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Title 20 – Employees’ Benefits–Volume 4

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Title 20 – Employees’ Benefits–Volume 4


Part


chapter v – Employment and Training Administration, Department of Labor (Continued)

657

chapter vi – Office of Workers’ Compensation Programs, Department of Labor

701

chapter vii – Benefits Review Board, Department of Labor

801

chapter viii – Joint Board for the Enrollment of Actuaries

900

chapter ix – Office of the Assistant Secretary for Veterans’ Employment and Training Service, Department of Labor

1001

CHAPTER V – EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED)

PART 657 – PROVISIONS GOVERNING GRANTS TO STATE AGENCIES FOR EMPLOYMENT SERVICES ACTIVITIES [RESERVED]

PART 658 – ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS GOVERNING THE WAGNER-PEYSER ACT EMPLOYMENT SERVICE


Authority:Secs. 189, 503, Pub. L. 113-128, 128 Stat. 1425 (Jul. 22, 2014); 29 U.S.C. chapter 4B.



Source:81 FR 56352, Aug. 19, 2016, unless otherwise noted.

Subpart A-D [Reserved]

Subpart E – Employment Service and Employment-Related Law Complaint System (Complaint System)

§ 658.400 Purpose and scope of subpart.

(a) This subpart sets forth the regulations governing the Complaint System for the Wagner-Peyser Act Employment Service (ES) at the State and Federal levels. Specifically, the Complaint System handles complaints against an employer about the specific job to which the applicant was referred through the ES and complaints involving the failure to comply with the ES regulations under parts 651, 652, 653, and 654 of this chapter and this part. As noted in § 658.411(d)(6), this subpart only covers ES-related complaints made within 2 years of the alleged violation.


(b) Any complaints alleging violations under the Unemployment Insurance program, under Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) title I programs, or complaints by veterans alleging employer violations of the mandatory listing requirements under 38 U.S.C. 4212 are not covered by this subpart and must be referred to the appropriate administering agency which would follow the procedures set forth in the respective regulations.


(c) The Complaint System also accepts, refers, and, under certain circumstances, tracks complaints involving employment-related laws as defined in § 651.10 of this chapter.


(d) A complainant may designate an individual to act as his/her representative.


Complaints Filed at the Local and State Level

§ 658.410 Establishment of local and State complaint systems.

(a) Each State Workforce Agency (SWA) must establish and maintain a Complaint System pursuant to this subpart.


(b) The State Administrator must have overall responsibility for the operation of the Complaint System; this includes responsibility for the informal resolution of complaints. In the ES office, the ES Office Manager is responsible for the operation of the Complaint System.


(c) SWAs must ensure centralized control procedures are established for the processing of complaints. The ES Office Manager and the SWA Administrator must ensure a central complaint log is maintained, listing all complaints taken by the ES office or the SWA, and specifying for each complaint:


(1) The name of the complainant;


(2) The name of the respondent (employer or State agency);


(3) The date the complaint is filed;


(4) Whether the complaint is by or on behalf of a migrant and seasonal farmworker (MSFW);


(5) Whether the complaint concerns an employment-related law or the ES regulations; and


(6) The action taken, and whether the complaint has been resolved, including informally. The complaint log also must include action taken on apparent violations.


(d) State agencies must ensure information pertaining to the use of the Complaint System is publicized, which must include, but is not limited to, the prominent display of an Employment and Training Administration (ETA)-approved Complaint System poster in each one-stop center.


(e) Each one-stop center must ensure there is appropriate staff available during regular office hours to take complaints.


(f) Complaints may be accepted in any one-stop center, or by a SWA, or elsewhere by outreach staff.


(g) All complaints filed through the local ES office must be handled by a trained Complaint System Representative.


(h) All complaints received by a SWA must be assigned to a trained Complaint System Representative designated by the State Administrator, provided that the Complaint System Representative designated to handle MSFW complaints must be the State Monitor Advocate (SMA).


(i) State agencies must ensure any action taken by the Complaint System Representative, including referral on a complaint from an MSFW, is fully documented and contains all relevant information, including a notation of the type of each complaint pursuant to Department guidance, a copy of the original complaint form, a copy of any ES-related reports, any relevant correspondence, a list of actions taken, a record of pertinent telephone calls, and all correspondence relating thereto.


(j) Within 1 month after the end of the calendar quarter, the ES office manager must transmit an electronic copy of the quarterly Complaint System log described in paragraph (c) of this section to the SMA. These logs must be made available to the Department upon request.


(k) The appropriate ES staff handling a complaint must offer to assist the complainant through the provision of appropriate services.


(l) The State Administrator must establish a referral system for cases where a complaint is filed alleging a violation that occurred in the same State but through a different ES office.


(m) Follow-up on unresolved complaints. When an MSFW submits a complaint, the SMA must follow-up monthly on the handling of the complaint, and must inform the complainant of the status of the complaint. No follow-up with the complainant is required for non-MSFW complaints.


(n) When a complainant is an English Language Learner (ELL), all written correspondence with the complainant under part 658, subpart E must include a translation into the complainant’s native language.


(o) A complainant may designate an individual to act as his/her representative throughout the filing and processing of a complaint.


[81 FR 56352, Aug. 19, 2016, as amended at 85 FR 628, Jan. 6, 2020]


§ 658.411 Action on complaints.

(a) Filing complaints.


(1) Whenever an individual indicates an interest in filing a complaint under this subpart with an ES office, the SWA, or outreach staff, the individual receiving the complaint must offer to explain the operation of the Complaint System and must offer to take the complaint in writing.


(2) During the initial discussion with the complainant, the staff taking the complaint must:


(i) Make every effort to obtain all the information he/she perceives to be necessary to investigate the complaint;


(ii) Request that the complainant indicate all of the physical addresses, email, and telephone numbers through which he/she might be contacted during the investigation of the complaint; and


(iii) Request that the complainant contact the Complaint System Representative before leaving the area if possible, and explain the need to maintain contact during the investigation.


(3) The staff must ensure the complainant (or his/her representative) submits the complaint on the Complaint/Referral Form or another complaint form prescribed or approved by the Department or submits complaint information which satisfies paragraph (a)(4) of this section. The Complaint/Referral Form must be used for all complaints, including complaints about unlawful discrimination, except as provided in paragraph (a)(4) of this section. The staff must offer to assist the complainant in filling out the form and submitting all necessary information, and must do so if the complainant desires such assistance. If the complainant also represents several other complainants, all such complainants must be named. The complainant, or his/her representative, must sign the completed form in writing or electronically. The identity of the complainant(s) and any persons who furnish information relating to, or assisting in, an investigation of a complaint must be kept confidential to the maximum extent possible, consistent with applicable law and a fair determination of the complaint. A copy of the completed complaint submission must be given to the complainant(s), and the complaint form must be given to the appropriate Complaint System Representative described in § 658.410(g).


(4) Any complaint in a reasonable form (letter or email) which is signed by the complainant, or his/her representative, and includes sufficient information to initiate an investigation must be treated as if it were a properly completed Complaint/Referral Form filed in person. A letter (via hard copy or email) confirming the complaint was received must be sent to the complainant and the document must be sent to the appropriate Complaint System Representative. The Complaint System Representative must request additional information from the complainant if the complainant has not provided sufficient information to investigate the matter expeditiously.


(b) Complaints regarding an employment-related law. (1) When a complaint is filed regarding an employment-related law with a ES office or a SWA the office must determine if the complainant is an MSFW.


(i) If the complainant is a non-MSFW, the office must immediately refer the complainant to the appropriate enforcement agency, another public agency, a legal aid organization, and/or a consumer advocate organization, as appropriate, for assistance. Upon completing the referral the local or State representative is not required to follow-up with the complainant.


(ii) If the complainant is a MSFW, the ES office or SWA Complaint System Representative must:


(A) Take from the MSFW or his/her representative, in writing (hard copy or electronic), the complaint(s) describing the alleged violation(s) of the employment-related law(s); and


(B) Attempt to resolve the issue informally at the local level, except in cases where the complaint was submitted to the SWA and the SMA determines that he/she must take immediate action and except in cases where informal resolution at the local level would be detrimental to the complainant(s). In cases where informal resolution at the local level would be detrimental to the complainant(s), the Complaint System Representative or SMA (depending on where the complaint was filed) must immediately refer the complaint to the appropriate enforcement agency. Concurrently, the Complaint System Representative must offer to refer the MSFW to other employment services should the MSFW be interested.


(C) If the issue is not resolved within 5 business days, the Complaint System Representative must refer the complaint to the appropriate enforcement agency (or another public agency, a legal aid organization, or a consumer advocate organization, as appropriate) for further assistance.


(D) If the ES office or SWA Complaint System Representative determines that the complaint must be referred to a State or Federal agency, he/she must refer the complaint to the SMA who must immediately refer the complaint to the appropriate enforcement agency for prompt action.


(E) If the complaint was referred to the SMA under paragraph (b)(1)(ii)(D) of this section, the representative must provide the SMA’s contact information to the complainant. The SMA must notify the complainant of the enforcement agency to which the complaint was referred.


(2) If an enforcement agency makes a final determination that the employer violated an employment-related law and the complaint is connected to a job order, the SWA must initiate procedures for discontinuation of services immediately in accordance with subpart F of this part. If this occurs, the SWA must notify the complainant and the employer of this action.


(c) Complaints alleging a violation of rights under the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) regulations or enforced by the Department of Labor’s Civil Rights Center (CRC). (1) All complaints received by a ES office or a SWA alleging unlawful discrimination, as well as reprisal for protected activity, in violation of EEOC regulations, must be logged and immediately referred to either a local Equal Opportunity (EO) representative, the State EO representative, or the EEOC. The Complaint System Representative must notify the complainant of the referral in writing.


(2) Any complaints received either at the local and State level or at the ETA regional office, that allege violations of civil rights laws and regulations such as those under title VI of the Civil Rights Act or sec. 188 of WIOA, including for beneficiaries (as defined in 29 CFR 38.4) only, on the basis of citizenship status or participant status, as well as reprisal for protected activity, must immediately be logged and directed or forwarded to the recipient’s Equal Opportunity Officer or the CRC.


(d) Complaints regarding the ES regulations (ES complaints). (1) When an ES complaint is filed with a ES office or a SWA the following procedures apply:


(i) When an ES complaint is filed against an employer, the proper office to handle the complaint is the ES office serving the area in which the employer is located.


(ii) When a complaint is against an employer in another State or against another SWA:


(A) The ES office or SWA receiving the complaint must send, after ensuring that the Complaint/Referral Form is adequately completed, a copy of the Complaint/Referral Form and copies of any relevant documents to the SWA in the other State. Copies of the referral letter must be sent to the complainant, and copies of the complaint and referral letter must be sent to the ETA Regional Office(s) with jurisdiction over the transferring and receiving State agencies. All such copies must be sent via hard copy or electronic mail.


(B) The SWA receiving the complaint must handle the complaint as if it had been initially filed with that SWA.


(C) The ETA regional office with jurisdiction over the receiving SWA must follow-up with it to ensure the complaint is handled in accordance with these regulations.


(D) If the complaint is against more than one SWA, the complaint must so clearly state. Additionally, the complaints must be processed as separate complaints and must be handled according to procedures in this paragraph (d).


(iii) When an ES complaint is filed against a ES office, the proper office to handle the complaint is the ES office serving the area in which the alleged violation occurred.


(iv) When an ES complaint is filed against more than one ES offices and is in regard to an alleged agency-wide violation the SWA representative or his/her designee must process the complaint.


(v) When a complaint is filed alleging a violation that occurred in the same State but through a different ES office, the ES office where the complaint is filed must ensure that the Complaint/Referral Form is adequately completed and send the form to the appropriate local ES office for tracking, further referral if necessary, and follow-up. A copy of the referral letter must be sent to the complainant via hard copy or electronic mail.


(2)(i) If a complaint regarding an alleged violation of the ES regulations is filed in a ES office by either a non-MSFW or MSFW, or their representative(s) (or if all necessary information has been submitted to the office pursuant to paragraph (a)(4) of this section), the appropriate ES office Complaint System Representative must investigate and attempt to resolve the complaint immediately upon receipt.


(ii) If resolution has not been achieved to the satisfaction of the complainant within 15 working days after receipt of the complaint, or 5 working days with respect to complaints filed by or on behalf of MSFWs, (or after all necessary information has been submitted to the ES office pursuant to paragraph (a)(4) of this section), the Complaint System Representative must send the complaint to the SWA for resolution or further action.


(iii) The ES office must notify the complainant and the respondent, in writing (via hard copy or electronic mail), of the determination (pursuant to paragraph (d)(5) of this section) of its investigation under paragraph (d)(2)(i) of this section, or of the referral to the SWA (if referred).


(3) When a non-MSFW or his/her representative files a complaint regarding the ES regulations with a SWA, or when a non-MSFW complaint is referred from a ES office the following procedures apply:


(i) If the complaint is not transferred to an enforcement agency under paragraph (b)(1)(i) of this section the Complaint System Representative must investigate and attempt to resolve the complaint immediately upon receipt.


(ii) If resolution at the SWA level has not been accomplished within 30 working days after the complaint was received by the SWA (or after all necessary information has been submitted to the SWA pursuant to paragraph (a)(4) of this section), whether the complaint was received directly or from an ES office pursuant to paragraph (d)(2)(ii) of this section, the SWA official must make a written determination regarding the complaint and must send electronic copies to the complainant and the respondent. The determination must follow the procedures set forth in paragraph (d)(5) of this section.


(4)(i) When a MSFW or his/her representative files a complaint regarding the ES regulations directly with a SWA, or when a MSFW complaint is referred from a ES office, the SMA must investigate and attempt to resolve the complaint immediately upon receipt and may, if necessary, conduct a further investigation.


(ii) If resolution at the SWA level has not been accomplished within 20 business days after the complaint was received by the SWA (or after all necessary information has been submitted to the SWA pursuant to paragraph (a)(4) of this section), the SMA must make a written determination regarding the complaint and must send electronic copies to the complainant and the respondent. The determination must follow the procedures set forth in paragraph (d)(5) of this section.


(5)(i) All written determinations by ES or SWA officials on complaints under the ES regulations must be sent by certified mail (or another legally viable method) and a copy of the determination may be sent via electronic mail. The determination must include all of the following:


(A) The results of any SWA investigation;


(B) The conclusions reached on the allegations of the complaint;


(C) If a resolution was not reached, an explanation of why the complaint was not resolved; and


(D) If the complaint is against the SWA, an offer to the complainant of the opportunity to request, in writing, a hearing within 20 business days after the certified date of receipt of the notification.


(ii) If SWA officials determine that the employer has not violated the ES regulations, the SWA must offer to the complainant the opportunity to request a hearing within 20 working days after the certified date of receipt of the notification.


(iii) If the SWA, within 20 business days from the certified date of receipt of the notification provided for in paragraph (d)(5) of this section, receives a written request (via hard copy or electronic mail) for a hearing, the SWA must refer the complaint to a State hearing official for hearing. The SWA must, in writing (via hard copy or electronic mail), notify the respective parties to whom the determination was sent that:


(A) The parties will be notified of the date, time, and place of the hearing;


(B) The parties may be represented at the hearing by an attorney or other representative;


(C) The parties may bring witnesses and/or documentary evidence to the hearing;


(D) The parties may cross-examine opposing witnesses at the hearing;


(E) The decision on the complaint will be based on the evidence presented at the hearing;


(F) The State hearing official may reschedule the hearing at the request of a party or its representative; and


(G) With the consent of the SWA official and of the State hearing official, the party who requested the hearing may withdraw the request for the hearing in writing before the hearing.


(iv) If the State agency makes a final determination that the employer who has or is currently using the ES has violated the ES regulations, the determination, pursuant to paragraph (d)(5) of this section, must state that the State will initiate procedures for discontinuation of services to the employer in accordance with subpart F of this part.


(6) A complaint regarding the ES regulations must be handled to resolution by these regulations only if it is made within 2 years of the alleged occurrence.


(e) Resolution of complaints. A complaint is considered resolved when:


(1) The complainant indicates satisfaction with the outcome via written correspondence;


(2) The complainant chooses not to elevate the complaint to the next level of review;


(3) The complainant or the complainant’s authorized representative fails to respond to a request for information under paragraph (a)(4) of this section within 20 working days or, in cases where the complainant is an MSFW, 40 working days of a written request by the appropriate ES office or State agency;


(4) The complainant exhausts all available options for review; or


(5) A final determination has been made by the enforcement agency to which the complaint was referred.


(f) Reopening of case after resolution. If the complainant or the complainant’s authorized representative fails to respond pursuant to paragraph (e)(3) of this section, the complainant or the complainant’s authorized representative may reopen the case within 1 year after the SWA has closed the case.


[81 FR 56352, Aug. 19, 2016, as amended at 85 FR 629, Jan. 6, 2020]


§ 658.417 State hearings.

(a) The hearing described in § 658.411(d)(5) must be held by State hearing officials. A State hearing official may be any State official authorized to hold hearings under State law. Examples of hearing officials are referees in State unemployment compensation hearings and officials of the State agency authorized to preside at State administrative hearings.


(b) The State hearing official may decide to conduct hearings on more than one complaint concurrently if he/she determines that the issues are related or that the complaints will be handled more expeditiously if conducted together.


(c) The State hearing official, upon the referral of a case for a hearing, must:


(1) Notify all involved parties of the date, time, and place of the hearing; and


(2) Reschedule the hearing, as appropriate.


(d) In conducting a hearing, the State hearing official must:


(1) Regulate the course of the hearing;


(2) Issue subpoenas if necessary, provided the official has the authority to do so under State law;


(3) Ensure that all relevant issues are considered;


(4) Rule on the introduction of evidence and testimony; and


(5) Take all actions necessary to ensure an orderly proceeding.


(e) All testimony at the hearing must be recorded and may be transcribed when appropriate.


(f) The parties must be afforded the opportunity to present, examine, and cross-examine witnesses.


(g) The State hearing official may elicit testimony from witnesses, but may not act as advocate for any party.


(h) The State hearing official must receive and include in the record, documentary evidence offered by any party and accepted at the hearing. Copies thereof must be made available by the party submitting the document to other parties to the hearing upon request.


(i) Federal and State rules of evidence do not apply to hearings conducted pursuant to this section; however rules or principles designed to assure production of the most credible evidence available and to subject testimony to test by cross-examination, must be applied where reasonably necessary by the State hearing official. The State hearing official may exclude irrelevant, immaterial, or unduly repetitious evidence.


(j) The case record, or any portion thereof, must be available for inspection and copying by any party at, prior to, or subsequent to the hearing upon request. Special procedures may be used for disclosure of medical and psychological records such as disclosure to a physician designated by the individual.


(k) The State hearing official must, if feasible, resolve the dispute at any time prior to the conclusion of the hearing.


(l) At the State hearing official’s discretion, other appropriate individuals, organizations, or associations may be permitted to participate in the hearing as amicus curiae (friends of the court) with respect to any legal or factual issues relevant to the complaint. Any documents submitted by the amicus curiae must be included in the record.


(m) If the parties to the hearing are located in more than one State or are located in the same State but access to the hearing location is extremely inconvenient for one or more parties as determined by the State hearing official, the hearing official must:


(1) Whenever possible, hold a single hearing at a location convenient to all parties or their representatives wishing to appear and present evidence, with all such parties and/or their representatives present.


(2) If a hearing location cannot be established by the State hearing official under paragraph (m)(1) of this section, the State hearing official may conduct, with the consent of the parties, the hearing by a telephone conference call from a State agency office. If the hearing is conducted via telephone conference call the parties and their representatives must have the option to participate in person or via telephone.


(3) Where the State agency is not able, for any reason, to conduct a telephonic hearing under paragraph (m)(2) of this section, the State agencies in the States where the parties are located must take evidence and hold the hearing in the same manner as used for appealed interstate unemployment claims in those States, to the extent that such procedures are consistent with this section.


§ 658.418 Decision of the State hearing official.

(a) The State hearing official may:


(1) Rule that it lacks jurisdiction over the case;


(2) Rule that the complaint has been withdrawn properly in writing;


(3) Rule that reasonable cause exists to believe that the request has been abandoned; or


(4) Render such other rulings as are appropriate to resolve the issues in question.


However, the State hearing official does not have authority or jurisdiction to consider the validity or constitutionality of the ES regulations or of the Federal statutes under which they are promulgated.


(b) Based on the entire record, including the investigations and determinations of the ES offices and State agencies and any evidence provided at the hearing, the State hearing official must prepare a written decision. The State hearing official must send a copy of the decision stating the findings of fact and conclusions of law, and the reasons therefor to the complainant, the respondent, entities serving as amicus capacity (if any), the State agency, the Regional Administrator, and the Solicitor of Labor, Attn: Associate Solicitor for Employment and Training Legal Services, Department of Labor, Room N2101, 200 Constitution Avenue NW., Washington, DC 20210. The notification to the complainant and respondent must be sent by certified mail or by other legally viable means.


(c) All decisions of a State hearing official must be accompanied by a written notice informing the parties (not including the Regional Administrator, the Solicitor of Labor, or entities serving in an amicus capacity) that they may appeal the judge’s decision within 20 working days of the certified date of receipt of the decision, and they may file an appeal in writing with the Regional Administrator. The notice must give the address of the Regional Administrator.


§ 658.419 Apparent violations.

(a) If a SWA, an ES office employee, or outreach staff observes, has reason to believe, or is in receipt of information regarding a suspected violation of employment-related laws or ES regulations by an employer, except as provided at § 653.503 of this chapter (field checks) or § 658.411 (complaints), the employee must document the suspected violation and refer this information to the ES Office Manager.


(b) If the employer has filed a job order with the ES office within the past 12 months, the ES office must attempt informal resolution provided at § 658.411.


(c) If the employer has not filed a job order with the ES office during the past 12 months, the suspected violation of an employment-related law must be referred to the appropriate enforcement agency in writing.


[81 FR 56352, Aug. 19, 2016, as amended at 85 FR 629, Jan. 6, 2020]


When a Complaint Rises to the Federal Level

§ 658.420 Responsibilities of the Employment and Training Administration regional office.

(a) Each Regional Administrator must establish and maintain a Complaint System within each ETA regional office.


(b) The Regional Administrator must designate Department of Labor officials to handle ES regulation-related complaints as follows:


(1) Any complaints received either at the local and State level or at the ETA regional office, that allege violations of civil rights laws and regulations such as those under Title VI of the Civil Rights Act or sec. 188 of WIOA, including for beneficiaries (as defined in 29 CFR 38.4) only, on the basis of citizenship status or participant status, as well as reprisal for protected activity, must immediately be logged and directed or forwarded to the recipient’s Equal Opportunity Officer or the CRC.


(2) All complaints alleging discrimination on the basis of genetic information must be assigned to a Regional Director for Equal Opportunity and Special Review and, where appropriate, handled in accordance with procedures Coordinated Enforcement at 29 CFR part 31.


(3) All complaints other than those described in paragraphs (b)(1) and (2) of this section, must be assigned to a regional office official designated by the Regional Administrator, provided that the regional office official designated to handle MSFW complaints must be the Regional Monitor Advocate (RMA).


(c) Except for those complaints under paragraphs (b)(1) and (2) of this section, the Regional Administrator must designate Department of Labor officials to handle employment-related law complaints in accordance with § 658.411, provided that the regional official designated to handle MSFW employment-related law complaints must be the RMA. The RMA must follow up monthly on all complaints filed by MSFWs including complaints under paragraphs (b)(1) and (2) of this section.


(d) The Regional Administrator must ensure that all complaints and all related documents and correspondence are logged with a notation of the nature of each item.


§ 658.421 Handling of Wagner-Peyser Act Employment Service regulation-related complaints.

(a)(1) Except as provided below in paragraph (a)(2) of this section, no complaint alleging a violation of the ES regulations may be handled at the ETA regional office level until the complainant has exhausted the SWA administrative remedies set forth at §§ 658.411 through 658.418. If the Regional Administrator determines that a complaint has been prematurely filed with an ETA regional office, the Regional Administrator must inform the complainant within 10 working days in writing that the complainant must first exhaust those remedies before the complaint may be filed in the regional office. A copy of this letter and a copy of the complaint also must be sent to the State Administrator.


(2) If a complaint is submitted directly to the Regional Administrator and if he/she determines that the nature and scope of a complaint described in paragraph (a) of this section is such that the time required to exhaust the administrative procedures at the SWA level would adversely affect a significant number of individuals, the RA must accept the complaint and take the following action:


(i) If the complaint is filed against an employer, the regional office must handle the complaint in a manner consistent with the requirements imposed upon State agencies by §§ 658.411 and 658.418. A hearing must be offered to the parties once the Regional Administrator makes a determination on the complaint.


(ii) If the complaint is filed against a SWA, the regional office must follow procedures established at § 658.411(d).


(b) The ETA regional office is responsible for handling appeals of determinations made on complaints at the SWA level. An appeal includes any letter or other writing which the Regional Administrator reasonably understands to be requesting review if it is received by the regional office and signed by a party to the complaint.


(c)(1) Once the Regional Administrator receives a timely appeal, he/she must request the complete SWA file, including the original Complaint/Referral Form from the appropriate SWA.


(2) The Regional Administrator must review the file in the case and must determine within 10 business days whether any further investigation or action is appropriate; however if the Regional Administrator determines that he/she needs to request legal advice from the Office of the Solicitor at the U.S. Department of Labor then the Regional Administrator is allowed 20 business days to make this determination.


(d) If the Regional Administrator determines that no further action is warranted, the Regional Administrator will send his/her determination in writing to the appellant within 5 days of the determination, with a notification that the appellant may request a hearing before a Department of Labor Administrative Law Judge (ALJ) by filing a hearing request in writing with the Regional Administrator within 20 working days of the appellant’s receipt of the notification.


(e) If the Regional Administrator determines that further investigation or other action is warranted, the Regional Administrator must undertake such an investigation or other action necessary to resolve the complaint.


(f) After taking the actions described in paragraph (e) of this section, the Regional Administrator must either affirm, reverse, or modify the decision of the State hearing official, and must notify each party to the State hearing official’s hearing or to whom the State office determination was sent, notice of the determination and notify the parties that they may appeal the determination to the Department of Labor’s Office of Administrative Law Judges within 20 business days of the party’s receipt of the notice.


(g) If the Regional Administrator finds reason to believe that a SWA or one of its ES offices has violated ES regulations, the Regional Administrator must follow the procedures set forth at subpart H of this part.


§ 658.422 Handling of employment-related law complaints by the Regional Administrator.

(a) This section applies to all complaints submitted directly to the Regional Administrator or his/her representative.


(b) Each complaint filed by an MSFW alleging violation(s) of employment-related laws must be taken in writing, logged, and referred to the appropriate enforcement agency for prompt action.


(c) Each complaint submitted by a non-MSFW alleging violation(s) of employment-related laws must be logged and referred to the appropriate enforcement agency for prompt action.


(d) Upon referring the complaint in accordance with paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section, the regional official must inform the complainant of the enforcement agency (and individual, if known) to which the complaint was referred.


§ 658.424 Proceedings before the Office of Administrative Law Judges.

(a) If a party requests a hearing pursuant to § 658.421 or § 658.707, the Regional Administrator must:


(1) Send the party requesting the hearing, and all other parties to the prior State level hearing, a written notice (hard copy or electronic) that the matter will be referred to the Office of Administrative Law Judges for a hearing;


(2) Compile four hearing files (hard copy or electronic) containing copies of all documents relevant to the case, indexed and compiled chronologically; and


(3) Send simultaneously one hearing file to the Department of Labor Chief Administrative Law Judge, 800 K Street NW., Suite 400N, Washington, DC 20001-8002, one hearing file to the OWI Administrator, and one hearing file to the Solicitor of Labor, Attn: Associate Solicitor for Employment and Training Legal Services, and retain one hearing file.


(b) Proceedings under this section are governed by the rules of practice and procedure at subpart A of 29 CFR part 18, Rule of Practice and Procedure for Administrative Hearings before the Office of Administrative Law Judges, except where otherwise specified in this section or at § 658.425.


(c) Upon receipt of a hearing file, the ALJ designated to the case must notify the party requesting the hearing, all parties to the prior State hearing official hearing (if any), the State agency, the Regional Administrator, the OWI Administrator, and the Solicitor of Labor of the receipt of the case. After conferring all the parties, the ALJ may decide to make a determination on the record in lieu of scheduling a hearing.


(d) The ALJ may decide to consolidate cases and conduct hearings on more than one complaint concurrently if he/she determines that the issues are related or that the complaints will be handled more expeditiously.


(e) If the parties to the hearing are located in more than one State or are located in the same State but access to the hearing location is extremely inconvenient for one or more parties as determined by the ALJ, the ALJ must:


(1) Whenever possible, hold a single hearing, at a location convenient to all parties or their representatives wishing to appear and present evidence, with all such parties and/or their representatives present.


(2) If a hearing location cannot be established by the ALJ at a location pursuant to paragraph (e)(1) of this section, the ALJ may conduct, with the consent of the parties, the hearing by a telephone conference call. If the hearing is conducted via telephone conference call the parties and their representatives must have the option to participate in person or via telephone.


(3) Where the ALJ is unable, for any reason, to conduct a telephonic hearing under paragraph (e)(2) of this section, the ALJ must confer with the parties on how to proceed.


(f) Upon deciding to hold a hearing, the ALJ must notify all involved parties of the date, time, and place of the hearing.


(g) The parties to the hearing must be afforded the opportunity to present, examine, and cross-examine witnesses. The ALJ may elicit testimony from witnesses, but may not act as advocate for any party. The ALJ has the authority to issue subpoenas.


(h) The ALJ must receive, and make part of the record, documentary evidence offered by any party and accepted at the hearing, provided that copies of such evidence is provided to the other parties to the proceeding prior to the hearing at the time required by the ALJ.


(i) Technical rules of evidence do not apply to hearings conducted pursuant to this part, but rules or principles designed to assure production of the most credible evidence available and to subject testimony to test by cross-examination must be applied where reasonably necessary by the ALJ conducting the hearing. The ALJ may exclude irrelevant, immaterial, or unduly repetitious evidence.


(j) The case record, or any portion thereof, must be available for inspection and copying by any party to the hearing at, prior to, or subsequent to the hearing upon request. Special procedures may be used for disclosure of medical and psychological records such as disclosure to a physician designated by the individual concerned.


(k) The ALJ must, if feasible, encourage resolution of the dispute by conciliation at any time prior to the conclusion of the hearing.


§ 658.425 Decision of Department of Labor Administrative Law Judge.

(a) The ALJ may:


(1) Rule that he/she lacks jurisdiction over the case;


(2) Rule that the appeal has been withdrawn, with the written consent of all parties;


(3) Rule that reasonable cause exists to believe that the appeal has been abandoned; or


(4) Render such other rulings as are appropriate to the issues in question. However, the ALJ does not have jurisdiction to consider the validity or constitutionality of the ES regulations or of the Federal statutes under which they are promulgated.


(b) Based on the entire record, including any legal briefs, the record before the State agency, the investigation (if any) and determination of the Regional Administrator, and evidence provided at the hearing, the ALJ must prepare a written decision. The ALJ must send a copy of the decision stating the findings of fact and conclusions of law to the parties to the hearing, including the State agency, the Regional Administrator, the OWI Administrator, and the Solicitor, and to entities filing amicus briefs (if any).


(c) The decision of the ALJ serves as the final decision of the Secretary.


§ 658.426 Complaints against the United States Employment Service.

(a) Complaints alleging that an ETA regional office or the National Office has violated ES regulations must be mailed to the Assistant Secretary for Employment and Training, U.S. Department of Labor, Washington, DC 20210. Such complaints must include:


(1) A specific allegation of the violation;


(2) The date of the incident;


(3) Location of the incident;


(4) The individual alleged to have committed the violation; and


(5) Any other relevant information available to the complainant.


(b) The Assistant Secretary or the Regional Administrator as designated must make a determination and respond to the complainant after investigation of the complaint.


Subpart F – Discontinuation of Services to Employers by the Wagner-Peyser Act Employment Service

§ 658.500 Scope and purpose of subpart.

This subpart contains the regulations governing the discontinuation of services provided pursuant part 653 of this chapter to employers by the ETA, including SWAs.


§ 658.501 Basis for discontinuation of services.

(a) SWA officials must initiate procedures for discontinuation of services to employers who:


(1) Submit and refuse to alter or withdraw job orders containing specifications which are contrary to employment-related laws;


(2) Submit job orders and refuse to provide assurances, in accordance with the Agricultural Recruitment System for U.S. Workers at part 653, subpart F, of this chapter, that the jobs offered are in compliance with employment-related laws, or to withdraw such job orders;


(3) Are found through field checks or otherwise to have either misrepresented the terms or conditions of employment specified on job orders or failed to comply fully with assurances made on job orders;


(4) Are found by a final determination by an appropriate enforcement agency to have violated any employment-related laws and notification of this final determination has been provided to the Department or the SWA by that enforcement agency;


(5) Are found to have violated ES regulations pursuant to § 658.411;


(6) Refuse to accept qualified workers referred through the clearance system;


(7) Refuse to cooperate in the conduct of field checks conducted pursuant to § 653.503 of this chapter; or


(8) Repeatedly cause the initiation of the procedures for discontinuation of services pursuant to paragraphs (a)(1) through (7) of this section.


(b) SWA officials may discontinue services immediately if, in the judgment of the State Administrator, exhaustion of the administrative procedures set forth in this subpart in paragraphs (a)(1) through (7) of this section would cause substantial harm to a significant number of workers. In such instances, procedures at §§ 658.503 and 658.504 must be followed.


(c) If it comes to the attention of an ES office or a SWA that an employer participating in the ES may not have complied with the terms of its temporary labor certification, under, for example the H-2A and H-2B visa programs, SWA officials must engage in the procedures for discontinuation of services to employers pursuant to paragraphs (a)(1) through (8) of this section and simultaneously notify the Chicago National Processing Center (CNPC) of the alleged non-compliance for investigation and consideration of ineligibility pursuant to § 655.184 or § 655.73 of this chapter respectively for subsequent temporary labor certification.


[81 FR 56352, Aug. 19, 2016, as amended at 85 FR 629, Jan. 6, 2020]


§ 658.502 Notification to employers.

(a) The SWA must notify the employer in writing that it intends to discontinue the provision of employment services pursuant to this part and parts 652, 653, and 654 of this chapter, and the reason therefore.


(1) Where the decision is based on submittal and refusal to alter or to withdraw job orders containing specifications contrary to employment-related laws, the SWA must specify the date the order was submitted, the job order involved, the specifications contrary to employment-related laws and the laws involved. The SWA must notify the employer in writing that all employment services will be terminated in 20 working days unless the employer within that time:


(i) Provides adequate evidence that the specifications are not contrary to employment-related laws; or


(ii) Withdraws the specifications and resubmits the job order in compliance with all employment-related laws; or


(iii) If the job is no longer available, makes assurances that all future job orders submitted will be in compliance with all employment-related laws; or


(iv) Requests a hearing from the SWA pursuant to § 658.417.


(2) Where the decision is based on the employer’s submittal of an order and refusal to provide assurances that the job is in compliance with employment-related laws or to withdraw the order, the SWA must specify the date the order was submitted, the job order involved, and the assurances involved. The employer must be notified that all employment services will be terminated within 20 working days unless the employer within that time:


(i) Resubmits the order with the appropriate assurances; or


(ii) If the job is no longer available, make assurances that all future job orders submitted will contain all necessary assurances that the job offered is in compliance with employment-related laws; or


(iii) Requests a hearing from the SWA pursuant to § 658.417.


(3) Where the decision is based on a finding that the employer has misrepresented the terms or conditions of employment specified on job orders or failed to comply fully with assurances made on job orders, the SWA must specify the basis for that determination. The employer must be notified that all employment services will be terminated in 20 working days unless the employer within that time:


(i) Provides adequate evidence that terms and conditions of employment were not misrepresented; or


(ii) Provides adequate evidence that there was full compliance with the assurances made on the job orders; or


(iii) Provides resolution of a complaint which is satisfactory to a complainant referred by the ES; and


(iv) Provides adequate assurance that specifications on future orders will accurately represent the terms and conditions of employment and that there will be full compliance with all job order assurances; or


(v) Requests a hearing from the SWA pursuant to § 658.417.


(4) Where the decision is based on a final determination by an enforcement agency, the SWA must specify the enforcement agency’s findings of facts and conclusions of law. The employer must be notified that all employment services will be terminated in 20 working days unless the employer within that time:


(i) Provides adequate evidence that the enforcement agency has reversed its ruling and that the employer did not violate employment-related laws; or


(ii) Provides adequate evidence that the appropriate fines have been paid and/or appropriate restitution has been made; and


(iii) Provides assurances that any policies, procedures, or conditions responsible for the violation have been corrected and the same or similar violations are not likely to occur in the future.


(5) Where the decision is based on a finding of a violation of ES regulations under § 658.411, the SWA must specify the finding. The employer must be notified that all employment services will be terminated in 20 working days unless the employer within that time:


(i) Provides adequate evidence that the employer did not violate ES regulations; or


(ii) Provides adequate evidence that appropriate restitution has been made or remedial action taken; and


(iii) Provides assurances that any policies, procedures, or conditions responsible for the violation have been corrected and the same or similar violations are not likely to occur in the future; or


(iv) Requests a hearing from the SWA pursuant to § 658.417.


(6) Where the decision is based on an employer’s failure to accept qualified workers referred through the clearance system, the SWA must specify the workers referred and not accepted. The employer must be notified that all employment services will be terminated in 20 working days unless the employer within that time:


(i) Provides adequate evidence that the workers were accepted; or


(ii) Provides adequate evidence that the workers were not available to accept the job; or


(iii) Provides adequate evidence that the workers were not qualified; and


(iv) Provides adequate assurances that qualified workers referred in the future will be accepted; or


(v) Requests a hearing from the SWA pursuant to § 658.417.


(7) Where the decision is based on lack of cooperation in the conduct of field checks, the SWA must specify the lack of cooperation. The employer must be notified that all employment services will be terminated in 20 working days unless the employer within that time:


(i) Provides adequate evidence that he/she did cooperate; or


(ii) Cooperates immediately in the conduct of field checks; and


(iii) Provides assurances that he/she will cooperate in future field checks in further activity; or


(iv) Requests a hearing from the SWA pursuant to § 658.417.


(b) If the employer chooses to respond pursuant to this section by providing documentary evidence or assurances, he/she must at the same time request a hearing if such hearing is desired in the event that the SWA does not accept the documentary evidence or assurances as adequate.


(c) Where the decision is based on repeated initiation of procedures for discontinuation of services, the employer must be notified that services have been terminated.


(d) If the employer makes a timely request for a hearing, in accordance with this section, the SWA must follow procedures set forth at § 658.411 and notify the complainant whenever the discontinuation of services is based on a complaint pursuant to § 658.411.


§ 658.503 Discontinuation of services.

(a) If the employer does not provide a satisfactory response in accordance with § 658.502, within 20 working days, or has not requested a hearing, the SWA must immediately terminate services to the employer.


(b) If services are discontinued to an employer subject to Federal Contractor Job Listing Requirements, the SWA must notify the ETA regional office immediately.


§ 658.504 Reinstatement of services.

(a) Services may be reinstated to an employer after discontinuation under § 658.503(a) and (b), if:


(1) The State is ordered to do so by a Federal ALJ Judge or Regional Administrator; or


(2)(i) The employer provides adequate evidence that any policies, procedures or conditions responsible for the previous discontinuation of services have been corrected and that the same or similar circumstances are not likely to occur in the future; and


(ii) The employer provides adequate evidence that he/she has responded adequately to any findings of an enforcement agency, SWA, or ETA, including restitution to the complainant and the payment of any fines, which were the basis of the discontinuation of services.


(b) The SWA must notify the employer requesting reinstatement within 20 working days whether his/her request has been granted. If the State denies the request for reinstatement, the basis for the denial must be specified and the employer must be notified that he/she may request a hearing within 20 working days.


(c) If the employer makes a timely request for a hearing, the SWA must follow the procedures set forth at § 658.417.


(d) The SWA must reinstate services to an employer if ordered to do so by a State hearing official, Regional Administrator, or Federal ALJ as a result of a hearing offered pursuant to paragraph (c) of this section.


Subpart G – Review and Assessment of State Workforce Agency Compliance With Employment Service Regulations

§ 658.600 Scope and purpose of subpart.

This subpart sets forth the regulations governing review and assessment of State Workforce Agency (SWA) compliance with the ES regulations at this part and parts 651, 652, 653, and 654 of this chapter. All recordkeeping and reporting requirements contained in this part and part 653 of this chapter have been approved by the Office of Management and Budget as required by the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1980.


§ 658.601 State Workforce Agency responsibility.

(a) Each SWA must establish and maintain a self-appraisal system for ES operations to determine success in reaching goals and to correct deficiencies in performance. The self-appraisal system must include numerical (quantitative) appraisal and non-numerical (qualitative) appraisal.


(1) Numerical appraisal at the ES office level must be conducted as follows:


(i) Performance must be measured on a quarterly-basis against planned service levels as stated in the Unified or Combined State Plan (“State Plan”). The State Plan must be consistent with numerical goals contained in ES office plans.


(ii) To appraise numerical activities/indicators, actual results as shown on the Department’s ETA Form 9172, or any successor report required by the Department must be compared to planned levels. Differences between achievement and plan levels must be identified.


(iii) When the numerical appraisal of required activities/indicators identifies significant differences from planned levels, additional analysis must be conducted to isolate possible contributing factors. This data analysis must include, as appropriate, comparisons to past performance, attainment of State Plan goals and consideration of pertinent non-numerical factors.


(iv) Results of ES office numerical reviews must be documented and significant deficiencies identified. A corrective action plan as described in paragraph (a)(6) of this section must be developed to address these deficiencies.


(v) The result of ES office appraisal, including corrective action plans, must be communicated in writing to the next higher level of authority for review. This review must cover adequacy of analysis, appropriateness of corrective actions, and need for higher level involvement. When this review is conducted at an area or district office, a report describing ES office performance within the area or district jurisdiction must be communicated to the SWA on a quarterly basis.


(2) Numerical appraisal at the SWA level must be conducted as follows:


(i) Performance must be measured on a quarterly basis against planned service levels as stated in the State Plan. The State Plan must be consistent with numerical goals contained in ES office plans.


(ii) To appraise these key numerical activities/indicators, actual results as shown on ETA Form 9172, or any successor report required by the Department must be compared to planned levels. Differences between achievement and plan levels must be identified.


(iii) The SWA must review statewide data and performance against planned service levels as stated in the State Plan on at least a quarterly basis to identify significant statewide deficiencies and to determine the need for additional analysis, including identification of trends, comparisons to past performance, and attainment of State Plan goals.


(iv) Results of numerical reviews must be documented and significant deficiencies identified. A corrective action plan as described in paragraph (a)(5) of this section must be developed to address these deficiencies. These plans must be submitted to the ETA Regional Office as part of the periodic performance process described at § 658.603(d)(2).


(3) Non-numerical (qualitative) appraisal of ES office activities must be conducted at least annually as follows:


(i) Each ES office must assess the quality of its services to applicants, employers, and the community and its compliance with Federal regulations.


(ii) At a minimum, non-numerical review must include an assessment of the following factors:


(A) Appropriateness of services provided to participants and employers;


(B) Timely delivery of services to participants and employers;


(C) Staff responsiveness to individual participants and employer needs;


(D) Thoroughness and accuracy of documents prepared in the course of service delivery; and


(E) Effectiveness of ES interface with external organizations, such as other ETA-funded programs, community groups, etc.


(iii) Non-numerical review methods must include:


(A) Observation of processes;


(B) Review of documents used in service provisions; and


(C) Solicitation of input from applicants, employers, and the community.


(iv) The result of non-numerical reviews must be documented and deficiencies identified. A corrective action plan addressing these deficiencies as described in paragraph (a)(6) of this section must be developed.


(v) The result of ES office non-numerical appraisal, including corrective actions, must be communicated in writing to the next higher level of authority for review. This review must cover thoroughness and adequacy of ES office appraisal, appropriateness of corrective actions, and need for higher level involvement. When this review is conducted at an area or district level, a report summarizing local ES office performance within that jurisdiction must be communicated to the SWA on an annual basis.


(4) As part of its oversight responsibilities, the SWA must conduct onsite reviews in those ES offices which show continuing internal problems or deficiencies in performance as indicated by such sources as data analysis, non-numerical appraisal, or other sources of information.


(5) Non-numerical (qualitative) review of SWA ES activities must be conducted as follows:


(i) SWA operations must be assessed annually to determine compliance with Federal regulations.


(ii) Results of non-numerical reviews must be documented and deficiencies identified. A corrective action plan addressing these deficiencies must be developed.


(6) Corrective action plans developed to address deficiencies uncovered at any administrative level within the State as a result of the self-appraisal process must include:


(i) Specific descriptions of the type of action to be taken, the time frame involved, and the assignment of responsibility.


(ii) Provision for the delivery of technical assistance as needed.


(iii) A plan to conduct follow-up on a timely basis to determine if action taken to correct the deficiencies has been effective.


(7)(i) The provisions of the ES regulations which require numerical and non-numerical assessment of service to special applicant groups (e.g., services to veterans at 20 CFR part 1001 – Services for Veterans and services to MSFWs at this part and part 653 of this chapter), are supplementary to the provisions of this section.


(ii) Each State Administrator and ES office manager must ensure their staff know and carry out ES regulations, including regulations on performance standards and program emphases, and any corrective action plans imposed by the SWA or by the Department.


(iii) Each State Administrator must ensure the SWA complies with its approved State Plan.


(iv) Each State Administrator must ensure to the maximum extent feasible the accuracy of data entered by the SWA into Department-required management information systems. Each SWA must establish and maintain a data validation system pursuant to Department instructions. The system must review every local ES office at least once every 4 years. The system must include the validation of time distribution reports and the review of data gathering procedures.


(b) [Reserved]


[81 FR 56352, Aug. 19, 2016, as amended at 85 FR 629, Jan. 6, 2020]


§ 658.602 Employment and Training Administration National Office responsibility.

The ETA National Office must:


(a) Monitor ETA Regional Offices’ operations under ES regulations;


(b) From time to time, conduct such special reviews and audits as necessary to monitor ETA regional office and SWA compliance with ES regulations;


(c) Offer technical assistance to the ETA regional offices and SWAs in carrying out ES regulations and programs;


(d) Have report validation surveys conducted in support of resource allocations; and


(e) Develop tools and techniques for reviewing and assessing SWA performance and compliance with ES regulations.


(f) ETA must appoint a National Monitor Advocate (NMA), who must devote full time to the duties set forth in this subpart. The NMA must:


(1) Review the effective functioning of the Regional Monitor Advocates (RMAs) and SMAs;


(2) Review the performance of SWAs in providing the full range of employment services to MSFWs;


(3) Take steps to resolve or refer ES-related problems of MSFWs which come to his/her attention;


(4) Take steps to refer non ES-related problems of MSFWs which come to his/her attention;


(5) Recommend to the Administrator changes in policy toward MSFWs; and


(6) Serve as an advocate to improve services for MSFWs within the ES system. The NMA must be a member of the National Farm Labor Coordinated Enforcement Staff Level Working Committee and other Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and Wage and Hour Division (WHD) task forces, and other committees as appropriate.


(g) The NMA must be appointed by the Office of Workforce Investment Administrator (Administrator) after informing farmworker organizations and other organizations with expertise concerning MSFWs of the opening and encouraging them to refer qualified applicants to apply through the Federal merit system. Among qualified candidates, determined through merit systems procedures, individuals must be sought who meet the criteria used in the selection of the SMAs, as provided in SWA self-monitoring requirements at § 653.108(b) of this chapter.


(h) The NMA must be assigned staff necessary to fulfill effectively all the responsibilities set forth in this subpart.


(i) The NMA must submit the Annual Report to the OWI Administrator, the ETA Assistant Secretary, and the National Farm Labor Coordinated Enforcement Committee covering the matters set forth in this subpart.


(j) The NMA must monitor and assess SWA compliance with ES regulations affecting MSFWs on a continuing basis. His/her assessment must consider:


(1) Information from RMAs and SMAs;


(2) Program performance data, including the service indicators;


(3) Periodic reports from regional offices;


(4) All Federal on-site reviews;


(5) Selected State on-site reviews;


(6) Other relevant reports prepared by the ES;


(7) Information received from farmworker organizations and employers; and


(8) His/her personal observations from visits to SWAs, ES offices, agricultural work sites, and migrant camps. In the Annual Report, the NMA must include both a quantitative and qualitative analysis of his/her findings and the implementation of his/her recommendations by State and Federal officials, and must address the information obtained from all of the foregoing sources.


(k) The NMA must review the activities of the State/Federal monitoring system as it applies to services to MSFWs and the Complaint System including the effectiveness of the regional monitoring function in each region and must recommend any appropriate changes in the operation of the system. The NMA’s findings and recommendations must be fully set forth in the Annual Report.


(l) If the NMA finds the effectiveness of any RMA has been substantially impeded by the Regional Administrator or other regional office official, he/she must, if unable to resolve such problems informally, report and recommend appropriate actions directly to the OWI Administrator. If the NMA receives information that the effectiveness of any SMA has been substantially impeded by the State Administrator, a State or Federal ES official, or other ES staff, he/she must, in the absence of a satisfactory informal resolution at the regional level, report and recommend appropriate actions directly to the OWI Administrator.


(m) The NMA must be informed of all proposed changes in policy and practice within the ES, including ES regulations, which may affect the delivery of services to MSFWs. The NMA must advise the Administrator concerning all such proposed changes which may adversely affect MSFWs. The NMA must propose directly to the OWI Administrator changes in ES policy and administration which may substantially improve the delivery of services to MSFWs. He/she also must recommend changes in the funding of SWAs and/or adjustment or reallocation of the discretionary portions of funding formulae.


(n) The NMA must participate in the review and assessment activities required in this section and §§ 658.700 through 658.711. As part of such participation, the NMA, or if he/she is unable to participate, a RMA must accompany the National Office review team on National Office on-site reviews. The NMA must engage in the following activities in the course of each State on-site review:


(1) He/she must accompany selected outreach workers on their field visits.


(2) He/she must participate in a random field check(s) of migrant camps or work site(s) where MSFWs have been placed on inter or intrastate clearance orders.


(3) He/she must contact local WIOA sec. 167 National Farmworker Jobs Program grantees or other farmworker organizations as part of the on-site review, and, discuss with representatives of these organizations current trends and any other pertinent information concerning MSFWs.


(4) He/she must meet with the SMA and discuss the full range of the employment services to MSFWs, including monitoring and the Complaint System.


(o) In addition to the duties specified in paragraph (f)(8) of this section, the NMA each year during the harvest season must visit the four States with the highest level of MSFW activity during the prior fiscal year, if they are not scheduled for a National Office on-site review during the current fiscal year, and must:


(1) Meet with the SMA and other ES staff to discuss MSFW service delivery; and


(2) Contact representatives of MSFW organizations and interested employer organizations to obtain information concerning ES delivery and coordination with other agencies.


(p) The NMA must perform duties specified in §§ 658.700 through 765.711. As part of this function, he/she must monitor the performance of regional offices in imposing corrective action. The NMA must report any deficiencies in performance to the Administrator.


(q) The NMA must establish routine and regular contacts with WIOA sec. 167 National Farmworker Jobs Program grantees, other farmworker organizations and agricultural employers and/or employer organizations. He/she must attend conferences or meetings of these groups wherever possible and must report to the Administrator and the National Farm Labor Coordinated Enforcement Committee on these contacts when appropriate. The NMA must include in the Annual Report recommendations about how the Department might better coordinate ES and WIOA sec. 167 National Farmworker Jobs Program services as they pertain to MSFWs.


(r) In the event that any SMA or RMA, enforcement agency, or MSFW group refers a matter to the NMA which requires emergency action, he/she must assist them in obtaining action by appropriate agencies and staff, inform the originating party of the action taken, and, upon request, provide written confirmation.


(s) Through all the mechanisms provided in this subpart, the NMA must aggressively seek to ascertain and remedy, if possible, systemic deficiencies in the provisions of employment services and protections afforded by these regulations to MSFWs. The NMA must:


(1) Use the regular reports on complaints submitted by SWAs and ETA regional offices to assess the adequacy of these systems and to determine the existence of systemic deficiencies.


(2) Provide technical assistance to ETA regional office and ES staff for administering the Complaint System, and any other employment services as appropriate.


(3) Recommend to the Regional Administrator specific instructions for action by regional office staff to correct any ES-related systemic deficiencies. Prior to any ETA review of regional office operations concerning employment services to MSFWs, the NMA must provide to the Regional Administrator a brief summary of ES-related services to MSFWs in that region and his/her recommendations for incorporation in the regional review materials as the Regional Administrator and ETA reviewing organization deem appropriate.


(4) Recommend to the National Farm Labor Coordinated Enforcement Committee specific instructions for action by WHD and OSHA regional office staff to correct any non-ES-related systemic deficiencies of which he/she is aware.


[81 FR 56352, Aug. 19, 2016, as amended at 85 FR 629, Jan. 6, 2020]


§ 658.603 Employment and Training Administration regional office responsibility.

(a) The Regional Administrator must have responsibility for the regular review and assessment of SWA performance and compliance with ES regulations.


(b) The Regional Administrator must participate with the National Office staff in reviewing and approving the State Plan for the SWAs within the region. In reviewing the State Plans the Regional Administrator and appropriate National Office staff must consider relevant factors including the following:


(1) State Workforce Agency compliance with ES regulations;


(2) State Workforce Agency performance against the goals and objectives established in the previous State Plan;


(3) The effect which economic conditions and other external factors considered by the ETA in the resource allocation process may have had or are expected to have on the SWA’s performance;


(4) SWA adherence to national program emphasis; and


(5) The adequacy and appropriateness of the State Plan for carrying out ES programs.


(c) The Regional Administrator must assess the overall performance of SWAs on an ongoing basis through desk reviews and the use of required reporting systems and other available information.


(d) As appropriate, Regional Administrators must conduct or have conducted:


(1) Comprehensive on-site reviews of SWAs and their offices to review SWA organization, management, and program operations;


(2) Periodic performance reviews of SWA operation of ES programs to measure actual performance against the State Plan, past performance, the performance of other SWAs, etc.;


(3) Audits of SWA programs to review their program activity and to assess whether the expenditure of grant funds has been in accordance with the approved budget. Regional Administrators also may conduct audits through other agencies or organizations or may require the SWA to have audits conducted;


(4) Validations of data entered into management information systems to assess:


(i) The accuracy of data entered by the SWAs into the management information system;


(ii) Whether the SWAs’ data validating and reviewing procedures conform to Department instructions; and


(iii) Whether SWAs have implemented any corrective action plans required by the Department to remedy deficiencies in their validation programs;


(5) Technical assistance programs to assist SWAs in carrying out ES regulations and programs;


(6) Reviews to assess whether the SWA has complied with corrective action plans imposed by the Department or by the SWA itself; and


(7) Random, unannounced field checks of a sample of agricultural work sites to which ES placements have been made through the clearance system to determine and document whether wages, hours, working and housing conditions are as specified on the job order. If regional office staff find reason to believe that conditions vary from job order specifications, findings must be documented on the Complaint/Apparent Violation Referral Form and provided to the State Workforce Agency to be handled as an apparent violation under § 658.419.


(e) The Regional Administrator must provide technical assistance to SWAs to assist them in carrying out ES regulations and programs.


(f) The Regional Administrator must appoint a RMA who must carry out the duties set forth in this subpart. The RMA must:


(1) Review the effective functioning of the SMAs in his/her region;


(2) Review the performance of SWAs in providing the full range of employment services to MSFWs;


(3) Take steps to resolve ES-related problems of MSFWs which come to his/her attention;


(4) Recommend to the Regional Administrator changes in policy towards MSFWs;


(5) Review the operation of the Complaint System; and


(6) Serve as an advocate to improve service for MSFWs within the ES. The RMA must be a member of the Regional Farm Labor Coordinated Enforcement Committee.


(g) The RMA must be appointed by the Regional Administrator after informing farmworker organizations and other organizations in the region with expertise concerning MSFWs of the opening and encouraging them to refer qualified applicants to apply through the Federal merit system. The RMA must have direct personal access to the Regional Administrator wherever he/she finds it necessary. Among qualified candidates, individuals must be sought who meet the criteria used in the selection of the SMAs, as provided in § 653.108(b) of this chapter.


(h) The Regional Administrator must ensure that staff necessary to fulfill effectively all the regional office responsibilities set forth in this section are assigned.


(i) The RMA within the first 3 months of his/her tenure must participate in a training session(s) approved by the National Office.


(j) At the regional level, the RMA must have primary responsibility for:


(1) Monitoring the effectiveness of the Complaint System set forth at subpart E of this part;


(2) Apprising appropriate State and ETA officials of deficiencies in the Complaint System; and


(3) Providing technical assistance to SMAs in the region.


(k) At the ETA regional level, the RMA must have primary responsibility for ensuring SWA compliance with ES regulations as it pertains to services to MSFWs is monitored by the regional office. He/she must independently assess on a continuing basis the provision of employment services to MSFWs, seeking out and using:


(1) Information from SMAs, including all reports and other documents;


(2) Program performance data;


(3) The periodic and other required reports from SWAs;


(4) Federal on-site reviews;


(5) Other reports prepared by the National Office;


(6) Information received from farmworker organizations and employers; and


(7) Any other pertinent information which comes to his/her attention from any possible source.


(8) In addition, the RMA must consider his/her personal observations from visits to ES offices, agricultural work sites, and migrant camps.


(l) The RMA must assist the Regional Administrator and other line officials in applying appropriate corrective and remedial actions to State agencies.


(m) The Regional Administrator’s quarterly report to the National Office must include the RMA’s summary of his/her independent assessment as required in paragraph (f)(5) of this section. The fourth quarter summary must include an annual summary from the region. The summary also must include both a quantitative and a qualitative analysis of his/her reviews and must address all the matters with respect to which he/she has responsibilities under these regulations.


(n) The RMA must review the activities and performance of the SMAs and the State monitoring system in the region, and must recommend any appropriate changes in the operation of the system to the Regional Administrator. The RMA’s review must include a determination whether the SMA:


(1) Does not have adequate access to information;


(2) Is being impeded in fulfilling his/her duties; or


(3) Is making recommendations that are being consistently ignored by SWA officials. If the RMA believes that the effectiveness of any SMA has been substantially impeded by the State Administrator, other State agency officials, any Federal officials, or other ES staff, he/she must report and recommend appropriate actions to the Regional Administrator. Copies of the recommendations must be provided to the NMA electronically or in hard copy.


(o)(1) The RMA must be informed of all proposed changes in policy and practice within the ES, including ES regulations, which may affect the delivery of services to MSFWs. He/she must advise the Regional Administrator on all such proposed changes which, in his/her opinion, may adversely affect MSFWs or which may substantially improve the delivery of services to MSFWs.


(2) The RMA also may recommend changes in ES policy or regulations, as well as changes in the funding of State Workforce Agencies and/or adjustments of reallocation of the discretionary portions of funding formulae as they pertain to MSFWs.


(p) The RMA must participate in the review and assessment activities required in this section and §§ 658.700 through 658.711. He/she, an assistant, or another RMA, must participate in National Office and regional office on-site statewide reviews of employment services to MSFWs in States in the region. The RMA must engage in the following activities in the course of participating in an on-site SWA review:


(1) Accompany selected outreach workers on their field visits;


(2) Participate in a random field check of migrant camps or work sites where MSFWs have been placed on intrastate or interstate clearance orders;


(3) Contact local WIOA sec. 167 National Farmworker Jobs Program grantees or other farmworker organizations as part of the on-site review, and must discuss with representatives of these organizations perceived trends, and/or other relevant information concerning MSFWs in the area; and


(4) Meet with the SMA and discuss the full range of the employment services to MSFWs, including monitoring and the Complaint System.


(q) During the calendar quarter preceding the time of peak MSFW activity in each State, the RMA must meet with the SMA and must review in detail the State Workforce Agency’s capability for providing the full range of services to MSFWs as required by ES regulations, during the upcoming harvest season. The RMA must offer technical assistance and recommend to the SWA and/or the Regional Administrator any changes in State policy or practice that he/she finds necessary.


(r) As appropriate, each year during the peak harvest season, the RMA must visit each State in the region not scheduled for an onsite review during that fiscal year and must:


(1) Meet with the SMA and other ES staff to discuss MSFW service delivery; and


(2) Contact representatives of MSFW organizations to obtain information concerning ES delivery and coordination with other agencies and interested employer organizations.


(s) The RMA must initiate and maintain regular and personal contacts, including informal contacts in addition to those specifically required by these regulations, with SMAs in the region. In addition, the RMA must have personal and regular contact with the NMA. The RMA also must establish routine and regular contacts with WIOA sec. 167 National Farmworker Jobs Program grantees, other farmworker organizations and agricultural employers and/or employer organizations in his/her region. He/she must attend conferences or meetings of these groups wherever possible and must report to the Regional Administrator and the Regional Farm Labor Coordinated Enforcement Committee on these contacts when appropriate. He/she also must make recommendations as to how the Department might better coordinate ES and WIOA sec. 167 National Farmworker Jobs Program services to MSFWs.


(t) The RMA must attend MSFW-related public meeting(s) conducted in the region, as appropriate. Following such meetings or hearings, the RMA must take such steps or make such recommendations to the Regional Administrator, as he/she deems necessary to remedy problem(s) or condition(s) identified or described therein.


(u) The RMA must attempt to achieve regional solutions to any problems, deficiencies, or improper practices concerning services to MSFWs which are regional in scope. Further, he/she must recommend policies, offer technical assistance, or take any other necessary steps as he/she deems desirable or appropriate on a regional, rather than State-by-State basis, to promote region-wide improvement in the delivery of employment services to MSFWs. He/she must facilitate region-wide coordination and communication regarding provision of employment services to MSFWs among SMAs, State Administrators, and Federal ETA officials to the greatest extent possible. In the event that any SWA or other RMA, enforcement agency, or MSFW group refers a matter to the RMA which requires emergency action, he/she must assist them in obtaining action by appropriate agencies and staff, inform the originating party of the action taken, and, upon request, provide written confirmation.


(v) The RMA must initiate and maintain such contacts as he/she deems necessary with RMAs in other regions to seek to resolve problems concerning MSFWs who work, live, or travel through the region. He/she must recommend to the Regional Administrator and/or the National Office inter-regional cooperation on any particular matter, problem, or policy with respect to which inter-regional action is desirable.


(w) The RMA must establish regular contacts with the regional agricultural coordinators from WHD and OSHA and any other regional staff from other Federal enforcement agencies and must establish contacts with the staff of other Department agencies represented on the Regional Farm Labor Coordinated Enforcement Committee and to the extent necessary, on other pertinent task forces or committees.


(x) The RMA must participate in the regional reviews of the State Plans, and must comment to the Regional Administrator as to the SWA compliance with the ES regulations as they pertain to services to MSFWs, including the staffing of ES offices.


[81 FR 56352, Aug. 19, 2016, as amended at 85 FR 630, Jan. 6, 2020]


§ 658.604 Assessment and evaluation of program performance data.

(a) State Workforce Agencies must compile program performance data required by the Department, including statistical information on program operations.


(b) The Department must use the program performance data in assessing and evaluating whether each SWA has complied with ES regulations and its State Plan.


(c) In assessing and evaluating program performance data, the Department must act in accordance with the following general principles:


(1) The fact that the program performance data from a SWA, whether overall or relative to a particular program activity, indicate poor program performance does not by itself constitute a violation of ES regulations or of the State Workforce Agency’s responsibilities under its State Plan;


(2) Program performance data, however, may so strongly indicate that a SWA’s performance is so poor that the data may raise a presumption (prima facie case) that a SWA is violating ES regulations or the State Plan. A SWA’s failure to meet the operational objectives set forth in the State Plan raises a presumption that the agency is violating ES regulations and/or obligations under its State Plan. In such cases, the Department must afford the SWA an opportunity to rebut the presumption of a violation pursuant to the procedures at subpart H of this part.


(3) The Department must take into account that certain program performance data may measure items over which SWAs have direct or substantial control while other data may measure items over which the SWA has indirect or minimal control.


(i) Generally, for example, a SWA has direct and substantial control over the delivery of employment services such as referrals to jobs, job development contacts, counseling, referrals to career and supportive services, and the conduct of field checks.


(ii) State Workforce Agencies, however, have only indirect control over the outcome of services. For example, SWAs cannot guarantee that an employer will hire a referred applicant, nor can they guarantee that the terms and conditions of employment will be as stated on a job order.


(iii) Outside forces, such as a sudden heavy increase in unemployment rates, a strike by SWA employees, or a severe drought or flood, may skew the results measured by program performance data.


(4) The Department must consider a SWA’s failure to keep accurate and complete program performance data required by ES regulations as a violation of the ES regulations.


§ 658.605 Communication of findings to State agencies.

(a) The Regional Administrator must inform SWAs in writing of the results of review and assessment activities and, as appropriate, must discuss with the State Administrator the impact or action required by the Department as a result of review and assessment activities.


(b) The ETA National Office must transmit the results of any review and assessment activities it conducted to the Regional Administrator who must send the information to the SWA.


(c) Whenever the review and assessment indicates a SWA violation of ES regulations or its State Plan, the Regional Administrator must follow the procedures set forth at subpart H of this part.


(d) Regional Administrators must follow-up any corrective action plan imposed on a SWA under subpart H of this part by further review and assessment of the State Workforce Agency pursuant to this subpart.


Subpart H – Federal Application of Remedial Action to State Workforce Agencies

§ 658.700 Scope and purpose of subpart.

This subpart sets forth the procedures which the Department must follow upon either discovering independently or receiving from other(s) information indicating that SWAs may not be adhering to ES regulations.


§ 658.701 Statements of policy.

(a) It is the policy of the Department to take all necessary action, including the imposition of the full range of sanctions set forth in this subpart, to ensure State Workforce Agencies comply with all requirements established by ES regulations.


(b) It is the policy of the Department to initiate decertification procedures against SWAs in instances of serious or continual violations of ES regulations if less stringent remedial actions taken in accordance with this subpart fail to resolve noncompliance.


(c) It is the policy of the Department to act on information concerning alleged violations by SWAs of the ES regulations received from any person or organization.


§ 658.702 Initial action by the Regional Administrator.

(a) The ETA Regional Administrator is responsible for ensuring that all SWAs in his/her region are in compliance with ES regulations.


(b) Wherever a Regional Administrator discovers or is apprised of possible SWA violations of ES regulations by the review and assessment activities under subpart G of this part, or through required reports or written complaints from individuals, organizations, or employers which are elevated to the Department after the exhaustion of SWA administrative remedies, the Regional Administrator must conduct an investigation. Within 10 business days after receipt of the report or other information, the Regional Administrator must make a determination whether there is probable cause to believe that a SWA has violated ES regulations.


(c) The Regional Administrator must accept complaints regarding possible SWA violations of ES regulations from employee organizations, employers or other groups, without exhaustion of the complaint process described at subpart E of this part, if the Regional Administrator determines that the nature and scope of the complaint are such that the time required to exhaust the administrative procedures at the State level would adversely affect a significant number of applicants. In such cases, the Regional Administrator must investigate the matter within 10 business days, may provide the SWA 10 business days for comment, and must make a determination within an additional 10 business days whether there is probable cause to believe that the SWA has violated ES regulations.


(d) If the Regional Administrator determines that there is no probable cause to believe that a SWA has violated ES regulations, he/she must retain all reports and supporting information in Department files. In all cases where the Regional Administrator has insufficient information to make a probable cause determination, he/she must so notify the Administrator in writing and the time for the investigation must be extended 20 additional business days.


(e) If the Regional Administrator determines there is probable cause to believe a SWA has violated ES regulations, he/she must issue a Notice of Initial Findings of Non-compliance by registered mail (or other legally viable means) to the offending SWA. The notice will specify the nature of the violation, cite the regulations involved, and indicate corrective action which may be imposed in accordance with paragraphs (g) and (h) of this section. If the non-compliance involves services to MSFWs or the Complaint System, a copy of said notice must be sent to the NMA.


(f)(1) The SWA may have 20 business days to comment on the findings, or up to 20 additional days, if the Regional Administrator determines a longer period is appropriate. The SWA’s comments must include agreement or disagreement with the findings and suggested corrective actions, where appropriate.


(2) After the period elapses, the Regional Administrator must prepare within 20 business days, written final findings which specify whether the SWA has violated ES regulations. If in the final findings the Regional Administrator determines the SWA has not violated ES regulations, the Regional Administrator must notify the State Administrator of this finding and retain supporting documents in his/her files. If the final finding involves services to MSFWs or the Complaint System, the Regional Administrator also must notify the NMA. If the Regional Administrator determines a SWA has violated ES regulations, the Regional Administrator must prepare a Final Notice of Noncompliance which must specify the violation(s) and cite the regulations involved. The Final Notice of Noncompliance must be sent to the SWA by registered mail or other legally viable means. If the noncompliance involves services to MSFWs or the Complaint System, a copy of the Final Notice must be sent to the NMA.


(g) If the violation involves the misspending of grant funds, the Regional Administrator may order in the Final Notice of Noncompliance a disallowance of the expenditure and may either demand repayment or withhold future funds in the amount in question. If the Regional Administrator disallows costs, the Regional Administrator must give the reasons for the disallowance, inform the SWA that the disallowance is effective immediately and that no more funds may be spent in the disallowed manner, and offer the SWA the opportunity to request a hearing pursuant to § 658.707. The offer, or the acceptance of an offer of a hearing, however, does not stay the effectiveness of the disallowance. The Regional Administrator must keep complete records of the disallowance.


(h) If the violation does not involve misspending of grant funds or the Regional Administrator determines that the circumstances warrant other action:


(1) The Final Notice of Noncompliance must direct the SWA to implement a specific corrective action plan to correct all violations. If the SWA’s comment demonstrates with supporting evidence (except where inappropriate) that all violations have already been corrected, the Regional Administrator need not impose a corrective action plan and instead may cite the violation(s) and accept the SWA’s resolution, subject to follow-up review, if necessary. If the Regional Administrator determines that the violation(s) cited had been found previously and that the corrective action(s) taken had not corrected the violation(s) contrary to the findings of previous follow-up reviews, the Regional Administrator must apply remedial actions to the SWA pursuant to § 658.704.


(2) The Final Notice of Noncompliance must specify the time by which each corrective action must be taken. This period may not exceed 40 business days unless the Regional Administrator determines that exceptional circumstances necessitate corrective actions requiring a longer time period. In such cases, and if the violations involve services to MSFWs or the Complaint System, the Regional Administrator must notify the Administrator in writing of the exceptional circumstances which necessitate more time, and must specify the additional time period. The specified time must commence with the date of signature on the registered mail receipt.


(3) When the time provided for in paragraph (h)(2) of this section elapses, Department staff must review the SWA’s efforts as documented by the SWA to determine if the corrective action(s) has been taken and if the SWA has achieved compliance with ES regulations. If necessary, Department staff must conduct a follow-up visit as part of this review.


(4) If, as a result of this review, the Regional Administrator determines the SWA has corrected the violation(s), the Regional Administrator must record the basis for this determination, notify the SWA, send a copy to the Administrator, and retain a copy in Department files.


(5) If, as a result of this review, the Regional Administrator determines the SWA has taken corrective action but is unable to determine if the violation has been corrected due to seasonality or other factors, the Regional Administrator must notify in writing the SWA and the Administrator of his/her findings. The Regional Administrator must conduct further follow-up at an appropriate time to make a final determination if the violation has been corrected. If the Regional Administrator’s follow-up reveals that violations have not been corrected, the Regional Administrator must apply remedial actions to the SWA pursuant to § 658.704.


(6) If, as a result of the review the Regional Administrator determines the SWA has not corrected the violations and has not made good faith efforts and adequate progress toward the correction of the violations, the Regional Administrator must apply remedial actions to the SWA pursuant to § 658.704.


(7) If, as a result of the review, the Regional Administrator determines the SWA has made good faith efforts and adequate progress toward the correction of the violation and it appears the violation will be fully corrected within a reasonable amount of time, the SWA must be advised by registered mail or other legally viable means (with a copy sent to the Administrator) of this conclusion, of remaining differences, of further needed corrective action, and that all deficiencies must be corrected within a specified time period. This period may not exceed 40 business days unless the Regional Administrator determines exceptional circumstances necessitate corrective action requiring more time. In such cases, the Regional Administrator must notify the Administrator in writing of the exceptional circumstances which necessitate more time, and must specify that time period. The specified time commences with the date of signature on the registered mail receipt.


(8)(i) If the SWA has been given additional time pursuant to paragraph (h)(7) of this section, Department staff must review the SWA’s efforts as documented by the SWA at the end of the time period. If necessary, the Department must conduct a follow-up visit as part of this review.


(ii) If the SWA has corrected the violation(s), the Regional Administrator must document that finding, notify in writing the SWA and the Administrator, and retain supporting documents in Department files. If the SWA has not corrected the violation(s), the Regional Administrator must apply remedial actions pursuant to § 658.704.


§ 658.703 Emergency corrective action.

In critical situations as determined by the Regional Administrator, where it is necessary to protect the integrity of the funds, or ensure the proper operation of the program, the Regional Administrator may impose immediate corrective action. Where immediate corrective action is imposed, the Regional Administrator must notify the SWA of the reason for imposing the emergency corrective action prior to providing the SWA an opportunity to comment.


§ 658.704 Remedial actions.

(a) If a SWA fails to correct violations as determined pursuant to § 658.702, the Regional Administrator must apply one or more of the following remedial actions to the SWA:


(1) Imposition of special reporting requirements for a specified time;


(2) Restrictions of obligational authority within one or more expense classifications;


(3) Implementation of specific operating systems or procedures for a specified time;


(4) Requirement of special training for ES staff;


(5) With the approval of the Assistant Secretary and after affording the State Administrator the opportunity to request a conference with the Assistant Secretary, the elevation of specific decision-making functions from the State Administrator to the Regional Administrator;


(6) With the approval of the Assistant Secretary and after affording the State Administrator the opportunity to request a conference with the Assistant Secretary, the imposition of Federal staff in key SWA positions;


(7) With the approval of the Assistant Secretary and after affording the State Administrator the opportunity to request a conference with the Assistant Secretary, funding of the SWA on a short-term basis or partial withholding of funds for a specific function or for a specific geographical area;


(8) Holding of public hearings in the State on the SWA’s deficiencies;


(9) Disallowance of funds pursuant to § 658.702(g); or


(10) If the matter involves a serious or continual violation, the initiation of decertification procedures against the State Workforce Agency, as set forth in paragraph (e) of this section.


(b) The Regional Administrator must send, by registered mail, a Notice of Remedial Action to the SWA. The Notice of Remedial Action must set forth the reasons for the remedial action. When such a notice is the result of violations of regulations governing services to MSFWs (§§ 653.100 through 653.113 of this chapter) or the Complaint System (§§ 658.400 through 658.426), a copy of said notice must be sent to the Administrator, who must publish the notice promptly in the Federal Register.


(c) If the remedial action is other than decertification, the notice must state the remedial action must take effect immediately. The notice also must state the SWA may request a hearing pursuant to § 658.707 by filing a request in writing with the Regional Administrator pursuant to § 658.707 within 20 business days of the SWA’s receipt of the notice. The offer of hearing, or the acceptance thereof, however, does not stay or otherwise delay the implementation of remedial action.


(d) Within 60 business days after the initial application of remedial action, the Regional Administrator must conduct a review of the SWA’s compliance with ES regulations unless the Regional Administrator determines more time is necessary. In such cases, the Regional Administrator must notify the Administrator in writing of the circumstances which necessitate more time, and specify that time period. If necessary, Department staff must conduct a follow-up visit as part of this review. If the SWA is in compliance with the ES regulations, the Regional Administrator must fully document these facts and must terminate the remedial actions. The Regional Administrator must notify the SWA of his/her findings. When the case involves violations of regulations governing services to MSFWs or the Complaint System, a copy of said notice must be sent to the Administrator, who must promptly publish the notice in the Federal Register. The Regional Administrator must conduct, within a reasonable time after terminating the remedial actions, a review of the SWA’s compliance to determine whether any remedial actions must be reapplied.


(e) If, upon conducting the on-site review referred to in paragraph (c) of this section, the Regional Administrator finds the SWA remains in noncompliance, the Regional Administrator must continue the remedial action and/or impose different additional remedial actions. The Regional Administrator must fully document all such decisions and, when the case involves violations of regulations governing services to MSFWs or the Complaint System, must send copies to the Administrator, who must promptly publish the notice in the Federal Register.


(f)(1) If the SWA has not brought itself into compliance with ES regulations within 120 business days of the initial application of remedial action, the Regional Administrator must initiate decertification unless the Regional Administrator determines the circumstances necessitate continuing remedial action for more time. In such cases, the Regional Administrator must notify the Administrator in writing of the circumstances which necessitate the extended time, and specify the time period.


(2) The Regional Administrator must notify the SWA by registered mail or by other legally viable means of the decertification proceedings, and must state the reasons therefor. Whenever such a notice is sent to a SWA, the Regional Administrator must prepare five copies (hard copies or electronic copies) containing, in chronological order, all the documents pertinent to the case along with a request for decertification stating the grounds therefor. One copy must be retained. Two must be sent to the ETA National Office, one must be sent to the Solicitor of Labor, Attention: Associate Solicitor for Employment and Training, and, if the case involves violations of regulations governing services to MSFWs or the Complaint System, one copy must be sent to the NMA. All copies also must be sent electronically to each respective party. The notice sent by the Regional Administrator must be published promptly in the Federal Register.


[81 FR 56352, Aug. 19, 2016, as amended at 85 FR 630, Jan. 6, 2020]


§ 658.705 Decision to decertify.

(a) Within 30 business days of receiving a request for decertification, the ETA Assistant Secretary must review the case and must decide whether to proceed with decertification.


(b) The Assistant Secretary must grant the request for decertification unless he/she makes a finding that:


(1) The violations of ES regulations are neither serious nor continual;


(2) The SWA is in compliance; or


(3) The Assistant Secretary has reason to believe the SWA will achieve compliance within 80 business days unless exceptional circumstances necessitate more time, pursuant to the remedial action already applied or to be applied. (In the event the Assistant Secretary does not have sufficient information to act upon the request, he/she may postpone the determination for up to an additional 20 business days in order to obtain any available additional information.) In making a determination of whether violations are “serious” or “continual,” as required by paragraph (b)(1) of this section, the Assistant Secretary must consider:


(i) Statewide or multiple deficiencies as shown by performance data and/or on-site reviews;


(ii) Recurrent violations, even if they do not persist over consecutive reporting periods, and


(iii) The good faith efforts of the State to achieve full compliance with ES regulations as shown by the record.


(c) If the Assistant Secretary denies a request for decertification, he/she must write a complete report documenting his/her findings and, if appropriate, instructing an alternate remedial action or actions be applied. Electronic copies of the report must be sent to the Regional Administrator. Notice of the Assistant Secretary’s decision must be published promptly in the Federal Register and the report of the Assistant Secretary must be made available for public inspection and copying.


(d) If the Assistant Secretary decides decertification is appropriate, he/she must submit the case to the Secretary providing written explanation for his/her recommendation of decertification.


(e) Within 30 business days after receiving the Assistant Secretary’s report, the Secretary must determine whether to decertify the SWA. The Secretary must grant the request for decertification unless he/she makes one of the three findings set forth in paragraph (b) of this section. If the Secretary decides not to decertify, he/she must then instruct that remedial action be continued or that alternate actions be applied. The Secretary must write a report explaining his/her reasons for not decertifying the SWA and copies (hard copy and electronic) will be sent to the SWA. Notice of the Secretary’s decision must be published promptly in the Federal Register, and the report of the Secretary must be made available for public inspection and copy.


(f) Where either the Assistant Secretary or the Secretary denies a request for decertification and orders further remedial action, the Regional Administrator must continue to monitor the SWA’s compliance. If the SWA achieves compliance within the time established pursuant to paragraph (b) of this section, the Regional Administrator must terminate the remedial actions. If the SWA fails to achieve full compliance within that time period after the Secretary’s decision not to decertify, the Regional Administrator must submit a report of his/her findings to the Assistant Secretary who must reconsider the request for decertification pursuant to the requirements of paragraph (b) of this section.


§ 658.706 Notice of decertification.

If the Secretary decides to decertify a SWA, he/she must send a Notice of Decertification to the SWA stating the reasons for this action and providing a 10 business day period during which the SWA may request an administrative hearing in writing to the Secretary. The notice must be published promptly in the Federal Register.


§ 658.707 Requests for hearings.

(a) Any SWA which received a Notice of Decertification under § 658.706 or a notice of disallowance under § 658.702(g) may request a hearing on the issue by filing a written request for hearing with the Secretary within 10 business days of receipt of the notice. This request must state the reasons the SWA believes the basis of the decision to be wrong, and it must be signed by the State Administrator (electronic signatures may be accepted).


(b) When the Secretary receives a request for a hearing from a SWA, he/she must send copies of a file containing all materials and correspondence relevant to the case to the Assistant Secretary, the Regional Administrator, the Solicitor of Labor, and the Department of Labor Chief Administrative Law Judge. When the case involves violations of regulations governing services to MSFWs or the Complaint System, a copy must be sent to the NMA.


(c) The Secretary must publish notice of hearing in the Federal Register. This notice must invite all interested parties to attend and to present evidence at the hearing. All interested parties who make written request to participate must thereafter receive copies (hard copy and/or electronic) of all documents filed in said proceedings.


§ 658.708 Hearings.

(a) Upon receipt of a hearing file by the Chief Administrative Law Judge, the case must be docketed and notice sent by electronic mail, other means of electronic service, or registered mail, return receipt requested, to the Solicitor of Labor, Attention: Associate Solicitor for Employment and Training, the Administrator, the Regional Administrator and the State Administrator. The notice must set a time, place, and date for a hearing on the matter and must advise the parties that:


(1) They may be represented at the hearing;


(2) They may present oral and documentary evidence at the hearing;


(3) They may cross-examine opposing witnesses at the hearing; and


(4) They may request rescheduling of the hearing if the time, place, or date set are inconvenient.


(b) The Solicitor of Labor or the Solicitor’s designee will represent the Department at the hearing.


§ 658.709 Conduct of hearings.

(a) Proceedings under this section are governed by secs. 5 through 8 of the Administrative Procedure Act, 5 U.S.C. 553 et seq. and the rules of practice and procedure at subpart A of 29 CFR part 18, except as otherwise specified in this section.


(b) Technical rules of evidence do not apply, but rules or principles designed to assure production of the most credible evidence available and to subject testimony to test by cross-examination, must be applied if necessary by the ALJ conducting the hearing. The ALJ may exclude irrelevant, immaterial, or unduly repetitious evidence. All documents and other evidence offered or taken for the record must be open to examination by the parties. Opportunity must be given to refute facts and arguments advanced on either side of the issue. A transcript must be made of the oral evidence except to the extent the substance thereof is stipulated for the record.


(c) Discovery may be conducted as provided in the rules of practice and procedure at 29 CFR 18.50 through 18.65.


(d) When a public officer is a respondent in a hearing in an official capacity and during its pendency dies, resigns, or otherwise ceases to hold office, the proceeding does not abate and the officer’s successor is automatically substituted as a party. Proceedings following the substitution must be in the name of the substituted party, but any misnomer not affecting the substantive rights of the parties must be disregarded. An order of substitution may be entered at any time, but the omission to enter such an order may not affect the substitution.


§ 658.710 Decision of the Administrative Law Judge.

(a) The ALJ has jurisdiction to decide all issues of fact and related issues of law and to grant or deny appropriate motions, but does not have jurisdiction to decide upon the validity of Federal statutes or regulations.


(b) The decision of the ALJ must be based on the hearing record, must be in writing, and must state the factual and legal basis of the decision. The ALJ’s decision must be available for public inspection and copying.


(c) Except when the case involves the decertification of a SWA, the decision of the ALJ will be considered the final decision of the Secretary.


(d) If the case involves the decertification of an appeal to the SWA, the decision of the ALJ must contain a notice stating that, within 30 calendar days of the decision, the SWA or the Administrator may appeal to the Administrative Review Board, United States Department of Labor, by filing an appeal with the Administrative Review Board in accordance with 29 CFR part 26.


[81 FR 56352, Aug. 19, 2016, as amended at 86 FR 1778, Jan. 11, 2021]


§ 658.711 Decision of the Administrative Review Board.

(a) Upon the receipt of an appeal to the Administrative Review Board, United States Department of Labor, the ALJ must certify the record in the case to the Administrative Review Board, which must make a decision to decertify or not on the basis of the hearing record.


(b) The decision of the Administrative Review Board must be in writing, and must set forth the factual and legal basis for the decision. After the Board’s decision becomes final, notice of the decision must be published in the Federal Register, and copies must be made available for public inspection and copying.


[81 FR 56352, Aug. 19, 2016, as amended at 85 FR 13030, Mar. 6, 2020; 85 FR 30615, May 20, 2020]


PART 660 – INTRODUCTION TO THE REGULATIONS FOR WORKFORCE INVESTMENT SYSTEMS UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT


Authority:Sec. 506(c), Pub. L. 105-220; 20 U.S.C. 9276(c).


Source:65 FR 49388, Aug. 11, 2000, unless otherwise noted.

§ 660.100 What is the purpose of title I of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998?

The purpose of title I of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 (WIA) is to provide workforce investment activities that increase the employment, retention and earnings of participants, and increase occupational skill attainment by participants, which will improve the quality of the workforce, reduce welfare dependency, and enhance the productivity and competitiveness of the Nation’s economy. These goals are achieved through the workforce investment system. (WIA sec. 106.)


§ 660.200 What do the regulations for workforce investment systems under title I of the Workforce Investment Act cover?

The regulations found in 20 CFR parts 660 through 671 set forth the regulatory requirements that are applicable to programs operated with funds provided under title I of WIA. This part 660 describes the purpose of that Act, explains the format of these regulations and sets forth definitions for terms that apply to each part. Part 661 contains regulations relating to Statewide and local governance of the workforce investment system. Part 662 describes the One-Stop system and the roles of One-Stop partners. Part 663 sets forth requirements applicable to WIA title I programs serving adults and dislocated workers. Part 664 sets forth requirements applicable to WIA title I programs serving youth. Part 665 contains regulations relating to Statewide activities. Part 666 describes the WIA title I performance accountability system. Part 667 sets forth the administrative requirements applicable to programs funded under WIA title I. Parts 668 and 669 contain the particular requirements applicable to programs serving Indians and Native Americans and Migrant and Seasonal Farmworkers, respectively. Parts 670 and 671 describe the particular requirements applicable to the Job Corps and other national programs, respectively. In addition, part 652 describes the establishment and functioning of State Employment Services under the Wagner-Peyser Act, and 29 CFR part 37 contains the Department’s nondiscrimination regulations implementing WIA section 188.


§ 660.300 What definitions apply to the regulations for workforce investment systems under title I of WIA?

In addition to the definitions set forth at WIA section 101, the following definitions apply to the regulations in 20 CFR parts 660 through 671:


Department or DOL means the U.S. Department of Labor, including its agencies and organizational units.


Designated region means a combination of local areas that are partly or completely in a single labor market area, economic development region, or other appropriate contiguous subarea of a State, that is designated by the State under WIA section 116(c), or a similar interstate region that is designated by two or more States under WIA section 116(c)(4).


Employment and training activity means a workforce investment activity that is carried out for an adult or dislocated worker.


EO data means data on race and ethnicity, age, sex, and disability required by 29 CFR part 37 of the DOL regulations implementing section 188 of WIA, governing nondiscrimination.


ETA means the Employment and Training Administration of the U.S. Department of Labor.


Grant means an award of WIA financial assistance by the U.S. Department of Labor to an eligible WIA recipient.


Grantee means the direct recipient of grant funds from the Department of Labor. A grantee may also be referred to as a recipient.


Individual with a disability means an individual with any disability (as defined in section 3 of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12102)). For purposes of WIA section 188, this term is defined at 29 CFR 37.4.


Labor Federation means an alliance of two or more organized labor unions for the purpose of mutual support and action.


Literacy means an individual’s ability to read, write, and speak in English, and to compute, and solve problems, at levels of proficiency necessary to function on the job, in the family of the individual, and in society.


Local Board means a Local Workforce Investment Board established under WIA section 117, to set policy for the local workforce investment system.


Obligations means the amounts of orders placed, contracts and subgrants awarded, goods and services received, and similar transactions during a funding period that will require payment by the recipient or subrecipient during the same or a future period. For purposes of the reallotment process described at 20 CFR 667.150, the Secretary also treats as State obligations any amounts allocated by the State under WIA sections 128(b) and 133(b) to a single area State or to a balance of State local area administered by a unit of the State government, and inter-agency transfers and other actions treated by the State as encumbrances against amounts reserved by the State under WIA sections 128(a) and 133(a) for Statewide workforce investment activities.


Outlying area means the United States Virgin Islands, Guam, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, the Republic of the Marshall Islands, the Federated States of Micronesia, and the Republic of Palau.


Participant means an individual who has registered under 20 CFR 663.105 or 664.215 and has been determined to be eligible to participate in and who is receiving services (except for follow up services) under a program authorized by WIA title I. Participation commences on the first day, following determination of eligibility, on which the individual begins receiving core, intensive, training or other services provided under WIA title I.


Recipient means an entity to which a WIA grant is awarded directly from the Department of Labor to carry out a program under title I of WIA. The State is the recipient of funds awarded under WIA sections 127(b)(1)(C)(I)(II), 132(b)(1)(B) and 132(b)(2)(B). The recipient is the entire legal entity that received the award and is legally responsible for carrying out the WIA program, even if only a particular component of the entity is designated in the grant award document.


Register means the process for collecting information to determine an individual’s eligibility for services under WIA title I. Individuals may be registered in a variety ways, as described in 20 CFR 663.105 and 20 CFR 664.215.


Secretary means the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Labor.


Self certification means an individual’s signed attestation that the information he/she submits to demonstrate eligibility for a program under title I of WIA is true and accurate.


State means each of the several States of the United States, the District of Columbia and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico. The term “State” does not include outlying areas.


State Board means a State Workforce Investment Board established under WIA section 111.


Subgrant means an award of financial assistance in the form of money, or property in lieu of money made under a grant by a grantee to an eligible subrecipient. The term includes financial assistance when provided by contractual legal agreement, but does not include procurement purchases, nor does it include any form of assistance which is excluded from the definition of Grant in this part.


Subrecipient means an entity to which a subgrant is awarded and which is accountable to the recipient (or higher tier subrecipient) for the use of the funds provided. DOL’s audit requirements for States, local governments, and non-profit organizations provides guidance on distinguishing between a subrecipient and a vendor at 29 CFR 99.210.


Unobligated balance means the portion of funds authorized by the Federal agency that has not been obligated by the grantee and is determined by deducting the cumulative obligations from the cumulative funds authorized.


Vendor means an entity responsible for providing generally required goods or services to be used in the WIA program. These goods or services may be for the recipient’s or subrecipient’s own use or for the use of participants in the program. DOL’s audit requirements for States, local governments, and non-profit organizations provides guidance on distinguishing between a subrecipient and a vendor at 29 CFR 99.210.


Wagner-Peyser Act means the Act of June 6, 1933, as amended, codified at 29 U.S.C. 49 et seq.


WIA regulations mean the regulations in 20 CFR parts 660 through 671, the Wagner-Peyser Act regulations in 20 CFR part 652, subpart C, and the regulations implementing WIA section 188 in 29 CFR part 37.


Workforce investment activities mean the array of activities permitted under title I of WIA, which include employment and training activities for adults and dislocated workers, as described in WIA section 134, and youth activities, as described in WIA section 129.


Youth activity means a workforce investment activity that is carried out for youth.


PART 661 – STATEWIDE AND LOCAL GOVERNANCE OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT SYSTEM UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT


Authority:Sec. 506(c), Pub. L. 105-220; 20 U.S.C. 9276(c).


Source:65 FR 49390, Aug. 11, 2000, unless otherwise noted.

Subpart A – General Governance Provisions

§ 661.100 What is the workforce investment system?

Under title I of WIA, the workforce investment system provides the framework for delivery of workforce investment activities at the State and local levels to individuals who need those services, including job seekers, dislocated workers, youth, incumbent workers, new entrants to the workforce, veterans, persons with disabilities, and employers. Each State’s Governor is required, in accordance with the requirements of this part, to establish a State Board; to designate local workforce investment areas; and to oversee the creation of Local Boards and One-Stop service delivery systems in the State.


§ 661.110 What is the role of the Department of Labor as the Federal governmental partner in the governance of the workforce investment system?

(a) Successful governance of the workforce investment system will be achieved through cooperation and coordination of Federal, State and local governments.


(b) The Department of Labor sees as one of its primary roles providing leadership and guidance to support a system that meets the objectives of title I of WIA, and in which State and local partners have flexibility to design systems and deliver services in a manner designed to best achieve the goals of WIA based on their particular needs. The WIA regulations provide the framework in which State and local officials can exercise such flexibility within the confines of the statutory requirements. Wherever possible, system features such as design options and categories of services are broadly defined, and are subject to State and local interpretation.


(c) The Secretary, in consultation with other Federal Agencies, as appropriate, may publish guidance on interpretations of statutory and regulatory provisions. State and local policies, interpretations, guidelines and definitions that are consistent with interpretations contained in such guidance will be considered to be consistent with the Act for purposes of § 661.120.


§ 661.120 What are the roles of the local and State governmental partner in the governance of the workforce investment system?

(a) Local areas should establish policies, interpretations, guidelines and definitions to implement provisions of title I of WIA to the extent that such policies, interpretations, guidelines and definitions are not inconsistent with the Act and the regulations issued under the Act, Federal statutes and regulations governing One-Stop partner programs, and with State policies.


(b) States should establish policies, interpretations, guidelines and definitions to implement provisions of title I of WIA to the extent that such policies, interpretations, guidelines and definitions are not inconsistent with the Act and the regulations issued under the Act, as well as Federal statutes and regulations governing One-Stop partner programs.


Subpart B – State Governance Provisions

§ 661.200 What is the State Workforce Investment Board?

(a) The State Board is a board established by the Governor in accordance with the requirements of WIA section 111 and this section.


(b) The membership of the State Board must meet the requirements of WIA section 111(b). The State Board must contain two or more members representing the categories described in WIA section 111(b)(1)(C)(iii)-(v), and special consideration must be given to chief executive officers of community colleges and community based organizations in the selection of members representing the entities identified in WIA section 111(b)(1)(C)(v).


(c) The Governor may appoint any other representatives or agency officials, such as agency officials responsible for economic development, child support and juvenile justice programs in the State.


(d) Members who represent organizations, agencies or other entities must be individuals with optimum policy making authority within the entities they represent.


(e) A majority of members of the State Board must be representatives of business. Members who represent business must be individuals who are owners, chief executive officers, chief operating officers, or other individuals with optimum policy making or hiring authority, including members of Local Boards.


(f) The Governor must appoint the business representatives from among individuals who are nominated by State business organizations and business trade associations. The Governor must appoint the labor representatives from among individuals who are nominated by State labor federations.


(g) The Governor must select a chairperson of the State Board from the business representatives on the board.


(h) The Governor may establish terms of appointment or other conditions governing appointment or membership on the State Board.


(i) For the programs and activities carried out by One-Stop partners, as described in WIA section 121(b) and 20 CFR 662.200 and 662.210, the State Board must include:


(1) The lead State agency officials with responsibility for such program, or


(2) In any case in which no lead State agency official has responsibility for such a program service, a representative in the State with expertise relating to such program, service or activity.


(3) If the director of the designated State unit, as defined in section 7(8)(B) of the Rehabilitation Act, does not represent the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services program (VR program) on the State Board, then the State must describe in its State plan how the member of the State Board representing the VR program will effectively represent the interests, needs, and priorities of the VR program and how the employment needs of individuals with disabilities in the State will be addressed.


(j) An individual may be appointed as a representative of more than one entity if the individual meets all the criteria for representation, including the criteria described in paragraphs (d) through (f) of this section, for each entity. (WIA sec. 111)


§ 661.203 What is meant by the terms “optimum policy making authority” and “expertise relating to [a] program, service or activity”?

For purposes of selecting representatives to State and local workforce investment boards:


(a) A representative with “optimum policy making authority” is an individual who can reasonably be expected to speak affirmatively on behalf of the entity he or she represents and to commit that entity to a chosen course of action.


(b) A representative with “expertise relating to [a] program, service or activity” includes a person who is an official with a One-stop partner program and a person with documented expertise relating to the One-stop partner program.


§ 661.205 What is the role of the State Board?

The State Board must assist the Governor in the:


(a) Development of the State Plan;


(b) Development and continuous improvement of a Statewide system of activities that are funded under subtitle B of title I of WIA, or carried out through the One-Stop delivery system, including –


(1) Development of linkages in order to assure coordination and nonduplication among the programs and activities carried out by One-Stop partners, including, as necessary, addressing any impasse situations in the development of the local Memorandum of Understanding; and


(2) Review of local plans;


(c) Commenting at least once annually on the measures taken under section 113(b)(14) of the Carl D. Perkins Vocational and Technical Education Act;


(d) Designation of local workforce investment areas,


(e) Development of allocation formulas for the distribution of funds for adult employment and training activities and youth activities to local areas, as permitted under WIA sections 128(b)(3)(B) and 133(b)(3)(B);


(f) Development and continuous improvement of comprehensive State performance measures, including State adjusted levels of performance, to assess the effectiveness of the workforce investment activities in the State, as required under WIA section 136(b);


(g) Preparation of the annual report to the Secretary described in WIA section 136(d);


(h) Development of the Statewide employment statistics system described in section 15(e) of the Wagner-Peyser Act; and


(i) Development of an application for an incentive grant under WIA section 503. (WIA sec. 111(d).)


§ 661.207 How does the State Board meet its requirement to conduct business in an open manner under the “sunshine provision” of WIA section 111(g)?

The State Board must conduct its business in an open manner as required by WIA section 111(g), by making available to the public, on a regular basis through open meetings, information about the activities of the State Board. This includes information about the State Plan prior to submission of the plan; information about membership; the development of significant policies, interpretations, guidelines and definitions; and, on request, minutes of formal meetings of the State Board.


§ 661.210 Under what circumstances may the Governor select an alternative entity in place of the State Workforce Investment Board?

(a) The State may use any State entity that meets the requirements of WIA section 111(e) to perform the functions of the State Board.


(b) If the State uses an alternative entity, the State workforce investment plan must demonstrate that the alternative entity meets all three of the requirements of WIA section 111(e). Section 111(e) requires that such entity:


(1) Was in existence on December 31, 1997;


(2)(i) Was established under section 122 (relating to State Job Training Coordinating Councils) or title VII (relating to State Human Resource Investment Councils) of the Job Training Partnership Act (29 U.S.C.1501 et seq.), as in effect on December 31, 1997, or


(ii) Is substantially similar to the State Board described in WIA section 111(a), (b), and (c) and § 661.200; and


(3) Includes, at a minimum, two or more representatives of business in the State and two or more representatives of labor organizations in the State.


(c) If the alternative entity does not provide for representative membership of each of the categories of required State Board membership under WIA section 111(b), the State Plan must explain the manner in which the State will ensure an ongoing role for any unrepresented membership group in the workforce investment system. The State Board may maintain an ongoing role for an unrepresented membership group, including entities carrying out One-stop partner programs, by means such as regularly scheduled consultations with entities within the unrepresented membership groups, by providing an opportunity for input into the State Plan or other policy development by unrepresented membership groups, or by establishing an advisory committee of unrepresented membership groups.


(d) If the membership structure of the alternative entity is significantly changed after December 31, 1997, the entity will no longer be eligible to perform the functions of the State Board. In such case, the Governor must establish a new State Board which meets all of the criteria of WIA section 111(b).


(e) A significant change in the membership structure includes any significant change in the organization of the alternative entity or in the categories of entities represented on the alternative entity which requires a change to the alternative entity’s charter or a similar document that defines the formal organization of the alternative entity, regardless of whether the required change to the document has or has not been made. A significant change in the membership structure is considered to have occurred when members are added to represent groups not previously represented on the entity. A significant change in the membership structure is not considered to have occurred when additional members are added to an existing membership category, when non-voting members are added, or when a member is added to fill a vacancy created in an existing membership category.


(f) In 20 CFR parts 660 through 671, all references to the State Board also apply to an alternative entity used by a State.


§ 661.220 What are the requirements for the submission of the State Workforce Investment Plan?

(a) The Governor of each State must submit a State Workforce Investment Plan (State Plan) in order to be eligible to receive funding under title I of WIA and the Wagner-Peyser Act. The State Plan must outline the State’s five year strategy for the workforce investment system.


(b) The State Plan must be submitted in accordance with planning guidelines issued by the Secretary of Labor. The planning guidelines set forth the information necessary to document the State’s vision, goals, strategies, policies and measures for the workforce investment system (that were arrived at through the collaboration of the Governor, chief elected officials, business and other parties), as well as the information required to demonstrate compliance with WIA, and the information detailed by WIA and the WIA regulations, including 29 CFR part 37, and the Wagner-Peyser Act and the Wagner-Peyser regulations at 20 CFR part 652:


(c) The State Plan must contain a description of the State’s performance accountability system, and the State performance measures in accordance with the requirements of WIA section 136 and 20 CFR part 666.


(d) The State must provide an opportunity for public comment on and input into the development of the State Plan prior to its submission. The opportunity for public comment must include an opportunity for comment by representatives of business, representatives of labor organizations, and chief elected official(s) and must be consistent with the requirement, at WIA section 111(g), that the State Board makes information regarding the State Plan and other State Board activities available to the public through regular open meetings. The State Plan must describe the State’s process and timeline for ensuring a meaningful opportunity for public comment.


(e) The Secretary reviews completed plans and must approve all plans within ninety days of their submission, unless the Secretary determines in writing that:


(1) The plan is inconsistent with the provisions of title I of WIA or the WIA regulations, including 29 CFR part 37. For example, a finding of inconsistency would be made if the Secretary and the Governor have not reached agreement on the adjusted levels of performance under WIA section 136(b)(3)(A), or there is not an effective strategy in place to ensure development of a fully operational One-Stop delivery system in the State; or


(2) The portion of the plan describing the detailed Wagner-Peyser plan does not satisfy the criteria for approval of such plans as provided in section 8(d) of the Wagner-Peyser Act or the Wagner-Peyser regulations at 20 CFR part 652.


(3) A plan which is incomplete, or which does not contain sufficient information to determine whether it is consistent with the statutory or regulatory requirements of title I of WIA or of section 8(d) of the Wagner-Peyser Act, will be considered to be inconsistent with those requirements.


§ 661.230 What are the requirements for modification of the State Workforce Investment Plan?

(a) The State may submit a modification of its workforce investment plan at any time during the five-year life of the plan.


(b) Modifications are required when:


(1) Changes in Federal or State law or policy substantially change the assumptions upon which the plan is based.


(2) There are changes in the Statewide vision, strategies, policies, performance indicators, the methodology used to determine local allocation of funds, reorganizations which change the working relationship with system employees, changes in organizational responsibilities, changes to the membership structure of the State Board or alternative entity and similar substantial changes to the State’s workforce investment system.


(3) The State has failed to meet performance goals, and must adjust service strategies.


(c) Modifications are required in accordance with the Wagner-Peyser provisions at 20 CFR 652.212.


(d) Modifications to the State Plan are subject to the same public review and comment requirements that apply to the development of the original State Plan.


(e) State Plan modifications will be approved by the Secretary based on the approval standard applicable to the original State Plan under § 661.220(e).


§ 661.240 How do the unified planning requirements apply to the five-year strategic WIA and Wagner-Peyser plan and to other Department of Labor plans?

(a) A State may submit to the Secretary a unified plan for any of the programs or activities described in WIA section 501(b)(2). This includes the following DOL programs and activities:


(1) The five-year strategic WIA and Wagner-Peyser plan;


(2) Trade adjustment assistance activities and NAFTA-TAA;


(3) Veterans’ programs under 38 U.S.C. Chapter 41;


(4) Programs authorized under State unemployment compensation laws;


(5) [Reserved]


(6) Senior Community Service Employment Programs under title V of the Older Americans Act.


(b) For purposes of paragraph (a) of this section:


(1) A State may submit, as part of the unified plan, any plan, application form or any other similar document, that is required as a condition for the approval of Federal funding under the applicable program. These plans include such things as the WIA plan. They do not include jointly executed funding instruments, such as grant agreements, or Governor/Secretary Agreements or items such as corrective actions plans.


(2) A state may submit a unified plan meeting the requirements of the Interagency guidance entitled State Unified Plan, Planning Guidance for State Unified Plans Under Section 501 of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998, in lieu of completing the individual State planning guidelines of the programs covered by the unified plan.


(c) A State which submits a unified plan covering an activity or program described in subsection 501(b) of WIA that is approved under subsection 501(d) of the Act will not be required to submit any other plan or application in order to receive Federal funds to carry out the activity or program.


(d) Each portion of a unified plan submitted under paragraph (a) of this section is subject to the particular requirements of Federal law authorizing the program. All grantees are still subject to such things as reporting and record-keeping requirements, corrective action plan requirements and other generally applicable requirements.


(e) A unified plan must contain the information required by WIA section 501(c) and will be approved in accordance with the requirements of WIA section 501(d).


[65 FR 49390, Aug. 11, 2000, as amended at 71 FR 35525, June 21, 2006]


§ 661.250 What are the requirements for designation of local workforce investment areas?

(a) The Governor must designate local workforce investment areas in order for the State to receive funding under title I of WIA.


(b) The Governor must take into consideration the factors described in WIA section 116(a)(1)(B) in making designations of local areas. Such designation must be made in consultation with the State Board, and after consultation with chief elected officials. The Governor must also consider comments received through the public comment process described in the State workforce investment plan under § 661.220(d).


(c) The Governor may approve a request for designation as a workforce investment area from any unit of general local government, including a combination of such units, if the State Board determines that the area meets the requirements of WIA section 116(a)(1)(B) and recommends designation.


(d) The Governor of any State that was a single service delivery area State under the Job Training Partnership Act as of July 1, 1998, and only those States, may designate the State as a single local workforce investment area State. (WIA sec.116.)


§ 661.260 What are the requirements for automatic designation of workforce investment areas relating to units of local government with a population of 500,000 or more?

The requirements for automatic designation relating to units of local government with a population of 500,000 or more and to rural concentrated employment programs are contained in WIA section 116(a)(2). The Governor has authority to determine the source of population data to use in making these designations.


§ 661.270 What are the requirements for temporary and subsequent designation of workforce investment areas relating to areas that had been designated as service delivery areas under JTPA?

The requirements for temporary and subsequent designation relating to areas that had been designated as service delivery areas under JTPA are contained in WIA section 116(a)(3).


§ 661.280 What right does an entity have to appeal the Governor’s decision rejecting a request for designation as a workforce investment area?

(a) A unit of local government (or combination of units) or a rural concentrated employment program grant recipient (as described at WIA section 116(a)(2)(B), which has requested but has been denied its request for designation as a workforce investment area under §§ 661.260 through 661.270, may appeal the decision to the State Board, in accordance with appeal procedures established in the State Plan.


(b) If a decision on the appeal is not rendered in a timely manner or if the appeal to the State Board does not result in designation, the entity may request review by the Secretary of Labor, under the procedures set forth at 20 CFR 667.640(a).


(c) The Secretary may require that the area be designated as a workforce investment area, if the Secretary determines that:


(1) The entity was not accorded procedural rights under the State appeals process; or


(2) The area meets the automatic designation requirements at WIA section 116(a)(2) or the temporary and subsequent designation requirements at WIA section 116(a)(3), as appropriate.


§ 661.290 Under what circumstances may States require Local Boards to take part in regional planning activities?

(a) The State may require Local Boards within a designated region (as defined at 20 CFR 660.300) to:


(1) Participate in a regional planning process that results in regional performance measures for workforce investment activities under title I of WIA. Regions that meet or exceed the regional performance measures may receive regional incentive grants;


(2) Share, where feasible, employment and other types of information that will assist in improving the performance of all local areas in the designated region on local performance measures; and


(3) Coordinate the provision of WIA title I services, including supportive services such as transportation, across the boundaries of local areas within the designated region.


(b) Two or more States may designate a labor market area, economic development region, or other appropriate contiguous subarea of the States as an interstate region. In such cases, the States may jointly exercise the State’s functions described in this section.


(c) Designation of intrastate regions and interstate regions and their corresponding performance measures must be described in the respective State Plan(s). For interstate regions, the roles of the respective Governors, State Boards and Local Boards must be described in the respective State Plans.


(d) Unless agreed to by all affected chief elected officials and the Governor, these regional planning activities may not substitute for or replace the requirements applicable to each local area under other provisions of the WIA. (WIA sec. 116(a).)


Subpart C – Local Governance Provisions

§ 661.300 What is the Local Workforce Investment Board?

(a) The Local Workforce Investment Board (Local Board) is appointed by the chief elected official in each local area in accordance with State criteria established under WIA section 117(b), and is certified by the Governor every two years, in accordance with WIA section 117(c)(2).


(b) In partnership with the chief elected official(s), the Local Board sets policy for the portion of the Statewide workforce investment system within the local area.


(c) The Local Board and the chief elected official(s) may enter into an agreement that describes the respective roles and responsibilities of the parties.


(d) The Local Board, in partnership with the chief elected official, develops the local workforce investment plan and performs the functions described in WIA section 117(d). (WIA sec.117 (d).)


(e) If a local area includes more than one unit of general local government in accordance with WIA section 117 (c)(1)(B), the chief elected officials of such units may execute an agreement to describe their responsibilities for carrying out the roles and responsibilities. If, after a reasonable effort, the chief elected officials are unable to reach agreement, the Governor may appoint the members of the local board from individuals nominated or recommended as specified in WIA section 117(b).


(f) If the State Plan indicates that the State will be treated as a local area under WIA title I, the Governor may designate the State Board to carry out any of the roles of the Local Board.


§ 661.305 What is the role of the Local Workforce Investment Board?

(a) WIA section 117(d) specifies that the Local Board is responsible for:


(1) Developing the five-year local workforce investment plan (Local Plan) and conducting oversight of the One-Stop system, youth activities and employment and training activities under title I of WIA, in partnership with the chief elected official;


(2) Selecting One-Stop operators with the agreement of the chief elected official;


(3) Selecting eligible youth service providers based on the recommendations of the youth council, and identifying eligible providers of adult and dislocated worker intensive services and training services, and maintaining a list of eligible providers with performance and cost information, as required in 20 CFR part 663, subpart E;


(4) Developing a budget for the purpose of carrying out the duties of the Local Board, subject to the approval of the chief elected official;


(5) Negotiating and reaching agreement on local performance measures with the chief elected official and the Governor;


(6) Assisting the Governor in developing the Statewide employment statistics system under the Wagner-Peyser Act;


(7) Coordinating workforce investment activities with economic development strategies and developing employer linkages; and


(8) Promoting private sector involvement in the Statewide workforce investment system through effective connecting, brokering, and coaching activities through intermediaries such as the One-Stop operator in the local area or through other organizations, to assist employers in meeting hiring needs.


(b) The Local Board, in cooperation with the chief elected official, appoints a youth council as a subgroup of the Local Board and coordinates workforce and youth plans and activities with the youth council, in accordance with WIA section 117(h) and § 661.335.


(c) Local Boards which are part of a State designated region for regional planning must carry out the regional planning responsibilities required by the State in accordance with WIA section 116(c) and § 661.290. (WIA sec. 117.)


§ 661.307 How does the Local Board meet its requirement to conduct business in an open manner under the “sunshine provision” of WIA section 117(e)?

The Local Board must conduct its business in an open manner as required by WIA section 117(e), by making available to the public, on a regular basis through open meetings, information about the activities of the Local Board. This includes information about the Local Plan prior to submission of the plan; information about membership; the development of significant policies, interpretations, guidelines and definitions; and, on request, minutes of formal meetings of the Local Board.


§ 661.310 Under what limited conditions may a Local Board directly be a provider of core services, intensive services, or training services, or act as a One-Stop Operator?

(a) A Local Board may not directly provide core services, or intensive services, or be designated or certified as a One-Stop operator, unless agreed to by the chief elected official and the Governor.


(b) A Local Board is prohibited from providing training services, unless the Governor grants a waiver in accordance with the provisions in WIA section 117(f)(1). The waiver shall apply for not more than one year. The waiver may be renewed for additional periods, but for not more than one additional year at a time.


(c) The restrictions on the provision of core, intensive, and training services by the Local Board, and designation or certification as One-Stop operator, also apply to staff of the Local Board. (WIA sec. 117(f)(1) and (f)(2).)


§ 661.315 Who are the required members of the Local Workforce Investment Boards?

(a) The membership of Local Board must be selected in accordance with criteria established under WIA section 117(b)(1) and must meet the requirements of WIA section 117(b)(2). The Local Board must contain two or more members representing the categories described in WIA section 117(b)(2)(A)(ii)-(v), and special consideration must be given to the entities identified in WIA section 117(b)(2)(A)(ii), (iv) and (v) in the selection of members representing those categories. The Local Board must contain at least one member representing each One-Stop partner.


(b) The membership of Local Boards may include individuals or representatives of other appropriate entities, including entities representing individuals with multiple barriers to employment and other special populations, as determined by the chief elected official.


(c) Members who represent organizations, agencies or other entities must be individuals with optimum policy making authority within the entities they represent.


(d) A majority of the members of the Local Board must be representatives of business in the local area. Members representing business must be individuals who are owners, chief executive officers, chief operating officers, or other individuals with optimum policymaking or hiring authority. Business representatives serving on Local Boards may also serve on the State Board.


(e) Chief elected officials must appoint the business representatives from among individuals who are nominated by local business organizations and business trade associations. Chief elected officials must appoint the labor representatives from among individuals who are nominated by local labor federations (or, for a local area in which no employees are represented by such organizations, other representatives of employees). (WIA sec. 117(b).)


(f) An individual may be appointed as a representative of more than one entity if the individual meets all the criteria for representation, including the criteria described in paragraphs (c) through (e) of this section, for each entity.


§ 661.317 Who may be selected to represent a particular One-Stop partner program on the Local Board when there is more than one partner program entity in the local area?

When there is more than one grant recipient, administrative entity or organization responsible for administration of funds of a particular One-stop partner program in the local area, the chief elected official may appoint one or more members to represent all of those particular partner program entities. In making such appointments, the local elected official may solicit nominations from the partner program entities.


§ 661.320 Who must chair a Local Board?

The Local Board must elect a chairperson from among the business representatives on the board. (WIA sec. 117(b)(5).)


§ 661.325 What criteria will be used to establish the membership of the Local Board?

The Local Board is appointed by the chief elected official(s) in the local area in accordance with State criteria established under WIA section 117(b), and is certified by the Governor every two years, in accordance with WIA section 117(c)(2). The criteria for certification must be described in the State Plan. (WIA sec. 117(c).)


§ 661.330 Under what circumstances may the State use an alternative entity as the Local Workforce Investment Board?

(a) The State may use any local entity that meets the requirements of WIA section 117(i) to perform the functions of the Local Board. WIA section 117(i) requires that such entity:


(1) Was established to serve the local area (or the service delivery area that most closely corresponds to the local area);


(2) Was in existence on December 31, 1997;


(3)(i) Is a Private Industry Council established under section 102 of the Job Training Partnership Act, as in effect on December 31, 1997; or


(ii) Is substantially similar to the Local Board described in WIA section 117 (a), (b), and (c) and (h)(1) and (2); and,


(4) Includes, at a minimum, two or more representatives of business in the local area and two or more representatives of labor organizations nominated by local labor federations or employees in the local area.


(b)(1) If the Governor certifies an alternative entity to perform the functions of the Local Board; the State workforce investment plan must demonstrate that the alternative entity meets the requirements of WIA section 117(i), set forth in paragraph (a) of this section.


(2) If the alternative entity does not provide for representative membership of each of the categories of required Local Board membership under WIA section 117(b), including all of the One-stop partner programs, the local workforce investment plan must explain the manner in which the Local Board will ensure an ongoing role for the unrepresented membership group in the local workforce investment system.


(3) The Local Board may provide an ongoing role for an unrepresented membership group, including entities carrying out One-stop partner programs, by means such as regularly scheduled consultations with entities within the unrepresented membership groups, by providing an opportunity for input into the local plan or other policy development by unrepresented membership groups, or by establishing an advisory committee of unrepresented membership groups. The Local Board must enter into good faith negotiations over the terms of the MOU with all entities carrying out One-stop partner programs, including programs not represented on the alternative entity.


(c) If the membership structure of an alternative entity is significantly changed after December 31, 1997, the entity will no longer be eligible to perform the functions of the Local Board. In such case, the chief elected official(s) must establish a new Local Board which meets all of the criteria of WIA section 117(a), (b), and (c) and (h)(1) and (2).


(d) A significant change in the membership structure includes any significant change in the organization of the alternative entity or in the categories of entities represented on the alternative entity which requires a change to the alternative entity’s charter or a similar document that defines the formal organization of the alternative entity, regardless of whether the required change to the document has or has not been made. A significant change in the membership structure is considered to have occurred when members are added to represent groups not previously represented on the entity. A significant change in the membership structure is not considered to have occurred when additional members are added to an existing membership category, when non-voting members (including a Youth Council) are added, or when a member is added to fill a vacancy created in an existing membership category.


(e) In 20 CFR parts 660 through 671, all references to the Local Board must be deemed to also apply to an alternative entity used by a local area. (WIA sec. 117(i).)


§ 661.335 What is a youth council, and what is its relationship to the Local Board?

(a) A youth council must be established as a subgroup within each Local Board.


(b) The membership of each youth council must include:


(1) Members of the Local Board, such as educators, which may include special education personnel, employers, and representatives of human service agencies, who have special interest or expertise in youth policy;


(2) Members who represent service agencies, such as juvenile justice and local law enforcement agencies;


(3) Members who represent local public housing authorities;


(4) Parents of eligible youth seeking assistance under subtitle B of title I of WIA;


(5) Individuals, including former participants, and members who represent organizations, that have experience relating to youth activities; and


(6) Members who represent the Job Corps, if a Job Corps Center is located in the local area represented by the council.


(c) Youth councils may include other individuals, who the chair of the Local Board, in cooperation with the chief elected official, determines to be appropriate.


(d) Members of the youth council who are not members of the Local Board must be voting members of the youth council and nonvoting members of the Local Board.


§ 661.340 What are the responsibilities of the youth council?

The youth council is responsible for:


(a) Coordinating youth activities in a local area;


(b) Developing portions of the local plan related to eligible youth, as determined by the chairperson of the Local Board;


(c) Recommending eligible youth service providers in accordance with WIA section 123, subject to the approval of the Local Board;


(d) Conducting oversight with respect to eligible providers of youth activities in the local area, subject to the approval of the Local Board; and


(e) Carrying out other duties, as authorized by the chairperson of the Local Board, such as establishing linkages with educational agencies and other youth entities.


§ 661.345 What are the requirements for the submission of the local workforce investment plan?

(a) WIA section 118 requires that each Local Board, in partnership with the appropriate chief elected officials, develops and submits a comprehensive five-year plan to the Governor which identifies and describes certain policies, procedures and local activities that are carried out in the local area, and that is consistent with the State Plan.


(b) The Local Board must provide an opportunity for public comment on and input into the development of the local workforce investment plan prior to its submission, and the opportunity for public comment on the local plan must:


(1) Make copies of the proposed local plan available to the public (through such means as public hearings and local news media);


(2) Include an opportunity for comment by members of the Local Board and members of the public, including representatives of business and labor organizations;


(3) Provide at least a thirty (30) day period for comment, beginning on the date on which the proposed plan is made available, prior to its submission to the Governor; and


(4) Be consistent with the requirement, in WIA section 117(e), that the Local Board make information about the plan available to the public on a regular basis through open meetings.


(c) The Local Board must submit any comments that express disagreement with the plan to the Governor along with the plan.


§ 661.350 What are the contents of the local workforce investment plan?

(a) The local workforce investment plan must meet the requirements of WIA section 118(b). The plan must include:


(1) An identification of the workforce investment needs of businesses, job-seekers, and workers in the local area;


(2) An identification of current and projected employment opportunities and job skills necessary to obtain such opportunities;


(3) A description of the One-Stop delivery system to be established or designated in the local area, including:


(i) How the Local Board will ensure continuous improvement of eligible providers of services and ensure that such providers meet the employment needs of local employers and participants; and


(ii) A copy of the local Memorandum(s) of Understanding between the Local Board and each of the One-Stop partners concerning the operation of the local One-Stop delivery system;


(4) A description of the local levels of performance negotiated with the Governor and the chief elected official(s) to be used by the Local Board for measuring the performance of the local fiscal agent (where appropriate), eligible providers, and the local One-Stop delivery system;


(5) A description and assessment of the type and availability of adult and dislocated worker employment and training activities in the local area, including a description of the local ITA system and the procedures for ensuring that exceptions to the use of ITA’s, if any, are justified under WIA section 134(d)(4)(G)(ii) and 20 CFR 663.430;


(6) A description of how the Local Board will coordinate local activities with Statewide rapid response activities;


(7) A description and assessment of the type and availability of youth activities in the local area, including an identification of successful providers of such activities;


(8) A description of the process used by the Local Board to provide opportunity for public comment, including comment by representatives of business and labor organizations, and input into the development of the local plan, prior to the submission of the plan;


(9) An identification of the fiscal agent, or entity responsible for the disbursal of grant funds;


(10) A description of the competitive process to be used to award grants and contracts for activities carried out under this subtitle I of WIA, including the process to be used to procure training services that are made as exceptions to the Individual Training Account process (WIA section 134(d)(4)(G)),


(11) A description of the criteria to be used by the Governor and the Local Board, under 20 CFR 663.600, to determine whether funds allocated to a local area for adult employment and training activities under WIA sections 133(b)(2)(A) or (3) are limited, and the process by which any priority will be applied by the One-Stop operator;


(12) In cases where an alternate entity functions as the Local Board, the information required at § 661.330(b), and


(13) Such other information as the Governor may require.


(b) The Governor must review completed plans and must approve all such plans within ninety days of their submission, unless the Governor determines in writing that:


(1) There are deficiencies identified in local workforce investment activities carried out under this subtitle that have not been sufficiently addressed; or


(2) The plan does not comply with title I of WIA and the WIA regulations, including the required consultations, the public comment provisions, and the nondiscrimination requirements of 29 CFR part 37.


(c) In cases where the State is a single local area:


(1) The Secretary performs the roles assigned to the Governor as they relate to local planning activities.


(2) The Secretary issues planning guidance for such States.


(3) The requirements found in WIA and in the WIA regulations for consultation with chief elected officials apply to the development of State and local plans and to the development and operation of the One-Stop delivery system.


(d) During program year 2000, if a local plan does not contain all of the elements described in paragraph (a) of this section, the Governor may approve a local plan on a transitional basis. A transitional approval under this paragraph is considered to be a written determination that the local plan is not approved under paragraph (b) of this section.


§ 661.355 When must a local plan be modified?

The Governor must establish procedures governing the modification of local plans. Situations in which modifications may be required by the Governor include significant changes in local economic conditions, changes in the financing available to support WIA title I and partner-provided WIA services, changes to the Local Board structure, or a need to revise strategies to meet performance goals.


Subpart D – Waivers and Work-Flex Waivers

§ 661.400 What is the purpose of the General Statutory and Regulatory Waiver Authority provided at section 189(i)(4) of the Workforce Investment Act?

(a) The purpose of the general statutory and regulatory waiver authority is to provide flexibility to States and local areas and enhance their ability to improve the statewide workforce investment system.


(b) A waiver may be requested to address impediments to the implementation of a strategic plan, including the continuous improvement strategy, consistent with the key reform principles of WIA. These key reform principles include:


(1) Streamlining services and information to participants through a One-Stop delivery system;


(2) Empowering individuals to obtain needed services and information to enhance their employment opportunities;


(3) Ensuring universal access to core employment-related services;


(4) Increasing accountability of States, localities and training providers for performance outcomes;


(5) Establishing a stronger role for Local Boards and the private sector;


(6) Providing increased State and local flexibility to implement innovative and comprehensive workforce investment systems; and


(7) Improving youth programs through services which emphasize academic and occupational learning.


§ 661.410 What provisions of WIA and the Wagner-Peyser Act may be waived, and what provisions may not be waived?

(a) The Secretary may waive any of the statutory or regulatory requirements of subtitles B and E of title I of WIA, except for requirements relating to:


(1) Wage and labor standards;


(2) Non-displacement protections;


(3) Worker rights;


(4) Participation and protection of workers and participants;


(5) Grievance procedures and judicial review;


(6) Nondiscrimination;


(7) Allocation of funds to local areas;


(8) Eligibility of providers or participants;


(9) The establishment and functions of local areas and local boards;


(10) Procedures for review and approval of State and Local plans; and


(b) The Secretary may waive any of the statutory or regulatory requirements of sections 8 through 10 of the Wagner-Peyser Act (29 U.S.C. 49g-49i) except for requirements relating to:


(1) The provision of services to unemployment insurance claimants and veterans; and


(2) Universal access to the basic labor exchange services without cost to job seekers.


(c) The Secretary does not intend to waive any of the statutory or regulatory provisions essential to the key reform principles embodied in the Workforce Investment Act, described in § 661.400, except in extremely unusual circumstances where the provision can be demonstrated as impeding reform. (WIA sec. 189(i).)


§ 661.420 Under what conditions may a Governor request, and the Secretary approve, a general waiver of statutory or regulatory requirements under WIA section 189(i)(4)?

(a) A Governor may request a general waiver in consultation with appropriate chief elected officials:


(1) By submitting a waiver plan which may accompany the State’s WIA 5-year strategic Plan; or


(2) After a State’s WIA Plan is approved, by directly submitting a waiver plan.


(b) A Governor’s waiver request may seek waivers for the entire State or for one or more local areas.


(c) A Governor requesting a general waiver must submit to the Secretary a plan to improve the Statewide workforce investment system that:


(1) Identifies the statutory or regulatory requirements for which a waiver is requested and the goals that the State or local area, as appropriate, intends to achieve as a result of the waiver and how those goals relate to the Strategic Plan goals;


(2) Describes the actions that the State or local area, as appropriate, has undertaken to remove State or local statutory or regulatory barriers;


(3) Describes the goals of the waiver and the expected programmatic outcomes if the request is granted;


(4) Describes the individuals affected by the waiver; and


(5) Describes the processes used to:


(i) Monitor the progress in implementing the waiver;


(ii) Provide notice to any Local Board affected by the waiver;


(iii) Provide any Local Board affected by the waiver an opportunity to comment on the request; and


(iv) Ensure meaningful public comment, including comment by business and organized labor, on the waiver.


(d) The Secretary issues a decision on a waiver request within 90 days after the receipt of the original waiver request.


(e) The Secretary will approve a waiver request if and only to the extent that:


(1) The Secretary determines that the requirements for which a waiver is requested impede the ability of either the State or local area to implement the State’s plan to improve the Statewide workforce investment system;


(2) The Secretary determines that the waiver plan meets all of the requirements of WIA section 189(i)(4) and §§ 661.400 through 661.420; and


(3) The State has executed a Memorandum of Understanding with the Secretary requiring the State to meet, or ensure that the local area meets, agreed-upon outcomes and to implement other appropriate measures to ensure accountability.


(f) The Secretary will issue guidelines under which the States may request general waivers of WIA and Wagner-Peyser requirements. (WIA sec. 189(i).)


§ 661.430 Under what conditions may the Governor submit a Workforce Flexibility Plan?

(a) A State may submit to the Secretary, and the Secretary may approve, a workforce flexibility (work-flex) plan under which the State is authorized to waive, in accordance with the plan:


(1) Any of the statutory or regulatory requirements under title I of WIA applicable to local areas, if the local area requests the waiver in a waiver application, except for:


(i) Requirements relating to the basic purposes of title I of WIA;


(ii) Wage and labor standards;


(iii) Grievance procedures and judicial review;


(iv) Nondiscrimination;


(v) Eligibility of participants;


(vi) Allocation of funds to local areas;


(vii) Establishment and functions of local areas and local boards;


(viii) Review and approval of local plans;


(ix) Worker rights, participation, and protection; and


(x) Any of the statutory provisions essential to the key reform principles embodied in the Workforce Investment Act, described in § 661.400.


(2) Any of the statutory or regulatory requirements applicable to the State under section 8 through 10 of the Wagner-Peyser Act (29 U.S.C. 49g-49i), except for requirements relating to:


(i) The provision of services to unemployment insurance claimants and veterans; and


(ii) Universal access to basic labor exchange services without cost to job seekers; and


(3) Any of the statutory or regulatory requirements under the Older Americans Act of 1965 (OAA) (42 U.S.C. 3001 et seq.), applicable to State agencies on aging with respect to activities carried out using funds allotted under OAA section 506(a)(3) (42 U.S.C. 3056d(a)(3)), except for requirements relating to:


(i) The basic purposes of OAA;


(ii) Wage and labor standards;


(iii) Eligibility of participants in the activities; and


(iv) Standards for agreements.


(b) A State’s workforce flexibility plan may accompany the State’s five-year Strategic Plan or may be submitted separately. If it is submitted separately, the workforce flexibility plan must identify related provisions in the State’s five-year Strategic Plan.


(c) A workforce flexibility plan submitted under paragraph (a) of this section must include descriptions of:


(1) The process by which local areas in the State may submit and obtain State approval of applications for waivers;


(2) The statutory and regulatory requirements of title I of WIA that are likely to be waived by the State under the workforce flexibility plan;


(3) The statutory and regulatory requirements of sections 8 through 10 of the Wagner-Peyser Act that are proposed for waiver, if any;


(4) The statutory and regulatory requirements of the Older Americans Act of 1965 that are proposed for waiver, if any;


(5) The outcomes to be achieved by the waivers described in paragraphs (c)(1) to (4) of this section including, where appropriate, revisions to adjusted levels of performance included in the State or local plan under title I of WIA; and


(6) The measures to be taken to ensure appropriate accountability for Federal funds in connection with the waivers.


(d) The Secretary may approve a workforce flexibility plan for a period of up to five years.


(e) Before submitting a workforce flexibility plan to the Secretary for approval, the State must provide adequate notice and a reasonable opportunity for comment on the proposed waiver requests under the workforce flexibility plan to all interested parties and to the general public.


(f) The Secretary will issue guidelines under which States may request designation as a work-flex State.


§ 661.440 What limitations apply to the State’s Workforce Flexibility Plan authority under WIA?

(a)(1) Under work-flex waiver authority a State must not waive the WIA, Wagner-Peyser or Older Americans Act requirements which are excepted from the work-flex waiver authority and described in § 661.430(a).


(2) Requests to waive statutory and regulatory requirements of title I of WIA applicable at the State level may not be granted under work-flex waiver authority granted to a State. Such requests may only be granted by the Secretary under the general waiver authority described at §§ 661.410 through 661.420.


(b) As required in § 661.430(c)(5), States must address the outcomes to result from work-flex waivers as part of its workforce flexibility plan. Once approved, a State’s work-flex designation is conditioned on the State demonstrating it has met the agreed-upon outcomes contained in its workforce flexibility plan.


PART 662 – DESCRIPTION OF THE ONE-STOP SYSTEM UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT


Authority:Sec. 506(c), Pub. L. 105-220; 20 U.S.C. 9276(c).


Source:65 FR 49398, Aug. 11, 2000, unless otherwise noted.

Subpart A – General Description of the One-Stop Delivery System

§ 662.100 What is the One-Stop delivery system?

(a) In general, the One-Stop delivery system is a system under which entities responsible for administering separate workforce investment, educational, and other human resource programs and funding streams (referred to as One-Stop partners) collaborate to create a seamless system of service delivery that will enhance access to the programs’ services and improve long-term employment outcomes for individuals receiving assistance.


(b) Title I of WIA assigns responsibilities at the local, State and Federal level to ensure the creation and maintenance of a One-Stop delivery system that enhances the range and quality of workforce development services that are accessible to individuals seeking assistance.


(c) The system must include at least one comprehensive physical center in each local area that must provide the core services specified in WIA section 134(d)(2), and must provide access to other programs and activities carried out by the One-Stop partners.


(d) While each local area must have at least one comprehensive center (and may have additional comprehensive centers), WIA section 134(c) allows for arrangements to supplement the center. These arrangements may include:


(1) A network of affiliated sites that can provide one or more partners’ programs, services and activities at each site;


(2) A network of One-Stop partners through which each partner provides services that are linked, physically or technologically, to an affiliated site that assures individuals are provided information on the availability of core services in the local area; and


(3) Specialized centers that address specific needs, such as those of dislocated workers.


(e) The design of the local area’s One-Stop delivery system, including the number of comprehensive centers and the supplementary arrangements, must be described in the local plan and be consistent with the Memorandum of Understanding executed with the One-Stop partners.


Subpart B – One-Stop Partners and the Responsibilities of Partners

§ 662.200 Who are the required One-Stop partners?

(a) WIA section 121(b)(1) identifies the entities that are required partners in the local One-Stop systems.


(b) The required partners are the entities that are responsible for administering the following programs and activities in the local area:


(1) Programs authorized under title I of WIA, serving:


(i) Adults;


(ii) Dislocated workers;


(iii) Youth;


(iv) Job Corps;


(v) Native American programs;


(vi) Migrant and seasonal farmworker programs; and


(vii) Veterans’ workforce programs; (WIA sec. 121(b)(1)(B)(i));


(2) Programs authorized under the Wagner-Peyser Act (29 U.S.C. 49 et seq.); (WIA sec. 121(b)(1)(B)(ii));


(3) Adult education and literacy activities authorized under title II of WIA; (WIA sec. 121(b)(1)(B)(iii));


(4) Programs authorized under parts A and B of title I of the Rehabilitation Act (29 U.S.C. 720 et seq.); (WIA sec. 121(b)(1)(B)(iv));


(5) [Reserved]


(6) Senior community service employment activities authorized under title V of the Older Americans Act of 1965 (42 U.S.C. 3056 et seq.); (WIA sec. 121(b)(1)(B)(vi));


(7) Postsecondary vocational education activities under the Carl D. Perkins Vocational and Applied Technology Education Act (20 U.S.C. 2301 et seq.); (WIA sec. 121(b)(1)(B)(vii));


(8) Trade Adjustment Assistance and NAFTA Transitional Adjustment Assistance activities authorized under chapter 2 of title II of the Trade Act of 1974, as amended (19 U.S.C. 2271 et seq.) and Section 123(c)(2) of the Trade Adjustment Assistance Reform Act of 2002 (Pub. L. 107-210), respectively; see (WIA sec. 121(b)(1)(B)(viii));


(9) Activities authorized under chapter 41 of title 38, U.S.C. (local veterans’ employment representatives and disabled veterans outreach programs); (WIA sec. 121(b)(1)(B)(ix));


(10) Employment and training activities carried out under the Community Services Block Grant (42 U.S.C. 9901 et seq.); (WIA sec. 121(b)(1)(B)(x));


(11) Employment and training activities carried out by the Department of Housing and Urban Development; (WIA sec. 121(b)(1)(B)(xi)); and


(12) Programs authorized under State unemployment compensation laws (in accordance with applicable Federal law); (WIA sec. 121(b)(1)(B)(xii).)


[65 FR 49398, Aug. 11, 2000, as amended at 71 FR 35523, June 21, 2006]


§ 662.210 What other entities may serve as One-Stop partners?

(a) WIA provides that other entities that carry out a human resource program, including Federal, State, or local programs and programs in the private sector may serve as additional partners in the One-Stop system if the Local Board and chief elected official(s) approve the entity’s participation.


(b) Additional partners may include:


(1) TANF programs authorized under part A of title IV of the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. 601 et seq.);


(2) Employment and training programs authorized under section 6(d)(4) of the Food Stamp Act of 1977 (7 U.S.C. 2015(d)(4));


(3) Work programs authorized under section 6(o) of the Food Stamp Act of 1977 (7 U.S.C. 2015(o));


(4) Programs authorized under the National and Community Service Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12501 et seq.); and


(5) Other appropriate Federal, State or local programs, including programs related to transportation and housing and programs in the private sector. (WIA sec. 121(b)(2).)


(c) The State may require that one or more of the programs identified in paragraph (b) of this section be included as a partner in all of the local One-Stop delivery systems in the State.


§ 662.220 What entity serves as the One-Stop partner for a particular program in the local area?

(a) The “entity” that carries out the program and activities listed in §§ 662.200 and 662.210 and, therefore, serves as the One-Stop partner is the grant recipient, administrative entity or organization responsible for administering the funds of the specified program in the local area. The term “entity” does not include the service providers that contract with or are subrecipients of the local administrative entity. For programs that do not include local administrative entities, the responsible State Agency should be the partner. Specific entities for particular programs are identified in paragraph (b) of this section. If a program or activity listed in § 662.200 is not carried out in a local area, the requirements relating to a required One-Stop partner are not applicable to such program or activity in that local One-Stop system.


(b)(1) For title II of WIA, the entity that carries out the program for the purposes of paragraph (a) is the State eligible entity. The State eligible entity may designate an eligible provider, or a consortium of eligible providers, as the “entity” for this purpose;


(2) For title I, Part A, of the Rehabilitation Act, the entity that carries out the program for the purposes of paragraph (a) of this section is the designated State agency or designated unit specified under section 101(a)(2) that is primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation, or vocational and other rehabilitation, of individuals with disabilities; and


(3) Under WIA, the national programs, including Job Corps, the WIA Indian and Native American program, the Migrant and Seasonal Farmworkers program, and the Veterans’ Workforce Investment program, are required One-Stop partners. Local Boards must include them in the One-Stop delivery system where they are present in their local area. In local areas where the national programs are not present, States and Local Boards should take steps to ensure that customer groups served by these programs have access to services through the One-Stop delivery system.


§ 662.230 What are the responsibilities of the required One-Stop partners?

All required partners must:


(a) Make available to participants through the One-Stop delivery system the core services that are applicable to the partner’s programs; (WIA sec. 121(b)(1)(A).)


(b) Use a portion of funds made available to the partner’s program, to the extent not inconsistent with the Federal law authorizing the partner’s program, to:


(1) Create and maintain the One-Stop delivery system; and


(2) Provide core services; (WIA sec. 134(d)(1)(B).)


(c) Enter into a memorandum of understanding (MOU) with the Local Board relating to the operation of the One-Stop system that meets the requirements of § 662.300, including a description of services, how the cost of the identified services and operating costs of the system will be funded, and methods for referrals (WIA sec. 121(c));


(d) Participate in the operation of the One-Stop system consistent with the terms of the MOU and requirements of authorizing laws; (WIA sec. 121(b)(1)(B).) and


(e) Provide representation on the Local Workforce Investment Board. (WIA sec. 117(b)(2)(A)(vi).)


§ 662.240 What are a program’s applicable core services?

(a) The core services applicable to any One-Stop partner program are those services described in paragraph (b) of this section, that are authorized and provided under the partner’s program.


(b) The core services identified in section 134(d)(2) of the WIA are:


(1) Determinations of whether the individuals are eligible to receive assistance under subtitle B of title I of WIA;


(2) Outreach, intake (which may include worker profiling), and orientation to the information and other services available through the One-Stop delivery system;


(3) Initial assessment of skill levels, aptitudes, abilities, and supportive service needs;


(4) Job search and placement assistance, and where appropriate, career counseling;


(5) Provision of employment statistics information, including the provision of accurate information relating to local, regional, and national labor market areas, including –


(i) Job vacancy listings in such labor market areas;


(ii) Information on job skills necessary to obtain the listed jobs; and


(iii) Information relating to local occupations in demand and the earnings and skill requirements for such occupations;


(6) Provision of program performance information and program cost information on:


(i) Eligible providers of training services described in WIA section 122;


(ii) Eligible providers of youth activities described in WIA section 123;


(iii) Providers of adult education described in title II;


(iv) Providers of postsecondary vocational education activities and vocational education activities available to school dropouts under the Carl D. Perkins Vocational and Applied Technology Education Act (20 U.S.C. 2301 et seq.); and


(v) Providers of vocational rehabilitation program activities described in title I of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (29 U.S.C. 720 et seq.);


(7) Provision of information on how the local area is performing on the local performance measures and any additional performance information with respect to the One-Stop delivery system in the local area;


(8) Provision of accurate information relating to the availability of supportive services, including, at a minimum, child care and transportation, available in the local area, and referral to such services, as appropriate;


(9) Provision of information regarding filing claims for unemployment compensation;


(10) Assistance in establishing eligibility for programs of financial aid assistance for training and education programs that are not funded under this Act and are available in the local area; and


(11) Followup services, including counseling regarding the workplace, for participants in workforce investment activities authorized under subtitle (B) of title I of WIA who are placed in unsubsidized employment, for not less than 12 months after the first day of the employment, as appropriate.


[65 FR 49398, Aug. 11, 2000, as amended at 71 FR 35523, June 21, 2006]


§ 662.250 Where and to what extent must required One-Stop partners make core services available?

(a) At a minimum, the core services that are applicable to the program of the partner under § 662.220, and that are in addition to the basic labor exchange services traditionally provided in the local area under the Wagner-Peyser program, must be made available at the comprehensive One-Stop center. These services must be made available to individuals attributable to the partner’s program who seek assistance at the center. The adult and dislocated worker program partners are required to make all of the core services listed in § 662.240 available at the center in accordance with 20 CFR 663.100(b)(1).


(b) The applicable core services may be made available by the provision of appropriate technology at the comprehensive One-Stop center, by co-locating personnel at the center, cross-training of staff, or through a cost reimbursement or other agreement between service providers at the comprehensive One-Stop center and the partner, as described in the MOU.


(c) The responsibility of the partner for the provision of core services must be proportionate to the use of the services at the comprehensive One-Stop center by the individuals attributable to the partner’s program. The specific method of determining each partner’s proportionate responsibility must be described in the MOU.


(d) For purposes of this part, individuals attributable to the partner’s program may include individuals who are referred through the comprehensive One-Stop center and enrolled in the partner’s program after the receipt of core services, who have been enrolled in the partner’s program prior to receipt of the applicable core services at the center, who meet the eligibility criteria for the partner’s program and who receive an applicable core service, or who meet an alternative definition described in the MOU.


(e) Under the MOU, the provision of applicable core services at the center by the One-Stop partner may be supplemented by the provision of such services through the networks of affiliated sites and networks of One-Stop partners described in WIA section 134(c)(2).


§ 662.260 What services, in addition to the applicable core services, are to be provided by One-Stop partners through the One-Stop delivery system?

In addition to the provision of core services, One-Stop partners must provide access to the other activities and programs carried out under the partner’s authorizing laws. The access to these services must be described in the local MOU. 20 CFR part 663 describes the specific requirements relating to the provision of core, intensive, and training services through the One-Stop system that apply to the adult and the dislocated worker programs authorized under title I of WIA. Additional requirements apply to the provision of all labor exchange services under the Wagner-Peyser Act. (WIA sec. 134(c)(1)(D).)


§ 662.270 How are the costs of providing services through the One-Stop delivery system and the operating costs of the system to be funded?

The MOU must describe the particular funding arrangements for services and operating costs of the One-Stop delivery system. Each partner must contribute a fair share of the operating costs of the One-Stop delivery system proportionate to the use of the system by individuals attributable to the partner’s program. There are a number of methods, consistent with the equirements of the relevant OMB circulars, that may be used for allocating costs among the partners. Some of these methodologies include allocations based on direct charges, cost pooling, indirect cost rates and activity-based cost allocation plans. Additional guidance relating to cost allocation methods may be issued by the Department in consultation with the other appropriate Federal agencies.


§ 662.280 Does title I require One-Stop partners to use their funds for individuals who are not eligible for the partner’s program or for services that are not authorized under the partner’s program?

No, the requirements of the partner’s program continue to apply. The Act intends to create a seamless service delivery system for individuals seeking workforce development services by linking the One-Stop partners in the One-Stop delivery system. While the overall effect is to provide universal access to core services, the resources of each partner may only be used to provide services that are authorized and provided under the partner’s program to individuals who are eligible under such program. (WIA sec. 121(b)(1).)


Subpart C – Memorandum of Understanding for the One-Stop Delivery System

§ 662.300 What is the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU)?

(a) The Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) is an agreement developed and executed between the Local Board, with the agreement of the chief elected official, and the One-Stop partners relating to the operation of the One-Stop delivery system in the local area.


(b) The MOU must contain the provisions required by WIA section 121(c)(2). These provisions cover services to be provided through the One-Stop delivery system; the funding of the services and operating costs of the system; and methods for referring individuals between the One-Stop operators and partners. The MOU’s provisions also must determine the duration and procedures for amending the MOU, and may contain any other provisions that are consistent with WIA title I and the WIA regulations agreed to by the parties. (WIA sec. 121(c).)


§ 662.310 Is there a single MOU for the local area or are there to be separate MOU’s between the Local Board and each partner?

(a) A single “umbrella” MOU may be developed that addresses the issues relating to the local One-Stop delivery system for the Local Board, chief elected official and all partners, or the Local Board, chief elected official and the partners may decide to enter into separate agreements between the Local Board (with the agreement of the chief elected official) and one or more partners. Under either approach, the requirements described in this subpart apply. Since funds are generally appropriated annually, financial agreements may be negotiated with each partner annually to clarify funding of services and operating costs of the system under the MOU.


(b) WIA emphasizes full and effective partnerships between Local Boards, chief elected officials and One-Stop partners. Local Boards and partners must enter into good-faith negotiations. Local Boards, chief elected officials and partners may request assistance from a State agency responsible for administering the partner program, the Governor, State Board, or other appropriate parties. The State agencies, the State Board, and the Governor may also consult with the appropriate Federal agencies to address impasse situations after exhausting other alternatives. The Local Board and partners must document the negotiations and efforts that have taken place. Any failure to execute an MOU between a Local Board and a required partner must be reported by the Local Board and the required partner to the Governor or State Board, and the State agency responsible for administering the partner’s program, and by the Governor or the State Board and the responsible State agency to the Secretary of Labor and to the head of any other Federal agency with responsibility for oversight of a partner’s program. (WIA sec. 121(c).)


(c) If an impasse has not been resolved through the alternatives available under this section any partner that fails to execute an MOU may not be permitted to serve on the Local Board. In addition, any local area in which a Local Board has failed to execute an MOU with all of the required partners is not eligible for State incentive grants awarded on the basis of local coordination of activities under 20 CFR 665.200(d)(2). These sanctions are in addition to, not in lieu of, any other remedies that may be applicable to the Local Board or to each partner for failure to comply with the statutory requirement.


Subpart D – One-Stop Operators

§ 662.400 Who is the One-Stop operator?

(a) The One-Stop operator is the entity that performs the role described in paragraph (c) of this section. The types of entities that may be selected to be the One-Stop operator include:


(1) A postsecondary educational institution;


(2) An Employment Service agency established under the Wagner-Peyser Act on behalf of the local office of the agency;


(3) A private, nonprofit organization (including a community-based organization);


(4) A private for-profit entity;


(5) A government agency; and


(6) Another interested organization or entity.


(b) One-Stop operators may be a single entity or a consortium of entities and may operate one or more One-Stop centers. In addition, there may be more than one One-Stop operator in a local area.


(c) The agreement between the Local Board and the One-Stop operator shall specify the operator’s role. That role may range between simply coordinating service providers within the center, to being the primary provider of services within the center, to coordinating activities throughout the One-Stop system. (WIA sec. 121(d).)


§ 662.410 How is the One-Stop operator selected?

(a) The Local Board, with the agreement of the chief elected official, must designate and certify One-Stop operators in each local area.


(b) The One-Stop operator is designated or certified:


(1) Through a competitive process,


(2) Under an agreement between the Local Board and a consortium of entities that includes at least three or more of the required One-Stop partners.identified at § 662.200, or


(3) Under the conditions described in §§ 662.420 or 662.430. (WIA sec.121(d), 121(e) and 117(f)(2))


(c) The designation or certification of the One-Stop operator must be carried out in accordance with the “sunshine provision” at 20 CFR 661.307.


§ 662.420 Under what limited conditions may the Local Board be designated or certified as the One-Stop operator?

(a) The Local Board may be designated or certified as the One-Stop operator only with the agreement of the chief elected official and the Governor.


(b) The designation or certification must be reviewed whenever the biennial certification of the Local Board is made under 20 CFR 663.300(a). (WIA sec. 117(f)(2).)


§ 662.430 Under what conditions may One-Stop operators designated to operate in a One-Stop delivery system established prior to the enactment of WIA be designated to continue as a One-Stop operator under WIA without meeting the requirements of § 662.410(b)?

Under WIA section 121(e), the Local Board, the chief elected official and the Governor may agree to certify an entity that has been serving as a One-Stop operator in a One-Stop delivery system established prior to the enactment of WIA (August 7, 1998) to continue to serve as a One-Stop operator without meeting the requirements for designation under § 662.410(b) if the local One-Stop delivery system is modified, as necessary, to meet the other requirements of this part, including the requirements relating to the inclusion of One-Stop partners, the execution of the MOU, and the provision of services.(WIA sec. 121(e).)


PART 663 – ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT


Authority:Section 506(c), Pub. L. 105-220; 20 U.S.C. 9276(c).


Source:65 FR 49402, Aug. 11, 2000, unless otherwise noted.

Subpart A – Delivery of Adult and Dislocated Worker Services Through the One-Stop Delivery System

§ 663.100 What is the role of the adult and dislocated worker programs in the One-Stop delivery system?

(a) The One-Stop system is the basic delivery system for adult and dislocated worker services. Through this system, adults and dislocated workers can access a continuum of services. The services are organized into three levels: core, intensive, and training.


(b) The chief elected official or his/her designee(s), as the local grant recipient(s) for the adult and dislocated worker programs, is a required One-Stop partner and is subject to the provisions relating to such partners described in 20 CFR part 662. Consistent with those provisions:


(1) Core services for adults and dislocated workers must be made available in at least one comprehensive One-Stop center in each local workforce investment area. Services may also be available elsewhere, either at affiliated sites or at specialized centers. For example, specialized centers may be established to serve workers being dislocated from a particular employer or industry, or to serve residents of public housing.


(2) The One-Stop centers also make intensive services available to adults and dislocated workers, as needed, either by the One-Stop operator directly or through contracts with service providers that are approved by the Local Board.


(3) Through the One-Stop system, adults and dislocated workers needing training are provided Individual Training Accounts (ITA’s) and access to lists of eligible providers and programs of training. These lists contain quality consumer information, including cost and performance information for each of the providers’ programs, so that participants can make informed choices on where to use their ITA’s. (ITA’s are more fully discussed in subpart D of this part.)


§ 663.105 When must adults and dislocated workers be registered?

(a) Registration is the process for collecting information to support a determination of eligibility. This information may be collected through methods that include electronic data transfer, personal interview, or an individual’s application.


(b) Adults and dislocated workers who receive services funded under title I other than self-service or informational activities must be registered and determined eligible.


(c) EO data must be collected on every individual who is interested in being considered for WIA title I financially assisted aid, benefits, services, or training by a recipient, and who has signified that interest by submitting personal information in response to a request from the recipient.


§ 663.110 What are the eligibility criteria for core services for adults in the adult and dislocated worker programs?

To be eligible to receive core services as an adult in the adult and dislocated worker programs, an individual must be 18 years of age or older. To be eligible for the dislocated worker programs, an eligible adult must meet the criteria of § 663.115. Eligibility criteria for intensive and training services are found at §§ 663.220 and 663.310.


§ 663.115 What are the eligibility criteria for core services for dislocated workers in the adult and dislocated worker programs?

(a) To be eligible to receive core services as a dislocated worker in the adult and dislocated worker programs, an individual must meet the definition of “dislocated worker” at WIA section 101(9). Eligibility criteria for intensive and training services are found at §§ 663.220 and 663.310.


(b) Governors and Local Boards may establish policies and procedures for One-Stop operators to use in determining an individual’s eligibility as a dislocated worker, consistent with the definition at WIA section 101(9). These policies and procedures may address such conditions as:


(1) What constitutes a “general announcement” of plant closing under WIA section 101(9)(B)(ii) or (iii); and


(2) What constitutes “unemployed as a result of general economic conditions in the community in which the individual resides or because of natural disasters” for determining the eligibility of self-employed individuals, including family members and farm or ranch hands, under WIA section 101(9)(C).


§ 663.120 Are displaced homemakers eligible for dislocated worker activities under WIA?

(a) Yes, there are two significant differences from the eligibility requirements under the Job Training Partnership Act.


(b) Under the dislocated worker program in JTPA, displaced homemakers are defined as “additional dislocated workers” and are only eligible to receive services if the Governor determines that providing such services would not adversely affect the delivery of services to the other eligible dislocated workers. Under WIA section 101(9), displaced homemakers who meet the definition at WIA section 101(10) are eligible dislocated workers without any additional determination.


(c) The definition of displaced homemaker under JTPA included individuals who had been dependent upon public assistance under Aid for Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) as well as those who had been dependent on the income of another family member. The definition in WIA section 101(10) includes only those individuals who were dependent on a family member’s income. Those individuals who have been dependent on public assistance may be served in the adult program.


§ 663.145 What services are WIA title I adult and dislocated workers formula funds used to provide?

(a) WIA title I formula funds allocated to local areas for adults and dislocated workers must be used to provide core, intensive and training services through the One-Stop delivery system. Local Boards determine the most appropriate mix of these services, but all three types must be available for both adults and dislocated workers. There are different eligibility criteria for each of these types of services, which are described at §§ 663.110, 663.115, 663.220 and 663.310.


(b) WIA title I funds may also be used to provide the other services described in WIA section 134(e):


(1) Discretionary One-Stop delivery activities, including:


(i) Customized screening and referral of qualified participants in training services to employment; and


(ii) Customized employment-related services to employers on a fee-for-service basis that are in addition to labor exchange services available to employers under the Wagner-Peyser Act.


(2) Supportive services, including needs-related payments, as described in subpart H of this part.


§ 663.150 What core services must be provided to adults and dislocated workers?

(a) At a minimum, all of the core services described in WIA section 134(d)(2) and 20 CFR 662.240 must be provided in each local area through the One-Stop delivery system.


(b) Followup services must be made available, as appropriate, for a minimum of 12 months following the first day of employment, to registered participants who are placed in unsubsidized employment.


§ 663.155 How are core services delivered?

Core services must be provided through the One-Stop delivery system. Core services may be provided directly by the One-Stop operator or through contracts with service providers that are approved by the Local Board. The Local Board may only be a provider of core services when approved by the chief elected official and the Governor in accordance with the requirements of WIA section 117(f)(2) and 20 CFR 661.310.


§ 663.160 Are there particular core services an individual must receive before receiving intensive services under WIA section 134(d)(3)?

(a) Yes, at a minimum, an individual must receive at least one core service, such as an initial assessment or job search and placement assistance, before receiving intensive services. The initial assessment provides preliminary information about the individual’s skill levels, aptitudes, interests, and supportive services needs. The job search and placement assistance helps the individual determine whether he or she is unable to obtain employment, and thus requires more intensive services to obtain employment. The decision on which core services to provide, and the timing of their delivery, may be made on a case-by-case basis at the local level depending upon the needs of the participant.


(b) A determination of the need for intensive services under § 663.220, as established by the initial assessment or the individual’s inability to obtain employment through the core services provided, must be contained in the participant’s case file.


§ 663.165 How long must an individual be in core services in order to be eligible for intensive services?

There is no Federally-required minimum time period for participation in core services before receiving intensive services. (WIA sec. 134(d)(3).)


Subpart B – Intensive Services

§ 663.200 What are intensive services for adults and dislocated workers?

(a) Intensive services are listed in WIA section 134(d)(3)(C). The list in the Act is not all-inclusive and other intensive services, such as out-of-area job search assistance, literacy activities related to basic workforce readiness, relocation assistance, internships, and work experience may be provided, based on an assessment or individual employment plan.


(b) For the purposes of paragraph (a) of this section, work experience is a planned, structured learning experience that takes place in a workplace for a limited period of time. Work experience may be paid or unpaid, as appropriate. A work experience workplace may be in the private for profit sector, the non-profit sector, or the public sector. Labor standards apply in any work experience where an employee/employer relationship, as defined by the Fair Labor Standards Act, exists.


§ 663.210 How are intensive services delivered?

(a) Intensive services must be provided through the One-Stop delivery system, including specialized One-Stop centers. Intensive services may be provided directly by the One-Stop operator or through contracts with service providers, which may include contracts with public, private for-profit, and private non-profit service providers (including specialized service providers), that are approved by the Local Board. (WIA secs. 117(d)(2)(D) and 134(d)(3)(B).)


(b) The Local Board may only be a provider of intensive services when approved by the chief elected official and the Governor in accordance with WIA section 117(f)(2) and 20 CFR 661.310.


§ 663.220 Who may receive intensive services?

There are two categories of adults and dislocated workers who may receive intensive services:


(a) Adults and dislocated workers who are unemployed, have received at least one core service and are unable to obtain employment through core services, and are determined by a One-Stop operator to be in need of more intensive services to obtain employment; and


(b) Adults and dislocated workers who are employed, have received at least one core service, and are determined by a One-Stop operator to be in need of intensive services to obtain or retain employment that leads to self-sufficiency, as described in § 663.230.


§ 663.230 What criteria must be used to determine whether an employed worker needs intensive services to obtain or retain employment leading to “self-sufficiency”?

State Boards or Local Boards must set the criteria for determining whether employment leads to self-sufficiency. At a minimum, such criteria must provide that self-sufficiency means employment that pays at least the lower living standard income level, as defined in WIA section 101(24). Self-sufficiency for a dislocated worker may be defined in relation to a percentage of the layoff wage. The special needs of individuals with disabilities or other barriers to employment should be taken into account when setting criteria to determine self-sufficiency.


§ 663.240 Are there particular intensive services an individual must receive before receiving training services under WIA section 134(d)(4)(A)(i)?

(a) Yes, at a minimum, an individual must receive at least one intensive service, such as development of an individual employment plan with a case manager or individual counseling and career planning, before the individual may receive training services.


(b) The case file must contain a determination of need for training services under § 663.310, as identified in the individual employment plan, comprehensive assessment, or through any other intensive service received.


§ 663.245 What is the individual employment plan?

The individual employment plan is an ongoing strategy jointly developed by the participant and the case manager that identifies the participant’s employment goals, the appropriate achievement objectives, and the appropriate combination of services for the participant to achieve the employment goals.


§ 663.250 How long must an individual participant be in intensive services to be eligible for training services?

There is no Federally-required minimum time period for participation in intensive services before receiving training services. The period of time an individual spends in intensive services should be sufficient to prepare the individual for training or employment. (WIA sec. 134(d)(4)(A)(i).)


Subpart C – Training Services

§ 663.300 What are training services for adults and dislocated workers?

Training services are listed in WIA section 134(d)(4)(D). The list in the Act is not all-inclusive and additional training services may be provided.


§ 663.310 Who may receive training services?

Training services may be made available to employed and unemployed adults and dislocated workers who:


(a) Have met the eligibility requirements for intensive services, have received at least one intensive service under § 663.240, and have been determined to be unable to obtain or retain employment through such services;


(b) After an interview, evaluation, or assessment, and case management, have been determined by a One-Stop operator or One-Stop partner, to be in need of training services and to have the skills and qualifications to successfully complete the selected training program;


(c) Select a program of training services that is directly linked to the employment opportunities either in the local area or in another area to which the individual is willing to relocate;


(d) Are unable to obtain grant assistance from other sources to pay the costs of such training, including such sources as Welfare-to-Work, State-funded training funds, Trade Adjustment Assistance and Federal Pell Grants established under title IV of the Higher Education Act of 1965, or require WIA assistance in addition to other sources of grant assistance, including Federal Pell Grants (provisions relating to fund coordination are found at § 663.320 and WIA section 134(d)(4)(B)); and


(e) For individuals whose services are provided through the adult funding stream, are determined eligible in accordance with the State and local priority system, if any, in effect for adults under WIA section 134(d)(4)(E) and § 663.600. (WIA sec. 134(d)(4)(A).)


§ 663.320 What are the requirements for coordination of WIA training funds and other grant assistance?

(a) WIA funding for training is limited to participants who:


(1) Are unable to obtain grant assistance from other sources to pay the costs of their training; or


(2) Require assistance beyond that available under grant assistance from other sources to pay the costs of such training. Program operators and training providers must coordinate funds available to pay for training as described in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section.


(b) Program operators must coordinate training funds available and make funding arrangements with One-Stop partners and other entities to apply the provisions of paragraph (a) of this section. Training providers must consider the availability of other sources of grants to pay for training costs such as Welfare-to-Work, State-funded training funds, and Federal Pell Grants, so that WIA funds supplement other sources of training grants.


(c) A WIA participant may enroll in WIA-funded training while his/her application for a Pell Grant is pending as long as the One-Stop operator has made arrangements with the training provider and the WIA participant regarding allocation of the Pell Grant, if it is subsequently awarded. In that case, the training provider must reimburse the One-Stop operator the WIA funds used to underwrite the training for the amount the Pell Grant covers. Reimbursement is not required from the portion of Pell Grant assistance disbursed to the WIA participant for education-related expenses. (WIA sec. 134(d)(4)(B).)


Subpart D – Individual Training Accounts

§ 663.400 How are training services provided?

Except under the three conditions described in WIA section 134(d)(4)(G)(ii) and § 663.430(a), the Individual Training Account (ITA) is established for eligible individuals to finance training services. Local Boards may only provide training services under § 663.430 if they receive a waiver from the Governor and meet the requirements of 20 CFR 661.310 and WIA section 117(f)(1). (WIA sec. 134(d)(4)(G).)


§ 663.410 What is an Individual Training Account (ITA)?

The ITA is established on behalf of a participant. WIA title I adult and dislocated workers purchase training services from eligible providers they select in consultation with the case manager. Payments from ITA’s may be made in a variety of ways, including the electronic transfer of funds through financial institutions, vouchers, or other appropriate methods. Payments may also be made incrementally; through payment of a portion of the costs at different points in the training course. (WIA sec. 134(d)(4)(G).)


§ 663.420 Can the duration and amount of ITA’s be limited?

(a) Yes, the State or Local Board may impose limits on ITA’s, such as limitations on the dollar amount and/or duration.


(b) Limits to ITA’s may be established in different ways:


(1) There may be a limit for an individual participant that is based on the needs identified in the individual employment plan; or


(2) There may be a policy decision by the State Board or Local Board to establish a range of amounts and/or a maximum amount applicable to all ITA’s.


(c) Limitations established by State or Local Board policies must be described in the State or Local Plan, respectively, but should not be implemented in a manner that undermines the Act’s requirement that training services are provided in a manner that maximizes customer choice in the selection of an eligible training provider. ITA limitations may provide for exceptions to the limitations in individual cases.


(d) An individual may select training that costs more than the maximum amount available for ITAs under a State or local policy when other sources of funds are available to supplement the ITA. These other sources may include: Pell Grants; scholarships; severance pay; and other sources.


§ 663.430 Under what circumstances may mechanisms other than ITA’s be used to provide training services?

(a) Contracts for services may be used instead of ITA’s only when one of the following three exceptions applies:


(1) When the services provided are on-the-job training (OJT) or customized training;


(2) When the Local Board determines that there are an insufficient number of eligible providers in the local area to accomplish the purpose of a system of ITA’s. The Local Plan must describe the process to be used in selecting the providers under a contract for services. This process must include a public comment period for interested providers of at least 30 days;


(3) When the Local Board determines that there is a training services program of demonstrated effectiveness offered in the area by a community-based organization (CBO) or another private organization to serve special participant populations that face multiple barriers to employment, as described in paragraph (b) in this section. The Local Board must develop criteria to be used in determining demonstrated effectiveness, particularly as it applies to the special participant population to be served. The criteria may include:


(i) Financial stability of the organization;


(ii) Demonstrated performance in the delivery of services to hard to serve participant populations through such means as program completion rate; attainment of the skills, certificates or degrees the program is designed to provide; placement after training in unsubsidized employment; and retention in employment; and


(iii) How the specific program relates to the workforce investment needs identified in the local plan.


(b) Under paragraph (a)(3) of this section, special participant populations that face multiple barriers to employment are populations of low-income individuals that are included in one or more of the following categories:


(1) Individuals with substantial language or cultural barriers;


(2) Offenders;


(3) Homeless individuals; and


(4) Other hard-to-serve populations as defined by the Governor.


§ 663.440 What are the requirements for consumer choice?

(a) Training services, whether under ITA’s or under contract, must be provided in a manner that maximizes informed consumer choice in selecting an eligible provider.


(b) Each Local Board, through the One-Stop center, must make available to customers the State list of eligible providers required in WIA section 122(e). The list includes a description of the programs through which the providers may offer the training services, the information identifying eligible providers of on-the-job training and customized training required under WIA section 122(h) (where applicable), and the performance and cost information about eligible providers of training services described in WIA sections 122 (e) and (h).


(c) An individual who has been determined eligible for training services under § 663.310 may select a provider described in paragraph (b) of this section after consultation with a case manager. Unless the program has exhausted training funds for the program year, the operator must refer the individual to the selected provider, and establish an ITA for the individual to pay for training. For purposes of this paragraph, a referral may be carried out by providing a voucher or certificate to the individual to obtain the training.


(d) The cost of referral of an individual with an ITA to a training provider is paid by the applicable adult or dislocated worker program under title I of WIA.


Subpart E – Eligible Training Providers

§ 663.500 What is the purpose of this subpart?

The workforce investment system established under WIA emphasizes informed customer choice, system performance, and continuous improvement. The eligible provider process is part of the strategy for achieving these goals. Local Boards, in partnership with the State, identify training providers and programs whose performance qualifies them to receive WIA funds to train adults and dislocated workers. In order to maximize customer choice and assure that all significant population groups are served, States and local areas should administer the eligible provider process in a manner to assure that significant numbers of competent providers, offering a wide variety of training programs and occupational choices, are available to customers. After receiving core and intensive services and in consultation with case managers, eligible participants who need training use the list of these eligible providers to make an informed choice. The ability of providers to successfully perform, the procedures State and Local Boards use to establish eligibility, and the degree to which information, including performance information, on those providers is made available to customers eligible for training services, are key factors affecting the successful implementation of the Statewide workforce investment system. This subpart describes the process for determining eligible training providers.


§ 663.505 What are eligible providers of training services?

(a) Eligible providers of training services are described in WIA section 122. They are those entities eligible to receive WIA title I-B funds to provide training services to eligible adult and dislocated worker customers.


(b) In order to provide training services under WIA title I-B, a provider must meet the requirements of this subpart and WIA section 122.


(1) These requirements apply to the use of WIA title I adult and dislocated worker funds to provide training:


(i) To individuals using ITA’s to access training through the eligible provider list; and


(ii) To individuals for training provided through the exceptions to ITA’s described at § 663.430 (a)(2) and (a)(3).


(2) These requirements apply to all organizations providing training to adult and dislocated workers, including:


(i) Postsecondary educational institutions providing a program described in WIA section 122(a)(2)(A)(ii);


(ii) Entities that carry out programs under the National Apprenticeship Act (29 U.S.C. 50 et seq.);


(iii) Other public or private providers of a program of training services described in WIA section 122(a)(2)(C);


(iv) Local Boards, if they meet the conditions of WIA section 117(f)(1); and


(v) Community-based organizations and other private organizations providing training under § 663.430.


(c) Provider eligibility procedures must be established by the Governor, as required by this subpart. Different procedures are described in WIA for determinations of “initial” and “subsequent” eligibility. Because the processes are different, they are discussed separately.


§ 663.508 What is a “program of training services”?

A program of training services is one or more courses or classes, or a structured regimen, that upon successful completion, leads to:


(a) A certificate, an associate degree, baccalaureate degree, or


(b) The skills or competencies needed for a specific job or jobs, an occupation, occupational group, or generally, for many types of jobs or occupations, as recognized by employers and determined prior to training.


§ 663.510 Who is responsible for managing the eligible provider process?

(a) The State and the Local Boards each have responsibilities for managing the eligible provider process.


(b) The Governor must establish eligibility criteria for certain providers to become initially eligible and must set minimum levels of performance for all providers to remain subsequently eligible.


(c) The Governor must designate a State agency (called the “designated State agency”) to assist in carrying out WIA section 122. The designated State agency is responsible for:


(1) Developing and maintaining the State list of eligible providers and programs, which is comprised of lists submitted by Local Boards;


(2) Determining if programs meet performance levels, including verifying the accuracy of the information on the State list in consultation with the Local Boards, removing programs that do not meet program performance levels, and taking appropriate enforcement actions, against providers in the case of the intentional provision of inaccurate information, as described in WIA section 122(f)(1), and in the case of a substantial violation of the requirements of WIA, as described in WIA section 122(f)(2);


(3) Disseminating the State list, accompanied by performance and cost information relating to each provider, to One-Stop operators throughout the State.


(d) The Local Board must:


(1) Accept applications for initial eligibility from certain postsecondary institutions and entities providing apprenticeship training;


(2) Carry out procedures prescribed by the Governor to assist in determining the initial eligibility of other providers;


(3) Carry out procedures prescribed by the Governor to assist in determining the subsequent eligibility of all providers;


(4) Compile a local list of eligible providers, collect the performance and cost information and any other required information relating to providers;


(5) Submit the local list and information to the designated State agency;


(6) Ensure the dissemination and appropriate use of the State list through the local One-Stop system;


(7) Consult with the designated State agency in cases where termination of an eligible provider is contemplated because inaccurate information has been provided; and


(8) Work with the designated State agency in cases where the termination of an eligible provider is contemplated because of violations of the Act.


(e) The Local Board may:


(1) Make recommendations to the Governor on the procedures to be used in determining initial eligibility of certain providers;


(2) Increase the levels of performance required by the State for local providers to maintain subsequent eligibility;


(3) Require additional verifiable program-specific information from local providers to maintain subsequent eligibility.


§ 663.515 What is the process for initial determination of provider eligibility?

(a) To be eligible to receive adult or dislocated worker training funds under title I of WIA, all providers must submit applications to the Local Boards in the areas in which they wish to provide services. The application must describe each program of training services to be offered.


(b) For programs eligible under title IV of the Higher Education Act and apprenticeship programs registered under the National Apprenticeship Act (NAA), and the providers or such programs, Local Boards determine the procedures to use in making an application. The procedures established by the Local Board must specify the timing, manner, and contents of the required application.


(c) For programs not eligible under title IV of the HEA or registered under the NAA, and for providers not eligible under title IV of the HEA or carrying out apprenticeship programs under NAA:


(1) The Governor must develop a procedure for use by Local Boards for determining the eligibility of other providers, after


(i) Soliciting and taking into consideration recommendations from Local Boards and providers of training services within the State;


(ii) Providing an opportunity for interested members of the public, including representatives of business and labor organizations, to submit comments on the procedure; and


(iii) Designating a specific time period for soliciting and considering the recommendations of Local Boards and provider, and for providing an opportunity for public comment.


(2) The procedure must be described in the State Plan.


(3)(i) The procedure must require that the provider must submit an application to the Local Board at such time and in such manner as may be required, which contains a description of the program of training services;


(ii) If the provider provides a program of training services on the date of application, the procedure must require that the application include an appropriate portion of the performance information and program cost information described in § 663.540, and that the program meet appropriate levels of performance;


(iii) If the provider does not provide a program of training services on that date, the procedure must require that the provider meet appropriate requirements specified in the procedure. (WIA sec. 122(b)(2)(D).)


(d) The Local Board must include providers that meet the requirements of paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section on a local list and submit the list to the designated State agency. The State agency has 30 days to determine that the provider or its programs do not meet the requirements relating to the providers under paragraph (c) of this section. After the agency determines that the provider and its programs meet(s) the criteria for initial eligibility, or 30 days have elapsed, whichever occurs first, the provider and its programs are initially eligible. The programs and providers submitted under paragraph (b) of this section are initially eligible without State agency review. (WIA sec. 122(e).)


§ 663.530 Is there a time limit on the period of initial eligibility for training providers?

Yes, under WIA section 122(c)(5), the Governor must require training providers to submit performance information and meet performance levels annually in order to remain eligible providers. States may require that these performance requirements be met one year from the date that initial eligibility was determined, or may require all eligible providers to submit performance information by the same date each year. If the latter approach is adopted, the Governor may exempt eligible providers whose determination of initial eligibility occurs within six months of the date of submissions. The effect of this requirement is that no training provider may have a period of initial eligibility that exceeds eighteen months. In the limited circumstance when insufficient data is available, initial eligibility may be extended for a period of up to six additional months, if the Governor’s procedures provide for such an extension.


§ 663.535 What is the process for determining the subsequent eligibility of a provider?

(a) The Governor must develop a procedure for the Local Board to use in determining the subsequent eligibility of all eligible training providers determined initially eligible under § 663.515 (b) and (c), after:


(1) Soliciting and taking into consideration recommendations from Local Boards and providers of training services within the State;


(2) Providing an opportunity for interested members of the public, including representatives of business and labor organizations, to submit comments on such procedure; and


(3) Designating a specific time period for soliciting and considering the recommendations of Local Boards and providers, and for providing an opportunity for public comment.


(b) The procedure must be described in the State Plan.


(c) The procedure must require that:


(1) Providers annually submit performance and cost information as described at WIA section 122(d)(1) and (2), for each program of training services for which the provider has been determined to be eligible, in a time and manner determined by the Local Board;


(2) Providers and programs annually meet minimum performance levels described at WIA section 122(c)(6), as demonstrated utilizing UI quarterly wage records where appropriate.


(d) The program’s performance information must meet the minimum acceptable levels established under paragraph (c)(2) of this section to remain eligible;


(e) Local Boards may require higher levels of performance for local programs than the levels specified in the procedures established by the Governor. (WIA sec.122(c)(5) and (c)(6).)


(f) The State procedure must require Local Boards to take into consideration:


(1) The specific economic, geographic and demographic factors in the local areas in which providers seeking eligibility are located, and


(2) The characteristics of the populations served by programs seeking eligibility, including the demonstrated difficulties in serving these populations, where applicable.


(g) The Local Board retains those programs on the local list that meet the required performance levels and other elements of the State procedures and submits the list, accompanied by the performance and cost information, and any additional required information, to the designated State agency. If the designated State agency determines within 30 days from the receipt of the information that the program does not meet the performance levels established under paragraph (c)(2) of this section, the program may be removed from the list. A program retained on the local list and not removed by the designated State agency is considered an eligible program of training services.


§ 663.540 What kind of performance and cost information is required for determinations of subsequent eligibility?

(a) Eligible providers of training services must submit, at least annually, under procedures established by the Governor under § 663.535(c):


(1) Verifiable program-specific performance information, including:


(i) The information described in WIA section 122(d)(1)(A)(i) for all individuals participating in the programs of training services, including individuals who are not receiving assistance under WIA section 134 and individuals who are receiving such assistance; and


(ii) The information described in WIA section 122(d)(1)(A)(ii) relating only to individuals receiving assistance under the WIA adult and dislocated worker program who are participating in the applicable program of training services; and


(2) Information on program costs (such as tuition and fees) for WIA participants in the program.


(b) Governors may require any additional verifiable performance information (such as the information described at WIA section 122(d)(2)) that the Governor determines to be appropriate to obtain subsequent eligibility, including information regarding all participating individuals as well as individuals receiving assistance under the WIA adult and dislocated worker program.


(c) Governors must establish procedures by which providers can demonstrate if the additional information required under paragraph (b) of this section imposes extraordinary costs on providers, or if providers experience extraordinary costs in the collection of information. If, through these procedures, providers demonstrate that they experience such extraordinary costs:


(1) The Governor or Local Board must provide access to cost-effective methods for the collection of the information; or


(2) The Governor must provide additional resources to assist providers in the collection of the information from funds for Statewide workforce investment activities reserved under WIA sections 128(a) and 133(a)(1).


(d) The Local Board and the designated State agency may accept program-specific performance information consistent with the requirements for eligibility under title IV of the Higher Education Act of 1965 from a provider for purposes of enabling the provider to fulfill the applicable requirements of this section, if the information is substantially similar to the information otherwise required under this section.


§ 663.550 How is eligible provider information developed and maintained?

(a) The designated State agency must maintain a list of all eligible training programs and providers in the State (the “State list”).


(b) The State list is a compilation of the eligible programs and providers identified or retained by local areas and that have not been removed under §§ 663.535(g) and 663.565.


(c) The State list must be accompanied by the performance and cost information contained in the local lists as required by § 663.535(e). (WIA sec. 122(e)(4)(A).)


§ 663.555 How is the State list disseminated?

(a) The designated State agency must disseminate the State list and accompanying performance and cost information to the One-Stop delivery systems within the State.


(b) The State list and information must be updated at least annually.


(c) The State list and accompanying information form the primary basis of the One-Stop consumer reports system that provides for informed customer choice. The list and information must be widely available, through the One-Stop delivery system, to customers seeking information on training outcomes, as well as participants in employment and training activities funded under WIA and other programs.


(1) The State list must be made available to individuals who have been determined eligible for training services under § 663.310.


(2) The State list must also be made available to customers whose training is supported by other One-Stop partners.


§ 663.565 May an eligible training provider lose its eligibility?

(a) Yes. A training provider must deliver results and provide accurate information in order to retain its status as an eligible training provider.


(b) If the provider’s programs do not meet the established performance levels, the programs will be removed from the eligible provider list.


(1) A Local Board must determine, during the subsequent eligibility determination process, whether a provider’s programs meet performance levels. If the program fails to meet such levels, the program must be removed from the local list. If all of the provider’s programs fail to meet such levels, the provider must be removed from the local list.


(2) The designated State agency upon receipt of the performance information accompanying the local list, may remove programs from the State list if the agency determines the program failed to meet the levels of performance prescribed under § 663.535(c). If all of the provider’s programs are determined to have failed to meet the levels, the designated State agency may remove the provider from the State list.


(3) Providers determined to have intentionally supplied inaccurate information or to have subsequently violated any provision of title I of WIA or the WIA regulations, including 29 CFR part 37, may be removed from the list in accordance with the enforcement provisions of WIA section 122(f). A provider whose eligibility is terminated under these conditions is liable to repay all adult and dislocated worker training funds it received during the period of noncompliance.


(4) The Governor must establish appeal procedures for providers of training to appeal a denial of eligibility under this subpart according to the requirements of 20 CFR 667.640(b).


§ 663.570 What is the consumer reports system?

The consumer reports system, referred to in WIA as performance information, is the vehicle for informing the customers of the One-Stop delivery system about the performance of training providers and programs in the local area. It is built upon the State list of eligible providers and programs developed through the procedures described in WIA section 122 and this subpart. The consumer reports system must contain the information necessary for an adult or dislocated worker customer to fully understand the options available to him or her in choosing a program of training services. Such program-specific factors may include overall performance, performance for significant customer groups (including wage replacement rates for dislocated workers), performance of specific provider sites, current information on employment and wage trends and projections, and duration of training programs.


§ 663.575 In what ways can a Local Board supplement the information available from the State list?

(a) Local Boards may supplement the information available from the State list by providing customers with additional information to assist in supporting informed customer choice and the achievement of local performance measures (as described in WIA section 136).


(b) This additional information may include:


(1) Information on programs of training services that are linked to occupations in demand in the local area;


(2) Performance and cost information, including program-specific performance and cost information, for the local outlet(s) of multi-site eligible providers; and


(3) Other appropriate information related to the objectives of WIA, which may include the information described in § 663.570.


§ 663.585 May individuals choose training providers located outside of the local area?

Yes, individuals may choose any of the eligible providers and programs on the State list. A State may also establish a reciprocal agreement with another State(s) to permit providers of eligible training programs in each State to accept individual training accounts provided by the other State. (WIA secs. 122(e)(4) and (e)(5).)


§ 663.590 May a community-based organization (CBO) be included on an eligible provider list?

Yes, CBO’s may apply and they and their programs may be determined eligible providers of training services, under WIA section 122 and this subpart. As eligible providers, CBO’s provide training through ITA’s and may also receive contracts for training special participant populations when the requirements of § 663.430 are met.


§ 663.595 What requirements apply to providers of OJT and customized training?

For OJT and customized training providers, One-Stop operators in a local area must collect such performance information as the Governor may require, determine whether the providers meet such performance criteria as the Governor may require, and disseminate a list of providers that have met such criteria, along with the relevant performance information about them, through the One-Stop delivery system. Providers determined to meet the criteria are considered to be identified as eligible providers of training services. These providers are not subject to the other requirements of WIA section 122 or this subpart.


Subpart F – Priority and Special Populations

§ 663.600 What priority must be given to low-income adults and public assistance recipients served with adult funds under title I?

(a) WIA states, in section 134(d)(4)(E), that in the event that funds allocated to a local area for adult employment and training activities are limited, priority for intensive and training services funded with title I adult funds must be given to recipients of public assistance and other low-income individuals in the local area.


(b) Since funding is generally limited, States and local areas must establish criteria by which local areas can determine the availability of funds and the process by which any priority will be applied under WIA section 134(d)(2)(E). Such criteria may include the availability of other funds for providing employment and training-related services in the local area, the needs of the specific groups within the local area, and other appropriate factors.


(c) States and local areas must give priority for adult intensive and training services to recipients of public assistance and other low-income individuals, unless the local area has determined that funds are not limited under the criteria established under paragraph (b) of this section.


(d) The process for determining whether to apply the priority established under paragraph (b) of this section does not necessarily mean that only the recipients of public assistance and other low income individuals may receive WIA adult funded intensive and training services when funds are determined to be limited in a local area. The Local Board and the Governor may establish a process that gives priority for services to the recipients of public assistance and other low income individuals and that also serves other individuals meeting eligibility requirements.


§ 663.610 Does the statutory priority for use of adult funds also apply to dislocated worker funds?

No, the statutory priority applies to adult funds for intensive and training services only. Funds allocated for dislocated workers are not subject to this requirement.


§ 663.620 How do the Welfare-to-Work program and the TANF program relate to the One-Stop delivery system?

(a) The local Welfare-to-Work (WtW) program operator is a required partner in the One-Stop delivery system. 20 CFR part 662 describes the roles of such partners in the One-Stop delivery system and applies to the Welfare-to-Work program operator. WtW programs serve individuals who may also be served by the WIA programs and, through appropriate linkages and referrals, these customers will have access to a broader range of services through the cooperation of the WtW program in the One-Stop system. WtW participants, who are determined to be WIA eligible, and who need occupational skills training may be referred through the One-Stop system to receive WIA training, when WtW grant and other grant funds are not available in accordance with § 663.320(a). WIA participants who are also determined WtW eligible, may be referred to the WtW operator for job placement and other WtW assistance.


(b) The local TANF agency is specifically suggested under WIA as an additional partner in the One-Stop system. TANF recipients will have access to more information about employment opportunities and services when the TANF agency participates in the One-Stop delivery system. The Governor and Local Board should encourage the TANF agency to become a One-Stop partner to improve the quality of services to the WtW and TANF-eligible populations. In addition, becoming a One-Stop partner will ensure that the TANF agency is represented on the Local Board and participates in developing workforce investment strategies that help cash assistance recipients secure lasting employment.


§ 663.630 How does a displaced homemaker qualify for services under title I?

Displaced homemakers may be eligible to receive assistance under title I in a variety of ways, including:


(a) Core services provided by the One-Stop partners through the One-Stop delivery system;


(b) Intensive or training services for which an individual qualifies as a dislocated worker/displaced homemaker if the requirements of this part are met;


(c) Intensive or training services for which an individual is eligible if the requirements of this part are met;


(d) Statewide employment and training projects conducted with reserve funds for innovative programs for displaced homemakers, as described in 20 CFR 665.210(f).


§ 663.640 May an individual with a disability whose family does not meet income eligibility criteria under the Act be eligible for priority as a low-income adult?

Yes, even if the family of an individual with a disability does not meet the income eligibility criteria, the individual with a disability is to be considered a low-income individual if the individual’s own income:


(a) Meets the income criteria established in WIA section 101(25)(B); or


(b) Meets the income eligibility criteria for cash payments under any Federal, State or local public assistance program. (WIA sec. 101(25)(F).)


Subpart G – On-the-Job Training (OJT) and Customized Training

§ 663.700 What are the requirements for on-the-job training (OJT)?

(a) On-the-job training (OJT) is defined at WIA section 101(31). OJT is provided under a contract with an employer in the public, private non-profit, or private sector. Through the OJT contract, occupational training is provided for the WIA participant in exchange for the reimbursement of up to 50 percent of the wage rate to compensate for the employer’s extraordinary costs. (WIA sec. 101(31)(B).)


(b) The local program must not contract with an employer who has previously exhibited a pattern of failing to provide OJT participants with continued long-term employment with wages, benefits, and working conditions that are equal to those provided to regular employees who have worked a similar length of time and are doing the same type of work. (WIA sec. 195(4).)


(c) An OJT contract must be limited to the period of time required for a participant to become proficient in the occupation for which the training is being provided. In determining the appropriate length of the contract, consideration should be given to the skill requirements of the occupation, the academic and occupational skill level of the participant, prior work experience, and the participant’s individual employment plan. (WIA sec. 101(31)(C).)


§ 663.705 What are the requirements for OJT contracts for employed workers?

OJT contracts may be written for eligible employed workers when:


(a) The employee is not earning a self-sufficient wage as determined by Local Board policy;


(b) The requirements in § 663.700 are met; and


(c) The OJT relates to the introduction of new technologies, introduction to new production or service procedures, upgrading to new jobs that require additional skills, workplace literacy, or other appropriate purposes identified by the Local Board.


§ 663.710 What conditions govern OJT payments to employers?

(a) On-the-job training payments to employers are deemed to be compensation for the extraordinary costs associated with training participants and the costs associated with the lower productivity of the participants.


(b) Employers may be reimbursed up to 50 percent of the wage rate of an OJT participant for the extraordinary costs of providing the training and additional supervision related to the OJT. (WIA sec. 101(31)(B).)


(c) Employers are not required to document such extraordinary costs.


§ 663.715 What is customized training?

Customized training is training:


(a) That is designed to meet the special requirements of an employer (including a group of employers);


(b) That is conducted with a commitment by the employer to employ, or in the case of incumbent workers, continue to employ, an individual on successful completion of the training; and


(c) For which the employer pays for not less than 50 percent of the cost of the training. (WIA sec. 101(8).)


§ 663.720 What are the requirements for customized training for employed workers?

Customized training of an eligible employed individual may be provided for an employer or a group of employers when:


(a) The employee is not earning a self-sufficient wage as determined by Local Board policy;


(b) The requirements in § 663.715 are met; and


(c) The customized training relates to the purposes described in § 663.705(c) or other appropriate purposes identified by the Local Board.


§ 663.730 May funds provided to employers for OJT of customized training be used to assist, promote, or deter union organizing?

No, funds provided to employers for OJT or customized training must not be used to directly or indirectly assist, promote or deter union organizing.


Subpart H – Supportive Services

§ 663.800 What are supportive services for adults and dislocated workers?

Supportive services for adults and dislocated workers are defined at WIA sections 101(46) and 134(e)(2) and (3). They include services such as transportation, child care, dependent care, housing, and needs-related payments, that are necessary to enable an individual to participate in activities authorized under WIA title I. Local Boards, in consultation with the One-Stop partners and other community service providers, must develop a policy on supportive services that ensures resource and service coordination in the local area. Such policy should address procedures for referral to such services, including how such services will be funded when they are not otherwise available from other sources. The provision of accurate information about the availability of supportive services in the local area, as well as referral to such activities, is one of the core services that must be available to adults and dislocated workers through the One-Stop delivery system. (WIA sec. 134(d)(2)(H).)


§ 663.805 When may supportive services be provided to participants?

(a) Supportive services may only be provided to individuals who are:


(1) Participating in core, intensive or training services; and


(2) Unable to obtain supportive services through other programs providing such services. (WIA sec. 134(e)(2)(A) and (B).)


(b) Supportive services may only be provided when they are necessary to enable individuals to participate in title I activities. (WIA sec. 101(46).)


§ 663.810 Are there limits on the amounts or duration of funds for supportive services?

(a) Local Boards may establish limits on the provision of supportive services or provide the One-Stop operator with the authority to establish such limits, including a maximum amount of funding and maximum length of time for supportive services to be available to participants.


(b) Procedures may also be established to allow One-Stop operators to grant exceptions to the limits established under paragraph (a) of this section.


§ 663.815 What are needs-related payments?

Needs-related payments provide financial assistance to participants for the purpose of enabling individuals to participate in training and are one of the supportive services authorized by WIA section 134(e)(3).


§ 663.820 What are the eligibility requirements for adults to receive needs-related payments?

Adults must:


(a) Be unemployed,


(b) Not qualify for, or have ceased qualifying for, unemployment compensation; and


(c) Be enrolled in a program of training services under WIA section 134(d)(4).


§ 663.825 What are the eligibility requirements for dislocated workers to receive needs-related payments?

To receive needs related payments, a dislocated worker must:


(a) Be unemployed, and:


(1) Have ceased to qualify for unemployment compensation or trade readjustment allowance under TAA or NAFTA-TAA; and


(2) Be enrolled in a program of training services under WIA section 134(d)(4) by the end of the 13th week after the most recent layoff that resulted in a determination of the worker’s eligibility as a dislocated worker, or, if later, by the end of the 8th week after the worker is informed that a short-term layoff will exceed 6 months; or


(b) Be unemployed and did not qualify for unemployment compensation or trade readjustment assistance under TAA or NAFTA-TAA.


§ 663.830 May needs-related payments be paid while a participant is waiting to start training classes?

Yes, payments may be provided if the participant has been accepted in a training program that will begin within 30 calendar days. The Governor may authorize local areas to extend the 30 day period to address appropriate circumstances.


§ 663.840 How is the level of needs-related payments determined?

(a) The payment level for adults must be established by the Local Board.


(b) For dislocated workers, payments must not exceed the greater of either of the following levels:


(1) For participants who were eligible for unemployment compensation as a result of the qualifying dislocation, the payment may not exceed the applicable weekly level of the unemployment compensation benefit; or


(2) For participants who did not qualify for unemployment compensation as a result of the qualifying layoff, the weekly payment may not exceed the poverty level for an equivalent period. The weekly payment level must be adjusted to reflect changes in total family income as determined by Local Board policies. (WIA sec. 134(e)(3)(C).)


PART 664 – YOUTH ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT


Authority:Sec. 506(c), Pub. L. 105-220; 20 U.S.C. 9276(c).


Source:65 FR 49411, Aug. 11, 2000, unless otherwise noted.

Subpart A – Youth Councils

§ 664.100 What is the youth council?

(a) The duties and membership requirements of the youth council are described in WIA section 117(h) and 20 CFR 661.335 and 661.340.


(b) The purpose of the youth council is to provide expertise in youth policy and to assist the Local Board in:


(1) Developing and recommending local youth employment and training policy and practice;


(2) Broadening the youth employment and training focus in the community to incorporate a youth development perspective;


(3) Establishing linkages with other organizations serving youth in the local area; and


(4) Taking into account a range of issues that can have an impact on the success of youth in the labor market. (WIA sec. 117(h).)


§ 664.110 Who is responsible for oversight of youth programs in the local area?

(a) The Local Board, working with the youth council, is responsible for conducting oversight of local youth programs operated under the Act, to ensure both fiscal and programmatic accountability.


(b) Local program oversight is conducted in consultation with the local area’s chief elected official.


(c) The Local Board may, after consultation with the CEO, delegate its responsibility for oversight of eligible youth providers, as well as other youth program oversight responsibilities, to the youth council, recognizing the advantage of delegating such responsibilities to the youth council whose members have expertise in youth issues. (WIA sec. 117(d); 117(h)(4).)


Subpart B – Eligibility for Youth Services

§ 664.200 Who is eligible for youth services?

An eligible youth is defined, under WIA sec. 101(13), as an individual who:


(a) Is age 14 through 21;


(b) Is a low income individual, as defined in the WIA section 101(25); and


(c) Is within one or more of the following categories:


(1) Deficient in basic literacy skills;


(2) School dropout;


(3) Homeless, runaway, or foster child;


(4) Pregnant or parenting;


(5) Offender; or


(6) Is an individual (including a youth with a disability) who requires additional assistance to complete an educational program, or to secure and hold employment. (WIA sec. 101(13).)


§ 664.205 How is the “deficient in basic literacy skills” criterion in § 664.200(c)(1) defined and documented?

(a) Definitions and eligibility documentation requirements regarding the “deficient in basic literacy skills” criterion in § 664.200(c)(1) may be established at the State or local level. These definitions may establish such criteria as are needed to address State or local concerns, and must include a determination that an individual:


(1) Computes or solves problems, reads, writes, or speaks English at or below the 8th grade level on a generally accepted standardized test or a comparable score on a criterion-referenced test; or


(2) Is unable to compute or solve problems, read, write, or speak English at a level necessary to function on the job, in the individual’s family or in society. (WIA secs. 101(19), 203(12).)


(b) In cases where the State Board establishes State policy on this criterion, the policy must be included in the State plan. (WIA secs. 101(13)(C)(i), 101(19).)


§ 664.210 How is the “requires additional assistance to complete an educational program, or to secure and hold employment” criterion in § 664.200(c)(6) defined and documented?

Definitions and eligibility documentation requirements regarding the “requires additional assistance to complete an educational program, or to secure and hold employment” criterion of § 664.200(c)(6) may be established at the State or local level. In cases where the State Board establishes State policy on this criterion, the policy must be included in the State Plan. (WIA sec. 101(13)(C)(iv).)


§ 664.215 Must youth participants be registered to participate in the youth program?

(a) Yes, all youth participants must be registered.


(b) Registration is the process of collecting information to support a determination of eligibility.


(c) Equal opportunity data must be collected during the registration process on any individual who has submitted personal information in response to a request by the recipient for such information.


§ 664.220 Is there an exception to permit youth who are not low-income individuals to receive youth services?

Yes, up to five percent of youth participants served by youth programs in a local area may be individuals who do not meet the income criterion for eligible youth, provided that they are within one or more of the following categories:


(a) School dropout;


(b) Basic skills deficient, as defined in WIA section 101(4);


(c) Are one or more grade levels below the grade level appropriate to the individual’s age;


(d) Pregnant or parenting;


(e) Possess one or more disabilities, including learning disabilities;


(f) Homeless or runaway;


(g) Offender; or


(h) Face serious barriers to employment as identified by the Local Board. (WIA sec. 129(c)(5).)


§ 664.230 Are the eligibility barriers for eligible youth the same as the eligibility barriers for the five percent of youth participants who do not have to meet income eligibility requirements?

No, the barriers listed in §§ 664.200 and 664.220 are not the same. Both lists of eligibility barriers include school dropout, homeless or runaway, pregnant or parenting, and offender, but each list contains barriers not included on the other list.


§ 664.240 May a local program use eligibility for free lunches under the National School Lunch Program as a substitute for the income eligibility criteria under title I of WIA?

No, the criteria for income eligibility under the National School Lunch Program are not the same as the Act’s income eligibility criteria. Therefore, the school lunch list may not be used as a substitute for income eligibility to determine who is eligible for services under the Act.


§ 664.250 May a disabled youth whose family does not meet income eligibility criteria under the Act be eligible for youth services?

Yes, even if the family of a disabled youth does not meet the income eligibility criteria, the disabled youth may be considered a low-income individual if the youth’s own income:


(a) Meets the income criteria established in WIA section 101(25)(B); or


(b) Meets the income eligibility criteria for cash payments under any Federal, State or local public assistance program. (WIA sec. 101(25)(F).)


Subpart C – Out-of-School Youth

§ 664.300 Who is an “out-of-school youth”?

An out-of-school youth is an individual who:


(a) Is an eligible youth who is a school dropout; or


(b) Is an eligible youth who has either graduated from high school or holds a GED, but is basic skills deficient, unemployed, or underemployed. (WIA sec. 101(33).)


§ 664.310 When is dropout status determined, particularly for youth attending alternative schools?

A school dropout is defined as an individual who is no longer attending any school and who has not received a secondary school diploma or its recognized equivalent. A youth’s dropout status is determined at the time of registration. A youth attending an alternative school at the time of registration is not a dropout. An individual who is out-of school at the time of registration and subsequently placed in an alternative school, may be considered an out-of-school youth for the purposes of the 30 percent expenditure requirement for out-of-school youth. (WIA sec. 101(39).)


§ 664.320 Does the requirement that at least 30 percent of youth funds be used to provide activities to out-of-school youth apply to all youth funds?

(a) Yes, the 30 percent requirement applies to the total amount of all funds allocated to a local area under WIA section 128(b)(2)(A) or (b)(3), except for local area expenditures for administrative purposes under 20 CFR 667.210(a)(2).


(b) Although it is not necessary to ensure that 30 percent of such funds spent on summer employment opportunities (or any other particular element of the youth program) are spent on out-of-school youth, the funds spent on these activities are included in the total to which the 30 percent requirement applies.


(c) There is a limited exception, at WIA section 129(c)(4)(B), under which certain small States may apply to the Secretary to reduce the minimum amount that must be spent on out-of-school youth. (WIA sec. 129(c)(4).)


Subpart D – Youth Program Design, Elements, and Parameters

§ 664.400 What is a local youth program?

A local youth program is defined as those youth activities offered by a Local Workforce Investment Board for a designated local workforce investment area, as specified in 20 CFR part 661.


§ 664.405 How must local youth programs be designed?

(a) The design framework of local youth programs must:


(1) Provide an objective assessment of each youth participant, that meets the requirements of WIA section 129(c)(1)(A), and includes a review of the academic and occupational skill levels, as well as the service needs, of each youth;


(2) Develop an individual service strategy for each youth participant that meets the requirements of WIA section 129(c)(1)(B), including identifying an age-appropriate career goal and consideration of the assessment results for each youth; and


(3) Provide preparation for postsecondary educational opportunities, provide linkages between academic and occupational learning, provide preparation for employment, and provide effective connections to intermediary organizations that provide strong links to the job market and employers.


(4) The requirement in WIA section 123 that eligible providers of youth services be selected by awarding a grant or contract on a competitive basis does not apply to the design framework component, such as services for intake, objective assessment and the development of individual service strategy, when these services are provided by the grant recipient/fiscal agent.


(b) The local plan must describe the design framework for youth program design in the local area, and how the ten program elements required in § 664.410 are provided within that framework.


(c) Local Boards must ensure appropriate links to entities that will foster the participation of eligible local area youth. Such links may include connections to:


(1) Local area justice and law enforcement officials;


(2) Local public housing authorities;


(3) Local education agencies;


(4) Job Corps representatives; and


(5) Representatives of other area youth initiatives, including those that serve homeless youth and other public and private youth initiatives.


(d) Local Boards must ensure that the referral requirements in WIA section 129(c)(3) for youth who meet the income eligibility criteria are met, including:


(1) Providing these youth with information regarding the full array of applicable or appropriate services available through the Local Board or other eligible providers, or One-Stop partners; and


(2) Referring these youth to appropriate training and educational programs that have the capacity to serve them either on a sequential or concurrent basis.


(e) In order to meet the basic skills and training needs of eligible applicants who do not meet the enrollment requirements of a particular program or who cannot be served by the program, each eligible youth provider must ensure that these youth are referred:


(1) For further assessment, as necessary, and


(2) To appropriate programs, in accordance with paragraph (d)(2) of this section.


(f) Local Boards must ensure that parents, youth participants, and other members of the community with experience relating to youth programs are involved in both the design and implementation of its youth programs.


(g) The objective assessment required under paragraph (a)(1) of this section or the individual service strategy required under paragraph (a)(2) of this section is not required if the program provider determines that it is appropriate to use a recent objective assessment or individual service strategy that was developed under another education or training program. (WIA section 129(c)(1).)


§ 664.410 Must local programs include each of the ten program elements listed in WIA section 129(c)(2) as options available to youth participants?

(a) Yes, local programs must make the following services available to youth participants:


(1) Tutoring, study skills training, and instruction leading to secondary school completion, including dropout prevention strategies;


(2) Alternative secondary school offerings;


(3) Summer employment opportunities directly linked to academic and occupational learning;


(4) Paid and unpaid work experiences, including internships and job shadowing, as provided in §§ 664.460 and 664.470;


(5) Occupational skill training;


(6) Leadership development opportunities, which include community service and peer-centered activities encouraging responsibility and other positive social behaviors;


(7) Supportive services, which may include the services listed in § 664.440;


(8) Adult mentoring for a duration of at least twelve (12) months, that may occur both during and after program participation;


(9) Followup services, as provided in § 664.450; and


(10) Comprehensive guidance and counseling, including drug and alcohol abuse counseling, as well as referrals to counseling, as appropriate to the needs of the individual youth.


(b) Local programs have the discretion to determine what specific program services will be provided to a youth participant, based on each participant’s objective assessment and individual service strategy. (WIA sec. 129(c)(2).)


§ 664.420 What are leadership development opportunities?

Leadership development opportunities are opportunities that encourage responsibility, employability, and other positive social behaviors such as:


(a) Exposure to postsecondary educational opportunities;


(b) Community and service learning projects;


(c) Peer-centered activities, including peer mentoring and tutoring;


(d) Organizational and team work training, including team leadership training;


(e) Training in decision-making, including determining priorities; and


(f) Citizenship training, including life skills training such as parenting, work behavior training, and budgeting of resources. (WIA sec. 129(c)(2)(F).)


§ 664.430 What are positive social behaviors?

Positive social behaviors are outcomes of leadership opportunities, often referred to as soft skills, which are incorporated by many local programs as part of their menu of services. Positive social behaviors focus on areas that may include the following:


(a) Positive attitudinal development;


(b) Self esteem building;


(c) Openness to working with individuals from diverse racial and ethnic backgrounds;


(d) Maintaining healthy lifestyles, including being alcohol and drug free;


(e) Maintaining positive relationships with responsible adults and peers, and contributing to the well being of one’s community, including voting;


(f) Maintaining a commitment to learning and academic success;


(g) Avoiding delinquency;


(h) Postponed and responsible parenting; and


(i) Positive job attitudes and work skills. (WIA sec. 129(c)(2)(F).)


§ 664.440 What are supportive services for youth?

Supportive services for youth, as defined in WIA section 101(46), may include the following:


(a) Linkages to community services;


(b) Assistance with transportation;


(c) Assistance with child care and dependent care;


(d) Assistance with housing;


(e) Referrals to medical services; and


(f) Assistance with uniforms or other appropriate work attire and work-related tools, including such items as eye glasses and protective eye gear. (WIA sec. 129(c)(2)(G).)


§ 664.450 What are follow-up services for youth?

(a) Follow-up services for youth may include:


(1) The leadership development and supportive service activities listed in §§ 664.420 and 664.440;


(2) Regular contact with a youth participant’s employer, including assistance in addressing work-related problems that arise;


(3) Assistance in securing better paying jobs, career development and further education;


(4) Work-related peer support groups;


(5) Adult mentoring; and


(6) Tracking the progress of youth in employment after training.


(b) All youth participants must receive some form of follow-up services for a minimum duration of 12 months. Follow-up services may be provided beyond twelve (12) months at the State or Local Board’s discretion. The types of services provided and the duration of services must be determined based on the needs of the individual. The scope of these follow-up services may be less intensive for youth who have only participated in summer youth employment opportunities. (WIA sec. 129(c)(2)(I).)


§ 664.460 What are work experiences for youth?

(a) Work experiences are planned, structured learning experiences that take place in a workplace for a limited period of time. As provided in WIA section 129(c)(2)(D) and § 664.470, work experiences may be paid or unpaid.


(b) Work experience workplaces may be in the private, for-profit sector; the non-profit sector; or the public sector.


(c) Work experiences are designed to enable youth to gain exposure to the working world and its requirements. Work experiences are appropriate and desirable activities for many youth throughout the year. Work experiences should help youth acquire the personal attributes, knowledge, and skills needed to obtain a job and advance in employment. The purpose is to provide the youth participant with the opportunities for career exploration and skill development and is not to benefit the employer, although the employer may, in fact, benefit from the activities performed by the youth. Work experiences may be subsidized or unsubsidized and may include the following elements:


(1) Instruction in employability skills or generic workplace skills such as those identified by the Secretary’s Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills (SCANS);


(2) Exposure to various aspects of an industry;


(3) Progressively more complex tasks;


(4) Internships and job shadowing;


(5) The integration of basic academic skills into work activities;


(6) Supported work, work adjustment, and other transition activities;


(7) Entrepreneurship;


(8) Service learning;


(9) Paid and unpaid community service; and


(10) Other elements designed to achieve the goals of work experiences.


(d) In most cases, on-the-job training is not an appropriate work experiences activity for youth participants under age 18. Local program operators may choose, however, to use this service strategy for eligible youth when it is appropriate based on the needs identified by the objective assessment of an individual youth participant. (WIA sec. 129(c)(2)(D).)


§ 664.470 Are paid work experiences allowable activities?

Funds under the Act may be used to pay wages and related benefits for work experiences in the public; private, for-profit or non-profit sectors where the objective assessment and individual service strategy indicate that work experiences are appropriate. (WIA sec. 129(c)(2)(D).)


Subpart E – Concurrent Enrollment

§ 664.500 May youth participate in both youth and adult/dislocated worker programs concurrently?

(a) Yes, under the Act, eligible youth are 14 through 21 years of age. Adults are defined in the Act as individuals age 18 and older. Thus, individuals ages 18 through 21 may be eligible for both adult and youth programs. There is no specified age for the dislocated worker program.


(b) Individuals who meet the respective eligibility requirements may participate in adult and youth programs concurrently. Concurrent enrollment is allowable for youth served in programs under WIA titles I or II. Such individuals must be eligible under the youth or adult/dislocated worker eligibility criteria applicable to the services received. Local program operators may determine, for individuals in this age group, the appropriate level and balance of services under the youth, adult, dislocated worker, or other services.


(c) Local program operators must identify and track the funding streams which pay the costs of services provided to individuals who are participating in youth and adult/dislocated worker programs concurrently, and ensure that services are not duplicated.


§ 664.510 Are Individual Training Accounts allowed for youth participants?

No, however, individuals age 18 and above, who are eligible for training services under the adult and dislocated worker programs, may receive Individual Training Accounts through those programs. Requirements for concurrent participation requirements are set forth in § 664.500. To the extent possible, in order to enhance youth participant choice, youth participants should be involved in the selection of educational and training activities.


Subpart F – Summer Employment Opportunities

§ 664.600 Are Local Boards required to offer summer employment opportunities in the local youth program?

(a) Yes, Local Boards are required to offer summer youth employment opportunities that link academic and occupational learning as part of the menu of services required in § 664.410(a).


(b) Summer youth employment must provide direct linkages to academic and occupational learning, and may provide other elements and strategies as appropriate to serve the needs and goals of the participants.


(c) Local Boards may determine how much of available youth funds will be used for summer and for year-round youth activities.


(d) The summer youth employment opportunities element is not intended to be a stand-alone program. Local programs should integrate a youth’s participation in that element into a comprehensive strategy for addressing the youth’s employment and training needs. Youths who participate in summer employment opportunities must be provided with a minimum of twelve months of followup services, as required in § 664.450. (WIA sec. 129(c)(2)(C).)


§ 664.610 How is the summer employment opportunities element administered?

Chief elected officials and Local Boards are responsible for ensuring that the local youth program provides summer employment opportunities to youth. The chief elected officials (which may include local government units operating as a consortium) are the grant recipients for local youth funds, unless another entity is chosen to be grant recipient or fiscal agent under WIA section 117(d)(3)(B). If, in the administration of the summer employment opportunities element of the local youth program, providers other than the grant recipient/fiscal agent, are used to provide summer youth employment opportunities, these providers must be selected by awarding a grant or contract on a competitive basis, based on the recommendation of the youth council and on criteria contained in the State Plan. However, the selection of employers who are providing unsubsidized employment opportunities may be excluded from the competitive process. (WIA sec. 129(c)(2)(C).)


§ 664.620 Do the core indicators described in 20 CFR 666.100(a)(3) apply to participation in summer employment activities?

Yes, the summer employment opportunities element is one of a number of activities authorized by the WIA youth program. WIA section 136(b)(2) (A)(ii) and(B) provides specific core indicators of performance for youth, and requires that all participating youth be included in the determination of whether the local levels of performance are met. Program operators can help ensure positive outcomes for youth participants by providing them with continuity of services.


Subpart G – One-Stop Services to Youth

§ 664.700 What is the connection between the youth program and the One-Stop service delivery system?

(a) The chief elected official (or designee, under WIA section 117(d)(3)(B)), as the local grant recipient for the youth program is a required One-Stop partner and is subject to the requirements that apply to such partners, described in 20 CFR part 662.


(b) In addition to the provisions of 20 CFR part 662, connections between the youth program and the One-Stop system may include those that facilitate:


(1) The coordination and provision of youth activities;


(2) Linkages to the job market and employers;


(3) Access for eligible youth to the information and services required in §§ 664.400 and 664.410; and


(4) Other activities designed to achieve the purposes of the youth program and youth activities as described in WIA section 129(a). (WIA secs. 121(b)(1)(B)(i); 129.)


§ 664.710 Do Local Boards have the flexibility to offer services to area youth who are not eligible under the youth program through the One-Stop centers?

Yes, however, One-Stop services for non-eligible youth must be funded by programs that are authorized to provide services to such youth. For example, basic labor exchange services under the Wagner-Peyser Act may be provided to any youth.


Subpart H – Youth Opportunity Grants

§ 664.800 How are the recipients of Youth Opportunity Grants selected?

(a) Youth Opportunity Grants are awarded through a competitive selection process. The Secretary establishes appropriate application procedures, selection criteria, and an approval process for awarding Youth Opportunity Grants to applicants which can accomplish the purpose of the Act and use available funds in an effective manner in the Solicitation for Grant Applications announcing the competition.


(b) The Secretary distributes grants equitably among urban and rural areas by taking into consideration such factors as the following:


(1) The poverty rate in urban and rural communities;


(2) The number of people in poverty in urban and rural communities; and


(3) The quality of proposals received. (WIA sec.169(a) and (e).)


§ 664.810 How does a Local Board or other entity become eligible to receive a Youth Opportunity Grant?

(a) A Local Board is eligible to receive a Youth Opportunity Grant if it serves a community that:


(1) Has been designated as an empowerment zone (EZ) or enterprise community (EC) under section 1391 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986;


(2) Is located in a State that does not have an EZ or an EC and that has been designated by its Governor as a high poverty area; or


(3) Is one of two areas in a State that has been designated by the Governor as an area for which a local board may apply for a Youth Opportunity Grant, and that meets the poverty rate criteria in section 1392 (a)(4), (b), and (d) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986.


(b) An entity other than a Local Board is eligible to receive a grant if that entity:


(1) Is a WIA Indian and Native American grant recipient under WIA section 166; and


(2) Serves a community that:


(i) Meets the poverty rate criteria in section 1392(a)(4), (b), and (d) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986; and


(ii) Is located on an Indian reservation or serves Oklahoma Indians or Alaska Native villages or Native groups, as provided in WIA section 169 (d)(2)(B). (WIA sec. 169(c) and (d).)


§ 664.820 Who is eligible to receive services under Youth Opportunity Grants?

All individuals ages 14 through 21 who reside in the community identified in the grant are eligible to receive services under the grant. (WIA sec. 169(a).)


§ 664.830 How are performance measures for Youth Opportunity Grants determined?

(a) The Secretary negotiates performance measures, including appropriate performance levels for each indicator, with each selected grantee, based on information contained in the application.


(b) Performance indicators for the measures negotiated under Youth Opportunity Grants are the indicators of performance provided in WIA sections 136(b)(2)(A) and (B). (WIA sec. 169(f).).


PART 665 – STATEWIDE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT


Authority:Section 506(c), Pub. L. 105-220; 20 U.S.C. 9276(c).


Source:65 FR 49415, Aug. 11, 2000, unless otherwise noted.

Subpart A – General Description

§ 665.100 What are the Statewide workforce investment activities under title I of WIA?

Statewide workforce investment activities include Statewide employment and training activities for adults and dislocated workers, as described in WIA section 134(a), and Statewide youth activities, as described in WIA section 129(b). They include both required and allowable activities. In accordance with the requirements of this subpart, the State may develop policies and strategies for use of Statewide workforce investment funds. Descriptions of these policies and strategies must be included in the State Plan. (WIA secs. 129(b), 134(a).)


§ 665.110 How are Statewide workforce investment activities funded?

(a) Except for the Statewide rapid response activities described in paragraph (c) of this section, Statewide workforce investment activities are supported by funds reserved by the Governor under WIA section 128(a).


(b) Funds reserved by the Governor for Statewide workforce investment activities may be combined and used for any of the activities authorized in WIA sections 129(b), 134(a)(2)(B) or 134(a)(3)(A) (which are described in §§ 665.200 and 665.210), regardless of whether the funds were allotted through the youth, adult, or dislocated worker funding streams.


(c) Funds for Statewide rapid response activities are reserved under WIA section 133(a)(2) and may be used to provide the activities authorized at section 134(a)(2)(A) (which are described in §§ 665.310 through 665.330). (WIA secs. 129(b), 133(a)(2), 134(a)(2)(B), and 134(a)(3)(A).)


Subpart B – Required and Allowable Statewide Workforce Investment Activities

§ 665.200 What are required Statewide workforce investment activities?

Required Statewide workforce investment activities are:


(a) Required rapid response activities, as described in § 665.310;


(b) Disseminating:


(1) The State list of eligible providers of training services (including those providing non-traditional training services), for adults and dislocated workers;


(2) Information identifying eligible providers of on-the-job training (OJT) and customized training;


(3) Performance and program cost information about these providers, as described in 20 CFR 663.540; and


(4) A list of eligible providers of youth activities as described in WIA section 123;


(c) States must assure that the information listed in paragraphs (b)(1) through (4) of this section is widely available.


(d) Conducting evaluations, under WIA section 136(e), of workforce investment activities for adults, dislocated workers and youth, in order to establish and promote methods for continuously improving such activities to achieve high-level performance within, and high-level outcomes from, the Statewide workforce investment system. Such evaluations must be designed and conducted in conjunction with the State and Local Boards, and must include analysis of customer feedback, outcome and process measures in the workforce investment system. To the maximum extent practicable, these evaluations should be conducted in coordination with Federal evaluations carried out under WIA section 172.


(e) Providing incentive grants:


(1) To local areas for regional cooperation among Local Boards (including Local Boards for a designated region, as described in 20 CFR 661.290);


(2) For local coordination of activities carried out under WIA; and


(3) For exemplary performance by local areas on the performance measures.


(f) Providing technical assistance to local areas that fail to meet local performance measures.


(g) Assisting in the establishment and operation of One-Stop delivery systems, in accordance with the strategy described in the State workforce investment plan. (WIA sec. 112(b)(14).)


(h) Providing additional assistance to local areas that have high concentrations of eligible youth.


(i) Operating a fiscal and management accountability information system, based on guidelines established by the Secretary after consultation with the Governors, chief elected officials, and One-Stop partners, as required by WIA section 136(f). (WIA secs. 129(b)(2), 134(a)(2), and 136(e)(2).)


§ 665.210 What are allowable Statewide workforce investment activities?

Allowable Statewide workforce investment activities include:


(a) State administration of the adult, dislocated worker and youth workforce investment activities, consistent with the five percent administrative cost limitation at 20 CFR 667.210(a)(1).


(b) Providing capacity building and technical assistance to local areas, including Local Boards, One-Stop operators, One-Stop partners, and eligible providers, which may include:


(1) Staff development and training; and


(2) The development of exemplary program activities.


(c) Conducting research and demonstrations.


(d) Establishing and implementing:


(1) Innovative incumbent worker training programs, which may include an employer loan program to assist in skills upgrading; and


(2) Programs targeted to Empowerment Zones and Enterprise Communities.


(e) Providing support to local areas for the identification of eligible training providers.


(f) Implementing innovative programs for displaced homemakers, and programs to increase the number of individuals trained for and placed in non-traditional employment.


(g) Carrying out such adult and dislocated worker employment and training activities as the State determines are necessary to assist local areas in carrying out local employment and training activities.


(h) Carrying out youth activities Statewide.


(i) Preparation and submission to the Secretary of the annual performance progress report as described in 20 CFR 667.300(e). (WIA secs. 129(b)(3) and 134(a)(3).)


§ 665.220 Who is an “incumbent worker” for purposes of Statewide workforce investment activities?

States may establish policies and definitions to determine which workers, or groups of workers, are eligible for incumbent worker services under this subpart. An incumbent worker is an individual who is employed, but an incumbent worker does not necessarily have to meet the eligibility requirements for intensive and training services for employed adults and dislocated workers at 20 CFR 663.220(b) and 663.310. (WIA sec. 134(a)(3)(A)(iv)(I).)


Subpart C – Rapid Response Activities

§ 665.300 What are rapid response activities and who is responsible for providing them?

(a) Rapid response activities are described in §§ 665.310 through 665.330. They encompass the activities necessary to plan and deliver services to enable dislocated workers to transition to new employment as quickly as possible, following either a permanent closure or mass layoff, or a natural or other disaster resulting in a mass job dislocation.


(b) The State is responsible for providing rapid response activities. Rapid response is a required activity carried out in local areas by the State, or an entity designated by the State, in conjunction with the Local Board and chief elected officials. The State must establish methods by which to provide additional assistance to local areas that experience disasters, mass layoffs, plant closings, or other dislocation events when such events substantially increase the number of unemployed individuals.


(c) States must establish a rapid response dislocated worker unit to carry out Statewide rapid response activities. (WIA secs. 101(38), 112(b)(17)(A)(ii) and 134(a)(2)(A).)


§ 665.310 What rapid response activities are required?

Rapid response activities must include:


(a) Immediate and on-site contact with the employer, representatives of the affected workers, and the local community, which may include an assessment of the:


(1) Layoff plans and schedule of the employer;


(2) Potential for averting the layoff(s) in consultation with State or local economic development agencies, including private sector economic development entities;


(3) Background and probable assistance needs of the affected workers;


(4) Reemployment prospects for workers in the local community; and


(5) Available resources to meet the short and long-term assistance needs of the affected workers.


(b) The provision of information and access to unemployment compensation benefits, comprehensive One-Stop system services, and employment and training activities, including information on the Trade Adjustment Assistance (TAA) program and the NAFTA-TAA program (19 U.S.C. 2271 et seq.);


(c) The provision of guidance and/or financial assistance in establishing a labor-management committee voluntarily agreed to by labor and management, or a workforce transition committee comprised of representatives of the employer, the affected workers and the local community. The committee may devise and oversee an implementation strategy that responds to the reemployment needs of the workers. The assistance to this committee may include:


(1) The provision of training and technical assistance to members of the committee;


(2) Funding the operating costs of a committee to enable it to provide advice and assistance in carrying out rapid response activities and in the design and delivery of WIA-authorized services to affected workers. Typically, such support will last no longer than six months; and


(3) Providing a list of potential candidates to serve as a neutral chairperson of the committee.


(d) The provision of emergency assistance adapted to the particular closing, layoff or disaster.


(e) The provision of assistance to the local board and chief elected official(s) to develop a coordinated response to the dislocation event and, as needed, obtain access to State economic development assistance. Such coordinated response may include the development of an application for National Emergency Grant under 20 CFR part 671. (WIA secs. 101(38) and 134(a)(2)(A).)


§ 665.320 May other activities be undertaken as part of rapid response?

Yes, a State or designated entity may provide rapid response activities in addition to the activities required to be provided under § 665.310. In order to provide effective rapid response upon notification of a permanent closure or mass layoff, or a natural or other disaster resulting in a mass job dislocation, the State or designated entity may:


(a) In conjunction, with other appropriate Federal, State and Local agencies and officials, employer associations, technical councils or other industry business councils, and labor organizations:


(1) Develop prospective strategies for addressing dislocation events, that ensure rapid access to the broad range of allowable assistance;


(2) Identify strategies for the aversion of layoffs; and


(3) Develop and maintain mechanisms for the regular exchange of information relating to potential dislocations, available adjustment assistance, and the effectiveness of rapid response strategies.


(b) In collaboration with the appropriate State agency(ies), collect and analyze information related to economic dislocations, including potential closings and layoffs, and all available resources in the State for dislocated workers in order to provide an adequate basis for effective program management, review and evaluation of rapid response and layoff aversion efforts in the State.


(c) Participate in capacity building activities, including providing information about innovative and successful strategies for serving dislocated workers, with local areas serving smaller layoffs.


(d) Assist in devising and overseeing strategies for:


(1) Layoff aversion, such as prefeasibility studies of avoiding a plant closure through an option for a company or group, including the workers, to purchase the plant or company and continue it in operation;


(2) Incumbent worker training, including employer loan programs for employee skill upgrading; and


(3) Linkages with economic development activities at the Federal, State and local levels, including Federal Department of Commerce programs and available State and local business retention and recruitment activities.


§ 665.330 Are the NAFTA-TAA program requirements for rapid response also required activities?

The Governor must ensure that rapid response activities under WIA are made available to workers who, under the NAFTA Implementation Act (Public Law 103-182), are members of a group of workers (including those in any agricultural firm or subdivision of an agricultural firm) for which the Governor has made a preliminary finding that:


(a) A significant number or proportion of the workers in such firm or an appropriate subdivision of the firm have become totally or partially separated, or are threatened to become totally or partially separated; and


(b) Either:


(1) The sales or production, or both, of such firm or subdivision have decreased absolutely; and


(2) Imports from Mexico or Canada of articles like or directly competitive with those produced by such firm or subdivision have increased; or


(c) There has been a shift in production by such workers’ firm or subdivision to Mexico or Canada of articles which are produced by the firm or subdivision.


§ 665.340 What is meant by “provision of additional assistance” in WIA section 134(a)(2)(A)(ii)?

Up to 25 percent of dislocated worker funds may be reserved for rapid response activities. Once the State has reserved adequate funds for rapid response activities, such as those described in §§ 665.310 and 665.320, the remainder of the funds may be used by the State to provide funds to local areas, that experience increased numbers of unemployed individuals due to natural disasters, plant closings, mass layoffs or other events, for provision of direct services to participants (such as intensive, training, and other services) if there are not adequate local funds available to assist the dislocated workers.


PART 666 – PERFORMANCE ACCOUNTABILITY UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT


Authority:Sec. 506(c), Pub. L. 105-220; 20 U.S.C. 9276(c).


Source:65 FR 49402, Aug. 11, 2000, unless otherwise noted.

Subpart A – State Measures of Performance

§ 666.100 What performance indicators must be included in a State’s plan?

(a) All States submitting a State Plan under WIA title I, subtitle B must propose expected levels of performance for each of the core indicators of performance for the adult, dislocated worker and youth programs, respectively and the two customer satisfaction indicators.


(1) For the Adult program, these indicators are:


(i) Entry into unsubsidized employment;


(ii) Retention in unsubsidized employment six months after entry into the employment;


(iii) Earnings received in unsubsidized employment six months after entry into the employment; and


(iv) Attainment of a recognized credential related to achievement of educational skills (such as a secondary school diploma or its recognized equivalent), or occupational skills, by participants who enter unsubsidized employment.


(2) For the Dislocated Worker program, these indicators are:


(i) Entry into unsubsidized employment;


(ii) Retention in unsubsidized employment six months after entry into the employment;


(iii) Earnings received in unsubsidized employment six months after entry into the employment; and


(iv) Attainment of a recognized credential related to achievement of educational skills (such as a secondary school diploma or its recognized equivalent), or occupational skills, by participants who enter unsubsidized employment.


(3) For the Youth program, these indicators are:


(i) For eligible youth aged 14 through 18:


(A) Attainment of basic skills goals, and, as appropriate, work readiness or occupational skills goals, up to a maximum of three goals per year;


(B) Attainment of secondary school diplomas and their recognized equivalents; and


(C) Placement and retention in postsecondary education, advanced training, military service, employment, or qualified apprenticeships.


(ii) For eligible youth aged 19 through 21:


(A) Entry into unsubsidized employment;


(B) Retention in unsubsidized employment six months after entry into the employment;


(C) Earnings received in unsubsidized employment six months after entry into the employment; and


(D) Attainment of a recognized credential related to achievement of educational skills (such as a secondary school diploma or its recognized equivalent), or occupational skills, by participants who enter post-secondary education, advanced training, or unsubsidized employment.


(4) A single customer satisfaction measure for employers and a single customer satisfaction indicator for participants must be used for the WIA title I, subtitle B programs for adults, dislocated workers and youth. (WIA sec. 136(b)(2).)


(b) After consultation with the representatives identified in WIA sections 136(i) and 502(b), the Departments of Labor and Education will issue definitions for the performance indicators established under title I and title II of WIA. (WIA sec. 136 (b), (f) and (i).)


§ 666.110 May a Governor require additional indicators of performance?

Yes, Governors may develop additional indicators of performance for adults, youth and dislocated worker activities. These indicators must be included in the State Plan. (WIA sec. 136(b)(2)(C).)


§ 666.120 What are the procedures for negotiating annual levels of performance?

(a) We issue instructions on the specific information that must accompany the State Plan and that is used to review the State’s expected levels of performance. The instructions may require that levels of performance for years two and three be expressed as a percentage improvement over the immediately preceding year’s performance, consistent with the objective of continuous improvement.


(b) States must submit expected levels of performance for the required indicators for each of the first three program years covered by the Plan.


(c) The Secretary and the Governor must reach agreement on levels of performance for each core indicator and the customer satisfaction indicators. In negotiating these levels, the following must be taken into account:


(1) The expected levels of performance identified in the State Plan;


(2) The extent to which the levels of performance for each core indicator assist in achieving high customer satisfaction;


(3) The extent to which the levels of performance promote continuous improvement and ensure optimal return on the investment of Federal funds; and


(4) How the levels compare with those of other States, taking into account factors including differences in economic conditions, participant characteristics, and the proposed service mix and strategies.


(d) The levels of performance agreed to under paragraph (c) of this section will be the State’s negotiated levels of performance for the first three years of the State Plan. These levels will be used to determine whether sanctions will be applied or incentive grant funds will be awarded.


(e) Before the fourth year of the State Plan, the Secretary and the Governor must reach agreement on levels of performance for each core indicator and the customer satisfaction indicators for the fourth and fifth years covered by the plan. In negotiating these levels, the factors listed in paragraph (c) of this section must be taken into account.


(f) The levels of performance agreed to under paragraph (e) of this section will be the State negotiated levels of performance for the fourth and fifth years of the plan and must be incorporated into the State Plan.


(g) Levels of performance for the additional indicators developed by the Governor, including additional indicators to demonstrate and measure continuous improvement toward goals identified by the State, are not part of the negotiations described in paragraphs (c) and (e) of this section. (WIA sec. 136(b)(3).)


(h) State negotiated levels of performance may be revised in accordance with § 666.130.


§ 666.130 Under what conditions may a State or DOL request revisions to the State negotiated levels of performance?

(a) The DOL guidelines describe when and under what circumstances a Governor may request revisions to negotiated levels. These circumstances include significant changes in economic conditions, in the characteristics of participants entering the program, or in the services to be provided from when the initial plan was submitted and approved. (WIA sec. 136(b)(3)(A)(vi).)


(b) The guidelines will establish the circumstances under which a State will be required to submit revisions under specified circumstances.


§ 666.140 Which individuals receiving services are included in the core indicators of performance?

(a)(1) The core indicators of performance apply to all individuals who are registered under 20 CFR 663.105 and 664.215 for the adult, dislocated worker and youth programs, except for those adults and dislocated workers who participate exclusively in self-service or informational activities. (WIA sec. 136(b)(2)(A).)


(2) Self-service and informational activities are those core services that are made available and accessible to the general public, that are designed to inform and educate individuals about the labor market and their employment strengths, weaknesses, and the range of services appropriate to their situation, and that do not require significant staff involvement with the individual in terms of resources or time.


(b) For registered participants, a standardized record that includes appropriate performance information must be maintained in accordance with WIA section 185(a)(3).


(c) Performance will be measured on the basis of results achieved by registered participants, and will reflect services provided under WIA title I, subtitle B programs for adults, dislocated workers and youth. Performance may also take into account services provided to participants by other One-Stop partner programs and activities, to the extent that the local MOU provides for the sharing of participant information.


§ 666.150 What responsibility do States have to use quarterly wage record information for performance accountability?

(a) States must, consistent with State laws, use quarterly wage record information in measuring the progress on State and local performance measures. In order to meet this requirement the use of social security numbers from registered participants and such other information as is necessary to measure the progress of those participants through quarterly wage record information is authorized.


(b) The State must include in the State Plan a description of the State’s performance accountability system, and a description of the State’s strategy for using quarterly wage record information to measure the progress on State and local performance measures. The description must identify the entities that may have access to quarterly wage record information for this purpose.


(c) “Quarterly wage record information” means information regarding wages paid to an individual, the social security account number (or numbers, if more than one) of the individual and the name, address, State, and (when known) the Federal employer identification number of the employer paying the wages to the individual. (WIA sec. 136(f)(2).)


Subpart B – Incentives and Sanctions for State Performance

§ 666.200 Under what circumstances is a State eligible for an Incentive Grant?

A State is eligible to apply for an Incentive Grant if its performance for the immediately preceding year exceeds:


(a) The State’s negotiated levels of performance for the required core indicators for the adult, dislocated worker and youth programs under title I of WIA as well as the customer satisfaction indicators for WIA title I programs;


(b) The adjusted levels of performance for title II Adult Education and Family Literacy programs; and


(c) The adjusted levels of performance under section 113 of the Carl D. Perkins Vocational and Technical Education Act (20 U.S.C. 2301 et seq.). (WIA sec. 503.)


§ 666.205 What are the time frames under which States submit performance progress reports and apply for incentive grants?

(a) State performance progress reports must be filed by the due date established in reporting instructions issued by the Department.


(b) Based upon the reports filed under paragraph (a) of this section, we will determine the amount of funds available, under WIA title I, to each eligible State for incentive grants, in accordance with the criteria of § 666.230. We will publish the award amounts for each eligible State, after consultation with the Secretary of Education, within ninety (90) days after the due date for performance progress reports established under paragraph (a) of this section.


(c) Within forty-five (45) days of the publication of award amounts under paragraph (b) of this section, States may apply for incentive grants in accordance with the requirements of § 666.220.


§ 666.210 How may Incentive Grant funds be used?

Incentive grant funds are awarded to States to carry out any one or more innovative programs under titles I or II of WIA or the Carl D. Perkins Vocational and Technical Education Act, regardless of which Act is the source of the incentive funds. (WIA sec. 503(a).)


§ 666.220 What information must be included in a State Board’s application for an Incentive Grant?

(a) After consultation with the Secretary of Education, we will issue instructions annually which will include the amount of funds available to be awarded for each State and provide instructions for submitting applications for an Incentive Grant.


(b) Each State desiring an incentive grant must submit to the Secretary an application, developed by the State Board, containing the following assurances:


(1) The State legislature was consulted regarding the development of the application.


(2) The application was approved by the Governor, the eligible agency (as defined in WIA section 203), and the State agency responsible for vocational and technical programs under the Carl D. Perkins Vocational and Technical Education Act.


(3) The State exceeded the State negotiated levels of performance for title I, the levels of performance under title II and the levels for vocational and technical programs under the Carl D. Perkins Vocational and Technical Education Act. (WIA sec. 503(b).)


§ 666.230 How does the Department determine the amounts for Incentive Grant awards?

(a) We determine the total amount to be allocated from funds available under WIA section 174(b) for Incentive Grants taking into consideration such factors as:


(1) The availability of funds under section 174(b) for technical assistance, demonstration and pilot projects, evaluations, and Incentive Grants and the needs for these activities;


(2) The number of States that are eligible for Incentive Grants and their relative program formula allocations under title I;


(3) The availability of funds under WIA section 136(g)(2) resulting from funds withheld for poor performance by States; and


(4) The range of awards established in WIA section 503(c).


(b) We will publish the award amount for eligible States, after consultation with the Secretary of Education, within 90 days after the due date, established under § 666.205(a), for the latest State performance progress report providing the annual information needed to determine State eligibility.


(c) In determining the amount available to an eligible State, the Secretary, with the Secretary of Education, may consider such factors as:


(1) The relative allocations of the eligible State compared to other States;


(2) The extent to which the negotiated levels of performance were exceeded;


(3) Performance improvement relative to previous years;


(4) Changes in economic conditions, participant characteristics and proposed service design since the negotiated levels of performance were agreed to;


(5) The eligible State’s relative performance for each of the indicators compared to other States; and


(6) The performance on those indicators considered most important in terms of accomplishing national goals established by each of the respective Secretaries.


§ 666.240 Under what circumstances may a sanction be applied to a State that fails to achieve negotiated levels of performance for title I?

(a) If a State fails to meet the negotiated levels of performance agreed to under § 666.120 for core indicators of performance or customer satisfaction indicators for the adult, dislocated worker or youth programs under title I of WIA, the Secretary must, upon request, provide technical assistance, as authorized under WIA sections 136(g) and 170.


(b) If a State fails to meet the negotiated levels of performance for core indicators of performance or customer satisfaction indicators for the same program in two successive years, the amount of the succeeding year’s allocation for the applicable program may be reduced by up to five percent.


(c) The exact amount of any allocation reduction will be based upon the degree of failure to meet the negotiated levels of performance for core indicators. In making a determination of the amount, if any, of such a sanction, we may consider factors such as:


(1) The State’s performance relative to other States;


(2) Improvement efforts underway;


(3) Incremental improvement on the performance measures;


(4) Technical assistance previously provided;


(5) Changes in economic conditions and program design;


(6) The characteristics of participants served compared to the participant characteristics described in the State Plan; and


(7) Performance on other core indicators of performance and customer satisfaction indicators for that program. (WIA sec. 136(g).)


(d) Only performance that is less than 80 percent of the negotiated levels will be deemed to be a failure to achieve negotiated levels of performance.


(e) In accordance with 20 CFR 667.300(e), a State grant may be reduced for failure to submit an annual performance progress report.


(f) A State may request review of a sanction we impose in accordance with the provisions of 20 CFR 667.800.


Subpart C – Local Measures of Performance

§ 666.300 What performance indicators apply to local areas?

(a) Each local workforce investment area in a State is subject to the same core indicators of performance and the customer satisfaction indicators that apply to the State under § 666.100(a).


(b) In addition to the indicators described in paragraph (a) of this section, under § 666.110, the Governor may apply additional indicators of performance to local areas in the State. (WIA sec. 136(c)(1).)


§ 666.310 What levels of performance apply to the indicators of performance in local areas?

(a) The Local Board and the chief elected official must negotiate with the Governor and reach agreement on the local levels of performance for each indicator identified under § 666.300. The levels must be based on the State negotiated levels of performance established under § 666.120 and take into account the factors described in paragraph (b) of this section.


(b) In determining the appropriate local levels of performance, the Governor, Local Board and chief elected official must take into account specific economic, demographic and other characteristics of the populations to be served in the local area.


(c) The performance levels agreed to under paragraph (a) of this section must be incorporated in the local plan. (WIA secs. 118(b)(3) and 136(c).)


Subpart D – Incentives and Sanctions for Local Performance

§ 666.400 Under what circumstances are local areas eligible for State Incentive Grants?

(a) States must use a portion of the funds reserved for Statewide workforce investment activities under WIA sections 128(a) and 133(a)(1) to provide Incentive Grants to local areas for regional cooperation among local boards (including local boards for a designated region, as described in WIA section 116(c)), for local coordination of activities carried out under this Act, and for exemplary performance on the local performance measures established under subpart C of this part.


(b) The amount of funds used for Incentive Grants under paragraph (a) of this section and the criteria used for determining exemplary local performance levels to qualify for the incentive grants are determined by the Governor. (WIA sec. 134(a)(2)(B)(iii).)


§ 666.410 How may local incentive awards be used?

The local incentive grant funds may be used for any activities allowed under WIA title I-B.


§ 666.420 Under what circumstances may a sanction be applied to local areas for poor performance?

(a) If a local area fails to meet the levels of performance agreed to under § 666.310 for the core indicators of performance or customer satisfaction indicators for a program in any program year, technical assistance must be provided. The technical assistance must be provided by the Governor with funds reserved for Statewide workforce investment activities under WIA sections 128(a) and 133(a)(1), or, upon the Governor’s request, by the Secretary. The technical assistance may include the development of a performance improvement plan, a modified local plan, or other actions designed to assist the local area in improving performance.


(b) If a local area fails to meet the levels of performance agreed to under § 666.310 for the core indicators of performance or customer satisfaction indicators for a program for two consecutive program years, the Governor must take corrective actions. The corrective actions may include the development of a reorganization plan under which the Governor:


(1) Requires the appointment and certification of a new Local Board;


(2) Prohibits the use of particular service providers or One-Stop partners that have been identified as achieving poor levels of performance; or


(3) Requires other appropriate measures designed to improve the performance of the local area.


(c) A local area may appeal to the Governor to rescind or revise a reorganization plan imposed under paragraph (b) of this section not later than thirty (30) days after receiving notice of the plan. The Governor must make a final decision within 30 days after receipt of the appeal. The Governor’s final decision may be appealed by the Local Board to the Secretary under 20 CFR 667.650(b) not later than thirty (30) days after the local area receives the decision. The decision by the Governor to impose a reorganization plan becomes effective at the time it is issued, and remains effective unless the Secretary rescinds or revises the reorganization plan. Upon receipt of the appeal from the local area, the Secretary must make a final decision within thirty (30) days. (WIA sec. 136(h).)


PART 667 – ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT


Authority:Subtitle C of Title I, Sec. 506(c), Pub. L. 105-220, 112 Stat. 936 (20 U.S.C. 9276(c)); Executive Order 13198, 66 FR 8497, 3 CFR 2001 Comp., p. 750; Executive Order 13279, 67 FR 77141, 3 CFR 2002 Comp., p. 258.


Source:65 FR 49421, Aug. 11, 2000, unless otherwise noted.

Subpart A – Funding

§ 667.100 When do Workforce Investment Act grant funds become available?

(a) Program year. Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, fiscal year appropriations for programs and activities carried out under title I of WIA are available for obligation on the basis of a program year. A program year begins on July 1 in the fiscal year for which the appropriation is made and ends on June 30 of the following year.


(b) Youth fund availability. Fiscal year appropriations for a program year’s youth activities, authorized under chapter 4, subtitle B, title I of WIA, may be made available for obligation beginning on April 1 of the fiscal year for which the appropriation is made.


§ 667.105 What award document authorizes the expenditure of Workforce Investment Act funds under title I of the Act?

(a) Agreement. All WIA title I funds that are awarded by grant, contract or cooperative agreement are issued under an agreement between the Grant Officer/Contracting Officer and the recipient. The agreement describes the terms and conditions applicable to the award of WIA title I funds.


(b) Grant funds awarded to States. Under the Governor/Secretary Agreement described in § 667.110, each program year, the grant agreement described in paragraph (a) of this section will be executed and signed by the Governor or the Governor’s designated representative and Secretary or the Grant Officer. The grant agreement and associated Notices of Obligation are the basis for Federal obligation of funds allotted to the States in accordance with WIA sections 127(b) and 132(b) for each program year.


(c) Indian and Native American Programs. (1) Awards of grants, contracts or cooperative agreements for the WIA Indian and Native American program will be made to eligible entities on a competitive basis every two program years for a two-year period, in accordance with the provisions of 20 CFR part 668. An award for the succeeding two-year period may be made to the same recipient on a non-competitive basis if the recipient:


(i) Has performed satisfactorily; and


(ii) Submits a satisfactory two-year program plan for the succeeding two-year grant, contract or agreement period.


(2) A grant, contract or cooperative agreement may be renewed under the authority of paragraph (c)(1) of this section no more than once during any four-year period for any single recipient.


(d) National Farmworker Jobs programs. (1) Awards of grants or contracts for the National Farmworker Jobs program will be made to eligible entities on a competitive basis every two program years for a two-year period, in accordance with the provisions of 20 CFR part 669. An award for the succeeding two-year period may be made to the same recipient if the recipient:


(i) Has performed satisfactorily; and


(ii) Submits a satisfactory two-year program plan for the succeeding two-year period.


(2) A grant or contract may be renewed under the authority of paragraph (d)(1) of this section no more than once during any four-year period for any single recipient.


(e) Job Corps. (1) Awards of contracts will be made on a competitive basis between the Contracting Officer and eligible entities to operate contract centers and provide operational support services.


(2) The Secretary may enter into interagency agreements with Federal agencies for funding, establishment, and operation of Civilian Conservation Centers for Job Corps programs.


(f) [Reserved]


(g) Awards under WIA sections 171 and 172. (1) Awards of grants, contracts or cooperative agreements will be made to eligible entities for programs or activities authorized under WIA sections 171 or 172. These funds are for:


(i) Demonstration;


(ii) Pilot;


(iii) Multi-service;


(iv) Research;


(v) Multi-State projects; and


(vi) Evaluations


(2) Grants and contracts under paragraphs (g)(1)(i) and (ii) of this section will be awarded on a competitive basis, except that a noncompetitive award may be made in the case of a project that is funded jointly with other public or private entities that provide a portion of the funding.


(3) Contracts and grants under paragraphs (g)(1)(iii), (iv), and (v) of this section in amounts that exceed $100,000 will be awarded on a competitive basis, except that a noncompetitive award may be made in the case of a project that is funded jointly with other public or private sector entities that provide a substantial portion of the assistance under the grant or contract for the project.


(4) Grants or contracts for carrying out projects in paragraphs (g)(1)(iii), (iv), and (v) of this section may not be awarded to the same organization for more than three consecutive years, unless the project is competitively reevaluated within that period.


(5) Entities with nationally recognized expertise in the methods, techniques and knowledge of workforce investment activities will be provided priority in awarding contracts or grants for the projects under paragraphs (g)(1)(iii), (iv), and (v) of this section.


(6) A peer review process will be used for projects under paragraphs (g)(1)(iii), (iv), and (v) of this section for grants that exceed $500,000, and to designate exemplary and promising programs.


(h) Termination. Each grant terminates when the period of fund availability has expired. The grant must be closed in accordance with the closeout provisions at 29 CFR 95.71 or 97.50, as appropriate.


[65 FR 49421, Aug. 11, 2000, as amended at 71 FR 35525, June 21, 2006]


§ 667.107 What is the period of availability for expenditure of WIA funds?

(a) Grant funds expended by States. Funds allotted to States under WIA sections 127(b) and 132(b) for any program year are available for expenditure by the State receiving the funds only during that program year and the two succeeding program years.


(b) Grant funds expended by local areas. (1) Funds allocated by a State to a local area under WIA sections 128(b) and 133(b), for any program year are available for expenditure only during that program year and the succeeding program year.


(2) Funds which are not expended by a local area in the two-year period described in paragraph (b)(1) of this section, must be returned to the State. Funds so returned are available for expenditure by State and local recipients and subrecipients only during the third program year of availability. These funds may:


(i) Be used for Statewide projects, or


(ii) Be distributed to other local areas which had fully expended their allocation of funds for the same program year within the two-year period.


(c) Job Corps. Funds obligated for any program year for any Job Corps activity carried out under title I, subtitle C, of WIA may be expended during that program year and the two succeeding program years.


(d) Funds awarded under WIA sections 171 and 172. Funds obligated for any program year for a program or activity authorized under sections 171 or 172 of WIA remain available until expended.


(e) Other programs under title I of WIA. For all other grants, contracts and cooperative agreements issued under title I of WIA the period of availability for expenditure is set in the terms and conditions of the award document.


§ 667.110 What is the Governor/Secretary Agreement?

(a) To establish a continuing relationship under the Act, the Governor and the Secretary will enter into a Governor/Secretary Agreement. The Agreement will consist of a statement assuring that the State will comply with:


(1) The Workforce Investment Act and all applicable rules and regulations, and


(2) The Wagner-Peyser Act and all applicable rules and regulations.


(b) The Governor/Secretary Agreement may be modified, revised or terminated at any time, upon the agreement of both parties.


§ 667.120 What planning information must a State submit in order to receive a formula grant?

Each State seeking financial assistance under WIA sections 127 (youth) or 132 (adults and dislocated workers) or under the Wagner-Peyser Act must submit a single State Plan. The requirements for the plan content and the plan review process are described in WIA section 112, Wagner-Peyser Act section 8, and 20 CFR 661.220, 661.240 and 652.211 through 652.214.


§ 667.130 How are WIA title I formula funds allocated to local workforce investment areas?

(a) General. The Governor must allocate WIA formula funds allotted for services to youth, adults and dislocated workers in accordance with WIA sections 128 and 133, and this section.


(1) State Boards must assist Governors in the development of any discretionary within-State allocation formulas. (WIA sec. 111(d)(5).)


(2) Within-State allocations must be made:


(i) In accordance with the allocation formulas contained in WIA sections 128(b) and 133(b) and in the State workforce investment plan, and


(ii) After consultation with chief elected officials in each of the workforce investment areas.


(b) State reserve. (1) Of the WIA formula funds allotted for services to youth, adults and dislocated workers, the Governor must reserve funds from each of these sources for Statewide workforce investment activities. In making these reservations, the Governor may reserve up to fifteen (15) percent from each of these sources. Funds reserved under this paragraph may be combined and spent on Statewide employment and training activities, for adults and dislocated workers, and Statewide youth activities, as described in 20 CFR 665.200 and 665.210, without regard to the funding source of the reserved funds.


(2) The Governor must reserve a portion of the dislocated worker funds for Statewide rapid response activities, as described in WIA section 134(a)(2)(A) and 20 CFR 665.310 through 665.330. In making this reservation, the Governor may reserve up to twenty-five (25) percent of the dislocated worker funds.


(c) Youth allocation formula. (1) Unless the Governor elects to distribute funds in accordance with the discretionary allocation formula described in paragraph (c)(2) of this section, the remainder of youth funds not reserved under paragraph (b)(1) of this section must be allocated:


(i) 33
1/3 percent on the basis of the relative number of unemployed individuals in areas of substantial unemployment in each workforce investment area, compared to the total number of unemployed individuals in all areas of substantial unemployment in the State;


(ii) 33
1/3 percent on the basis of the relative excess number of unemployed individuals in each workforce investment area, compared to the total excess number of unemployed individuals in the State; and


(iii) 33
1/3 percent on the basis of the relative number of disadvantaged youth in each workforce investment area, compared to the total number of disadvantaged youth in the State. (WIA sec. 128(b)(2)(A)(i))


(2) Discretionary youth allocation formula. In lieu of making the formula allocation described in paragraph (c)(1) of this section, the State may allocate youth funds under a discretionary formula. Under that formula, the State must allocate a minimum of 70 percent of youth funds not reserved under paragraph (b)(1) of this section on the basis of the formula in paragraph (c)(1) of this section, and may allocate up to 30 percent on the basis of a formula that:


(i) Incorporates additional factors (other than the factors described in paragraph (c)(1) of this section) relating to:


(A) Excess youth poverty in urban, rural and suburban local areas; and


(B) Excess unemployment above the State average in urban, rural and suburban local areas; and


(ii) Was developed by the State Board and approved by the Secretary of Labor as part of the State workforce investment plan. (WIA sec. 128(b)(3).)


(d) Adult allocation formula. (1) Unless the Governor elects to distribute funds in accordance with the discretionary allocation formula described in paragraph (d)(2) of this section, the remainder of adult funds not reserved under paragraph (b)(1) of this section must be allocated:


(i) 33
1/3 percent on the basis of the relative number of unemployed individuals in areas of substantial unemployment in each workforce investment area, compared to the total number of unemployed individuals in areas of substantial unemployment in the State;


(ii) 33
1/3 percent on the basis of the relative excess number of unemployed individuals in each workforce investment area, compared to the total excess number of unemployed individuals in the State; and


(iii) 33
1/3 percent on the basis of the relative number of disadvantaged adults in each workforce investment area, compared to the total number of disadvantaged adults in the State. (WIA sec. 133(b)(2)(A)(i))


(2) Discretionary adult allocation formula. In lieu of making the formula allocation described in paragraph (d)(1) of this section, the State may allocate adult funds under a discretionary formula. Under that formula, the State must allocate a minimum of 70 percent of adult funds on the basis of the formula in paragraph (d)(1) of this section, and may allocate up to 30 percent on the basis of a formula that:


(i) Incorporates additional factors (other than the factors described in paragraph (d)(1) of this section) relating to:


(A) Excess poverty in urban, rural and suburban local areas; and


(B) Excess unemployment above the State average in urban, rural and suburban local areas; and


(ii) Was developed by the State Board and approved by the Secretary of Labor as part of the State workforce investment plan. (WIA sec. 133(b)(3).)


(e) Dislocated worker allocation formula. (1) The remainder of dislocated worker funds not reserved under paragraph (b)(1) or (b)(2) of this section must be allocated on the basis of a formula prescribed by the Governor that distributes funds in a manner that addresses the State’s worker readjustment assistance needs. Funds so distributed must not be less than 60 percent of the State’s formula allotment.


(2)(i) The Governor’s dislocated worker formula must use the most appropriate information available to the Governor, including information on:


(A) Insured unemployment data,


(B) Unemployment concentrations,


(C) Plant closings and mass layoff data,


(D) Declining industries data,


(E) Farmer-rancher economic hardship data, and


(F) Long-term unemployment data.


(ii) The State Plan must describe the data used for the formula and the weights assigned, and explain the State’s decision to use other information or to omit any of the information sources set forth in paragraph (e)(2)(i) of this section.


(3) The Governor may not amend the dislocated worker formula more than once for any program year.


(4)(i) Dislocated worker funds initially reserved by the Governor for Statewide rapid response activities in accordance with paragraph (b)(2) of this section may be:


(A) Distributed to local areas, and


(B) Used to operate projects in local areas in accordance with the requirements of WIA section 134(a)(2)(A) and 20 CFR 665.310 through 665.330.


(ii) The State Plan must describe the procedures for any distribution to local areas, including the timing and process for determining whether a distribution will take place.


§ 667.135 What “hold harmless” provisions apply to WIA adult and youth allocations?

(a)(1) For the first two fiscal years after the date on which a local area is designated under section 116 of WIA, the State may elect to apply the “hold harmless” provisions specified in paragraph (b) of this section to local area allocations of WIA youth funds under § 667.130(c) and to allocations of WIA adult funds under § 667.130(d).


(2) Effective at the end of the second full fiscal year after the date on which a local area is designated under section 116 of WIA the State must apply the “hold harmless” specified in paragraph (b) of this section to local area allocations of WIA youth funds under § 667.130(c) and to allocations of WIA adult funds under § 667.130(d).


(3) There are no “hold harmless” provisions that apply to local area allocations of WIA dislocated worker funds.


(b)(1) If a State elects to apply a “hold-harmless” under paragraph (a)(1) of this section, a local area must not receive an allocation amount for a fiscal year that is less than 90 percent of the average allocation of the local area for the two preceding fiscal years.


(2) In applying the “hold harmless” under paragraph (a)(2) of this section, a local area must not receive an allocation amount for a fiscal year that is less than 90 percent of the average allocation of the local area for the two preceding fiscal years.


(3) Amounts necessary to increase allocations to local areas must be obtained by ratably reducing the allocations to be made to other local areas.


(4) If the amounts of WIA funds appropriated in a fiscal year are not sufficient to provide the amount specified in paragraph (b)(1) of this section to all local areas, the amounts allocated to each local area mustbe ratably reduced. (WIA secs. 128(b)(2)(A)(ii), 133(b)(2)(A)(ii), 506.)


§ 667.140 Does a Local Board have the authority to transfer funds between programs?

(a) A Local Board may transfer up to 20 percent of a program year allocation for adult employment and training activities, and up to 20 percent of a program year allocation for dislocated worker employment and training activities between the two programs.


(b) Before making any such transfer, a Local Board must obtain the Governor’s approval.


(c) Local Boards may not transfer funds to or from the youth program.


§ 667.150 What reallotment procedures does the Secretary use?

(a) The first reallotment of funds among States will occur during PY 2001 based on obligations in PY 2000.


(b) The Secretary determines, during the first quarter of the program year, whether a State has obligated its required level of at least 80 percent of the funds allotted under WIA sections 127 and 132 for programs serving youth, adults, and dislocated workers for the prior year, as separately determined for each of the three funding streams. Unobligated balances are determined based on allotments adjusted for any allowable transfer between the adult and dislocated worker funding streams. The amount to be recaptured from each State for reallotment, if any, is based on State obligations of the funds allotted to each State under WIA sections 127 and 132 for programs serving youth, adults, or dislocated workers, less any amount reserved (up to 5 percent at the State level and up to 10 percent at the local level) for the costs of administration. This amount, if any, is separately determined for each funding stream.


(c) The Secretary reallots youth, adult and dislocated worker funds among eligible States in accordance with the provisions of WIA sections 127(c) and 132(c), respectively. To be eligible to receive a reallotment of youth, adult, or dislocated worker funds under the reallotment procedures, a State must have obligated at least 80 percent of the prior program year’s allotment, less any amount reserved for the costs of administration of youth, adult, or dislocated worker funds. A State’s eligibility to receive a reallotment is separately determined for each funding stream.


(d) The term “obligation” is defined at 20 CFR 660.300. For purposes of this section, the Secretary will also treat as State obligations:


(1) Amounts allocated by the State, under WIA sections 128(b) and 133(b), to the single State local area if the State has been designated as a single local area under WIA section 116(b) or to a balance of State local area administered by a unit of the State government, and


(2) Inter-agency transfers and other actions treated by the State as encumbrances against amounts reserved by the State under WIA sections 128(a) and 133(a) for Statewide workforce investment activities.


§ 667.160 What reallocation procedures must the Governors use?

(a) The Governor may reallocate youth, adult, and dislocated worker funds among local areas within the State in accordance with the provisions of sections 128(c) and 133(c) of the Act. If the Governor chooses to reallocate funds, the provisions in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section apply.


(b) For the youth, adult and dislocated worker programs, the amount to be recaptured from each local area for purposes of reallocation, if any, must be based on the amount by which the prior year’s unobligated balance of allocated funds exceeds 20 percent of that year’s allocation for the program, less any amount reserved (up to 10 percent) for the costs of administration. Unobligated balances must be determined based on allocations adjusted for any allowable transfer between funding streams. This amount, if any, must be separately determined for each funding stream.


(c) To be eligible to receive youth, adult or dislocated worker funds under the reallocation procedures, a local area must have obligated at least 80 percent of the prior program year’s allocation, less any amount reserved (up to 10 percent) for the costs of administration, for youth, adult, or dislocated worker activities, as separately determined. A local area’s eligibility to receive a reallocation must be separately determined for each funding stream.


§ 667.170 What responsibility review does the Department conduct for awards made under WIA title I, subtitle D?

(a) Before final selection as a potential grantee, we conduct a review of the available records to assess the organization’s overall responsibility to administer Federal funds. As part of this review, we may consider any information that has come to our attention and will consider the organization’s history with regard to the management of other grants, including DOL grants. The failure to meet any one responsibility test, except for those listed in paragraphs (a)(1) and (a)(2) of this section, does not establish that the organization is not responsible unless the failure is substantial or persistent (for two or more consecutive years). The responsibility tests include:


(1) The organization’s efforts to recover debts (for which three demand letters have been sent) established by final agency action have been unsuccessful, or that there has been failure to comply with an approved repayment plan;


(2) Established fraud or criminal activity of a significant nature within the organization.


(3) Serious administrative deficiencies that we identify, such as failure to maintain a financial management system as required by Federal regulations;


(4) Willful obstruction of the audit process;


(5) Failure to provide services to applicants as agreed to in a current or recent grant or to meet applicable performance standards;


(6) Failure to correct deficiencies brought to the grantee’s attention in writing as a result of monitoring activities, reviews, assessments, or other activities;


(7) Failure to return a grant closeout package or outstanding advances within 90 days of the grant expiration date or receipt of closeout package, whichever is later, unless an extension has been requested and granted; final billings reflecting serious cost category or total budget cost overrun;


(8) Failure to submit required reports;


(9) Failure to properly report and dispose of government property as instructed by DOL;


(10) Failure to have maintained effective cash management or cost controls resulting in excess cash on hand;


(11) Failure to ensure that a subrecipient complies with its OMB Circular A-133 audit requirements specified at § 667.200(b);


(12) Failure to audit a subrecipient within the required period;


(13) Final disallowed costs in excess of five percent of the grant or contract award if, in the judgement of the grant officer, the disallowances are egregious findings and;


(14) Failure to establish a mechanism to resolve a subrecipient’s audit in a timely fashion.


(b) This responsibility review is independent of the competitive process. Applicants which are determined to be not responsible will not be selected as potential grantees irrespective of their standing in the competition.


Subpart B – Administrative Rules, Costs and Limitations

§ 667.200 What general fiscal and administrative rules apply to the use of WIA title I funds?

(a) Uniform fiscal and administrative requirements. (1) Except as provided in paragraphs (a)(3) through (6) of this section, State, local, and Indian tribal government organizations that receive grants or cooperative agreements under WIA title I must follow the common rule “Uniform Administrative Requirements for Grants and Cooperative Agreements to State and Local Governments” which is codified at 29 CFR part 97.


(2) Except as provided in paragraphs (a)(3) through (7) of this section, institutions of higher education, hospitals, other non-profit organizations, and commercial organizations must the follow the common rule implementing OMB Circular A-110 which is codified at 2 CFR part 215 and 29 CFR part 95.


(3) In addition to the requirements at 29 CFR 95.48 or 29 CFR 97.36(i) (as appropriate), all procurement contracts and other transactions between Local Boards and units of State or local governments must be conducted only on a cost reimbursement basis. No provision for profit is allowed. (WIA sec. 184(a)(3)(B).)


(4) In addition to the requirements at 29 CFR 95.42 or 29 CFR 97.36(b)(3) (as appropriate), which address codes of conduct and conflict of interest issues related to employees:


(i) A State Board member or a Local Board member or a Youth Council member must neither cast a vote on, nor participate in any decision-making capacity, on the provision of services by such member (or any organization which that member directly represents), nor on any matter which would provide any direct financial benefit to that member or a member of his immediate family.


(ii) Neither membership on the State Board, the Local Board, the Youth Council nor the receipt of WIA funds to provide training and related services, by itself, violates these conflict of interest provisions.


(5) The addition method, described at 29 CFR 95.24 or 29 CFR 97.25(g)(2) (as appropriate), must be used for the all program income earned under WIA title I grants. When the cost of generating program income has been charged to the program, the gross amount earned must be added to the WIA program. However, the cost of generating program income must be subtracted from the amount earned to establish the net amount of program income available for use under the grants when these costs have not been charged to the WIA program.


(6) Any excess of revenue over costs incurred for services provided by a governmental or non-profit entity must be included in program income. (WIA sec. 195(7)(A) and (B).)


(7) Interest income earned on funds received under WIA title I must be included in program income. (WIA sec. 195(7)(B)(iii).)


(8) On a fee-for-service basis, employers may use local area services, facilities, or equipment funded under title I of WIA to provide employment and training activities to incumbent workers:


(i) When the services, facilities, or equipment are not being used by eligible participants;


(ii) If their use does not affect the ability of eligible participants to use the services, facilities, or equipment; and


(iii) If the income generated from such fees is used to carry out programs authorized under this title.


(b) Audit requirements. (1) All governmental and non-profit organizations must follow the audit requirements of OMB Circular A-133. These requirements are found at 29 CFR 97.26 for governmental organizations and at 29 CFR 95.26 for institutions of higher education, hospitals, and other non-profit organizations.


(2)(i) We are responsible for audits of commercial organizations which are direct recipients of Federal financial assistance under WIA title I.


(ii) Commercial organizations which are subrecipients under WIA title I and which expend more than the minimum level specified in OMB Circular A-133 ($300,000 ($500,000 for years ending after December 21, 2003)) must have either an organization-wide audit conducted in accordance with A-133 or a program specific financial and compliance audit.


(c) Allowable costs/cost principles. All recipients and subrecipients must follow the Federal allowable cost principles that apply to their kind of organizations. The DOL regulations at 29 CFR 95.27 and 29 CFR 97.22 identify the Federal principles for determining allowable costs which each kind of recipient and subrecipient must follow. The applicable Federal principles for each kind of recipient are described in paragraphs (c)(1) through (5) of this section; all recipients must comply with paragraphs (c)(6) and (c)(7) of this section. For those selected items of cost requiring prior approval, the authority to grant or deny approval is delegated to the Governor for programs funded under sections 127 or 132 of the Act.


(1) Allowable costs for State, local, and Indian tribal government organizations must be determined under OMB Circular A-87, “Cost Principles for State, Local and Indian Tribal Governments.”


(2) Allowable costs for non-profit organizations must be determined under OMB Circular A-122, “Cost Principles for Non-Profit Organizations.”


(3) Allowable costs for institutions of higher education must be determined under OMB Circular A-21, “Cost Principles for Educational Institutions.”


(4) Allowable costs for hospitals must be determined in accordance under appendix E of 45 CFR part 74, “Principles for Determining Costs Applicable to Research and Development Under Grants and Contracts with Hospitals.”


(5) Allowable costs for commercial organizations and those non-profit organizations listed in Attachment C to OMB Circular A-122 must be determined under the provisions of the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR), at 48 CFR part 31.


(6) For all types of entities, legal expenses for the prosecution of claims against the Federal Government, including appeals to an Administrative Law Judge, are unallowable.


(d) Government-wide debarment and suspension, and government-wide drug-free workplace requirements. All WIA title I grant recipients and subrecipients must comply with the government-wide requirements for debarment and suspension, and the government-wide requirements for a drug-free workplace, codified at 29 CFR part 98.


(e) Restrictions on lobbying. All WIA title I grant recipients and subrecipients must comply with the restrictions on lobbying which are codified in the DOL regulations at 29 CFR part 93.


(f) Nondiscrimination. All WIA title I recipients, as the term is defined in 29 CFR 37.4, must comply with the nondiscrimination and equal opportunity provisions of WIA section 188 and its implementing regulations found at 29 CFR part 37. Information on the handling of discrimination complaints by participants and other interested parties may be found in 29 CFR 37.70 through 37.80, and in § 667.600(g).


(g) Nepotism. (1) No individual may be placed in a WIA employment activity if a member of that person’s immediate family is directly supervised by or directly supervises that individual.


(2) To the extent that an applicable State or local legal requirement regarding nepotism is more restrictive than this provision, such State or local requirement must be followed.


[65 FR 49421, Aug. 11, 2000, as amended at 71 FR 35523, June 21, 2006]


§ 667.210 What administrative cost limits apply to Workforce Investment Act title I grants?

(a) Formula grants to States:


(1) As part of the 15 percent that a State may reserve for Statewide activities, the State may spend up to five percent (5%) of the amount allotted under sections 127(b)(1), 132(b)(1) and 132(b)(2) of the Act for the administrative costs of Statewide workforce investment activities.


(2) Local area expenditures for administrative purposes under WIA formula grants are limited to no more than ten percent (10%) of the amount allocated to the local area under sections 128(b) and 133(b) of the Act.


(3) Neither the five percent (5%) of the amount allotted that may be reserved for Statewide administrative costs nor the ten percent (10%) of the amount allotted that may be reserved for local administrative costs needs to be allocated back to the individual funding streams.


(b) Limits on administrative costs for programs operated under subtitle D of title I will be identified in the grant or contract award document.


(c) In a One-Stop environment, administrative costs borne by other sources of funds, such as the Wagner-Peyser Act, are not included in the administrative cost limit calculation. Each program’s administrative activities area chargeable to its own grant and subject to its own administrative cost limitations.


§ 667.220 What Workforce Investment Act title I functions and activities constitute the costs of administration subject to the administrative cost limit?

(a) The costs of administration are that allocable portion of necessary and reasonable allowable costs of State and local workforce investment boards, direct recipients, including State grant recipients under subtitle B of title I and recipients of awards under subtitle D of title I, as well as local grant recipients, local grant subrecipients, local fiscal agents and one-stop operators that are associated with those specific functions identified in paragraph (b) of this section and which are not related to the direct provision of workforce investment services, including services to participants and employers. These costs can be both personnel and non-personnel and both direct and indirect.


(b) The costs of administration are the costs associated with performing the following functions:


(1) Performing the following overall general administrative functions and coordination of those functions under WIA title I:


(i) Accounting, budgeting, financial and cash management functions;


(ii) Procurement and purchasing functions;


(iii) Property management functions;


(iv) Personnel management functions;


(v) Payroll functions;


(vi) Coordinating the resolution of findings arising from audits, reviews, investigations and incident reports;


(vii) Audit functions;


(viii) General legal services functions; and


(ix) Developing systems and procedures, including information systems, required for these administrative functions;


(2) Performing oversight and monitoring responsibilities related to WIA administrative functions;


(3) Costs of goods and services required for administrative functions of the program, including goods and services such as rental or purchase of equipment, utilities, office supplies, postage, and rental and maintenance of office space;


(4) Travel costs incurred for official business in carrying out administrative activities or the overall management of the WIA system; and


(5) Costs of information systems related to administrative functions (for example, personnel, procurement, purchasing, property management, accounting and payroll systems) including the purchase, systems development and operating costs of such systems.


(c)(1) Awards to subrecipients or vendors that are solely for the performance of administrative functions are classified as administrative costs.


(2) Personnel and related non-personnel costs of staff who perform both administrative functions specified in paragraph (b) of this section and programmatic services or activities must be allocated as administrative or program costs to the benefitting cost objectives/categories based on documented distributions of actual time worked or other equitable cost allocation methods.


(3) Specific costs charged to an overhead or indirect cost pool that can be identified directly as a program cost are to be charged as a program cost. Documentation of such charges must be maintained.


(4) Except as provided at paragraph (c)(1), all costs incurred for functions and activities of subrecipients and vendors are program costs.


(5) Costs of the following information systems including the purchase, systems development and operating (e.g., data entry) costs are charged to the program category:


(i) Tracking or monitoring of participant and performance information;


(ii) Employment statistics information, including job listing information, job skills information, and demand occupation information;


(iii) Performance and program cost information on eligible providers of training services, youth activities, and appropriate education activities;


(iv) Local area performance information; and


(v) Information relating to supportive services and unemployment insurance claims for program participants;


(6) Continuous improvement activities are charged to administration or program category based on the purpose or nature of the activity to be improved. Documentation of such charges must be maintained.


§ 667.250 What requirements relate to the enforcement of the Military Selective Service Act?

The requirements relating to the enforcement of the Military Selective Service Act are found at WIA section 189(h).


§ 667.255 Are there special rules that apply to veterans when income is a factor in eligibility determinations?

Yes, under 38 U.S.C. 4213, when past income is an eligibility determinant for Federal employment or training programs, any amounts received as military pay or allowances by any person who served on active duty, and certain other specified benefits must be disregarded. This applies when determining if a person is a “low-income individual” for eligibility purposes, (for example, in the WIA youth, Job Corps, or NFJP programs) and applies if income is used as a factor in applying the priority provision, under 20 CFR 663.600, when WIA adult funds are limited. Questions regarding the application of 38 U.S.C. 4213 should be directed to the Veterans Employment and Training Service.


§ 667.260 May WIA title I funds be spent for construction?

WIA title I funds must not be spent on construction or purchase of facilities or buildings except:


(a) To meet a recipient’s, as the term is defined in 29 CFR 37.4, obligation to provide physical and programmatic accessibility and reasonable accommodation, as required by section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, as amended;


(b) To fund repairs, renovations, alterations and capital improvements of property, including:


(1) SESA real property, identified at WIA section 193, using a formula that assesses costs proportionate to space utilized;


(2) JTPA owned property which is transferred to WIA title I programs;


(c) Job Corps facilities, as authorized by WIA section 160(3)(B); and


(d) To fund disaster relief employment on projects for demolition, cleaning, repair, renovation, and reconstruction of damaged and destroyed structures, facilities, and lands located within a disaster area. (WIA sec. 173(d).)


§ 667.262 Are employment generating activities, or similar activities, allowable under WIA title I?

(a) Under WIA section 181(e), WIA title I funds may not be spent on employment generating activities, economic development, and other similar activities, unless they are directly related to training for eligible individuals. For purposes of this section, employer outreach and job development activities are directly related to training for eligible individuals.


(b) These employer outreach and job development activities include:


(1) Contacts with potential employers for the purpose of placement of WIA participants;


(2) Participation in business associations (such as chambers of commerce); joint labor management committees, labor associations, and resource centers;


(3) WIA staff participation on economic development boards and commissions, and work with economic development agencies, to:


(i) Provide information about WIA programs,


(ii) Assist in making informed decisions about community job training needs, and


(iii) Promote the use of first source hiring agreements and enterprise zone vouchering services,


(4) Active participation in local business resource centers (incubators) to provide technical assistance to small and new business to reduce the rate of business failure;


(5) Subscriptions to relevant publications;


(6) General dissemination of information on WIA programs and activities;


(7) The conduct of labor market surveys;


(8) The development of on-the-job training opportunities; and


(9) Other allowable WIA activities in the private sector. (WIA sec. 181(e).)


§ 667.264 What other activities are prohibited under title I of WIA?

(a) WIA title I funds must not be spent on:


(1) The wages of incumbent employees during their participation in economic development activities provided through a Statewide workforce investment system, (WIA sec. 181(b)(1).);


(2) Public service employment, except to provide disaster relief employment, as specifically authorized in section 173(d) of WIA, (WIA sec. 195(10));


(3) Expenses prohibited under any other Federal, State or local law or regulation.


(b) WIA formula funds available to States and local areas under subtitle B, title I of WIA must not be used for foreign travel. (WIA sec. 181(e).)


§ 667.266 What are the limitations related to religious activities?

(a) Limitations related to sectarian activities are set forth at WIA section 188(a)(3) and 29 CFR 37.6(f).


(b)(1) 29 CFR part 2, subpart D governs the circumstances under which DOL support, including WIA Title I financial assistance, may be used to employ or train participants in religious activities. Under that subpart, such assistance may be used for such employment or training only when the assistance is provided indirectly within the meaning of the Establishment Clause of the U.S. Constitution, and not when the assistance is provided directly. As explained in that subpart, assistance provided through an Individual Training Account is generally considered indirect, and other mechanisms may also be considered indirect. See also 20 CFR 667.275 and 29 CFR 37.6(f)(1). 29 CFR part 2, subpart D also contains requirements related to equal treatment in Department of Labor programs for religious organizations, and to protecting the religious liberty of Department of Labor social service providers and beneficiaries.


(2) Limitations on the employment of participants under WIA Title I to carry out the construction, operation, or maintenance of any part of any facility used or to be used for religious instruction or as a place for religious worship are described at 29 CFR 37.6(f)(2).


[65 FR 49421, Aug. 11, 2000, as amended at 69 FR 41891, July 12, 2004]


§ 667.268 What prohibitions apply to the use of WIA title I funds to encourage business relocation?

(a) WIA funds may not be used or proposed to be used for:


(1) The encouragement or inducement of a business, or part of a business, to relocate from any location in the United States, if the relocation results in any employee losing his or her job at the original location;


(2) Customized training, skill training, or on-the-job training or company specific assessments of job applicants or employees of a business or a part of a business that has relocated from any location in the United States, until the company has operated at that location for 120 days, if the relocation has resulted in any employee losing his or her jobs at the original location.


(b) Pre-award review. To verify that an establishment which is new or expanding is not, in fact, relocating employment from another area, standardized pre-award review criteria developed by the State must be completed and documented jointly by the local area with the establishment as a prerequisite to WIA assistance.


(1) The review must include names under which the establishment does business, including predecessors and successors in interest; the name, title, and address of the company official certifying the information, and whether WIA assistance is sought in connection with past or impending job losses at other facilities, including a review of whether WARN notices relating to the employer have been filed.


(2) The review may include consultations with labor organizations and others in the affected local area(s). (WIA sec. 181(d).)


§ 667.269 What procedures and sanctions apply to violations of §§ 667.260 through 667.268?

(a) We will promptly review and take appropriate action on alleged violations of the provisions relating to:


(1) Employment generating activities (§ 667.262);


(2) Other prohibited activities (§ 667.264);


(3) The limitation related to sectarian activities (§ 667.266);


(4) The use of WIA title I funds to encourage business relocation (§ 667.268).


(b) Procedures for the investigation and resolution of the violations are provided for under the Grant Officer’s resolution process at § 667.510. Sanctions and remedies are provided for under WIA section 184(c) for violations of the provisions relating to:


(1) Construction (§ 667.260);


(2) Employment generating activities (§ 667.262);


(3) Other prohibited activities (§ 667.264); and


(4) The limitation related to sectarian activities (§ 667.266(b)(1)).


(c) Sanctions and remedies are provided for in WIA section 181(d)(3) for violations of § 667.268, which addresses business relocation.


(d) Violations of § 667.266(b)(2) will be handled in accordance with the DOL nondiscrimination regulations implementing WIA section 188, codified at 29 CFR part 37.


§ 667.270 What safeguards are there to ensure that participants in Workforce Investment Act employment and training activities do not displace other employees?

(a) A participant in a program or activity authorized under title I of WIA must not displace (including a partial displacement, such as a reduction in the hours of non-overtime work, wages, or employment benefits) any currently employed employee (as of the date of the participation).


(b) A program or activity authorized under title I of WIA must not impair existing contracts for services or collective bargaining agreements. When a program or activity authorized under title I of WIA would be inconsistent with a collective bargaining agreement, the appropriate labor organization and employer must provide written concurrence before the program or activity begins.


(c) A participant in a program or activity under title I of WIA may not be employed in or assigned to a job if:


(1) Any other individual is on layoff from the same or any substantially equivalent job;


(2) The employer has terminated the employment of any regular, unsubsidized employee or otherwise caused an involuntary reduction in its workforce with the intention of filling the vacancy so created with the WIA participant; or


(3) The job is created in a promotional line that infringes in any way on the promotional opportunities of currently employed workers.


(d) Regular employees and program participants alleging displacement may file a complaint under the applicable grievance procedures found at § 667.600. (WIA sec. 181.)


§ 667.272 What wage and labor standards apply to participants in activities under title I of WIA?

(a) Individuals in on-the-job training or individuals employed in activities under title I of WIA must be compensated at the same rates, including periodic increases, as trainees or employees who are similarly situated in similar occupations by the same employer and who have similar training, experience and skills. Such rates must be in accordance with applicable law, but may not be less than the higher of the rate specified in section 6(a)(1) of the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 (29 U.S.C. 206(a)(1)) or the applicable State or local minimum wage law.


(b) Individuals in on-the-job training or individuals employed in programs and activities under Title I of WIA must be provided benefits and working conditions at the same level and to the same extent as other trainees or employees working a similar length of time and doing the same type of work.


(c) Allowances, earnings, and payments to individuals participating in programs under Title I of WIA are not considered as income for purposes of determining eligibility for and the amount of income transfer and in-kind aid furnished under any Federal or Federally assisted program based on need other than as provided under the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. 301 et seq.). (WIA sec. 181(a)(2).)


§ 667.274 What health and safety standards apply to the working conditions of participants in activities under title I of WIA?

(a) Health and safety standards established under Federal and State law otherwise applicable to working conditions of employees are equally applicable to working conditions of participants engaged in programs and activities under Title I of WIA.


(b)(1) To the extent that a State workers’ compensation law applies, workers’ compensation must be provided to participants in programs and activities under Title I of WIA on the same basis as the compensation is provided to other individuals in the State in similar employment.


(2) If a State workers’ compensation law applies to a participant in work experience, workers’ compensation benefits must be available for injuries suffered by the participant in such work experience. If a State workers’ compensation law does not apply to a participant in work experience, insurance coverage must be secured for injuries suffered by the participant in the course of such work experience.


§ 667.275 What are a recipient’s obligations to ensure nondiscrimination and equal opportunity, and what are a recipient’s obligations with respect to religious activities?

(a)(1) Recipients, as defined in 29 CFR 37.4, must comply with the nondiscrimination and equal opportunity provisions of WIA section 188 and its implementing regulations, codified at 29 CFR part 37. Under that definition, the term “recipients” includes State and Local Workforce Investment Boards, One-Stop operators, service providers, vendors, and subrecipients, as well as other types of individuals and entitites.


(2) Nondiscrimination and equal opportunity requirements and procedures, including complaint processing and compliance reviews, are governed by the regulations implementing WIA section 188, codified at 29 CFR part 37, and are administered and enforced by the DOL Civil Rights Center.


(3) As described in § 667.260(a), financial assistance provided under WIA title I may be used to meet a recipient’s obligation to provide physical and programmatic accessibility and reasonable accommodation/modification in regard to the WIA program, as required by section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, as amended, section 188 of WIA, and the regulations implementing these statutory provisions.


(b) 29 CFR part 2, subpart D governs the circumstances under which recipients may use DOL support, including WIA Title I financial assistance, to employ or train participants in religious activities. Under that subpart, such assistance may be used for such employment or training only when the assistance is provided indirectly within the meaning of the Establishment Clause of the U.S. Constitution, and not when the assistance is provided directly. As explained in that subpart, assistance provided through an Individual Training Account is generally considered indirect, and other mechanisms may also be considered indirect. See also 20 CFR 667.266 and 29 CFR 37.6(f)(1). 29 CFR part 2, subpart D also contains requirements related to equal treatment of religious organizations in Department of Labor programs, and to protection of religious liberty of Department of Labor social service providers and beneficiaries. Limitations on the employment of participants under WIA Title I to carry out the construction, operation, or maintenance of any part of any facility used or to be used for religious instruction or as a place of religious worship are described at 29 CFR 37.6(f)(2). See section 188(a)(3) of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998, 29 U.S.C. 2938(a)(3).


[65 FR 49421, Aug. 11, 2000, as amended at 69 FR 41891, July 12, 2004]


Subpart C – Reporting Requirements

§ 667.300 What are the reporting requirements for Workforce Investment Act programs?

(a) General. All States and other direct grant recipients must report financial, participant, and performance data in accordance with instructions issued by DOL. Required reports must be submitted no more frequently than quarterly within a time period specified in the reporting instructions.


(b) Subrecipient reporting. (1) A State or other direct grant recipient may impose different forms or formats, shorter due dates, and more frequent reporting requirements on subrecipients. However, the recipient is required to meet the reporting requirements imposed by DOL.


(2) If a State intends to impose different reporting requirements, it must describe those reporting requirements in its State WIA plan.


(c) Financial reports. (1) Each grant recipient must submit financial reports.


(2) Reports must include any income or profits earned, including such income or profits earned by subrecipients, and any costs incurred (such as stand-in costs) that are otherwise allowable except for funding limitations. (WIA sec. 185(f)(2))


(3) Reported expenditures and program income, including any profits earned, must be on the accrual basis of accounting and cumulative by fiscal year of appropriation. If the recipient’s accounting records are not normally kept on the accrual basis of accounting, the recipient must develop accrual information through an analysis of the documentation on hand.


(d) Due date. Financial reports and participant data reports are due no later than 45 days after the end of each quarter unless otherwise specified in reporting instructions. A final financial report is required 90 days after the expiration of a funding period or the termination of grant support.


(e) Annual performance progress report. An annual performance progress report for each of the three programs under title I, subpart B is required by WIA section 136(d).


(1) A State failing to submit any of these annual performance progress reports within 45 days of the due date may have its grant (for that program or all title I, subpart B programs) for the succeeding year reduced by as much as five percent, as provided by WIA section 136(g)(1)(B).


(2) States submitting annual performance progress reports that cannot be validated or verified as accurately counting and reporting activities in accordance with the reporting instructions, may be treated as failing to submit annual reports, and be subject to sanction. Sanctions related to State performance or failure to submit these reports timely cannot result in a total grant reduction of more than five percent. Any sanction would be in addition to having to repay the amount of any incentive funds granted based on the invalid report.


Subpart D – Oversight and Monitoring

§ 667.400 Who is responsible for oversight and monitoring of WIA title I grants?

(a) The Secretary is authorized to monitor all recipients and subrecipients of all grants awarded and funds expended under WIA title I to determine compliance with the Act and the WIA regulations, and may investigate any matter deemed necessary to determine such compliance. Federal oversight will be conducted primarily at the recipient level.


(b) In each fiscal year, we will also conduct in-depth reviews in several States, including financial and performance audits, to assure that funds are spent in accordance with the Act. Priority for such in-depth reviews will be given to States not meeting annual adjusted levels of performance.


(c)(1) Each recipient and subrecipient must continuously monitor grant-supported activities in accordance with the uniform administrative requirements at 29 CFR parts 95 and 97, as applicable, including the applicable cost principles indicated at 29 CFR 97.22(b) or 29 CFR 95.27, for all entities receiving WIA title I funds. For governmental units, the applicable requirements are at 29 CFR part 97. For non-profit organizations, the applicable requirements are at 29 CFR part 95.


(2) In the case of grants under WIA sections 127 and 132, the Governor must develop a State monitoring system that meets the requirements of § 667.410(b). The Governor must monitor Local Boards annually for compliance with applicable laws and regulations in accordance with the State monitoring system. Monitoring must include an annual review of each local area’s compliance with the uniform administrative requirements.


§ 667.410 What are the oversight roles and responsibilities of recipients and subrecipients?

(a) Roles and responsibilities for all recipients and subrecipients of funds under WIA title I in general. Each recipient and subrecipient must conduct regular oversight and monitoring of its WIA activities and those of its subrecipients and contractors in order to:


(1) Determine that expenditures have been made against the cost categories and within the cost limitations specified in the Act and the regulations in this part;


(2) Determine whether or not there is compliance with other provisions of the Act and the WIA regulations and other applicable laws and regulations; and


(3) Provide technical assistance as necessary and appropriate.


(b) State roles and responsibilities for grants under WIA sections 127 and 132. (1) The Governor is responsible for the development of the State monitoring system. The Governor must be able to demonstrate, through a monitoring plan or otherwise, that the State monitoring system meets the requirements of paragraph (b)(2) of this section.


(2) The State monitoring system must:


(i) Provide for annual on-site monitoring reviews of local areas’ compliance with DOL uniform administrative requirements, as required by WIA section 184(a)(4);


(ii) Ensure that established policies to achieve program quality and outcomes meet the objectives of the Act and the WIA regulations, including policies relating to: the provision of services by One-Stop Centers; eligible providers of training services; and eligible providers of youth activities;


(iii) Enable the Governor to determine if subrecipients and contractors have demonstrated substantial compliance with WIA requirements; and


(iv) Enable the Governor to determine whether a local plan will be disapproved for failure to make acceptable progress in addressing deficiencies, as required in WIA section 118(d)(1).


(v) Enable the Governor to ensure compliance with the nondiscrimination and equal opportunity requirements of WIA section 188 and 29 CFR part 37. Requirements for these aspects of the monitoring system are set forth in 29 CFR 37.54(d)(2)(ii).


(3) The State must conduct an annual on-site monitoring review of each local area’s compliance with DOL uniform administrative requirements, including the appropriate administrative requirements for subrecipients and the applicable cost principles indicated at § 667.200 for all entities receiving WIA title I funds.


(4) The Governor must require that prompt corrective action be taken if any substantial violation of standards identified in paragraphs (b) (2) or (3) of this section is found. (WIA sec. 184(a)(5).)


(5) The Governor must impose the sanctions provided in WIA section 184 (b) and (c) in the event of a subrecipient’s failure to take required corrective action required under paragraph (b)(4) of this section.


(6) The Governor may issue additional requirements and instructions to subrecipients on monitoring activities.


(7) The Governor must certify to the Secretary every two years that:


(i) The State has implemented uniform administrative requirements;


(ii) The State has monitored local areas to ensure compliance with uniform administrative requirements; and


(iii) The State has taken appropriate corrective action to secure such compliance. (WIA sec. 184(a)(6)(A), (B), and (C).)


Subpart E – Resolution of Findings From Monitoring and Oversight Reviews

§ 667.500 What procedures apply to the resolution of findings arising from audits, investigations, monitoring and oversight reviews?

(a) Resolution of subrecipient-level findings. (1) The Governor is responsible for resolving findings that arise from the State’s monitoring reviews, investigations and audits (including OMB Circular A-133 audits) of subrecipients.


(2) A State must utilize the audit resolution, debt collection and appeal procedures that it uses for other Federal grant programs.


(3) If a State does not have such procedures, it must prescribe standards and procedures to be used for this grant program.


(b) Resolution of State and other direct recipient level findings. (1) The Secretary is responsible for resolving findings that arise from Federal audits, monitoring reviews, investigations, incident reports, and recipient level OMB Circular A-133 audits.


(2) The Secretary uses the DOL audit resolution process, consistent with the Single Audit Act of 1996 and OMB Circular A-133, and Grant Officer Resolution provisions of § 667.510, as appropriate.


(3) A final determination issued by a Grant Officer under this process may be appealed to the DOL Office of Administrative Law Judges under the procedures at § 667.800.


(c) Resolution of nondiscrimination findings. Findings arising from investigations or reviews conducted under nondiscrimination laws will be resolved in accordance with WIA section 188 and the Department of Labor nondiscrimination regulations implementing WIA section 188, codified at 29 CFR part 37.


§ 667.505 How do we resolve investigative and monitoring findings?

(a) As a result of an investigation, on-site visit or other monitoring, we notify the recipient of the findings of the investigation and gives the recipient a period of time (not more than 60 days) to comment and to take appropriate corrective actions.


(b) The Grant Officer reviews the complete file of the investigation or monitoring report and the recipient’s actions under paragraph (a) of this section. The Grant Officer’s review takes into account the sanction provisions of WIA section 184(b) and (c). If the Grant Officer agrees with the recipient’s handling of the situation, the Grant Officer so notifies the recipient. This notification constitutes final agency action.


(c) If the Grant Officer disagrees with the recipient’s handling of the matter, the Grant Officer proceeds under § 667.510.


§ 667.510 What is the Grant Officer resolution process?

(a) General. When the Grant Officer is dissatisfied with the State’s disposition of an audit or other resolution of violations (including those arising out of incident reports or compliance reviews), or with the recipient’s response to findings resulting from investigations or monitoring report, the initial and final determination process, set forth in this section, is used to resolve the matter.


(b) Initial determination. The Grant Officer makes an initial determination on the findings for both those matters where there is agreement and those where there is disagreement with the recipient’s resolution, including the allowability of questioned costs or activities. This initial determination is based upon the requirements of the Act and regulations, and the terms and conditions of the grants, contracts, or other agreements under the Act.


(c) Informal resolution. Except in an emergency situation, when the Secretary invokes the authority described in WIA section 184(e), the Grant Officer may not revoke a recipient’s grant in whole or in part, nor institute corrective actions or sanctions, without first providing the recipient with an opportunity to present documentation or arguments to resolve informally those matters in controversy contained in the initial determination. The initial determination must provide for an informal resolution period of at least 60 days from issuance of the initial determination. If the matters are resolved informally, the Grant Officer must issue a final determination under paragraph (d) of this section which notifies the parties in writing of the nature of the resolution and may close the file.


(d) Grant Officer’s final determination. (1) If the matter is not fully resolved informally, the Grant Officer provides each party with a written final determination by certified mail, return receipt requested. For audits of recipient-level entities and other recipients which receive WIA funds directly from DOL, ordinarily, the final determination is issued not later than 180 days from the date that the Office of Inspector General (OIG) issues the final approved audit report to the Employment and Training Administration. For audits of subrecipients conducted by the OIG, ordinarily the final determination is issued not later than 360 days from the date the OIG issues the final approved audit report to ETA.


(2) A final determination under this paragraph (d) must:


(i) Indicate whether efforts to informally resolve matters contained in the initial determination have been unsuccessful;


(ii) List those matters upon which the parties continue to disagree;


(iii) List any modifications to the factual findings and conclusions set forth in the initial determination and the rationale for such modifications;


(iv) Establish a debt, if appropriate;


(v) Require corrective action, when needed;


(vi) Determine liability, method of restitution of funds and sanctions; and


(vii) Offer an opportunity for a hearing in accordance with § 667.800 of this part.


(3) Unless a hearing is requested, a final determination under this paragraph (d) is final agency action and is not subject to further review.


(e) Nothing in this subpart precludes the Grant Officer from issuing an initial determination and/or final determination directly to a subrecipient, in accordance with section 184(d)(3) of the Act. In such a case, the Grant Officer will inform the recipient of this action.


Subpart F – Grievance Procedures, Complaints, and State Appeals Processes

§ 667.600 What local area, State and direct recipient grievance procedures must be established?

(a) Each local area, State and direct recipient of funds under title I of WIA, except for Job Corps, must establish and maintain a procedure for grievances and complaints according to the requirements of this section. The grievance procedure requirements applicable to Job Corps are set forth at 20 CFR 670.990.


(b) Each local area, State, and direct recipient must:


(1) Provide information about the content of the grievance and complaint procedures required by this section to participants and other interested parties affected by the local Workforce Investment System, including One-Stop partners and service providers;


(2) Require that every entity to which it awards Title I funds must provide the information referred to in paragraph (b)(1) of this section to participants receiving Title I-funded services from such entities; and


(3) Must make reasonable efforts to assure that the information referred to in paragraph (b)(1) of this section will be understood by affected participants and other individuals, including youth and those who are limited-English speaking individuals. Such efforts must comply with the language requirements of 29 CFR 37.35 regarding the provision of services and information in languages other than English.


(c) Local area procedures must provide:


(1) A process for dealing with grievances and complaints from participants and other interested parties affected by the local Workforce Investment System, including One-Stop partners and service providers;


(2) An opportunity for an informal resolution and a hearing to be completed within 60 days of the filing of the grievance or complaint;


(3) A process which allows an individual alleging a labor standards violation to submit the grievance to a binding arbitration procedure, if a collective bargaining agreement covering the parties to the grievance so provides; and


(4) An opportunity for a local level appeal to a State entity when:


(i) No decision is reached within 60 days; or


(ii) Either party is dissatisfied with the local hearing decision.


(d) State procedures must provide:


(1) A process for dealing with grievances and complaints from participants and other interested parties affected by the Statewide Workforce Investment programs;


(2) A process for resolving appeals made under paragraph (c)(4) of this section;


(3) A process for remanding grievances and complaints related to the local Workforce Investment Act programs to the local area grievance process; and


(4) An opportunity for an informal resolution and a hearing to be completed within 60 days of the filing of the grievance or complaint.


(e) Procedures of direct recipients must provide:


(1) A process for dealing with grievance and complaints from participants and other interested parties affected by the recipient’s Workforce Investment Act programs; and


(2) An opportunity for an informal resolution and a hearing to be completed within 60 days of the filing of the grievance or complaint.


(f) The remedies that may be imposed under local, State and direct recipient grievance procedures are enumerated at WIA section 181(c)(3).


(g)(1) The provisions of this section on grievance procedures do not apply to discrimination complaints brought under WIA section 188 and/or 29 CFR part 37. Such complaints must be handled in accordance with the procedures set forth in that regulatory part.


(2) Questions about or complaints alleging a violation of the nondiscrimination provisions of WIA section 188 may be directed or mailed to the Director, Civil Rights Center, U.S. Department of Labor, Room N4123, 200 Constitution Avenue, NW, Washington, D.C. 20210, for processing.


(h) Nothing in this subpart precludes a grievant or complainant from pursuing a remedy authorized under another Federal, State or local law.


§ 667.610 What processes do we use to review State and local grievances and complaints?

(a) We investigate allegations arising through the grievance procedures described in § 667.600 when:


(1) A decision on a grievance or complaint under § 667.600(d) has not been reached within 60 days of receipt of the grievance or complaint or within 60 days of receipt of the request for appeal of a local level grievance and either party appeals to the Secretary; or


(2) A decision on a grievance or complaint under § 667.600(d) has been reached and the party to which such decision is adverse appeals to the Secretary.


(b) We must make a final decision on an appeal under paragraph (a) of this section no later than 120 days after receiving the appeal.


(c) Appeals made under paragraph (a)(2) of this section must be filed within 60 days of the receipt of the decision being appealed. Appeals made under paragraph (a)(1) of this section must be filed within 120 days of the filing of the grievance with the State, or the filing of the appeal of a local grievance with the State. All appeals must be submitted by certified mail, return receipt requested, to the Secretary, U.S. Department of Labor, Washington, DC 20210, Attention: ASET. A copy of the appeal must be simultaneously provided to the appropriate ETA Regional Administrator and the opposing party.


(d) Except for complaints arising under WIA section 184(f) or section 188, grievances or complaints made directly to the Secretary will be referred to the appropriate State or local area for resolution in accordance with this section, unless we notify the parties that the Department of Labor will investigate the grievance under the procedures at § 667.505. Discrimination complaints brought under WIA section 188 or 29 CFR part 37 will be referred to the Director of the Civil Rights Center.


§ 667.630 How are complaints and reports of criminal fraud and abuse addressed under WIA?

Information and complaints involving criminal fraud, waste, abuse or other criminal activity must be reported immediately through the Department’s Incident Reporting System to the DOL Office of Inspector General, Office of Investigations, Room S5514, 200 Constitution Avenue NW., Washington, D.C. 20210, or to the corresponding Regional Inspector General for Investigations, with a copy simultaneously provided to the Employment and Training Administration. The Hotline number is 1-800-347-3756. Complaints of a non-criminal nature are handled under the procedures set forth in § 667.505 or through the Department’s Incident Reporting System.


§ 667.640 What additional appeal processes or systems must a State have for the WIA program?

(a) Non-designation of local areas: (1) The State must establish, and include in its State Plan, due process procedures which provide expeditious appeal to the State Board for a unit or combination of units of general local government or a rural concentrated employment program grant recipient (as described at WIA section 116(a)(2)(B)) that requests, but is not granted, automatic or temporary and subsequent designation as a local workforce investment area under WIA section 116(a)(2) or 116(a)(3).


(2) These procedures must provide an opportunity for a hearing and prescribe appropriate time limits to ensure prompt resolution of the appeal.


(3) If the appeal to the State Board does not result in designation, the appellant may request review by the Secretary under § 667.645.


(4) If the Secretary determines that the appellant was not accorded procedural rights under the appeal process established in paragraph (a)(1) of this section, or that the area meets the requirements for designation at WIA section 116(a)(2) or 116(a)(3), the Secretary may require that the area be designated as a workforce investment area.


(b) Denial or termination of eligibility as a training provider. (1) A State must establish procedures which allow providers of training services the opportunity to appeal:


(i) Denial of eligibility by a Local Board or the designated State agency under WIA section 122 (b), (c) or (e);


(ii) Termination of eligibility or other action by a Local Board or State agency under WIA section 122(f); or


(iii) Denial of eligibility as a provider of on-the-job training (OJT) or customized training by a One-Stop operator under WIA section 122(h).


(2) Such procedures must provide an opportunity for a hearing and prescribe appropriate time limits to ensure prompt resolution of the appeal.


(3) A decision under this State appeal process may not be appealed to the Secretary.


(c) Testing and sanctioning for use of controlled substances. (1) A State must establish due process procedures which provide expeditious appeal for:


(i) WIA participants subject to testing for use of controlled substances, imposed under a State policy established under WIA section 181(f); and


(ii) WIA participants who are sanctioned after testing positive for the use of controlled substances, under the policy described in paragraph (c)(1)(i) of this section.


(2) A decision under this State appeal process may not be appealed to the Secretary.


§ 667.645 What procedures apply to the appeals of non-designation of local areas?

(a) A unit or combination of units of general local government or rural concentrated employment program grant recipient (as described in WIA section 116(a)(2)(B)) whose appeal of the denial of a request for automatic or temporary and subsequent designation as a local workforce investment area to the State Board has not resulted in designation may appeal the denial of local area designation to the Secretary.


(b) Appeals made under paragraph (a) of this section must be filed no later than 30 days after receipt of written notification of the denial from the State Board, and must be submitted by certified mail, return receipt requested, to the Secretary, U.S. Department of Labor, Washington, DC 20210, Attention: ASET. A copy of the appeal must be simultaneously provided to the State Board.


(c) The appellant must establish that it was not accorded procedural rights under the appeal process set forth in the State Plan, or establish that it meets the requirements for designation in WIA section 116(a)(2) or (a)(3). The Secretary may consider any comments submitted in response by the State Board.


(d) If the Secretary determines that the appellant has met its burden of establishing that it was not accorded procedural rights under the appeal process set forth in the State Plan, or that it meets the requirements for designation in WIA section 116(a)(2) or (a)(3), the Secretary may require that the area be designated as a local workforce investment area.


(e) The Secretary must issue a written decision to the Governor and the appellant.


§ 667.650 What procedures apply to the appeals of the Governor’s imposition of sanctions for substantial violations or performance failures by a local area?

(a) A local area which has been found in substantial violation of WIA title I, and has received notice from the Governor that either all or part of the local plan will be revoked or that a reorganization will occur, may appeal such sanctions to the Secretary under WIA section 184(b). The sanctions do not become effective until:


(1) The time for appeal has expired; or


(2) The Secretary has issued a decision.


(b) A local area which has failed to meet local performance measures for two consecutive years, and has received the Governor’s notice of intent to impose a reorganization plan, may appeal such sanctions to the Secretary under WIA section 136(h)(1)(B).


(c) Appeals made under paragraph (a) or (b) of this section must be filed no later than 30 days after receipt of written notification of the revoked plan or imposed reorganization, and must be submitted by certified mail, return receipt requested, to the Secretary, U.S. Department of Labor, Washington, DC 20210, Attention: ASET. A copy of the appeal must be simultaneously provided to the Governor.


(d) The Secretary may consider any comments submitted in response by the Governor.


(e) The Secretary will notify the Governor and the appellant in writing of the Secretary’s decision under paragraph (a) of this section within 45 days after receipt of the appeal. The Secretary will notify the Governor and the appellant in writing of the Secretary’s decision under paragraph (b) of this section within 30 days after receipt of the appeal.


Subpart G – Sanctions, Corrective Actions, and Waiver of Liability

§ 667.700 What procedure do we use to impose sanctions and corrective actions on recipients and subrecipients of WIA grant funds?

(a)(1) Except for actions under WIA section 188(a) or 29 CFR part 37 (relating to nondiscrimination requirements), the Grant Officer uses the initial and final determination procedures outlined in § 667.510 to impose a sanction or corrective action.


(2) To impose a sanction or corrective action for a violation of WIA section 188(a) or 29 CFR part 37, the Department will use the procedures set forth in that regulatory part.


(b) To impose a sanction or corrective action for noncompliance with the uniform administrative requirements set forth at section 184(a)(3) of WIA, and § 667.200(a), when the Grant Officer determines that the Governor has not taken corrective action to remedy the violation as required by WIA section 184(a)(5), the Grant Officer, under the authority of WIA section 184(a)(7) and § 667.710(c), must require the Governor to impose any of the corrective actions set forth at WIA section 184(b)(1). If the Governor fails to impose the corrective actions required by the Grant Officer, the Secretary may immediately suspend or terminate financial assistance in accordance with WIA section 184(e).


(c) For substantial violations of WIA statutory and regulatory requirements, if the Governor fails to promptly take the actions specified in WIA section 184(b)(1), the Grant Officer may impose such actions directly against the local area.


(d) The Grant Officer may also impose a sanction directly against a subrecipient, as authorized in section 184(d)(3) of the Act. In such a case, the Grant Officer will inform the recipient of the action.


§ 667.705 Who is responsible for funds provided under title I of WIA?

(a) The recipient is responsible for all funds under its grant(s).


(b) The political jurisdiction(s) of the chief elected official(s) in a local workforce investment area is liable for any misuse of the WIA grant funds allocated to the local area under WIA sections 128 and 133, unless the chief elected official(s) reaches an agreement with the Governor to bear such liability.


(c) When a local workforce area is composed of more than one unit of general local government, the liability of the individual jurisdictions must be specified in a written agreement between the chief elected officials.


§ 667.710 What actions are required to address the failure of a local area to comply with the applicable uniform administrative provisions?

(a) If, as part of the annual on-site monitoring of local areas, the Governor determines that a local area is not in compliance with the uniform administrative requirements found at 29 CFR part 95 or part 97, as appropriate, the Governor must:


(1) Require corrective action to secure prompt compliance; and


(2) Impose the sanctions provided for at section 184(b) if the Governor finds that the local area has failed to take timely corrective action.


(b) An action by the recipient to impose a sanction against a local area, in accordance with this section, may be appealed to the Secretary in accordance with § 667.650, and will not become effective until:


(1) The time for appeal has expired; or


(2) The Secretary has issued a decision.


(c)(1) If the Secretary finds that the Governor has failed to monitor and certify compliance of local areas with the administrative requirements, under WIA section 184(a), or that the Governor has failed to promptly take the actions required upon a determination under paragraph (a) of this section that a local area is not in compliance with the uniform administrative requirements, the Secretary will require the Governor to take corrective actions against the State recipient or the local area, as appropriate to ensure prompt compliance.


(2) If the Governor fails to take the corrective actions required by the Secretary under paragraph (c)(1) of this section, the Secretary may immediately suspend or terminate financial assistance under WIA section 184(e).


§ 667.720 How do we handle a recipient’s request for waiver of liability under WIA section 184(d)(2)?

(a) A recipient may request a waiver of liability, as described in WIA section 184(d)(2), and a Grant Officer may approve such a waiver under WIA section 184(d)(3).


(b)(1) When the debt for which a waiver of liability is desired was established in a non-Federal resolution proceeding, the resolution report must accompany the waiver request.


(2) When the waiver request is made during the ETA Grant Officer resolution process, the request must be made during the informal resolution period described in § 667.510(c).


(c) A waiver of the recipient’s liability shall be considered by the Grant Officer only when:


(1) The misexpenditure of WIA funds occurred at a subrecipient’s level;


(2) The misexpenditure was not due to willful disregard of the requirements of title I of the Act, gross negligence, failure to observe accepted standards of administration, or did not constitute fraud;


(3) If fraud did exist, it was perpetrated against the recipient/subrecipients; and


(i) The recipient/subrecipients discovered, investigated, reported, and cooperated in any prosecution of the perpetrator of the fraud; and


(ii) After aggressive debt collection action, it has been documented that further attempts at debt collection from the perpetrator of the fraud would be inappropriate or futile;


(4) The recipient has issued a final determination which disallows the misexpenditure, the recipient’s appeal process has been exhausted, and a debt has been established; and


(5) The recipient requests such a waiver and provides documentation to demonstrate that it has substantially complied with the requirements of section 184(d)(2) of the Act, and this section.


(d) The recipient will not be released from liability for misspent funds under the determination required by section 184(d) of the Act unless the Grant Officer determines that further collection action, either by the recipient or subrecipients, would be inappropriate or would prove futile.


§ 667.730 What is the procedure to handle a recipient’s request for advance approval of contemplated corrective actions?

(a) The recipient may request advance approval from the Grant Officer for contemplated corrective actions, including debt collection actions, which the recipient plans to initiate or to forego. The recipient’s request must include a description and an assessment of all actions taken by the subrecipients to collect the misspent funds.


(b) Based on the recipient’s request, the Grant Officer may determine that the recipient may forego certain collection actions against a subrecipient when:


(1) The subrecipient meets the criteria set forth in section 184(d)(2) of the Act;


(2) The misexpenditure of funds:


(i) Was not made by that subrecipient but by an entity that received WIA funds from that subrecipient;


(ii) Was not a violation of section 184(d)(1) of the Act, and did not constitute fraud; or


(iii) If fraud did exist,


(A) It was perpetrated against the subrecipient; and:


(B) The subrecipient discovered, investigated, reported, and cooperated in any prosecution of the perpetrator of the fraud; and


(C) After aggressive debt collection action, it has been documented that further attempts at debt collection from the perpetrator of the fraud would be inappropriate or futile;


(3) A final determination which disallows the misexpenditure and establishes a debt has been issued at the appropriate level;


(4) Final action within the recipient’s appeal system has been completed; and


(5) Further debt collection action by that subrecipient or the recipient would be either inappropriate or futile.


§ 667.740 What procedure must be used for administering the offset/deduction provisions at section 184(c) of the Act?

(a)(1) For recipient level misexpenditures, we may determine that a debt, or a portion thereof, may be offset against amounts that are allotted to the recipient. Recipients must submit a written request for an offset to the Grant Officer. Generally, we will apply the offset against amounts that are available at the recipient level for administrative costs.


(2) The Grant Officer may approve an offset request, under paragraph (a)(1) of this section, if the misexpenditures were not due to willful disregard of the requirements of the Act and regulations, gross negligence, failure to observe accepted standards of administration or a pattern of misexpenditure.


(b) For subrecipient level misexpenditures that were not due to willful disregard of the requirements of the Act and regulations, gross negligence, failure to observe accepted standards of administration or a pattern of misexpenditure, if we have required the State to repay such amount the State may deduct an amount equal to the misexpenditure from its subsequent year’s allocations to the local area from funds available for the administrative costs of the local programs involved.


(c) If offset is granted, the debt will not be fully satisfied until the Grant Officer reduces amounts allotted to the State by the amount of the misexpenditure.


(d) A State may not make a deduction under paragraph (b) of this section until the State has taken appropriate corrective action to ensure full compliance within the local area with regard to appropriate expenditure of WIA funds.


Subpart H – Administrative Adjudication and Judicial Review

§ 667.800 What actions of the Department may be appealed to the Office of Administrative Law Judges?

(a) An applicant for financial assistance under title I of WIA which is dissatisfied because we have issued a determination not to award financial assistance, in whole or in part, to such applicant; or a recipient, subrecipient, or a vendor against which the Grant Officer has directly imposed a sanction or corrective action, including a sanction against a State under 20 CFR part 666, may appeal to the U.S. Department of Labor, Office of Administrative Law Judges (OALJ) within 21 days of receipt of the final determination.


(b) Failure to request a hearing within 21 days of receipt of the final determination constitutes a waiver of the right to a hearing.


(c) A request for a hearing under this subpart must state specifically those issues in the final determination upon which review is requested. Those provisions of the final determination not specified for review, or the entire final determination when no hearing has been requested within the 21 days, are considered resolved and not subject to further review. Only alleged violations of the Act, its regulations, grant or other agreement under the Act fairly raised in the determination, and the request for hearing are subject to review.


(d) A request for a hearing must be filed with the Chief Administrative Law Judge, U.S. Department of Labor, in accordance with 29 CFR part 18, with one copy to the Departmental official who issued the determination.


(e) The procedures in this subpart apply in the case of a complainant who has not had a dispute adjudicated under the alternative dispute resolution process set forth in § 667.840 within the 60 days, except that the request for hearing before the OALJ must be filed within 15 days of the conclusion of the 60-day period provided in § 667.840. In addition to including the final determination upon which review is requested, the complainant must include a copy of any Stipulation of Facts and a brief summary of proceedings.


[65 FR 49421, Aug. 11, 2000, as amended at 86 FR 1779, Jan. 11, 2021]


§ 667.810 What rules of procedure apply to hearings conducted under this subpart?

(a) Rules of practice and procedure. The rules of practice and procedure promulgated by the OALJ at subpart A of 29 CFR part 18, govern the conduct of hearings under this subpart. However, a request for hearing under this subpart is not considered a complaint to which the filing of an answer by DOL or a DOL agency or official is required. Technical rules of evidence will not apply to hearings conducted pursuant to this part. However, rules or principles designed to assure production of the most credible evidence available and to subject testimony to cross-examination will apply.


(b) Prehearing procedures. In all cases, the Administrative Law Judge (ALJ) should encourage the use of prehearing procedures to simplify and clarify facts and issues.


(c) Subpoenas. Subpoenas necessary to secure the attendance of witnesses and the production of documents or other items at hearings must be obtained from the ALJ and must be issued under the authority contained in section 183(c) of the Act, incorporating 15 U.S.C. 49.


(d) Timely submission of evidence. The ALJ must not permit the introduction at the hearing of any documentation if it has not been made available for review by the other parties to the proceeding either at the time ordered for any prehearing conference, or, in the absence of such an order, at least 3 weeks prior to the hearing date.


(e) Burden of production. The Grant Officer has the burden of production to support her or his decision. To this end, the Grant Officer prepares and files an administrative file in support of the decision which must be made part of the record. Thereafter, the party or parties seeking to overturn the Grant Officer’s decision has the burden of persuasion.


§ 667.820 What authority does the Administrative Law Judge have in ordering relief as an outcome of an administrative hearing?

In ordering relief, the ALJ has the full authority of the Secretary under the Act.


§ 667.825 What special rules apply to reviews of NFJP and WIA INA grant selections?

(a) An applicant whose application for funding as a WIA INA grantee under 20 CFR part 668 or as an NFJP grantee under 20 CFR part 669 is denied in whole or in part may request an administrative review under § 667.800(a) with to determine whether there is a basis in the record to support the decision. This appeal will not in any way interfere with the designation and funding of another organization to serve the area in question during the appeal period. The available remedy in such an appeal is the right to be designated in the future as the WIA INA or NFJP grantee for the remainder of the current grant cycle. Neither retroactive nor immediately effective selection status may be awarded as relief in a non-selection appeal under this section.


(b) If the ALJ rules that the organization should have been selected and the organization continues to meet the requirements of 20 CFR part 668 or part 669, we will select and fund the organization within 90 days of the ALJ’s decision unless the end of the 90-day period is within six (6) months of the end of the funding period. An applicant so selected is not entitled to the full grant amount, but will only receive the funds remaining in the grant that have not been expended by the current grantee through its operation of the grant and its subsequent closeout.


(c) Any organization selected and/or funded as a WIA INA or NFJP grantee is subject to being removed as grantee in the event an ALJ decision so orders. The Grant Officer provides instructions on transition and close-out to a grantee which is removed. All parties must agree to the provisions of this paragraph as a condition for WIA INA or NFJP funding.


(d) A successful appellant which has not been awarded relief because of the application of paragraph (b) of this section is eligible to compete for funds in the immediately subsequent two-year grant cycle. In such a situation, we will not issue a waiver of competition and for the area and will select a grantee through the normal competitive process.


§ 667.830 When will the Administrative Law Judge issue a decision?

(a) The ALJ should render a written decision not later than 90 days after the closing of the record.


(b) The decision of the ALJ constitutes final agency action unless, within 20 days of the decision, a party dissatisfied with the ALJ’s decision has filed a petition for review with the Administrative Review Board (ARB) (established under Secretary’s Order No. 01-2020), specifically identifying the procedure, fact, law, or policy to which exception is taken, in accordance with 29 CFR part 26. Any exception not specifically urged is deemed to have been waived. A copy of the petition for review must be sent to the opposing party at that time. Thereafter, the decision of the ALJ constitutes final agency action unless the ARB, within 30 days of the filing of the petition for review, notifies the parties that the case has been accepted for review. In any case accepted by the ARB, a decision must be issued by the ARB within 180 days of acceptance. If a decision is not so issued, the decision of the ALJ constitutes final agency action.


[65 FR 49421, Aug. 11, 2000, as amended at 85 FR 13030, Mar. 6, 2020; 85 FR 30615, May 20, 2020; 86 FR 1779, Jan. 11, 2021]


§ 667.840 Is there an alternative dispute resolution process that may be used in place of an OALJ hearing?

(a) Parties to a complaint which has been filed according to the requirements of § 667.800 may choose to waive their rights to an administrative hearing before the OALJ. Instead, they may choose to transfer the settlement of their dispute to an individual acceptable to all parties who will conduct an informal review of the stipulated facts and render a decision in accordance with applicable law. A written decision must be issued within 60 days after submission of the matter for informal review.


(b) The waiver of the right to request a hearing before the OALJ will automatically be revoked if a settlement has not been reached or a decision has not been issued within the 60 days provided in paragraph (a) of this section.


(c) The decision rendered under this informal review process will be treated as a final decision of an Administrative Law Judge under section 186(b) of the Act.


§ 667.850 Is there judicial review of a final order of the Secretary issued under section 186 of the Act?

(a) Any party to a proceeding which resulted in a Secretary’s final order under section 186 of the Act may obtain a review in the United States Court of Appeals having jurisdiction over the applicant or recipient of funds involved, by filing a review petition within 30 days of the issuance of the Secretary’s final order.


(b) The court has jurisdiction to make and enter a decree affirming, modifying, or setting aside the order of the Secretary, in whole or in part.


(c) No objection to the Secretary’s order may be considered by the court unless the objection was specifically urged, in a timely manner, before the Secretary. The review is limited to questions of law, and the findings of fact of the Secretary are conclusive if supported by substantial evidence.


(d) The judgment of the court is final, subject to certiorari review by the United States Supreme Court.


§ 667.860 Are there other remedies available outside of the Act?

Nothing contained in this subpart prejudices the separate exercise of other legal rights in pursuit of remedies and sanctions available outside the Act.


PART 668 – INDIAN AND NATIVE AMERICAN PROGRAMS UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT


Authority:Secs. 506(c) and 166(h)(2), Pub. L. 105-220; 20 U.S.C. 9276(c); 29 U.S.C. 2911(h)(2).


Source:65 FR 49435, Aug. 11, 2000, unless otherwise noted.

Subpart A – Purposes and Policies

§ 668.100 What is the purpose of the programs established to serve Native American peoples (INA programs) under section 166 of the Workforce Investment Act?

(a) The purpose of WIA INA programs is to support comprehensive employment and training activities for Indian, Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian individuals in order to:


(1) Develop more fully their academic, occupational, and literacy skills;


(2) Make them more competitive in the workforce;


(3) Promote the economic and social development of Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian communities according to the goals and values of such communities; and


(4) Help them achieve personal and economic self-sufficiency.


(b) The principal means of accomplishing these purposes is to enable tribes and Native American organizations to provide employment and training services to Native American peoples and their communities. Services should be provided in a culturally appropriate manner, consistent with the principles of Indian self-determination. (WIA sec. 166(a)(1).)


§ 668.120 How must INA programs be administered?

(a) We will administer INA programs to maximize the Federal commitment to support the growth and development of Native American people and communities as determined by representatives of such communities.


(b) In administering these programs, we will observe the Congressional declaration of policy set forth in the Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act, at 25 U.S.C. section 450a, as well as the Department of Labor’s “American Indian and Alaska Native Policy,” dated July 29, 1998.


(c) The regulations in this part are not intended to abrogate the trust responsibilities of the Federal Government to Native American bands, tribes, or groups in any way.


(d) We will administer INA programs through a single organizational unit and consistent with the requirements in section 166(h) of the Act. We have designated the Division of Indian and Native American Programs (DINAP) within the Employment and Training Administration (ETA) as this single organizational unit required by WIA section 166(h)(1).


(e) We will establish and maintain administrative procedures for the selection, administration, monitoring, and evaluation of Native American employment and training programs authorized under this Act. We will utilize staff who have a particular competence in this field to administer these programs. (WIA sec. 166(h).)


§ 668.130 What obligation do we have to consult with the INA grantee community in developing rules, regulations, and standards of accountability for INA programs?

We will consult with the Native American grantee community as a full partner in developing policies for the INA programs. We will actively seek and consider the views of all INA grantees, and will discuss options with the grantee community prior to establishing policies and program regulations. The primary consultation vehicle is the Native American Employment and Training Council. (WIA sec. 166(h)(2).)


§ 668.140 What WIA regulations apply to the INA program?

(a) The regulations found in this subpart.


(b) The general administrative requirements found in 20 CFR part 667, including the regulations concerning Complaints, Investigations and Hearings found at 20 CFR part 667, subpart E through subpart H.


(c) The Department’s regulations codifying the common rules implementing Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Circulars which generally apply to Federal programs carried out by Indian tribal governments and nonprofit organizations, at 29 CFR parts 95, 96, 97, and 99 as applicable.


(d) The Department’s regulations at 29 CFR part 37, which implement the nondiscrimination provisions of WIA section 188, apply to recipients of financial assistance under WIA section 166.


§ 668.150 What definitions apply to terms used in the regulations in this part?

In addition to the definitions found in WIA sections 101 and 166 and 20 CFR 660.300, the following definitions apply:


DINAP means the Division of Indian and Native American Programs within the Employment and Training Administration of the Department.


Governing body means a body of representatives who are duly elected, appointed by duly elected officials, or selected according to traditional tribal means. A governing body must have the authority to provide services to and to enter into grants on behalf of the organization that selected or designated it.


Grant Officer means a Department of Labor official authorized to obligate Federal funds. Indian or Native American (INA) Grantee means an entity which is formally designated under subpart B of this part to operate an INA program and which has a grant agreement under § 668.292.


NEW means the Native Employment Works Program, the tribal work program authorized under section 412(a)(2) of the Social Security Act, as amended by the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (Public Law 104-193).


Underemployed means an individual who is working part time but desires full time employment, or who is working in employment not commensurate with the individual’s demonstrated level of educational and/or skill achievement.


Subpart B – Service Delivery Systems Applicable to Section 166 Programs

§ 668.200 What are the requirements for designation as an “Indian or Native American (INA) grantee”?

(a) To be designated as an INA grantee, an entity must have:


(1) A legal status as a government or as an agency of a government, private non-profit corporation, or a consortium which contains at least one of these entities;


(2) The ability to administer INA program funds, as defined at § 668.220; and


(3) A new (non-incumbent) entity must have a population within the designated geographic service area which would provide funding under the funding formula found at § 668.296(b) in the amount of at least $100,000, including any amounts received for supplemental youth services under the funding formula at § 668.440(a). Incumbent grantees which do not meet this dollar threshold for Program Year (PY) 2000 and beyond will be grandfathered in. We will make an exception for grantees wishing to participate in the demonstration program under Public Law 102-477 if all resources to be consolidated under the Public Law 102-477 plan total at least $100,000, with at least $20,000 derived from section 166 funds as determined by the most recent Census data. Exceptions to this $20,000 limit may be made for those entities which are close to the limit and which have demonstrated the capacity to administer Federal funds and operate a successful employment and training program.


(b) To be designated as a Native American grantee, a consortium or its members must meet the requirements of paragraph (a) of this section and must:


(1) Be in close proximity to one another, but they may operate in more than one State;


(2) Have an administrative unit legally authorized to run the program and to commit the other members to contracts, grants, and other legally-binding agreements; and


(3) Be jointly and individually responsible for the actions and obligations of the consortium, including debts.


(c) Entities potentially eligible for designation under paragraph (a)(1) or (b)(1) of this section are:


(1) Federally-recognized Indian tribes;


(2) Tribal organizations, as defined in 25 U.S.C. 450b;


(3) Alaska Native-controlled organizations representing regional or village areas, as defined in the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act;


(4) Native Hawaiian-controlled entities;


(5) Native American-controlled organizations serving Indians; and


(6) Consortia of eligible entities which individually meets the legal requirements for a consortium described in paragraph (c) of this section.


(d) Under WIA section 166(d)(2)(B), individuals who were eligible to participate under section 401 of JTPA on August 6, 1998, remain eligible to participate under section 166 of WIA. State-recognized tribal organizations serving such individuals are considered to be “Native American controlled” for WIA section 166 purposes.


§ 668.210 What priority for designation is given to eligible organizations?

(a) Federally-recognized Indian tribes, Alaska Native entities, or consortia that include a tribe or entity will have the highest priority for designation. To be designated, the organizations must meet the requirements in this subpart. These organizations will be designated for those geographic areas and/or populations over which they have legal jurisdiction. (WIA sec. 166(c)(1).)


(b) If we decide not to designate Indian tribes or Alaska Native entities to serve their service areas, we will enter into arrangements to provide services with entities which the tribes or Alaska Native entities involved approve.


(c) In geographic areas not served by Indian tribes or Alaska Native entities, entities with a Native American-controlled governing body and which are representative of the Native American community or communities involved will have priority for designation.


§ 668.220 What is meant by the “ability to a