 760.902 Eligible counties and disaster periods.

Counties are eligible for agricultural assistance under the 2005-2007 LIP if they received a timely Presidential designation, a timely Secretarial declaration, or a qualifying Administrator’s Physical Loss Notice (APLN) determination in a county otherwise the subject of a timely Presidential declaration, or are counties contiguous to such counties. Presidential designations and Secretarial declarations will be considered timely only if made after January 1, 2005, and before February 28, 2007. Eligible counties, disaster events, and disaster periods are listed at http://disaster.fsa.usda.gov.


§ 760.903 Definitions.

The following definitions apply to this subpart. The definitions in parts 718 and 1400 of this title also apply, except where they conflict with the definitions in this section.


Adult beef bull means a male beef bovine animal that was at least 2 years old and used for breeding purposes before it died.


Adult beef cow means a female beef bovine animal that had delivered one or more offspring before dying. A first-time bred beef heifer is also considered an adult beef cow if it was pregnant at the time it died.


Adult buffalo and beefalo bull means a male animal of those breeds that was at least 2 years old and used for breeding purposes before it died.


Adult buffalo and beefalo cow means a female animal of those breeds that had delivered one or more offspring before dying. A first-time bred buffalo or beefalo heifer is also considered an adult buffalo or beefalo cow if it was pregnant at the time it died.


Adult dairy bull means a male dairy breed bovine animal at least 2 years old used primarily for breeding dairy cows before it died.


Adult dairy cow means a female bovine animal used for the purpose of providing milk for human consumption that had delivered one or more offspring before dying. A first-time bred dairy heifer is also considered an adult dairy cow if it was pregnant at the time it died.


Agricultural operation means a farming operation.


Application means the “2005-2007 Livestock Indemnity Program” form.


Application period means the date established by the Deputy Administrator for Farm Programs for participants to apply for program benefits.


Buck means a male goat.


Catfish means catfish grown as food for human consumption by a commercial operator on private property in water in a controlled environment.


Commercial use means used in the operation of a business activity engaged in as a means of livelihood for profit by the eligible producer to apply for program benefits.


Contract means, with respect to contracts for the handling of livestock, a written agreement between a livestock owner and another individual or entity setting the specific terms, conditions, and obligations of the parties involved regarding the production of livestock or livestock products.


Controlled environment means an environment in which everything that can practicably be controlled by the participant with structures, facilities, and growing media (including, but not limited to, water and nutrients) and was in fact controlled by the participant at the time of the disaster.


Crawfish means crawfish grown as food for human consumption by a commercial operator on private property in water in a controlled environment.


Deputy Administrator means the Deputy Administrator for Farm Programs, Farm Service Agency, U.S. Department of Agriculture or the designee.


Doe means a female goat.


Equine animal means a domesticated horse, mule, or donkey.


Ewe means a female sheep.


Farming operation means a business enterprise engaged in producing agricultural products.


Goat means a domesticated, ruminant mammal of the genus Capra, including Angora goats. Goats are further defined by sex (bucks and does) and age (kids).


Kid means a goat less than 1 year old.


Lamb means a sheep less than 1 year old.


Livestock owner means one having legal ownership of the livestock for which benefits are being requested on the day such livestock died due to an eligible disaster.


Non-adult beef cattle means a bovine that does not meet the definition of adult beef cow or bull. Non-adult beef cattle are further delineated by weight categories of less than 400 pounds, and 400 pounds or more at the time they died.


Non-adult buffalo or beefalo means an animal of those breeds that does not meet the definition of adult buffalo/beefalo cow or bull. Non-adult buffalo or beefalo are further delineated by weight categories of less than 400 pounds, and 400 pounds or more at the time of death.


Non-adult dairy cattle means a bovine livestock, of a breed used for the purpose of providing milk for human consumption, that do not meet the definition of adult dairy cow or bull. Non-adult dairy cattle are further delineated by weight categories of less than 400 pounds, and 400 pounds or more at the time they died.


Poultry means domesticated chickens, turkeys, ducks, and geese. Poultry are further delineated by sex, age, and purpose of production as determined by FSA.


Ram means a male sheep.


Sheep means a domesticated, ruminant mammal of the genus Ovis. Sheep are further defined by sex (rams and ewes) and age (lambs).


Swine means a domesticated omnivorous pig, hog, and boar. Swine are further delineated by sex and weight as determined by FSA.


§ 760.904 Limitations on payments and other benefits.

(a) A participant may receive benefits for livestock losses for only one of the 2005, 2006, or 2007 calendar years as specified under this part.


(b) A “person” as determined under part 1400 of this title may receive no more than $80,000 under this subpart. In applying the $80,000 per person payment limitation, regardless of whether 2005, 2006, or 2007 calendar year benefits are at issue or sought, the most restrictive “person” determination for the participant in the years 2005, 2006, and 2007, will be used to limit benefits.


(c) The provisions of part 1400, subpart G, of this title relating to limits to payments for individuals or entities with certain levels of adjusted gross income apply to this program.


(d) As a condition to receive benefits under this subpart, a participant must have been in compliance with the provisions of parts 12 and 718 of this title and must not otherwise be precluded from receiving benefits under any law.


(e) An individual or entity determined to be a foreign person under part 1400 of this title is not eligible to receive benefits under this subpart.


§ 760.905 Eligible owners and contract growers.

(a) To be considered eligible, a livestock owner must have had legal ownership of the eligible livestock, as provided in § 760.906(a), on the day the livestock died.


(b) To be considered eligible, a contract grower on the day the livestock died must have had:


(1) A written agreement with the owner of eligible livestock setting the specific terms, conditions, and obligations of the parties involved regarding the production of livestock; and


(2) Control of the eligible livestock, as provided in § 760.906(b), on the day the livestock died.


§ 760.906 Eligible livestock.

(a) To be considered eligible livestock for livestock owners, livestock must be adult or non-adult dairy cattle, beef cattle, buffalo, beefalo, catfish, crawfish, equine, sheep, goats, swine, poultry, deer, or reindeer and meet all the conditions in paragraph (c) of this section.


(b) To be considered eligible livestock for contract growers, livestock must be poultry or swine as defined in § 760.903 and meet all the conditions in paragraph (c) of this section.


(c) To be considered eligible, livestock must meet all of the following conditions:


(1) Died in an eligible county as a direct result of an eligible disaster event;


(i) After January 1, 2005, but before February 28, 2007;


(ii) No later than 60 calendar days from the ending date of the applicable disaster period, but before February 28, 2007; and


(iii) In the calendar year for which benefits are being requested.


(2) The disaster event that caused the loss must be the same event for which a natural disaster was declared or designated.


(3) Been maintained for commercial use as part of a farming operation on the day they died; and


(4) Before dying, not have been produced or maintained for reasons other than commercial use as part of a farming operation, including, but not limited to, wild free roaming animals or animals used for recreational purposes, such as pleasure, hunting, roping, pets, or for show.


(d) In those counties in § 760.902, the following types of animals owned by a livestock owner are eligible livestock:


(1) Adult beef bulls;


(2) Adult beef cows;


(3) Adult buffalo or beefalo bulls;


(4) Adult buffalo or beefalo cows;


(5) Adult dairy bulls;


(6) Adult dairy cows;


(7) Catfish;


(8) Chickens, broilers, pullets;


(9) Chickens, chicks;


(10) Chickens, layers, roasters;


(11) Crawfish;


(12) Deer;


(13) Ducks;


(14) Ducks, ducklings;


(15) Equine;


(16) Geese, goose;


(17) Geese, gosling;


(18) Goats, bucks;


(19) Goats, does;


(20) Goats, kids;


(21) Non-adult beef cattle;


(22) Non-adult buffalo/beefalo;


(23) Non-adult dairy cattle;


(24) Reindeer


(25) Sheep, ewes;


(26) Sheep, lambs;


(27) Sheep, rams;


(28) Swine, feeder pigs under 50 pounds;


(29) Swine, sows, boars, barrows, gilts 50 to 150 pounds;


(30) Swine, sows, boars, barrows, gilts over 150 pounds;


(31) Turkeys, poults; and


(32) Turkeys, toms, fryers, and roasters.


(e) In those counties in § 760.902, the following types of animals are eligible livestock for contract growers:


(1) Chickens, broilers, pullets;


(2) Chickens, layers, roasters;


(3) Geese, goose;


(4) Swine, boars, sows;


(5) Swine, feeder pigs;


(6) Swine, lightweight barrows, gilts;


(7) Swine, sows, boars, barrows, gilts; and


(8) Turkeys, toms, fryers, and roasters.


§ 760.907 Application process.

(a) To apply for 2005-2007 LIP, submit a completed application to the administrative county FSA office that maintains the farm records for your agricultural operation, a copy of your grower contract, if you are a contract grower, and other supporting documents required for determining your eligibility as an applicant. Supporting documents must show:


(1) Evidence of loss,


(2) Current physical location of livestock in inventory, and


(3) Physical location of claimed livestock at the time of death.


(b) The application must be filed during the application period announced by the Deputy Administrator.


(c) A minor child is eligible to apply for program benefits if all eligibility requirements are met and one of the following conditions exists:


(1) The right of majority has been conferred upon the minor by court proceedings or statute;


(2) A guardian has been appointed to manage the minor’s property, and the applicable program documents are executed by the guardian; or


(3) A bond is furnished under which a surety guarantees any loss incurred for which the minor would be liable had the minor been an adult.


(d) The participant must provide adequate proof that the death of the eligible livestock occurred in an eligible county as a direct result of an eligible disaster event during the applicable disaster period. The quantity and kind of livestock that died as a direct result of the eligible disaster event may be documented by: purchase records; veterinarian records; bank or other loan papers; rendering truck receipts; Federal Emergency Management Agency records; National Guard records; written contracts; production records; Internal Revenue Service records; property tax records; private insurance documents; and other similar verifiable documents as determined by FSA.


(e) Certification of livestock deaths by third parties may be accepted only if both the following conditions are met:


(1) The livestock owner or livestock contract grower, as applicable, certifies in writing:


(i) That there is no other documentation of death available;


(ii) The number of livestock, by category determined by FSA, were in inventory at the time the applicable disaster event occurred; and


(iii) Other details required for FSA to determine the certification acceptable; and


(2) The third party provides their telephone number, address, and a written statement containing:


(i) Specific details about their knowledge of the livestock deaths;


(ii) Their affiliation with the livestock owner;


(iii) The accuracy of the deaths claimed by the livestock owner; and


(iv) Other details required by FSA to determine the certification acceptable.


(f) Data furnished by the participant will be used to determine eligibility for program benefits. Furnishing the data is voluntary; however, without all required data program benefits will not be approved or provided.


§ 760.908 Deceased individuals or dissolved entities.

(a) Payments may be made for eligible losses suffered by an eligible participant who is now a deceased individual or is a dissolved entity if a representative, who currently has authority to enter into a contract, on behalf of the participant, signs the application for payment.


(b) Legal documents showing proof of authority to sign for the deceased individual or dissolved entity must be provided.


(c) If a participant is now a dissolved general partnership or joint venture, all members of the general partnership or joint venture at the time of dissolution or their duly authorized representatives must sign the application for payment.


§ 760.909 Payment calculation.

(a) Under this subpart separate payment rates are established for eligible livestock owners and eligible livestock contract growers in accordance with paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section. Payments for the 2005-2007 LIP are calculated by multiplying the national payment rate for each livestock category, as determined in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section, by the number of eligible livestock in each category, as provided in § 760.906. Adjustments will be applied in accordance with paragraphs (d) and (e) of this section.


(b) The 2005-2007 LIP national payment rate for eligible livestock owners is based on 26 percent of the average fair market value of the livestock.


(c) The 2005-2007 LIP national payment rate for eligible livestock contract growers is based on 26 percent of the average income loss sustained by the contract grower with respect to the dead livestock.


(d) The 2005 payment calculated under 2005-2007 LIP for eligible livestock owners will be reduced by the amount the participant received under:


(1) The Livestock Indemnity Program (subpart E of this part);


(2) The Aquaculture Grant Program (subpart G of this part); and


(3) The Livestock Indemnity Program II (part 1416, subpart C of this title).


(e) The 2005 payment calculated under 2005-2007 LIP for eligible livestock contract growers will be reduced by the amount the participant received:


(1) Under the Livestock Indemnity Program (subpart E of this part);


(2) For the loss of income from the dead livestock from the party who contracted with the producer to grow the livestock; and


(3) Under the Livestock Indemnity Program II (part 1416, subpart C of this title).


§ 760.910 Appeals.

The appeal regulations set forth at parts 11 and 780 of this title apply to determinations made pursuant to this subpart.


§ 760.911 Offsets, assignments, and debt settlement.

(a) Any payment to any participant will be made without regard to questions of title under State law and without regard to any claim or lien against the commodity, or proceeds, in favor of the owner or any other creditor except agencies of the U.S. Government. The regulations governing offsets and withholdings found at part 792 of this chapter apply to payments made under this subpart.


(b) Any participant entitled to any payment may assign any payment in accordance with regulations governing the assignment of payments found at part 1404 of this title.


§ 760.912 Records and inspections.

Participants receiving payments under this subpart or any other person who furnishes information for the purposes of enabling such participant to receive a payment under this subpart must maintain any books, records, and accounts supporting any information so furnished for 3 years following the end of the year during which the application for payment was filed. Participants receiving payments or any other person who furnishes such information to FSA must allow authorized representatives of USDA and the General Accountability Office, during regular business hours, to inspect, examine, and make copies of such books or records, and to enter upon, inspect and verify all applicable livestock and acreage in which the participant has an interest for the purpose of confirming the accuracy of information provided by or for the participant.


§ 760.913 Refunds; joint and several liability.

In the event there is a failure to comply with any term, requirement, or condition for payment or assistance arising under this subpart, and if any refund of a payment to FSA will otherwise become due in connection with this subpart, all payments made in regard to such matter must be refunded to FSA together with interest and late-payment charges as provided for in part 792 of this chapter.


Subpart K – General Provisions for 2005-2007 Livestock Compensation and Catfish Grant Programs


Source:72 FR 72881, Dec. 21, 2007, unless otherwise noted.

§ 760.1000 Applicability.

(a) This subpart establishes the terms and conditions under which the following programs will be administered under Title IX of the U.S. Troop Readiness, Veterans’ Care, Katrina Recovery, and Iraq Accountability Appropriations Act, 2007 for participants affected by eligible disaster events and located in counties that are eligible as specified in § 760.1001:


(1) The 2005-2007 Livestock Compensation Program (2005-2007 LCP); and


(2) The 2005-2007 Catfish Grant Program (2005-2007 CGP).


(b) Farm Service Agency (FSA) funds as are necessary for the programs in subparts L and M of this part are available under Title IX of the U.S. Troop Readiness, Veterans’ Care, Katrina Recovery, and Iraq Accountability Appropriations Act, 2007.


§ 760.1001 Eligible counties, disaster events, and disaster periods.

(a) Except as provided in this subpart, FSA will provide assistance under the programs listed in § 760.1000 to eligible participants who have suffered certain losses due to eligible disaster events in eligible disaster counties provided in paragraph (c) of this section.


(b) The “Disaster Period” is the time period in which losses occurred for the particular disaster that may be considered eligible for the programs under subparts L and M of this part. The start and end dates for each eligible disaster period are specified at http://disaster.fsa.usda.gov.


(c) Eligible counties are those primary counties declared by the Secretary or designated for the applicable loss by the President, including counties contiguous to those counties, between January 1, 2005, and February 28, 2007 (that is after January 1, 2005 and before February 28, 2007). The listing is provided at http://disaster.fsa.usda.gov. For counties where there was an otherwise timely Presidential declaration, but the declarations do not cover agricultural physical loss, the subject counties may still be eligible if the counties were the subject of an approved Administrator’s Physical Loss Notice (APLN) when the APLN applies to a natural disaster timely designated by the President.


§ 760.1002 Definitions.

The following definitions apply to the programs in subpart L and M of this part. The definitions in parts 718 and 1400 of this title also apply, except where they conflict with the definitions in this section.


Commercial use means a use performed as part of the operation of a business activity engaged in as a means of livelihood for profit by the eligible producer.


Farming operation means a business enterprise engaged in producing agricultural products.


§ 760.1003 Limitations on payments and other benefits.

(a) A participant may receive benefits for eligible livestock feed losses, including additional feed costs, for only one of the 2005, 2006, or 2007 calendar years under 2005-2007 LCP, subpart L of this part, or under the CGP of subpart M of this part.


(b) As specified in § 760.1106(c), the payment under the 2005-2007 LCP may not exceed the smaller of the calculated payment in § 760.1106(a) or the value of the producer’s eligible feed loss, increased feed costs, or forage or grazing loss.


(c) A person may receive no more than $80,000 under 2005-2007 LCP, subpart L of this part. In applying the $80,000 per person payment limitation, regardless of whether the 2005, 2006, or 2007 calendar year benefits are at issue or sought, the most restrictive “person” determination for the participant in the years 2005, 2006, and 2007, will be used to limit benefits. The rules and definitions of part 1400 of this title apply in construing who is a qualified separate “person” for purposes of this limit. All payment eligibility requirements of part 1400 as they apply to any other payments, also apply to payments under subpart L of this part.


(d) For payments under 2005-2007 CGP, a farming operation may receive no more than $80,000, except for general partnerships and joint ventures, in which case assistance will not exceed $80,000 times the number of eligible members of the general partnership or joint venture. This limit must be enforced by the state government administering the grant program.


(e) The provisions of part 1400, subpart G, of this title apply to these programs. That is the rules that limit the eligibility for benefits of those individuals or entities with an adjusted gross income greater than a certain limit will be applied in the same manner to payments under subparts L and M of this part.


(f) As a condition to receive benefits under subparts L and M of this part, a participant must have been in compliance with the provisions of parts 12 and 718 of this title for the calendar year for which benefits are being requested and must not otherwise be precluded from receiving benefits under any law.


(g) An individual or entity determined to be a foreign person under part 1400 of this title is not eligible to receive benefits under subparts L and M of this part.


(h) In addition to limitations provided in subparts L and M of this part, participants cannot receive duplicate benefits under subparts L and M of this part for the same loss or any similar loss under:


(1) An agricultural disaster assistance provision contained in the announcement of the Secretary on January 26, 2006, or August 29, 2006;


(2) The Emergency Supplemental Appropriations Act for Defense, the Global War on Terror, and Hurricane Recovery, 2006 (Pub. L. 109-234; 120 Stat. 418); or


(3) Any other disaster assistance program.


Subpart L – 2005-2007 Livestock Compensation Program


Source:72 FR 72881, Dec. 21, 2007, unless otherwise noted.

§ 760.1100 Applicability.

This subpart sets forth the terms and conditions applicable to the 2005-2007 Livestock Compensation Program (LCP).


§ 760.1101 Administration.

(a) This program is administered under the general supervision of the Administrator, Farm Service Agency (FSA).


(b) FSA representatives do not have authority to modify or waive any of the provisions of the regulations of this subpart.


(c) The State FSA committee must take any action required by the regulations of this subpart that the county FSA committee has not taken. The State committee must also:


(1) Correct, or require a county committee to correct, any action taken by such county committee that is not in accordance with the regulations of this subpart; or


(2) Require a county committee to withhold taking any action that is not in accordance with this subpart.


(d) No provision or delegation to a State or county FSA committee will preclude the FSA Deputy Administrator for Farm Programs (Deputy Administrator), or a designee of such, from determining any question arising under the program or from reversing or modifying any determination made by a State or county FSA committee.


(e) The Deputy Administrator for Farm Programs may authorize state and county committees to waive or modify nonstatutory deadlines or other program requirements in cases where lateness or failure to meet such does not adversely affect the operation of the program.


§ 760.1102 Definitions.

The following definitions apply to this subpart.


Adult beef bull means a male beef bovine animal that was at least 2 years old and used for breeding purposes on the beginning date of the disaster period.


Adult beef cow means a female beef bovine animal that had delivered one or more offspring before the disaster period. A first-time bred beef heifer is also considered an adult beef cow if it was pregnant on the beginning date of the disaster period.


Adult buffalo and beefalo bull means a male animal of those breeds that was at least 2 years old and used for breeding purposes on the beginning date of the disaster period.


Adult buffalo and beefalo cow means a female animal of those breeds that had delivered one or more offspring before the beginning date of the applicable disaster period. A first-time bred buffalo or beefalo heifer is also considered to be an adult buffalo or beefalo cow if it was pregnant on the beginning date of the disaster period.


Adult dairy bull means a male dairy bovine breed animal at least 2 years old used primarily for breeding dairy cows on the beginning date of the disaster period.


Adult dairy cow means a female bovine animal used for the purpose of providing milk for human consumption that had delivered one or more offspring before the beginning date of the applicable disaster period. A first-time bred dairy heifer is also considered an adult dairy cow if it was pregnant on the beginning date of the disaster period.


Agricultural operation means a farming operation.


Application means the “2005/2006/2007 Livestock Compensation Program” form.


Application period means the date established by the Deputy Administrator for Farm Programs for participants to apply for program benefits.


Disaster period means the applicable disaster period specified in § 760.1001.


Equine animal means a domesticated horse, mule, or donkey.


Goat means a domesticated, ruminant mammal of the genus Capra, including Angora goats.


Non-adult beef cattle means a bovine animal that weighed 500 pounds or more on the beginning date of the disaster period, but does not meet the definition of an adult beef cow or bull.


Non-adult buffalo/beefalo means an animal of those breeds that weighed 500 pounds or more on the beginning date of the disaster period, but does not meet the definition of an adult buffalo or beefalo cow or bull.


Non-adult dairy cattle means a bovine livestock, of a breed used for the purpose of providing milk for human consumption, that weighed 500 pounds or more on the beginning date of the disaster period, but does not meet the definition of an adult dairy cow or bull.


Owner means one who had legal ownership of the livestock for which benefits are being requested under this subpart on the beginning date of the applicable disaster period as set forth in § 760.1001.


Poultry means a domesticated chicken, turkey, duck, or goose. Poultry are further delineated by sex, age and purpose of production, as determined by FSA.


Sheep means a domesticated, ruminant mammal of the genus Ovis.


Swine means a domesticated omnivorous pig, hog, and boar. Swine are further delineated by sex and weight as determined by FSA.


§ 760.1103 Eligible livestock and producers.

(a) To be considered eligible livestock to generate benefits under this subpart, livestock must meet all the following conditions:


(1) Be adult or non-adult dairy cattle, beef cattle, buffalo, beefalo, equine, poultry, elk, reindeer, sheep, goats, swine, or deer;


(2) Been physically located in the eligible disaster county on the beginning date of the disaster period;


(3) Been maintained for commercial use as part of the producer’s farming operation on the beginning date of the disaster period; and


(4) Not have been produced and maintained for reasons other than commercial use as part of a farming operation. Such excluded uses include, but are not limited to, wild free roaming animals or animals used for recreational purposes, such as pleasure, roping, hunting, pets, or for show.


(b) To be considered an eligible livestock producer, the participant’s eligible livestock must have been located in the eligible disaster county on the beginning date of the disaster period. To be eligible, also, the livestock producer must have:


(1) Owned or cash-leased eligible livestock on the beginning date of the disaster period (provided that if there is a cash lease, only the cash lessee and not the owner will be eligible); and


(2) Suffered any of the following:


(i) A grazing loss on eligible grazing lands physically located in the eligible disaster county, where the forage was damaged or destroyed by an eligible disaster event, and intended for use as feed for the participant’s eligible livestock;


(ii) A loss of feed from forage or feedstuffs physically located in the eligible disaster county, that was mechanically harvested and intended for use as feed for the participant’s eligible livestock, that was damaged or destroyed after harvest as the result of an eligible disaster event;


(iii) A loss of feed from purchased forage or feedstuffs physically located in the eligible disaster county, intended for use as feed for the participant’s eligible livestock, that was damaged or destroyed by an eligible disaster event; or


(iv) Increased feed costs incurred in the eligible disaster county, due to an eligible disaster event, to feed the participant’s eligible livestock.


(c) The eligible livestock categories are:


(1) Adult beef cows or bulls;


(2) Non-adult beef cattle;


(3) Adult buffalo or beefalo cows or bulls;


(4) Non-adult buffalo or beefalo;


(5) Adult dairy cows or bulls;


(6) Non-adult dairy cattle;


(7) Goats;


(8) Sheep;


(9) Equine;


(10) Reindeer;


(11) Elk;


(12) Poultry; and


(13) Deer.


(d) Ineligible livestock include, but are not limited to, livestock:


(1) Livestock that were or would have been in a feedlot regardless of whether there was a disaster or where such livestock were in a feedlot as part of a participant’s normal business operation, as determined by FSA;


(2) Emus;


(3) Yaks;


(4) Ostriches;


(5) Llamas;


(6) All beef and dairy cattle, and buffalo and beefalo that weighed less than 500 pounds on the beginning date of the disaster period;


(7) Any wild free roaming livestock, including horses and deer;


(8) Livestock produced or maintained for reasons other than commercial use as part of a farming operation, including, but not limited to, livestock produced or maintained for recreational purposes, such as:


(i) Roping,


(ii) Hunting,


(iii) Show,


(iv) Pleasure,


(v) Use as pets, or


(vi) Consumption by owner.


§ 760.1104 Application for payment.

(a) To apply for 2005-2007 LCP, an application and required supporting documentation must be submitted to the administrative county FSA office.


(b) The application must be filed during the application period announced by the Deputy Administrator for Farm Programs.


(c) Payments may be made for eligible losses suffered by an eligible livestock producer who is now a deceased individual or is a dissolved entity if a representative who currently has authority to enter into a contract, on behalf of the livestock producer, signs the application for payment. Legal documents showing proof of authority to sign for the deceased individual or dissolved entity must be provided. If a participant is now a dissolved general partnership or joint venture, all members of the general partnership or joint venture at the time of dissolution or their duly authorized representatives must sign the application for payment.


(d) Data furnished by the participant will be used to determine eligibility for program benefits. Furnishing the data is voluntary; however, without all required data program benefits will not be approved or provided.


(e) A minor child is eligible to apply for program benefits if all eligibility requirements are met and one of the following conditions exists:


(1) The right of majority has been conferred upon the minor by court proceedings or statute;


(2) A guardian has been appointed to manage the minor’s property, and the applicable program documents are executed by the guardian; or


(3) A bond is furnished under which a surety guarantees any loss incurred for which the minor would be liable had the minor been an adult.


§ 760.1105 Application process.

(a) Participants must submit to FSA:


(1) A completed application in accordance with § 760.1104;


(2) Adequate proof, as determined by FSA, that the feed lost:


(i) Was for the claimed eligible livestock;


(ii) Was lost as a direct result of an eligible disaster event during an eligible disaster period specified in § 760.1001;


(iii) Was lost after January 1, 2005, but before February 28, 2007; and


(iv) Occurred in the calendar year for which benefits are being requested; and


(3) Any other supporting documentation as determined by FSA to be necessary to make a determination of eligibility of the participant. Supporting documents include, but are not limited to: verifiable purchase records; veterinarian records; bank or other loan papers; rendering truck receipts; Federal Emergency Management Agency records; National Guard records; written contracts; production records; Internal Revenue Service records; property tax records; private insurance documents; sales records, and similar documents determined acceptable by FSA.


(b) [Reserved]


§ 760.1106 Payment calculation.

(a) Preliminary, unadjusted LCP payments are calculated for a producer by multiplying the national payment rate for each livestock category, as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, by the number of eligible livestock for the producer in each category. The national payment rate represents the cost of the amount of corn needed to maintain the specific livestock for 30 days, as determined by FSA. As provided in subpart K of this part, a producer may receive benefits for only one of the three program years, 2005, 2006, or 2007. The producer must indicate which year has been chosen. Payments are available only with respect to disaster-related fees losses in the period from January 2, 2005 through February 27, 2007, in eligible counties for losses during the times specified for the disaster periods as specified in § 760.1001(b).


(b) The preliminary LCP payment calculated in accordance with paragraph (a) of this section:


(1) For 2005 LCP provided for under this subpart will be reduced by the amount the participant received for the specific livestock under the Feed Indemnity Program in accordance with subpart D of this part and LCP for the 2005 hurricanes under subpart B of part 1416 of this title; and


(2) For 2006 LCP under this subpart will be reduced by the amount the participant received for the same or similar loss under the Livestock Assistance Grant Program in accordance with subpart H of this part.


(c) Subject to such other limitations as may apply, including those in paragraph (b) of this section, the payment under the 2005-2007 LCP may not exceed for the relevant year chosen by the producer the smaller of either the:


(1) Payment calculated in paragraph (a) of this section for that year; or


(2) Value of the producer’s eligible feed loss, increased feed costs, or forage or grazing loss as determined by FSA for that year.


(d) The actual payment to the producer will be the amount provided for in paragraph (c) of this section subject to the adjustments and limits provided for in this section or in this part.


§ 760.1107 Appeals.

The appeal regulations in parts 11 and 780 of this title apply to determinations made under this subpart.


§ 760.1108 Offsets, assignments, and debt settlement.

(a) Any payment to any participant will be made without regard to any claim or lien against the commodity, or proceeds, in favor of the owner or any other creditor except agencies of the U.S. Government. The regulations governing offsets and withholdings in parts 792 and 1403 of this title apply to payments made under this subpart.


(b) Any participant entitled to any payment may assign any payments in accordance with regulations governing the assignment of payments in part 1404 of this chapter.


§ 760.1109 Recordkeeping and inspections.

Participants receiving payments under this subpart or any other person who furnishes information for the purposes of enabling the participant to receive a payment under this subpart must maintain any books, records, and accounts supporting that information for a minimum of 3 years following the end of the year during which the application for payment was filed. Participants receiving payments or any other person who furnishes the information to FSA must allow authorized representatives of USDA and the General Accounting Office, during regular business hours, and to enter upon, inspect, examine, and make copies of the books or records, and to inspect and verify all applicable livestock and acreage in which the participant has an interest for the purpose of confirming the accuracy of the information provided by or for the participant.


§ 760.1110 Refunds; joint and several liability.

In the event there is a failure to comply with any term, requirement, or condition for payment or assistance arising under this subpart, and if any refund of a payment to FSA will otherwise become due in connection with this subpart, all payments made in regard to such matter must be refunded to FSA together with interest and late-payment charges as provided for in part 792 of this title, provided that interest will run from the date of the disbursement of the refund to the producer.


Subpart M – 2005-2007 Catfish Grant Program


Source:72 FR 72881, Dec. 21, 2007, unless otherwise noted.

§ 760.1200 Administration.

FSA will administer a limited 2005-2007 CGP to provide assistance to catfish producers in eligible counties that suffered catfish feed and related losses between January 1, 2005, and February 28, 2007, that is after January 1, 2005, and before February 28, 2007. Under the 2005-2007 CGP, FSA will provide grants to State governments in those States that have catfish producers that are located in eligible counties and that have agreed to participate in the 2005-2007 CGP. The amount of each grant will be based on the total value of catfish feed and related losses suffered in eligible counties in the subject state. Each State must submit a work plan providing a summary of how the State will implement the 2005-2007 CGP.


§ 760.1201 Application for payment.

Application procedures for 2005-2007 CGP will be as determined by the State governments.


§ 760.1202 Eligible producers.

(a) To be considered an eligible catfish producer, an participant must:


(1) Raise catfish in a controlled environment and be physically located in an eligible county on the beginning date of the disaster period;


(2) Maintain the catfish for commercial use as part of a farming operation;


(3) Have a risk in production of such catfish; and


(4) Have suffered one of the following types of losses relating to catfish feed as a direct result of the county’s disaster event that occurred in that year:


(i) Physical loss of feed that was damaged or destroyed,


(ii) Cost to the extent allowed by FSA, associated with lost feeding days, or


(iii) Cost associated with increased feed prices.


(b) [Reserved]


§ 760.1203 Payment calculation.

(a) Producers must be paid for feed losses of higher costs only for one of the three years, 2005, 2006, or 2007, and the loss must be for eligible catfish feed losses in an eligible county, as determined pursuant to subpart K of this part. Further, the feed loss or higher costs must be caused by the disaster that caused the county to qualify as an eligible county. The loss, moreover, to qualify for payment, must have occurred during the allowable time period provided in this part, namely the period beginning on January 2, 2005 and ending February 27, 2007. The producer must pick the year of the benefits sought.


(b) Subject to all adjustments and limits provided for in this part the amount of assistance provided to each participant from the State will be equal to the smaller of:


(1) Depending on the year chosen by the producer, the value of the participant’s 2005, 2006, or 2007 catfish feed and related losses as a direct result of an eligible disaster event, as determined by the State or


(2) Result of multiplying:


(i) Total tons of catfish feed purchased by the participant in depending on the year chosen by the producer 2005 (entire year), 2006 (entire year), or 2007 (through February 27, 2007, only), times,


(ii) Catfish feed payment rate for 2005, 2006, or 2007, as applicable, as set by FSA.


(c) The catfish feed rate represents 61 percent of the normal cost of a ton of feed for a year divided by six to reflect the normal feeding price for catfish.


Subpart N – Dairy Economic Loss Assistance Payment Program


Source:74 FR 67808, Dec. 21, 2009, unless otherwise noted.

§ 760.1301 Administration.

(a) This subpart establishes, subject to the availability of funds, the terms and conditions under which the Dairy Economic Loss Assistance Payments (DELAP) program as authorized by section 10104 of the Farm Security and Rural Investment Act of 2002 (Pub. L. 107-171) will be administered with respect to funds appropriated under Section 748 of the Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug Administration, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2010 (2010 Agriculture Appropriations Bill, Pub. L. 111-80).


(b) The DELAP program will be administered under the general supervision of the Administrator, FSA, and the Deputy Administrator for Farm Programs, FSA (who is referred to as the “Deputy Administrator” in this part), and will be carried out by FSA’s Price Support Division (PSD) and Kansas City Management Office (KCMO).


(c) FSA representatives do not have authority to modify or waive any of the provisions of the regulations of this subpart, except as provided in paragraph (d) of this section.


(d) The State committee will take any action required by the provisions of this subpart that has not been taken by the county committee. The State committee will also:


(1) Correct or require the county committee to correct any action taken by the county committee that is not in compliance with the provisions of this subpart.


(2) Require a county committee to not take an action or implement a decision that is not in compliance with the provisions of this subpart.


(e) No provision or delegation of this subpart to PSD, KCMO, a State committee, or a county committee will preclude the Administrator, FSA, or a designee, from determining any question arising under the program or from reversing or modifying any determination made by PSD, KCMO, a State committee, or a county committee.


(f) The Deputy Administrator may waive or modify non-statutory deadlines and other program requirements of this part in cases where lateness or failure to meet other requirements does not adversely affect the operation of the program. Participants have no right to seek an exception under this provision. The Deputy Administrator’s refusal to consider cases or circumstances or decision not to exercise the discretionary authority of this provision will not be considered an adverse decision and is not appealable.


§ 760.1302 Definitions and acronyms.

The following definitions apply to this subpart. The definitions in parts 718 and 1400 of this title also apply, except where they may conflict with the definitions in this section.


County office or FSA county office means the FSA offices responsible for administering FSA programs in a specific areas, sometimes encompassing more than one county, in a State.


Dairy operation means any person or group of persons who, as a single unit, as determined by FSA, produce and market milk commercially produced from cows, and whose production facilities are located in the United States. In any case, however, dairy operation may be given by the agency the same meaning as the definition of dairy operation as found in part 1430 of this title for other dairy assistance programs.


Department or USDA means the U. S. Department of Agriculture.


Deputy Administrator means the Deputy Administrator for Farm programs (DAFP), FSA, or a designee.


Eligible production means milk from cows that was produced during February through July 2009, by a dairy producer in the United States and marketed commercially by a producer in a participating State.


Farm Service Agency or FSA means the Farm Service Agency of the USDA.


Fiscal year or FY means the year beginning October 1 and ending the following September 30. The fiscal year will be designated for this subpart by year reference to the calendar year in which it ends. For example, FY 2009 is from October 1, 2008, through September 30, 2009 (inclusive).


Marketed commercially means sold to the market to which the dairy operation normally delivers whole milk and receives a monetary amount and in any case this term will be construed to allow the use of MILC records in making DELAP payments.


Milk handler means the marketing agency to or through which the dairy operation commercially markets whole milk.


Milk marketing means a marketing of milk for which there is a verifiable sales or delivery record of milk marketed for commercial use.


Participating State means each of the 50 States in the United States of America, the District of Columbia, and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, or any other territory or possession of the United States.


Payment quantity means the pounds of milk production for which an operation is eligible to be paid under this subpart.


Producer means any individual, group of individuals, partnership, corporation, estate, trust association, cooperative, or other business enterprise or other legal entity, as defined in 7 CFR 1400.3, who is, or whose members are, a citizen of or legal resident alien in the United States, and who directly or indirectly, as determined by the Secretary, shares in the risk of producing milk, and who is entitled to a share of the commercial production available for marketing from the dairy operation. This term, and other terms in this subpart, will in any case be applied in a way that allows MILC records to be used to make DELAP payments.


United States means the 50 States of the United States of America, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, and any other territory or possession of the United States.


Verifiable production records means evidence that is used to substantiate the amount of production marketed commercially by a dairy operation and its producers and that can be verified by FSA through an independent source.


§ 760.1303 Requesting benefits.

(a) If as a dairy operation or producer, your records are currently available in the FSA county office from previous participation in a fiscal year 2009 dairy program administered by FSA, you do not need to request benefits under this subpart to receive payments. FSA will make payments as specified in this subpart to eligible dairy producers based on production data maintained by the FSA county office for the months of February through July 2009.


(b) If records are not available in the FSA county office, dairy producers may request benefits. The request for benefits may be a letter or email; no specific form is required.


(1) Submit your request for DELAP to: Deputy Administrator for Farm Programs, FSA, USDA, STOP 0512, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW., Washington, DC 20250-0512; Attention: DELAP Program. Or you may send your request for DELAP via fax to (202) 690-1536 or e-mail to [email protected]


(2) The complete request as described in this subpart must be received by FSA by the close of business on January 19, 2010.


(3) The complete request for benefits must include all of the following:


(i) The name and location of the dairy operation;


(ii) Contact information for the dairy operation, including telephone number;


(iii) Name, percentage share, and tax identification number for the entity or individual producer’s receiving a share of the payment; and


(iv) Proof of production (acceptable documentation as specified in § 760.1305).


(4) Requests for benefits and related documents not provided to FSA as required by this subpart, will not be approved.


(5) If not already provided and available to FSA, the dairy producer or dairy operation must provide documentation to support:


(i) The amount (quantity in pounds) of milk produced by the dairy operation during the months of February 2009 through July 2009;


(ii) Percentage share of milk production during February through July 2009 attributed to each producer in the dairy operation; and


(iii) Average adjusted gross income for each individual or entity with a share in the operation and any additional entities or individuals as needed to apply the adjusted gross income rules of these regulations.


(6) Each dairy producer requesting benefits under this subpart is responsible for providing accurate and truthful information and any supporting documentation. If the dairy operation provides the required information, each dairy producer who shares in the risk of a dairy operation’s total production is responsible for the accuracy and truthfulness of the information submitted for the request for benefits before the request will be considered complete. Providing a false statement, request, or certification to the Government may be punishable by imprisonment, fines, other penalties, or sanctions.


(c) All information provided by the dairy producer or dairy operation is subject to verification, spot check, and audit by FSA. Further verification information may be obtained from the dairy operation’s milk handler or marketing cooperative if necessary for FSA to verify provided information. Refusal to allow FSA or any other USDA agency to verify any information provided or the inability of FSA to verify such information will result in a determination of ineligibility for benefits under this subpart.


(d) Data furnished by dairy producers and dairy operations, subject to verification, will be used to determine eligibility for program benefits. Although participation in the DELAP program is voluntary, program benefits will not be provided unless a producer or operation furnishes all requested data or such data is already recorded at the FSA county office.


§ 760.1304 Eligibility.

(a) Payment under DELAP will only be made to producers, but the dairy “operation” must first qualify its production within limits provided for in this subpart in order to have the individuals or entities that qualify as “producers” receive payment subject to whatever additional limits (such as the adjusted gross income provisions of these regulations) apply. As needed the agency may construe the terms of this regulation in any manner needed to facilitate and expedite payments using existing data and records from other assistance programs. Further, those parties (State and local governments and their political subdivisions and related agencies) excluded from the MILC program will not be eligible for DELAP payments notwithstanding any other provision of these regulation. That said, to be eligible to receive payments under this subpart, a dairy producer in the United States must:


(1) Have produced milk in the United States and commercially marketed the milk produced any time during February 2009 through July 2009;


(2) Be a producer, as defined in § 760.1302;


(3) Provide FSA with proof of milk production commercially marketed by all dairy producers in the dairy operation during February 2009 through July 2009; and


(4) Submit an accurate and complete request for benefits as specified in § 760.1303, if production data is not available in the FSA county office.


(b) To be eligible to receive a payment, each producer in an eligible dairy operation must meet the average adjusted gross income eligibility requirements of 7 CFR part 1400. No person or entity will be eligible to receive any payment or direct or indirect benefit under this subpart if their annual average adjusted nonfarm income is over $500,000 as determined under 7 CFR part 1400. In the case of indirect benefits, direct benefits to other parties will be reduced accordingly. This will mean that all of the attribution rules of part 1400 will apply. For example if Individual A is over the limit and owns 100 percent of Corporation C which had a 20 percent interest in Corporation B which had a 50 percent interest in milk producer Corporation A, the AGI of Individual A would result in a 10 percent (100 percent times 20 percent times 50 percent) loss in benefits to Corporation A. For DELAP, the relevant period for the annual average adjusted nonfarm income is 2005 through 2007.


(1) Individual dairy producers in a dairy operation that is an entity are only eligible for a payment based on their share of the dairy operation.


(2) No payment will be made to any other producer based on the share of any dairy producer who exceeds the income limit or who, because of the attribution rules, has their payment reduced.


§ 760.1305 Proof of production.

(a) Dairy producers requesting benefits must, as required by this subpart, provide adequate proof of the dairy operation’s eligible production during the months of February through July 2009, if those records are not already available at the FSA county office. The dairy operation must also provide proof that the eligible production was also commercially marketed during the same period.


(b) To be eligible for payment, dairy producers marketing milk during February through July 2009 must provide any required supporting documents to assist FSA in verifying production. Supporting documentation may be provided by either the dairy producer or by the dairy operation for each of its producers. Examples of supporting documentation may include, but are not limited to: Milk marketing payment stubs, tank records, milk handler records, daily milk marketings, copies of any payments received as compensation from other sources, or any other documents available to confirm the production and production history of the dairy operation. Dairy operations and producers may also be required to allow FSA to examine the herd of cattle as production evidence. If supporting documentation requested is not presented to FSA, the request for benefits will be denied.


§ 760.1306 Availability of funds.

(a) Payments under this subpart are subject to the availability of funds. The total available program funds are $290,000,000.


(b) FSA will prorate the available funds by a national factor to ensure payments do not exceed $290,000,000. The payment will be made based on the national payment rate as determined by FSA. FSA will prorate the payments based on the amount of milk production eligible for payments in a fair and reasonable manner.


(c) A reserve will be created to handle new applications, appeals, and errors.


§ 760.1307 Dairy operation payment quantity.

(a) A dairy operation’s payment quantity (the quantity of milk on which the “operation” can generate payments for “producers” involved in the operation) will be determined by FSA, based on the pounds of production of commercially marketed milk during the months of February 2009 through July 2009, multiplied by two.


(b) The maximum payment quantity for which a dairy operation can generate payments for its dairy producers under this subpart will be 6,000,000 pounds.


(c) The dairy operation’s payment quantity will be used to determine the amount of DELAP payments made to dairy producers.


§ 760.1308 Payment rate.

(a) A national per-hundredweight payment rate will be calculated by dividing the available funding, less a reserve established by FSA, by the total pounds of eligible production approved for payment.


(b) Each eligible dairy producer’s payment with respect to an operation will be calculated by multiplying the payment rate determined in paragraph (a) of this section by the dairy producer’s share in the dairy operation’s eligible production payment quantity as determined in accordance with section § 760.1307.


(c) In the event that approval of all eligible requests for benefits would result in expenditures in excess of the amount available, FSA will reduce the payment rate in a manner that FSA determines to be fair and reasonable.


§ 760.1309 Appeals.

The appeal regulations set forth at 7 CFR parts 11 and 780 apply to determinations made under this subpart.


§ 760.1310 Misrepresentation and scheme or device.

(a) In addition to other penalties, sanctions or remedies as may apply, a dairy producer or operation will be ineligible to receive benefits under this subpart if the producer or operation is determined by FSA to have:


(1) Adopted any scheme or device that tends to defeat the purpose of this subpart;


(2) Made any fraudulent representation; or


(3) Misrepresented any fact affecting a program determination.


(b) Any payment to any person or operation engaged in a misrepresentation, scheme, or device, must be refunded with interest together with such other sums as may become due. Any dairy operation or person engaged in acts prohibited by this section and receiving payment under this subpart will be jointly and severally liable with other producers or operations involved in such claim for benefits for any refund due under this section and for related charges. The remedies provided in this subpart will be in addition to other civil, criminal, or administrative remedies that may apply.


§ 760.1311 Death, incompetence, or disappearance.

(a) In the case of the death, incompetency, or disappearance of a person or the dissolution of an entity that is eligible to receive benefits in accordance with this subpart, such alternate person or persons specified in 7 CFR part 707 may receive such benefits, as determined appropriate by FSA.


(b) Payments may be made to an otherwise eligible dairy producer who is now deceased or to a dissolved entity if a representative who currently has authority to enter into an application for the producer or the producer’s estate makes the request for benefits as specified in § 760.1303. Proof of authority over the deceased producer’s estate or a dissolved entity must be provided.


(c) If a dairy producer is now a dissolved general partnership or joint venture, all members of the general partnership or joint venture at the time of dissolution or their duly authorized representatives must be identified in the request for benefits.


§ 760.1312 Maintaining records.

(a) Persons requesting benefits under this subpart must maintain records and accounts to document all eligibility requirements specified in this subpart. Such records and accounts must be retained for 3 years after the date of payment to the dairy producer under this subpart.


(b) Destruction of the records after 3 years from the date of payment will be at the decision and risk of the party undertaking the destruction.


§ 760.1313 Refunds; joint and several liability.

(a) Any dairy producer that receives excess payment, payment as the result of erroneous information provided by any person, or payment resulting from a failure to comply with any requirement or condition for payment under this subpart, must refund the amount of that payment to FSA.


(b) Any refund required will be due from the date of the disbursement by the agency with interest determined in accordance with paragraph (d) of this section and late payment charges as provided in 7 CFR part 1403.


(c) Each dairy producer that has an interest in the dairy operation will be jointly and severally liable for any refund and related charges found to be due to FSA.


(d) Interest will be applicable to any refunds to FSA required in accordance with 7 CFR parts 792 and 1403. Such interest will be charged at the rate that the U.S. Department of the Treasury charges FSA for funds, and will accrue from the date FSA made the payment to the date the refund is repaid.


(e) FSA may waive the accrual of interest if it determines that the cause of the erroneous payment was not due to any action of the person or entity, or was beyond the control of the person or entity committing the violation. Any waiver is at the discretion of FSA alone.


§ 760.1314 Miscellaneous provisions.

(a) Offset. FSA may offset or withhold any amount due to FSA from any benefit provided under this subpart in accordance with the provisions of 7 CFR part 1403.


(b) Claims. Claims or debts will be settled in accordance with the provisions of 7 CFR part 1403.


(c) Other interests. Payments or any portion thereof due under this subpart will be made without regard to questions of title under State law and without regard to any claim or lien against the milk production, or proceeds thereof, in favor of the owner or any other creditor except agencies and instrumentalities of the U.S. Government.


(d) Assignments. Any dairy producer entitled to any payment under this part may assign any payments in accordance with the provisions of 7 CFR part 1404.


(e) Violations of highly erodible land and wetland conservation provisions. The provisions of part 12 of this title apply to this subpart. That part sets out certain conservation requirements as a general condition for farm benefits.


(f) Violations regarding controlled substances. The provisions of § 718.6 of this title, which generally limit program payment eligibility for persons who have engaged in certain offenses with respect to controlled substances, will apply to this subpart.


Subpart O – Agricultural Disaster Indemnity Programs


Source:83 FR 33801, July 18, 2018, unless otherwise noted.

§ 760.1500 Applicability.

(a) This subpart specifies the terms and conditions for the 2017 Wildfires and Hurricanes Indemnity Program (2017 WHIP) and the Wildfires and Hurricanes Indemnity Program Plus (WHIP+).


(b) The 2017 WHIP provides disaster assistance for necessary expenses related to crop, tree, bush, and vine losses related to the consequences of wildfires, hurricanes, and Tropical Storm Cindy that occurred in calendar year 2017, and for losses of peach and blueberry crops in calendar year 2017 due to extreme cold, and blueberry productivity losses in calendar year 2018 due to extreme cold and hurricane damage in calendar year 2017.


(c) WHIP+ provides disaster assistance for necessary expenses related to losses of crops, trees, bushes, and vines, as a consequence of Hurricanes Michael and Florence, other hurricanes, floods, tornadoes, typhoons, volcanic activity, snowstorms, wildfires, excessive moisture, and qualifying drought occurring in calendar years 2018 and 2019.


[84 FR 48528, Sept. 13, 2019, as amended at 86 FR 445, Jan. 6, 2021]


§ 760.1501 Administration.

(a) Programs under this subpart are administered under the general supervision of the Administrator, Farm Service Agency (FSA), and the Deputy Administrator for Farm Programs, FSA. Programs under this subpart are carried out by FSA State and county committees with instructions issued by the Deputy Administrator.


(b) FSA State and county committees, and representatives and their employees, do not have authority to modify or waive any of the provisions of the regulations in this subpart or instructions issued by the Deputy Administrator.


(c) The FSA State committee will take any action required by the regulations in this subpart that the FSA county committee has not taken. The FSA State committee will also:


(1) Correct, or require an FSA county committee to correct, any action taken by the FSA county committee that is not in accordance with the regulations in this subpart; or


(2) Require an FSA county committee to withhold taking any action that is not in accordance with this subpart.


(d) No delegation to an FSA State or county committee precludes the FSA Administrator, the Deputy Administrator, or a designee, from determining any question arising under this subpart or from reversing or modifying any determination made by an FSA State or county committee.


(e) The Deputy Administrator has the authority to permit State and county committees to waive or modify a non-statutory deadline specified in this part.


(f) Items of general applicability to program participants, including, but not limited to, application periods, application deadlines, internal operating guidelines issued to FSA State and county offices, prices, yields, and payment factors established under this subpart, are not subject to appeal in accordance with part 780 of this chapter.


[83 FR 33801, July 18, 2018, as amended 84 FR 48528, Sept. 13, 2019]


§ 760.1502 Definitions.

The following definitions apply to this subpart. The definitions in §§ 718.2 and 1400.3 of this title also apply, except where they conflict with the definitions in this section. In the event of conflict, the definitions in this section apply.


2017 WHIP factor means the factor in § 760.1511, determined by the Deputy Administrator, that is based on the crop insurance or NAP coverage level elected by the 2017 WHIP participant for a crop for which a payment is being requested; or, as applicable, the factor that applies for a crop of a crop year where the participant had no insurance or NAP coverage.


2017 WHIP yield means, for a unit:


(1) For an insured crop, excluding crops located in Puerto Rico, the approved federal crop insurance APH, for the disaster year;


(2) For a NAP covered crop, excluding crops located in Puerto Rico, the approved yield for the disaster year;


(3) For a crop located in Puerto Rico or an uninsured crop, excluding citrus crops located in Florida, the county expected yield for the disaster year; and


(4) For citrus crops located in Florida, the yield based on documentation submitted according to § 760.1511(c)(3), or if documentation is not submitted, the county expected yield.


Actual production means the total quantity of the crop appraised, harvested, or assigned, as determined by the FSA State or county committee in accordance with instructions issued by the Deputy Administrator.


Administrative county office means the FSA county office designated to make determinations, handle official records, and issue payments for the farm as specified in accordance part 718 of this title.


Appraised production means the amount of production determined by FSA, or a company reinsured by the Federal Crop Insurance Corporation (FCIC), that was unharvested but was determined to reflect the crop’s yield potential at the time of appraisal.


Approved yield means the amount of production per acre, computed as specified in FCIC’s Actual Production History (APH) Program in part 400, subpart G of this title or, for crops not included in part 400, subpart G of this title, the yield used to determine the guarantee. For crops covered under NAP, the approved yield is established according to part 1437 of this title.


Average adjusted gross farm income means the average of the portion of adjusted gross income of the person or legal entity that is attributable to activities related to farming, ranching, or forestry. The relevant tax years are:


(1) For 2017 WHIP, 2013, 2014, and 2015; and


(2) For WHIP+, 2015, 2016, and 2017.


Average adjusted gross income means the average of the adjusted gross income as defined under 26 U.S.C. 62 or comparable measure of the person or legal entity. The relevant tax years are:


(1) For 2017 WHIP, 2013, 2014, and 2015; and


(2) For WHIP+, 2015, 2016, and 2017.


Bush means, a low, branching, woody plant, from which at maturity of the bush, an annual fruit or vegetable crop is produced for commercial market for human consumption, such as a blueberry bush. The definition does not cover nursery stock or plants that produce a bush after the normal crop is harvested.


Buy-up NAP coverage means NAP coverage at a payment amount that is equal to an indemnity amount calculated for buy-up coverage computed under section 508(c) or (h) of the Federal Crop Insurance Act and equal to the amount that the buy-up coverage yield for the crop exceeds the actual yield for the crop.


Catastrophic coverage has the meaning as defined in § 1437.3 of this title.


Citrus crops and citrus trees include grapefruit, lemon, lime, Mandarin, Murcott, orange (all types), pummelo (pomelo), tangelo, tangerine, tangor.


County disaster yield means the average yield per acre calculated for a county or part of a county for the applicable crop year based on disaster events, and is intended to reflect the amount of production that a participant would have been expected to make based on the eligible disaster conditions in the county or area, as determined by the FSA county committee in accordance with instructions issued by the Deputy Administrator.


County expected yield has the meaning assigned in § 1437.102(b) of this title.


Coverage level means the percentage determined by multiplying the elected yield percentage under a crop insurance policy or NAP coverage by the elected price percentage.


Crop insurance means an insurance policy reinsured by FCIC under the provisions of the Federal Crop Insurance Act, as amended. It does not include private plans of insurance.


Crop insurance indemnity means, for the purpose of this subpart, the payment to a participant for crop losses covered under crop insurance administered by RMA in accordance with the Federal Crop Insurance Act (7 U.S.C. 1501-1524).


Crop year means:


(1) For insurable crops, trees, bushes, and vines, the crop year as defined according to the applicable crop insurance policy;


(2) For NAP eligible crops, the crop year as defined in § 1437.3 of this title;


(3) For uninsurable trees, bushes, and vines, the calendar year in which the qualifying disaster event occurred.


Damage factor means a percentage of the value lost when a tree, bush, or vine is damaged and requires rehabilitation but is not completely destroyed, as determined by the Deputy Administrator.


Eligible crop means a crop for which coverage was available either from FCIC under part 400 of this title, or through NAP under § 1437.4 of this title, that was affected by a qualifying disaster event.


Eligible disaster event means a disaster event that was:


(1) For insured crops, an eligible cause of loss under the applicable crop insurance policy for the crop year;


(2) For NAP covered crops and uninsured crops, an eligible cause of loss as specified in § 1437.10 of this title.


End use means the purpose for which the harvested crop is used, such as grain, hay, or seed.


Expected production means, for an agricultural unit, the historic yield multiplied by the number of planted or prevented planted acres of the crop for the unit.


FCIC means the Federal Crop Insurance Corporation, a wholly owned Government Corporation of USDA, administered by RMA.


Final planting date means the latest date, established by RMA for insurable crops, by which the crop must initially be planted in order to be insured for the full production guarantee or amount of insurance per acre. For NAP eligible crops, the final planting date is as defined in § 1437.3 of this title.


Growth stage means a classification system for trees, bushes, and vines based on a combination of age and production capability, determined by:


(1) The applicable insurance policy for insurable trees, bushes, and vines; or


(2) The Deputy Administrator for trees, bushes, and vines for which RMA does not offer an insurance policy.


Harvested means:


(1) For insurable crops, harvested as defined according to the applicable crop insurance policy;


(2) For NAP eligible single harvest crops, that a crop has been removed from the field, either by hand or mechanically;


(3) For NAP eligible crops with potential multiple harvests in 1 year or harvested over multiple years, that the producer has, by hand or mechanically, removed at least one mature crop from the field during the crop year;


(4) For mechanically-harvested NAP eligible crops, that the crop has been removed from the field and placed in a truck or other conveyance, except hay is considered harvested when in the bale, whether removed from the field or not. Grazed land will not be considered harvested for the purpose of determining an unharvested or prevented planting payment factor.


Insurable crop means an agricultural crop (excluding livestock) for which the producer on a farm is eligible to obtain a policy or plan of insurance under the Federal Crop Insurance Act (7 U.S.C. 1501-1524).


Multi-use crop means a crop intended for more than one end use during the crop year such as grass harvested for seed, hay, and grazing.


Multiple cropping means the planting of two or more different crops on the same acreage for harvest within the same crop year.


Multiple planting means the planting for harvest of the same crop in more than one planting period in a crop year on different acreage.


NASS means the National Agricultural Statistics Service.


NAP means the Noninsured Crop Disaster Assistance Program under section 196 of the Federal Agriculture Improvement and Reform Act of 1996 (7 U.S.C. 7333) and part 1437 of this title.


NAP covered crop means a crop for which the producer on a farm obtained NAP coverage.


NAP eligible crop means an agricultural crop for which the producer on a farm is eligible to obtain NAP coverage.


NAP service fee means the amount the producer must pay to obtain NAP coverage.


Planted acreage means land in which seed, plants, or trees have been placed, appropriate for the crop and planting method, at a correct depth, into a seedbed that has been properly prepared for the planting method and production practice normal to the USDA plant hardiness zone as determined by the county committee.


Prevented planting means the inability to plant an eligible crop with proper equipment during the planting period as a result of an eligible cause of loss, as determined by FSA.


Price means price per unit of the crop or commodity and will be:


(1) For an insured crop under a crop insurance policy that establishes a price, and under WHIP+, the price for a crop for which the producer obtained a revenue plan of insurance is the greater of the projected price or the harvest price to determine liability, that established price;


(2) For an insured crop under a crop insurance policy that does not establish a price to determine crop insurance liability, the county average price, as determined by FSA;


(3) For a NAP covered crop or uninsured crop, the average market price determined in § 1437.12 of this title; or


(4) For a tree, bush, or vine, the price determined by the Deputy Administrator based on the species of tree, bush, or vine and its growth stage.


Production means quantity of the crop or commodity produced expressed in a specific unit of measure including, but not limited to, bushels or pounds. Production under this subpart includes all harvested production, unharvested appraised production, and assigned production for the total planted acreage of the crop on the unit.


Qualifying disaster event means:


(1) For 2017 WHIP, a hurricane, wildfire, or Tropical Storm Cindy or related condition that occurred in the 2017 calendar year; extreme cold in calendar year 2017 for losses of peach and blueberry crops in calendar year 2017; and extreme cold and hurricane damage in calendar year 2017 for blueberry productivity losses in calendar year 2018; and


(2) For WHIP+, a hurricane, flood, tornado, typhoon, volcanic activity, snowstorm, wildfire, excessive moisture, qualifying drought, or related condition that occurred in the 2018 or 2019 calendar year.


Qualifying drought means an area within the county was rated by the U.S. Drought Monitor as having a D3 (extreme drought) or higher level of drought intensity during the applicable calendar year.


Related condition means damaging weather or an adverse natural occurrence that occurred as a direct result of a specified qualifying disaster event, as determined by FSA, such as excessive rain, high winds, flooding, mudslides, and heavy smoke, as determined by the Deputy Administrator.


Repeat crop means, with respect to production, a commodity that is planted or prevented from being planted in more than one planting period on the same acreage in the same crop year.


RMA means the Risk Management Agency.


Salvage value means the dollar amount or equivalent for the quantity of the commodity that cannot be marketed or sold in any recognized market for the crop.


Secondary use means the harvesting of a crop for a use other than the intended use.


Secondary use value means the value determined by multiplying the quantity of secondary use times the FSA-established price for that use.


Tree means a tall, woody plant having comparatively great height, and a single trunk from which an annual crop is produced for commercial market for human consumption, such as a maple tree for syrup, or papaya or orchard tree for fruit. It includes immature trees that are intended for commercial purposes. Nursery stock, banana and plantain plants, and trees used for pulp or timber are not considered eligible trees under this subpart.


Tropical crops is defined in § 1437.501 of this title.


Tropical region is defined in § 1437.502 of this title.


Unharvested payment factor means a percentage established by FSA for a crop and applied in a payment formula to reduce the payment for reduced expenses incurred because commercial harvest was not performed.


Uninsured means a crop that was not covered by crop insurance or NAP for the crop year for which a payment is being requested under this subpart.


Unit means, unless otherwise determined by the Deputy Administrator, basic unit as defined in part 457 or § 1437.9 of this title, for ornamental nursery production, includes all eligible plant species and sizes.


Unit of measure means:


(1) For insurable crops, the FCIC-established unit of measure; and


(2) For NAP eligible crops, the established unit of measure used for the NAP price and yield.


USDA means the U.S. Department of Agriculture.


USDA Plant Hardiness Zone means the 11 regions or planting zones as defined by a 10 degree Fahrenheit difference in the average annual minimum temperature.


U.S. drought monitor is a system for classifying drought severity according to a range of abnormally dry to exceptional drought. It is a collaborative effort between Federal and academic partners, produced on a weekly basis, to synthesize multiple indices, outlooks, and drought impacts on a map and in narrative form. This synthesis of indices is reported by the National Drought Mitigation Center at http://droughtmonitor.unl.edu.


Value loss crop has the meaning specified in subpart D, of part 1437 of this title.


Vine means a perennial plant grown under normal conditions from which an annual fruit crop is produced for commercial market for human consumption, such as grape, kiwi, or passion fruit, and that has a flexible stem supported by climbing, twining, or creeping along a surface. Nursery stock, perennials that are normally propagated as annuals such as tomato plants, biennials such as strawberry plants, and annuals such as pumpkin, squash, cucumber, watermelon, and other melon plants, are excluded from the term vine in this subpart.


WHIP+ factor means the factor in § 760.1511, determined by the Deputy Administrator, that is based on the crop insurance or NAP coverage level elected by the WHIP+ participant for a crop for which a payment is being requested; or, as applicable, the factor that applies for a crop during a crop year in which the participant had no insurance or NAP coverage.


WHIP+ yield means, for a unit:


(1) For an insured crop, excluding crops located in Puerto Rico, the approved federal crop insurance APH, for the crop year;


(2) For a NAP covered crop, excluding crops located in Puerto Rico, the approved yield for the crop year;


(3) For a crop located in Puerto Rico or an uninsured crop, excluding select crops, the county expected yield for the crop year; and


(4) For select crops, the yield based on documentation submitted according to § 760.1511(c)(3), or if documentation is not submitted, the county expected yield.


Yield means unit of production, measured in bushels, pounds, or other unit of measure, per area of consideration, usually measured in acres.


[83 FR 33801, July 18, 2018, as amended 84 FR 48529, Sept. 13, 2019; 86 FR 445, Jan. 6, 2021]


§ 760.1503 Eligibility.

(a) Participants will be eligible to receive a payment under this subpart only if they incurred a loss to an eligible crop, tree, bush, or vine due to a qualifying disaster event, as further specified in this subpart.


(b) To be an eligible participant under this subpart a producer who is a person or legal entity must be a:


(1) Citizen of the United States;


(2) Resident alien; for purposes of this subpart, resident alien means “lawful alien;”


(3) Partnership consisting of solely of citizens of the United States or resident aliens; or


(4) Corporation, limited liability company, or other organizational structure organized under State law consisting solely of citizens of the United States or resident aliens.


(c) If any person who would otherwise be eligible to receive a payment dies before the payment is received, payment may be released as specified in § 707.3 of this title. Similarly, if any person or legal entity who would otherwise been eligible to apply for a payment dies or is dissolved, respectively, before the payment is applied for, payment may be released in accordance with this subpart if a timely application is filed by an authorized representative. Proof of authority to sign for the deceased producer or dissolved entity must be provided. If a participant is now a dissolved general partnership or joint venture, all members of the general partnership or joint venture at the time of dissolution or their duly authorized representatives must sign the application for payment. Eligibility of such participant will be determined, as it is for other participants, based upon ownership share and risk in producing the crop.


(d) Growers growing eligible crops under contract for crop owners are not eligible unless the grower is also determined to have an ownership share of the crop. Any verbal or written contract that precludes the grower from having an ownership share renders the grower ineligible for payments under this subpart.


(e) A person or legal entity is not eligible to receive disaster assistance under this subpart if it is determined by FSA that the person or legal entity:


(1) Adopted any scheme or other device that tends to defeat the purpose of this subpart or any of the regulations applicable to this subpart;


(2) Made any fraudulent representation; or


(3) Misrepresented any fact affecting a program determination under any or all of the following: This subpart and parts 12, 400, 1400, and 1437 of this title.


(g) A person ineligible for crop insurance or NAP under §§ 400.458 or 1437.16 of this title, respectively, for any year is ineligible for payments under this subpart for the same year.


(h) The provisions of § 718.11 of this title, providing for ineligibility for payments for offenses involving controlled substances, apply.


(i) As a condition of eligibility to receive payments under this subpart, the participant must have been in compliance with the Highly Erodible Land Conservation and Wetland Conservation provisions of part 12 of this title for the applicable crop year for which the producer is applying for benefits under this subpart, and must not otherwise be precluded from receiving payments under parts 12, 400, 1400, or 1437 of this title or any law.


(j) Members of cooperative processors are not eligible for WHIP+ assistance for sugar beet losses.


[83 FR 33801, July 18, 2018, as amended 84 FR 48529, Sept. 13, 2019; 86 FR 445, Jan. 6, 2021]


§ 760.1504 Miscellaneous provisions.

(a) All persons with a financial interest in the legal entity receiving payments under this subpart are jointly and severally liable for any refund, including related charges, which is determined to be due to FSA for any reason.


(b) In the event that any application for payment under this subpart resulted from erroneous information or a miscalculation, the payment will be recalculated and any excess refunded to FSA with interest to be calculated from the date of the disbursement.


(c) Any payment to any participant under this subpart will be made without regard to questions of title under State law, and without regard to any claim or lien against the commodity, or proceeds, in favor of the owner or any other creditor except agencies of the U.S. Government. The regulations governing offsets and withholdings in part 792 of this chapter apply to payments made under this subpart.


(d) Any participant entitled to any payment may assign any payment(s) in accordance with regulations governing the assignment of payments in part 792 of this chapter.


(e) The regulations in parts 11 and 780 of this title apply to determinations under this subpart.


§ 760.1505 General provisions.

(a) For loss calculations, the participant’s unit structure will be:


(1) For an insured crop, the participant’s existing unit structure established in accordance with part 457 of this title;


(2) For a crop with NAP coverage, the participant’s existing unit structure established in accordance with part 1437 of this title;


(3) For an uninsured crop, the participant’s unit structure established in accordance with part 1437 of this title.


(b) FSA county committees will make the necessary adjustments to assign production or reduce the 2017 WHIP yield or WHIP+ yield when the county committee determines:


(1) An acceptable appraisal or record of harvested production does not exist;


(2) The loss is due to an ineligible cause of loss;


(3) The loss is due to practices, soil type, climate, or other environmental factors that cause lower yields than those upon which the historic yield is based;


(4) The participant has a contract providing a guaranteed payment for all or a portion of the crop; or


(5) The crop was planted beyond the normal planting period for the crop.


(c) Assignment of production or reduction in yield will apply for practices that result in lower yields than those for which the historic yield is based.


(d) Eligibility and payments under this subpart will be determined based on a unit’s:


(1) Physical location county for insured crops; and


(2) Administrative county for NAP covered crops and uninsured crops.


(e) FSA may separate or combine types and varieties as a crop for eligibility and payment purposes under this subpart when specific credible information as determined by FSA shows the crop of a specific type or variety has a significantly different or similar value, respectively, when compared to other types or varieties, as determined by the Deputy Administrator.


(f) Unless otherwise specified, all the eligibility provisions of part 1437 of this title apply to value loss crops and tropical crops under this subpart.


(g) The quantity or value of a crop will not be reduced for any quality consideration unless a zero value is established based on a total loss of quality, except as specified in § 760.1513(i).


(h) FSA will use the most reliable data available at the time payments under this subpart are calculated. If additional data or information is provided or becomes available after a payment is issued, FSA will recalculate the payment amount and the producer must return any overpayment amount to FSA. In all cases, payments can only issue based on the payment formula for losses that affirmatively occurred.


(i) A participant who received a payment for a loss under 2017 WHIP cannot:


(1) Be paid for the same loss under WHIP+; or


(2) Refund the 2017 WHIP payment to be eligible for payment for that loss under WHIP+.


[83 FR 33801, July 18, 2018, as amended 84 FR 48529, Sept. 13, 2019]


§ 760.1506 Availability of funds and timing of payments.

(a) For 2017 WHIP:


(1) An initial payment will be issued for 50 percent of each 2017 WHIP payment calculated according to this subpart, as determined by the Secretary. The remainder of the calculated 2017 WHIP payment will be paid to a participant only after the application period has ended and any crop insurance indemnity or NAP payment the participant is entitled to receive for the crop has been calculated and reported to FSA, and then only if there are funds available for such payment as discussed in this subpart.


(2) In the event that, within the limits of the funding made available by the Secretary, approval of eligible applications would result in payments in excess of the amount available, FSA will prorate payments by a national factor to reduce the payments to an amount that is less than available funds as determined by the Secretary. FSA will prorate the payments in such manner as it determines equitable.


(3) Applications and claims that are unpaid or prorated for any reason will not be carried forward for payment under other funds for later years or otherwise, but will be considered, as to any unpaid amount, void and nonpayable.


(b) For WHIP:


(1) For the 2018 crop year, the calculated WHIP+ payment will be paid at 100 percent.


(2) For the 2019 and 2020 crop years, an initial payment will be issued for 50 percent of each WHIP+ payment calculated according to this subpart, as determined by the Secretary. Up to the remaining 50 percent of the calculated WHIP+ payment will be paid only to the extent that there are funds available for such payment as discussed in this subpart.


(3) In the event that, within the limits of the funding made available by the Secretary, approval of eligible applications would result in payments in excess of the amount available, FSA will prorate 2019 and 2020 payments by a national factor to reduce the payments to the remaining available funds, as determined by the Secretary. FSA will prorate the payments accordingly.


(4) Applications and claims that are unpaid or prorated for aforementioned reasons of fund availability will not be carried forward for payment and will be considered, as to any unpaid amount, void and non-payable.


[83 FR 33801, July 18, 2018, as amended 84 FR 48529, Sept. 13, 2019]


§ 760.1507 Payment limitation.

(a) For any 2017 WHIP payments for the 2017 or 2018 crop year combined, a person or legal entity, other than a joint venture or general partnership, is eligible to receive, directly or indirectly, 2017 WHIP payments of not more than:


(1) $125,000, if less than 75 percent of the person or legal entity’s average adjusted gross income is average adjusted gross farm income; or


(2) $900,000, if not less than 75 percent of the average adjusted gross income of the person or legal entity is average adjusted gross farm income.


(b) For any WHIP+ payments, a person or legal entity, other than a joint venture or general partnership, is eligible to receive, directly or indirectly, WHIP+ payments of not more than:


(1) $125,000 combined for the 2018, 2019, and 2020 crop years, if less than 75 percent of the person or legal entity’s average adjusted gross income is average adjusted gross farm income; or


(2) $250,000 for each of the 2018, 2019, and 2020 crop years, if 75 percent or more of the average adjusted gross income of the person or legal entity is average adjusted gross farm income, and such payments cannot exceed a total of $500,000 combined for all of the 2018, 2019, and 2020 crop years.


(c) A person or legal entity’s average adjusted gross income and average adjusted gross farm income are determined based on the:


(1) 2013, 2014, and 2015 tax years for 2017 WHIP;


(2) 2015, 2016, and 2017 tax years for WHIP+.


(d) To be eligible for more than $125,000 in payments for the applicable period specified in this section, a person or legal entity must submit FSA-892 and provide a certification in the manner prescribed by FSA from a certified public accountant or attorney that at least 75 percent of the person or legal entity’s average adjusted gross income was average adjusted gross farm income. Persons or legal entities who fail to provide FSA-892 and the required certification may not receive a 2017 WHIP payment, directly or indirectly, of more than $125,000.


(e) The direct attribution provisions in part 1400 of this chapter apply to payments under this subpart for both payment limitation as well as in determining average AGI as defined and used in this rule.


[83 FR 33801, July 18, 2018, as amended 84 FR 48529, Sept. 13, 2019]


§ 760.1508 Qualifying disaster events.

(a) A producer will be eligible for payments under this subpart for a crop, tree, bush, or vine loss only if the producer suffered a loss to the crop, tree, bush, or vine on the unit due to a qualifying disaster event.


(b) For a loss due to hurricane and conditions related to hurricanes, the crop, tree, bush, or vine loss must have occurred on acreage that was physically located in a county that received a:


(1) Presidential Emergency Disaster Declaration authorizing public assistance for categories C through G or individual assistance due to a hurricane occurring in the 2017 calendar year; or


(2) Secretarial Disaster Designation for a hurricane occurring in the 2017 calendar year.


(c) A producer with crop, tree, bush, or vine losses on acreage not located in a physical location county that was eligible under paragraph (b) of this section will be eligible for 2017 WHIP for losses due to hurricane and related conditions only if the producer provides supporting documentation that is acceptable to FSA from which the FSA county committee determines that the loss of the crop, tree, bush, or vine on the unit was reasonably related to a qualifying disaster event as specified in this subpart. Supporting documentation may include furnishing climatological data from a reputable source or other information substantiating the claim of loss due to a qualifying disaster event.


(d) For a loss due to wildfires and conditions related to wildfire in the 2017 calendar year, all counties where wildfires occurred, as determined by FSA county committees, are eligible for 2017 WHIP; a Presidential Emergency Disaster Declaration or Secretarial Disaster Designation for wildfire is not required. The loss of the crop, tree, bush, or vine must be reasonably related to wildfire and conditions related to wildfire, as specified in this subpart’s definition of qualifying disaster event.


(e) For WHIP+, for a loss due to a qualifying disaster event, the crop, tree, bush, or vine loss must have occurred on acreage that was physically located in a county that received a:


(1) Presidential Emergency Disaster Declaration authorizing public assistance for categories C through G or individual assistance due to a qualifying disaster event occurring in the 2018 or 2019 calendar years; or


(2) Secretarial Disaster Designation for a qualifying disaster event occurring in the 2018 or 2019 calendar years.


(f) A producer with crop, tree, bush, or vine losses on acreage not located in a physical location county that was eligible under paragraph (e) of this section will be eligible for WHIP+ for losses due to qualifying disaster events only if the producer provides supporting documentation that is acceptable to FSA from which the FSA county committee determines that the loss of the crop, tree, bush, or vine on the unit was reasonably related to a qualifying disaster event as specified in this subpart. Supporting documentation may include furnishing climatological data from a reputable source or other information substantiating the claim of loss due to a qualifying disaster event.


[83 FR 33801, July 18, 2018, as amended 84 FR 48530, Sept. 13, 2019; 86 FR 445, Jan. 6, 2021]


§ 760.1509 Eligible and ineligible losses.

(a) Except as provided in paragraphs (b) through (e) of this section, to be eligible for payments under this subpart the unit must have suffered a loss of the crop, tree, bush, or vine, or prevented planting of a crop, due to a qualifying disaster event.


(b) A loss will not be eligible under this subpart if any of the following apply:


(1) The cause of loss is determined by FSA to be the result of poor management decisions, poor farming practices, or drifting herbicides;


(2) The cause of loss was due to failure of the participant to re-seed or replant to the same crop in a county where it is customary to re-seed or replant after a loss before the final planting date;


(3) The cause of loss was due to water contained or released by any governmental, public, or private dam or reservoir project if an easement exists on the acreage affected by the containment or release of the water;


(4) The cause of loss was due to conditions or events occurring outside of the applicable growing season for the crop, tree, bush, or vine;


(5) The cause of loss was due to failure of a power supply or brownout; or


(6) FSA or RMA have previously disapproved a notice of loss for the crop and disaster event unless that notice of loss was disapproved solely because it was filed after the applicable deadline.


(c) The following types of loss, regardless of whether they were the result of an eligible disaster event, are not eligible losses:


(1) Losses to crops intended for grazing;


(2) Losses to crops for which FCIC coverage or NAP coverage is unavailable;


(3) Losses to volunteer crops;


(4) Losses to crops not intended for harvest;


(5) Losses of by-products resulting from processing or harvesting a crop, such as, but not limited to, cotton seed, peanut shells, wheat or oat straw, or corn stalks or stovers;


(6) Losses to home gardens;


(7) Losses of first year seeding for forage production, or immature fruit crops; or


(8) Losses to crops that occur after harvest.


(d) The following losses of ornamental nursery stock are not eligible losses:


(1) Losses caused by the inability to market nursery stock as a result of lack of compliance with State and local commercial ordinances and laws, quarantine, boycott, or refusal of a buyer to accept production;


(2) Losses affecting crops where weeds and other forms of undergrowth in the vicinity of nursery stock have not been controlled; or


(3) Losses caused by the collapse or failure of buildings or structures.


(e) The following losses for honey, as a crop, where the honey production by colonies or bees was diminished, are not eligible losses:


(1) Losses caused by the unavailability of equipment or the collapse or failure of equipment or apparatus used in the honey operation;


(2) Losses caused by improper storage of honey;


(3) Losses caused by bee feeding;


(4) Losses caused by the application of chemicals;


(5) Losses caused by theft;


(6) Losses caused by the movement of bees by or for the participant;


(7) Losses caused by disease or pest infestation of the colonies, unless approved by the Deputy Administrator;


(8) Losses of income from pollinators; or


(9) Losses of equipment or facilities.


(f) Qualifying losses for trees, bushes, and vines will not include losses:


(1) That could have been prevented through reasonable and available measures; and


(2) To trees, bushes, or vines that were abandoned or were not in use or intended for commercial operation at the time of the loss.


[83 FR 33801, July 18, 2018, as amended 84 FR 48530, Sept. 13, 2019]


§ 760.1510 Application for payment.

(a) An application for payment under this subpart must be submitted to the FSA county office serving as the farm’s administrative county office by the close of business on October 30, 2020. Producers must submit:


(1) For 2017 WHIP, a completed form FSA-890, Wildfires and Hurricanes Indemnity Program Application; or


(2) For WHIP+, a completed form FSA-894, Wildfires and Hurricanes Indemnity Program + Application.


(b) Once signed by a producer, the application for payment is considered to contain information and certifications of and pertaining to the producer regardless of who entered the information on the application.


(c) The producer applying for payment under this subpart certifies the accuracy and truthfulness of the information provided in the application as well as any documentation filed with or in support of the application. All information is subject to verification or spot check by FSA at any time, either before or after payment is issued. Refusal to allow FSA or any agency of the Department of Agriculture to verify any information provided will result in the participant’s forfeiting eligibility for payment under this subpart. FSA may at any time, including before, during, or after processing and paying an application, require the producer to submit any additional information necessary to implement or determine any eligibility provision of this subpart. Furnishing required information is voluntary; however, without it FSA is under no obligation to act on the application or approve payment. Providing a false certification will result in ineligibility and can also be punishable by imprisonment, fines, and other penalties.


(d) The application submitted in accordance with paragraph (a) of this section is not considered valid and complete for issuance of payment under this subpart unless FSA determines all the applicable eligibility provisions have been satisfied and the participant has submitted all of following completed forms and information:


(1) Report of all acreage for the crop for the unit for which payments under this subpart are requested, on FSA-578, Report of Acreage, or in another format acceptable to FSA;


(2) AD-1026, Highly Erodible Land Conservation (HELC) and Wetland Conservation Certification; and


(3) For 2017 WHIP:


(i) FSA-891, Crop Insurance and/or NAP Coverage Agreement;


(ii) FSA-892, Request for an Exception to the WHIP Payment Limitation of $125,000, if the applicant is requesting 2017 WHIP payments in excess of the $125,000 payment limitation; and


(iii) FSA-893, 2018 Citrus Actual Production History and Approved Yield Record, Florida Only, for participants applying for payment for a citrus crop located in Florida;


(4) For WHIP+:


(i) FSA-895, Crop Insurance and/or NAP Coverage Agreement;


(ii) FSA-896, Request for an Exception to the WHIP Payment Limitation of $125,000, if 75 percent or more of an applicant’s average AGI is attributable to activities related to farming, ranching, or forestry and the applicant wants to be eligible to receive WHIP+ payments of more than $125,000, up to the $250,000 payment limitation per crop year, with an overall WHIP+ limit of $500,000; and


(iii) FSA-897, Actual Production History and Approved Yield Record (WHIP+ Select Crops Only), for applicants requesting payments for select crops.


(e) Application approval and payment by FSA does not relieve a participant from having to submit any form required, but not filed, according to paragraph (d) of this section.


[83 FR 33801, July 18, 2018, as amended 84 FR 48530, Sept. 13, 2019; 86 FR 446, Jan. 6, 2021]


§ 760.1511 Calculating payments for yield-based crop losses.

(a) Payments made under this subpart to a participant for a loss to yield-based crops, including losses due to prevented planting, subject to § 760.1514(i) and (j), are determined for a unit by:


(1) Multiplying the eligible acres by the 2017 WHIP yield in paragraph (c) of this section or the WHIP+ yield in paragraph (d) of this section by the price;


(2) Multiplying the result from paragraph (a)(1) of this section by the applicable 2017 WHIP factor or WHIP+ factor in paragraph (b) of this section;


(3) Multiplying the applicable production in paragraph (d) of this section by the price;


(4) Subtracting the result from paragraph (a)(3) of this section from the result of paragraph (a)(2) of this section;


(5) Multiplying the result from paragraph (a)(4) of this section by the participant’s share in paragraph (e) of this section;


(6) Multiplying the result from paragraph (a)(5) of this section by the applicable payment factor in paragraph (g) of this section;


(7) Subtracting the amount of the gross insurance indemnity or NAP payment from the result from paragraph (a)(6) of this section;


(8) Subtracting the secondary use or salvage value of the crop from the result from paragraph (a)(7) of this section; and


(b) If the NAP or crop insurance coverage is at the coverage level listed in the first column, then the 2017 WHIP factor is listed in the second column, and the WHIP+ factor is listed in the third column:


Table 1 to § 760.1511(b)

Coverage level
2017

WHIP factor

(percent)
WHIP+

factor

(percent)
(1) No crop insurance or No NAP coverage6570
(2) Catastrophic coverage7075
(3) More than catastrophic coverage but less than 55 percent72.577.5
(4) At least 55 percent but less than 60 percent7580
(5) At least 60 percent but less than 65 percent77.582.5
(6) At least 65 percent but less than 70 percent8085
(7) At least 70 percent but less than 75 percent8587.5
(8) At least 75 percent but less than 80 percent9092.5
(9) At least 80 percent9595

(c) The 2017 WHIP yield is:


(1) The producer’s APH for insured crops under a crop insurance policy that has an associated yield and for NAP covered crops, excluding all crops located in Puerto Rico;


(2) The county expected yield for crops located in Puerto Rico and uninsured crops, excluding citrus crops located in Florida; or


(3) For uninsured citrus crops located in Florida:


(i) Determined based on information provided on FSA-893 and supported by evidence that meets the requirements of § 760.1513(c), or


(ii) If FSA-893 and supporting documentation are not submitted, the county expected yield.


(d) The WHIP+ yield is:


(1) The producer’s APH for insured crops under a crop insurance policy that has an associated yield and for NAP covered crops, excluding all crops located in Puerto Rico;


(2) The county expected yield for crops located in Puerto Rico and uninsured crops, excluding select crops; or


(3) For select crops:


(i) Determined based on information provided on FSA-897 and supported by evidence that meets the requirements of § 760.1513(c), or


(ii) If FSA-897 and supporting documentation are not submitted, the county expected yield.


(e) The production used to calculate a payment under this subpart will be determined as specified in § 760.1513.


(f) The eligible participant’s share of a payment under this subpart is based on the participant’s ownership entitlement share of the crop or crop proceeds, or, if no crop was produced, the share of the crop the participant would have received if the crop had been produced. If the participant has no ownership share of the crop, the participant is ineligible for payment.


(g) Payment factors will be used to calculate payments for crops produced with significant and variable production and harvesting expenses that are not incurred because the crop acreage was prevented planted, or planted but not harvested, as determined by FSA. The use of payment factors is based on whether the crop acreage was unharvested or prevented planted, not whether a participant actually incurs or does not incur expenses. Payment factors are generally applicable to all similarly situated participants and are not established in response to individual participants. Accordingly established payment factors are not appealable under parts 11 and 780 of this title. A crop that is intended for mechanical harvest, but subsequently grazed and not mechanically harvested, will have an unharvested payment factor applied.


(h) Production from all end uses of a multi-use crop will be calculated separately and summarized together.


[83 FR 33801, July 18, 2018, as amended 84 FR 48530, Sept. 13, 2019; 86 FR 446, Jan. 6, 2021]


§ 760.1512 Production losses; participant responsibility.

(a) For any record submitted along with the certification of production, the record must be either a verifiable or reliable record that substantiates the certification to the satisfaction of the FSA county committee. If the eligible crop was sold or otherwise disposed of through commercial channels, a record of that disposition must be provided to FSA with the certification.


(1) Acceptable production records include:


(i) RMA or NAP records, if accurate and complete;


(ii) Commercial receipts;


(iii) Settlement sheets;


(iv) Warehouse ledger sheets or load summaries; or


(v) Appraisal information from a loss adjuster acceptable to FSA.


(2) If the eligible crop was farm-stored, sold, fed to livestock, or disposed of by means other than verifiable commercial channels, acceptable records for these purposes include:


(i) Truck scale tickets;


(ii) Appraisal information from a loss adjuster acceptable to FSA;


(iii) Contemporaneous reliable diaries; or


(iv) Other documentary evidence, such as contemporaneous reliable measurements.


(3) Determinations of reliability with respect to this paragraph will take into account, as appropriate, the ability for FSA to review and verify or compare the evidence against the similarity of the evidence or reports or data received by FSA for the crop or similar crops. Other factors deemed relevant may also be taken into account.


(b) If RMA or NAP records are not available, or if the FSA county committee determines the RMA or NAP records as reported by the insured or covered participant appear to be questionable or incomplete, or if the FSA county committee makes inquiry, the participant is responsible for:


(1) Retaining and providing, at time of application and whenever required by FSA, the best available verifiable or reliable or other production records for the crop;


(2) Summarizing all the production evidence;


(3) Accounting for the total amount of unit production for the crop, whether or not records reflect this production;


(4) Providing the information in a manner that can be easily understood by the FSA county committee; and


(5) Providing supporting documentation if the FSA county committee has reason to question the disaster event or that all production has been taken into account.


(c) FSA may verify the production evidence submitted with records on file at the warehouse, gin, or other entity that received or may have received the reported production.


(d) Participants must provide all records for any production of a crop that is grown with an arrangement, agreement, or contract for guaranteed payment.


(e) Under WHIP+, participants requesting payments for losses to adulterated wine grapes must submit verifiable sales tickets that document that the reduced price received was due to adulteration due to a qualifying disaster event. For adulterated wine grapes that have not been sold, participants must submit verifiable records obtained by testing or analysis to establish that the wine grapes were adulterated due to a qualifying disaster event and the price they would receive due to adulteration.


[83 FR 33801, July 18, 2018, as amended 84 FR 48531, Sept. 13, 2019]


§ 760.1513 Determination of production.

(a) The harvested production of eligible crop acreage harvested more than once in a crop year includes the total harvested production from all the harvests in the crop year.


(b) If a crop is appraised and subsequently harvested as the intended use, the actual harvested production must be taken into account to determine payments. FSA will analyze and determine whether a participant’s evidence of actual production represents all that could or would have been harvested.


(c) For all crops eligible for loan deficiency payments or marketing assistance loans (see parts 1421 and 1434 of this title) with an intended use of grain but harvested as silage, ensilage, cabbage, hay, cracked, rolled, or crimped, production will be converted to a whole grain equivalent based on conversion factors as previously established by FSA.


(d) If a participant does not receive compensation based upon the quantity of the commodity delivered to a purchaser, but has an agreement or contract for guaranteed payment for production, the determination of the production will be the greater of the actual production or the guaranteed payment converted to production as determined by FSA.


(e) Production that is commingled between crop years, units, ineligible and eligible acres, or different practices before it was a matter of record or combination of record and cannot be separated by using records or other means acceptable to FSA will be prorated to each respective year, unit, type of acreage, or practice, respectively. Commingled production may be attributed to the applicable unit, if the participant made the unit production of a commodity a matter of record before commingling and does any of the following, as applicable:


(1) Provides copies of verifiable documents showing that production of the commodity was purchased, acquired, or otherwise obtained from beyond the unit;


(2) Had the production measured in a manner acceptable to the FSA county committee; or


(3) Had the current year’s production appraised in a manner acceptable to the FSA county committee.


(f) The FSA county committee will assign production for the unit when the FSA county committee determines that:


(1) The participant has failed to provide adequate and acceptable production records;


(2) The loss to the crop is because of a disaster condition not covered by this subpart, or circumstances other than natural disaster, and there has not otherwise been an accounting of this ineligible cause of loss;


(3) The participant carries out a practice, such as multiple cropping, that generally results in lower yields than the established historic yields;


(5) A crop was late-planted;


(6) Unharvested acreage was not timely appraised; or


(7) Other appropriate causes exist for such assignment as determined by the Deputy Administrator.


(g) The FSA county committee will establish a county disaster yield that reflects the amount of production producers would have produced considering the eligible disaster events in the county or area for the same crop. The county disaster yield for the county or area will be expressed as either a percent of loss or yield per acre. The county disaster yield will apply when:


(1) Unharvested acreage has not been appraised by FSA or a company reinsured by FCIC; or


(2) Acceptable production records for harvested acres are not available from any source.


(h) In no case will the production amount of any applicant be less than the producer’s certified loss.


(i) Under WHIP+, production for eligible adulterated wine grapes will be adjusted for quality deficiencies due to a qualifying disaster event. Wine grapes are eligible for production adjustment only if adulteration occurred prior to harvest and as a result of a qualifying disaster event or as a result of a related condition (such as application of fire retardant). Losses due to all other causes of adulteration (such as addition of artificial flavoring or chemicals for economic purposes) are not eligible for WHIP+. Production will be eligible for quality adjustment if, due to a qualifying disaster event, it has a value of less than 75 percent of the average market price of undamaged grapes of the same or similar variety. The value per ton of the qualifying damaged production and the average market price of undamaged grapes will be determined on the earlier of the date the damaged production is sold or the date of final inspection for the unit. Grape production that is eligible for quality adjustment will be reduced by:


(1) Dividing the value per ton of the damaged grapes by the value per ton for undamaged grapes; and


(2) Multiplying this result (not to exceed 1.000) by the number of tons of the eligible damaged grapes.


[83 FR 33801, July 18, 2018, as amended 84 FR 48531, Sept. 13, 2019]


§ 760.1514 Eligible acres.

(a) Eligible acreage will be calculated using the lesser of the reported or determined acres shown to have been planted or prevented from being planted to a crop.


(b) Initial crop acreage will be the payment acreage for under this subpart, unless the provisions for subsequent crops in this section are met. Subsequently planted or prevented planted acre acreage is considered acreage for under this subpart only if the provisions of this section are met. All plantings of an annual or biennial crop are considered the same as a planting of an initial crop in tropical regions as defined in part 1437, subpart F, of this title.


(c) In cases where there is double cropped acreage, each crop may be included in the acreage only if the specific crops are approved by the FSA State committee as eligible double cropping practices in accordance with procedures approved by the Deputy Administrator.


(d) Except for insured crops, participants with double cropped acreage not meeting the criteria in paragraph (c) of this section may have such acreage included in the acreage on more than one crop only if the participant submits verifiable records establishing a history of carrying out a successful double cropping practice on the specific crops for which payment is requested.


(e) Participants having multiple plantings may receive payments for each planting included only if the planting meets the requirements of part 1437 of this title and all other provisions of this subpart are satisfied.


(f) Losses due to prevented planting are eligible under this subpart only if the loss was due to a qualifying disaster event. Provisions of parts 718 and 1437 of this title specifying what is considered prevented planting and how it must be documented and reported apply. Crops located in tropical regions are not eligible for prevented planting.


(g) Subject to the provisions of this subpart, the FSA county committee will:


(1) Use the most accurate data available when determining planted and prevented planted acres; and


(2) Disregard acreage of a crop produced on land that is not eligible for crop insurance or NAP.


(h) If a farm has a crop that has both FSA and RMA acreage for insured crops, eligible acres will be based on the lesser of RMA or FSA acres.


(i) For 2017 WHIP, prevented planting acres will be considered eligible acres if they meet all requirements of this subpart.


(j) For WHIP+:


(1) 2018 and 2020 crop year prevented planting acres and 2019 crop year uninsured and NAP-covered prevented planting acres will be eligible acres if they meet all requirements of this subpart; and


(2) 2019 crop year insured prevented planting acres will not be eligible acres.


[83 FR 33801, July 18, 2018, as amended 84 FR 48531, Sept. 13, 2019]


§ 760.1515 Calculating payments for value loss crops.

(a) Payments made under this