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Title 7 – Agriculture–Volume 15

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Title 7 – Agriculture–Volume 15



SUBTITLE B – Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued)

Part


chapter xviii – Rural Housing Service, Rural Business-Cooperative Service, Rural Utilities Service, and Farm Service Agency, Department of Agriculture (Continued)

2003

chapter xx – Local Television Loan Guarantee Board Procedures [Reserved]

chapter xxv – Office of Advocacy and Outreach, Department of Agriculture

2500

chapter xxvi – Office of Inspector General, Department of Agriculture

2610

chapter xxvii – Office of Information Resources Management, Department of Agriculture

2700

chapter xxviii – Office of Operations, Department of Agriculture

2810

chapter xxix – Office of Energy Policy and New Uses, Department of Agriculture

2900

chapter xxx – Office of the Chief Financial Officer, Department of Agriculture

3010

chapter xxxi – Office of Environmental Quality, Department of Agriculture

3100

chapter xxxii – Office of Procurement and Property Management, Department of Agriculture

3200

chapter xxxiii – Office of Transportation, Department of Agriculture

3300

chapter xxxiv – National Institute of Food and Agriculture

3400

chapter xxxv – Rural Housing Service, Department of Agriculture

3550

chapter xxxvi – National Agricultural Statistics Service, Department of Agriculture

3600

chapter xxxvii – Economic Research Service, Department of Agriculture

3700

chapter xxxviii – World Agricultural Outlook Board, Department of Agriculture

3800

chapter xli [Reserved]

chapter xlii – Rural Business-Cooperative Service and Rural Utilities Service, Department of Agriculture

4274

chapter l – Rural Business-Cooperative Service, Rural Housing Service, and Rural Utilities Service, Department of Agriculture

5001


Subtitle B – Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued)

CHAPTER XVIII – RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE SERVICE, RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, AND FARM SERVICE AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED)

SUBCHAPTER I – ADMINISTRATIVE REGULATIONS

PARTS 2000-2002 [RESERVED]

PART 2003 – ORGANIZATION


Authority:5 U.S.C. 301; 7 U.S.C. 6941; and 7 CFR 2.17.


Source:62 FR 67259, Dec. 24, 1997, unless otherwise noted.

Subpart A – Functional Organization of the Rural Development Mission Area

§ 2003.1 Definitions.

EEO – the Equal Employment Opportunity Act of 1972, 42 U.S.C. § 2000e et seq.


O&M – Operations and Management.


P&P – Policy and Planning.


RBS – Rural Business-Cooperative Development Service, USDA, or any successor agency.


RHS – Rural Housing Service, USDA, or any successor agency.


Rural Development – Rural Development mission area of USDA.


RUS – Rural Utilities Service, USDA, or any successor agency.


Secretary – the Secretary of USDA.


USDA – the United States Department of Agriculture.


[62 FR 67259, Dec. 24, 1997, as amended at 84 FR 59923, Nov. 7, 2019]


§ 2003.2 General.

The Rural Development mission area of the Department of Agriculture was established as a result of the Department of Agriculture Reorganization Act of 1994, Title II of Pub.L. 103-354. Rural Development’s basic organization consists of Headquarters in Washington, D.C. and 47 State Offices. Headquarters maintains overall planning, coordination, and control of Rural Development agency programs. Administrators head RHS, RBS, and RUS under the direction of the Under Secretary for Rural Development. State Directors head the State Offices and are directly responsible to the Under Secretary for the execution of all Rural Development agency programs within the boundaries of their states.


§§ 2003.3-2003.4 [Reserved]

§ 2003.5 Headquarters organization.

(a) The Rural Development Headquarters is comprised of:


(1) The Office of the Under Secretary;


(2) Two Deputy Under Secretaries; and,


(3) Three Administrators and their staffs.


(b) The Rural Development Headquarters is located at 1400 Independence Avenue, SW., Washington, DC. 20250-0700


§ 2003.6 Office of the Under Secretary.

In accordance with 7 CFR § 2.17 the Secretary has delegated to the Under Secretary, Rural Development, authority to manage and administer programs and support functions of the Rural Development mission area.


(a) Office of the Deputy Under Secretary for P&P. This office is headed by the Deputy Under Secretary for P&P. The Under Secretary, Rural Development, has delegated to the Deputy Under Secretary for P&P, responsibility for formulation and development of short-and long-range rural development policies of the Department in accordance with 7 CFR § 2.45. The Deputy Under Secretary for P&P reports directly to the Under Secretary, Rural Development, and provides guidance and supervision for research, policy analysis and development, strategic planning, partnerships and special initiatives. For budget and accounting purposes, all of the staff offices under the Deputy Under Secretary for P&P are housed in RBS.


(1) The Budget Analysis Division assesses potential impacts of alternative policies on the mission area’s programs and operations and develops recommendations for change. The units are headed by the Chief Budget Officer, who individually serves as the top policy advisor to the Under Secretary and Deputy Under Secretary on all matters relating to mission area budget policy.


(2) The Research, Analysis and Information Division analyzes information on rural conditions and the strategies and techniques for promoting rural development. The division performs, or arranges to have conducted, short-term and major research studies needed to formulate policy.


(3) The Reinvention and Capacity Building Division coordinates the mission area’s strategic planning initiatives, both at the National level and in the State Offices. The division assists the Rural Development agencies in their implementation of the Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA) and special initiatives of the Administration, USDA, and the Office of the Under Secretary.


(4) The Rural Initiatives and Partnership Division manages the mission area’s involvement and coordination with other Federal and state departments and agencies to assess rural issues and develop model partnerships and initiatives to achieve shared rural development goals. The division is responsible for managing the National Rural Development Partnership and providing support and oversight of 37 State Rural Development Councils.


(b) Office of the Deputy Under Secretary for O&M. In accordance with 7 CFR 2.45, the Under Secretary, Rural Development, has delegated to the Deputy Under Secretary for O&M responsibility for providing leadership in planning, developing, and administering overall administrative management program policies and operational activities of the Rural Development mission area. The Deputy Under Secretary for O&M reports directly to the Under Secretary, Rural Development.


(1) Office of the Deputy Administrator for O&M. Headed by the Deputy Administrator for O&M, this office reports directly to the Deputy Under Secretary for O&M, and is responsible for directing and coordinating the consolidated administrative and financial management functions for Rural Development. This office provides overall guidance and supervision for budget and financial management, human resources management and personnel services, administrative and procurement services, information resources management and automated data systems. For budget and accounting purposes, all of the staff offices under the Deputy Administrator for O&M are housed in RHS.


(i) Office of the Controller. Headed by the Chief Financial Officer, this office supports the Deputy Administrator for O&M in executing Rural Development requirements related to compliance with the Chief Financial Officers Act of 1990 and provides leadership, coordination, and oversight of all financial management matters and financial execution of the budget for the Rural Development agencies. This office also has full responsibility for Rural Development agencies’ accounting, financial, reporting, and internal controls. The office provides direct oversight to the Headquarters Budget Division, Financial Management Division, and the Office of the Assistant Controller, located in St. Louis, Missouri.


(ii) Office of Assistant Administrator for Procurement and Administrative Services. Headed by the Assistant Administrator for Procurement and Administrative Services, this office is responsible to the Deputy Administrator for O&M for overseeing the Procurement Management Division, the Property and Supply Management Division, and the Support Services Division:


(A) The Procurement Management Division is responsible for developing, implementing, and interpreting procurement and contracting policies for the Rural Development mission area. Major functions include planning outreach efforts and goals for small and disadvantaged businesses, providing staff assistance reviews in State and Local Offices, administering the Contracting Officer Professionalism Warrant program for Rural Development agencies, and coordinating the development of Rural Development’s acquisition plans.


(B) The Property and Supply Management Division is responsible for developing office space acquisition and utilization policies, providing training to field office leasing officers, administering the Leasing Officer Warrant program, assuring accessibility compliance in Rural Development’s work sites, administering Rural Development’s Physical Security program, and establishing and providing oversight to the worksite Energy Conservation program. This office operates a nationwide supply warehousing and distribution program, and oversees a nationwide Personal Property Management and Utilization Program, manages the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Excess Personal Property Program for field level activities, and provides direct support services to Rural Development’s St. Louis facilities.


(C) The Support Services Division has responsibility for designing, developing, administering, and controlling Rural Development’s directives management and issuance system, coordinating Rural Development’s Regulatory Agenda and Regulatory Program submissions to USDA and OMB, serving as Federal Register liaison, and analyzing and coordinating regulatory work plans for the Under Secretary. This office submits Paperwork Reduction Act public burden clearances to OMB, administers all printing programs, manages Rural Development travel policies and programs, and manages Freedom of Information Act, Privacy Act and Tort Claims programs.


(iii) Office of Information Resources Management (IRM). Headed by the Chief Information Officer, this office is responsible to the Deputy Administrator for O&M for developing Rural Development’s IRM policies, regulations, standards and guidelines. This office provides overall leadership and direction to activities assigned to the following four major divisions:


(A) The Customer Services Division is responsible for direct customer and technical support (hardware and software).


(B) The Management Services Division coordinates all IRM acquisition, budget, and policy and planning activities in support of Rural Development automation.


(C) The Information Technology Division provides support technical services in the areas of data administration, system integrity management, research and development, and telecommunications.


(D) The Systems Services Division is responsible for planning, directing, and controlling activities related to Rural Development’s Automated Information Systems.


(iv) Office of the Assistant Administrator for Human Resources. Headed by the Assistant Administrator for Human Resources, this office is responsible to the Deputy Administrator for O&M for the overall development, implementation, and management, of personnel and human resources support services for Rural Development. The office provides direction to the Headquarters Personnel Services, Human Resources Training and Mission Area Personnel Services Division, and Labor Relations Staff offices. The office is also responsible for the establishment of recruitment, retention, and development policies and programs supporting workforce diversity and affirmative action.


(2) Office of Civil Rights Staff. Headed by a staff director, this staff has primary responsibility for providing leadership and administration of the Civil Rights Program for the Rural Development mission area. The staff conducts on-site reviews of borrowers and beneficiaries of Federal financial assistance to ensure compliance with Titles VI and VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended, Title VIII of the Civil Rights Act of 1968, as amended, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, the Americans with Disabilities Act, and prepares compliance reports. The staff conducts and evaluates Title VII compliance visits to insure that EEO programs are adequately implemented. In addition, the office develops, monitors, and evaluates Affirmative Employment programs for minorities, women and persons with disabilities, and coordinates and conducts community outreach activities at historically black colleges and universities. It also has oversight of special emphasis programs such as the Federal Women’s Program, Hispanic Emphasis Program, and Black Emphasis Program. The staff director reports directly to the Deputy Under Secretary for O&M.


(3) Office of Communications. Headed by a director who reports directly to the Deputy Under Secretary for O&M, this office has primary responsibility for tracking legislation and development and institution of policies to provide public communication and information services related to the Rural Development. The office maintains a constituent data base and conducts minority outreach efforts and administers a public information and media center responsible for media inquiries, news releases, program announcements, media advisories, and information retrieval. This office also serves as a liaison with Office of Congressional Relations (OCR), Office of the General Counsel (OGC), and other Departmental units involved in Congressional relations and public information. This office drafts testimony, prepares witnesses, and provides staff for hearings and markups. In addition, the office briefs Congressional members and staff on the Rural Development matters, coordinates Rural Development’s legislative activities with other USDA agencies and OMB and develops and implements legislative strategy. The staff also coordinates development and production of brochures, press releases, and other public information materials.


§§ 2003.7-2003.9 [Reserved]

§ 2003.10 Rural Development State Offices.

(a) Headed by State Directors, State Offices report directly to the Under Secretary, Rural Development, and are responsible to the three Rural Development agency Administrators for carrying out agency program operations at the State level, ensuring adherence to program plans approved for the State by the Under Secretary, and rendering staff advisory and manpower support to Area and Local offices. The Rural Development State Directors, for budget and accounting purposes, are housed in the RHS agency.


(b) Program Directors within the State Office provide oversight and leadership on major program functions. Major program functions include: Single Family and Multi-Family Housing loans and grants, Community Facility, Water and Waste Disposal, Business and Cooperative, and the Empowerment Zones and Enterprise Communities (EZ/EC) programs.


(c) The USDA Rural Development State Office locations are as follows:


State
Location
AlabamaMontgomery, AL
AlaskaPalmer, AK
ArizonaPhoenix, AZ
ArkansasLittle Rock, AR
CaliforniaWoodland, CA
ColoradoLakewood, CO
DelawareCamden, DE
FloridaGainesville, FL
GeorgiaAthens, GA
HawaiiHilo, HI
IdahoBoise, ID
IllinoisChampaign, IL
IndianaIndianapolis, IN
IowaDes Moines, IA
KansasTopeka, KS
KentuckyLexington, KY
LouisianaAlexandria, LA
MaineBangor, ME
MassachusettsAmherst, MA
MichiganEast Lansing, MI
MinnesotaSt. Paul, MN
MississippiJackson, MS
MissouriColumbia, MO
MontanaBozeman, MT
NebraskaLincoln, NE
NevadaCarson City, NV
New JerseyMt. Holly, NJ
New MexicoAlbuquerque, NM
New YorkSyracuse, NY
North CarolinaRaleigh, NC
North DakotaBismarck, ND
OhioColumbus, OH
OklahomaStillwater, OK
OregonPortland, OR
PennsylvaniaHarrisburg, PA
Puerto RicoHato Rey, PR
South CarolinaColumbia, SC
South DakotaHuron, SD
TennesseeNashville, TN
TexasTemple, TX
UtahSalt Lake City, UT
VermontMontpelier, VT
VirginiaRichmond, VA
WashingtonOlympia, WA
West VirginiaCharleston, WV
WisconsinStevens Point, WI
WyomingCasper, WY

[62 FR 67259, Dec. 24, 1997; 63 FR 3256, Jan. 22, 1998]


§§ 2003.11-2003.13 [Reserved]

§ 2003.14 Field Offices.

Rural Development field offices report to their respective State Director and State Office Program Directors. State Directors may organizationally structure their offices based on the program workloads within their respective State. Field offices generally are patterned in a three or two tier program delivery structure. In a three tier system, Local offices report to an Area office, that reports to the State Office. In a two tier system, a “Local” or “Area” office reports to the State Office. Locations and telephone numbers of Area and Local Offices may be obtained from the appropriate Rural Development State Office.


§§ 2003.15-2003.16 [Reserved]

§ 2003.17 Availability of information.

Information concerning Rural Development programs and agencies may be obtained from the Office of Communications, Rural Development, U. S. Department of Agriculture, STOP 0705, 1400 Independence Avenue SW., Washington, DC 20250-0705.


§ 2003.18 Functional organization of RHS.

(a) General. The Secretary established RHS pursuant to section 233 of the Department of Agriculture Reorganization Act of 1994 (7 U.S.C. 6943).


(b) Office of the Administrator. According to 7 CFR 2.49, the Administrator has responsibility for implementing programs aimed at delivering loans and grant assistance to rural Americans and their communities in obtaining adequate and affordable housing and community facilities, in accordance with Title V of the Housing Act of 1949 (42 U.S.C. 1471 et seq.) and the Consolidated Farm and Rural Development Act (7 U.S.C. 1921 et seq.).


(1) Legislative Affairs Staff. The duties and responsibilities of this staff have now been aligned under the Office of Communication, headed by a director who reports directly to the Under Secretary for O&M. The Office of Communication is responsible for providing and carrying out legislative, public communication, and information services for the Rural Development mission area.


(2) Office of Program Support Staff. The Program Support Staff is headed by a staff director who is responsible to the Administrator for monitoring managerial and technical effectiveness of RHS programs. The staff coordinates review and analysis of legislation, Executive Orders, OMB circulars, and Department regulations for their impact on Agency programs. The staff develops, implements, and reports on architectural and environmental policies, in cooperation with the Department. Staff responsibilities also include managing RHS’s Hazardous Waste Management Fund, coordinating the Debarment and Suspension process for RHS, tracking the use of Program Loan Cost Expense funds, and maintaining the RHS Internet “Home Page.”


(3) Office of Deputy Administrator, Single Family Housing. Headed by the Deputy Administrator, Single Family Housing, this office is responsible to the Administrator for the development and implementation of RHS’s Single Family Housing programs, which extend supervised housing credit to rural people of limited resources, for adequate, modest, decent, safe, and sanitary homes. The office is responsible for administering and managing sections 502 and 504 Rural Housing direct and guaranteed loan and grant programs, Rural Housing and Self-Help Site loans, the Self-Help Technical Assistance grant program, Housing Application Packaging and Technical and Supervisory Assistance grants, and Home Improvement and Repaid loans and grants. The office directs the following three divisions: Single Family Housing Processing Division, Single Family Housing Servicing and Property Management Division, and Single Family Housing Centralized Servicing Center in St. Louis, Mo.


(i) Office of Single Family Housing Processing Division. Headed by a division director, this division is responsible for development and nationwide implementation of policies on processing Single Family Housing direct and guaranteed program loans. In addition, the division provides direction on the following: the Rural Housing Targeted Area Set-Aside program, debarments, payment assistance, title clearance and loan closing, site/subdivision development, Deferred Mortgage Payment Program; construction defects, credit reports, appraisals, Manufactured Housing, coordinated assessment reviews, Home Buyer’s Counseling/Education Program, and allocation of loan and grant program funds.


(ii) Office of Single Family Housing Servicing and Property Management Division. Headed by a division director, this division is responsible for the development and implementation of nationwide policies for servicing RHS’s multi-billion dollar portfolio of Single Family Housing loans, and managing and selling Single Family Housing inventory properties. The division also conducts state program evaluations, identifies program weaknesses, makes recommendations for improvements, and identifies corrective actions.


(iii) Office of Single Family Housing Centralized Servicing Center (CSC) – St. Louis, Missouri. Headed by a director, CSC is responsible for centrally servicing RHS’s multi-billion dollar portfolio of Single Family Housing loans. CSC provides interest credit or payment assistance renewals, performs escrow activities for real estate taxes and property hazard insurance, oversees collection of loan payments, and grants interest credit, payment assistance, and moratoria.


(4) Office of the Deputy Administrator, Multi-Family Housing Division. Headed by the Deputy Administrator, Multi-Family Housing, this office is responsible for the development and nationwide implementation of RHS’s Multi-Family Housing programs, which extend supervised housing credit to rural residents an opportunity to have decent, safe, and sanitary rental housing. The following programs are administered and managed by this office: Section 515 Rural Rental Housing, Rural Cooperative and Congregate Housing Programs, Section 521 Rental Assistance, Farm Labor Housing loan and grant programs, Housing Preservation Grants, rural housing vouchers, and Housing Application Packaging Grants. This office directs the following two divisions:


(i) Multi-Family Housing Processing Division. Headed by a division director, this division is responsible for the development and nationwide implementation of policies on processing Multi-Family Housing program loans. The division manages the following program areas: elderly and family rental housing, Farm Labor Housing loans and grants, outreach contacts, congregate facilities, Housing Preservation Grants, cooperative housing, rural housing vouchers, appraisals, Congregate Housing Services Grants, Rental Assistance, Housing Application Packaging Grants, targeted area and nonprofit set asides, Multi-Family Housing suspensions and debarments, title clearance and loan closing, allocation and monitoring of loan and grant funds, adverse decisions and appeals, commercial credit reports, individual credit reports, and, site development.


(ii) Multi-Family Housing Portfolio Management Division. Headed by a division director, this division is responsible for the development and institution of policies on the management and servicing of the nationwide Multi-Family Housing programs. The Division implements current and long range plans for servicing Rural Rental Housing loans, Labor Housing loans and grants, and Rental Assistance or similar tenant subsidies.


(5) Office of the Deputy Administrator, Community Programs. Headed by the Deputy Administrator, Community Programs, this office is responsible for overseeing the administration and management of Community Facilities loans and grants to hospitals and nursing homes, police and fire stations, libraries, schools, adult and child care centers, etc. The office monitors and evaluates the administration of loan and grant programs on a nationwide basis and provides guidance and direction for community programs through two divisions, Community Programs Loan Processing Division and Servicing and Special Authorities Division.


(i) Community Programs Loan Processing Division. Headed by a director, this division is responsible for the overall administration, policy development, fund distribution, and processing of Community Facilities loans and grants and other loan and grant programs assigned to the Division.


(ii) Servicing and Special Authorities Division. Headed by a division director, this division is responsible for the overall administration, policy development, and servicing of the Community Facilities loan and grant programs. The division conducts program evaluations, identifies program weaknesses, makes recommendations for improvements, and identifies corrective actions. The division also administers and services Nonprofit National Corporation loans and grants.


[62 FR 67259, Dec. 24, 1997, as amended at 64 FR 32388, June 17, 1999]


§§ 2003.19-2003.21 [Reserved]

§ 2003.22 Functional organization of RUS.

(a) General. The Secretary established RUS pursuant to § 232 of the Department of Agriculture Reorganization Act of 1994 (7 U.S.C. 6942).


(b) Office of the Administrator. According to 7 CFR 2.47, the Administrator has responsibility for managing and administering the programs and support functions of RUS to provide financial and technical support for rural infrastructure to include electrification, clean drinking water, telecommunications, and water disposal systems, pursuant to the Consolidated Farm and Rural Development Act, as amended (7 U.S.C. 1921 et. seq.), and the Rural Electrification Act of 1936, as amended (7 U.S.C. 901 et. seq.). The office develops and implements strategic plans concerning the Rural Electrification Act of 1936, as amended.


(1) Borrower and Program Support Services. Borrower and Program Support Services consist of the three following staffs which are responsible to the Administrator for planning and carrying out a variety of program and administrative services in support of all RUS programs, and providing expert advice and coordination for the Administrator:


(i) Administrative Liaison Staff. Headed by a staff director, this staff advises the Administrator on management issues and policies relating to human resources, EEO, labor-management partnership, administrative services, travel management, automated information systems, and administrative budgeting and funds control.


(ii) Program Accounting Services Division. Headed by a division director, this division develops and evaluates the accounting systems and procedures of Electric, Telecommunications, and Water and Wastewater borrowers; assures that accounting policies, systems, and procedures meet regulatory, Departmental, General Accounting Office, OMB, and Treasury Department requirements; examines borrowers’ records and operations, and reviews expenditures of loans and other funds; develops audit requirements; and approves Certified Public Accountants to perform audits of borrowers.


(iii) Program and Financial Services Staff. Headed by a staff director, this staff evaluates the financial conditions of troubled borrowers, negotiates settlements of delinquent loans, and makes recommendations to program Assistant Administrators on ways to improve the financial health of borrowers.


(2) Office of Assistant Administrator – Electric Program. Headed by the Assistant Administrator – Electric Program, this office is responsible to the Administrator for directing and coordinating the Rural Electrification program of RUS nationwide. This office develops, maintains, and implements regulations and program procedures on processing and approving loans and loan-related activities for rural electric borrowers. The office directs the following three divisions:


(i) Electric Regional Divisions. Headed by division directors, these two divisions are responsible for administering the Rural Electrification program in specific geographic areas and serving as the single point of contact for all distribution borrowers. The divisions provide guidance to borrowers on RUS loan policies and procedures, maintain oversight of borrower rate actions, and make recommendations to the Administrator on borrower applications for RUS financing. The divisions also assure that power plant, distribution, and transmission systems and facilities are designed and constructed in accordance with the terms of the loan and proper engineering practices and specifications.


(ii) Power Supply Division. Headed by a division director, this division is responsible for administering the Rural Electrification program responsibilities with regard to power supply borrowers nationwide and serves as primary point of contact between RUS and all such borrowers. The division develops and maintains a loan processing program for Rural Electrification Act purposes, and develops and administers engineering and construction policies related to planning, design, construction, operation, and maintenance for power supply borrowers.


(iii) Electric Staff Division. Headed by a division director, this division is responsible for engineering activities related to the design, construction, and technical operations and maintenance of power plants; distribution of power; and transmission systems and facilities, including load management and communications. The division develops criteria and techniques for evaluating the financing and performance of electric borrowers and forecasting borrowers’ future power needs; and maintains financial expertise on the distribution and power supply loan program, and retail and wholesale rates.


(3) Office of Assistant AdministratorTelecommunications Program. Headed by the Assistant Administrator – Telecommunications Program, this office is responsible to the Administrator for directing and coordinating the National Rural Telecommunications, Distance Learning, and Telemedicine programs of RUS. The Assistant Administrator, Telecommunications Program, is responsible for developing, maintaining, and implementing regulations and program procedures on the processing and approval of grants, loans, and loan-related activities for all rural telecommunications borrowers and grant recipients. The office directs the following three divisions:


(i) Telecommunications Standards Division. Headed by a division director, this division is responsible for engineering staff activities related to the design, construction, and technical operation and maintenance of rural telecommunications systems and facilities. The office develops engineering practices, policies, and technical data related to borrowers’ telecommunications systems; and evaluates the application of new communications network technology, including distance learning and telemedicine, to rural telecommunications systems.


(ii) Advanced Telecommunications Services Staff. Headed by a staff director, this staff primarily serves the Assistant Administrator, Telecommunications Program in the role of the Assistant Governor of the RTB. The office performs analyses and makes recommendations to the AAT on issues raised by the RTB Governor, Board of Directors, or RTB borrowers. This staff maintains official records for the RTB Board and prepares minutes of RTB Board meetings. The staff director serves as the Assistant Secretary to the RTB. The staff performs the calculations necessary to determine the cost of money rate to RTB borrowers and recommends and develops program- wide procedures for loan and grant programs. The office is responsible for the Telecommunications Program’s home page on the Internet.


(iii) Telecommunications Area Offices. Headed by area directors, these four offices are responsible for administering the Telecommunications, Distance Learning, and Telemedicine programs for specific geographic areas, and serving as the single point of contact for all program applicants and borrowers within their respective areas. The offices provide guidance to applicants and borrowers on RUS loan policies and procedures and make recommendations to the Administrator on applications for loans, guarantees, and grants. The offices assure that borrower systems and facilities are designed and constructed in accordance with the terms of the loan, acceptable engineering practices and specifications, and acceptable loan security standards.


(4) Office of the Assistant Administrator – Water and Environmental Programs. Headed by the Assistant Administrator, Water and Environmental Programs, this office is responsible to the Administrator for directing and coordinating a nationwide Water and Waste Disposal Program for RUS as authorized under Section 306 of the Consolidated Farm and Rural Development Act, as amended (7 U.S.C. 1926). The office oversees administration of RUS policies on making and servicing loans and grants for water and waste facilities in rural America, and the development of engineering policies, and practices related to the construction and operation of community water and waste disposal systems. This office is responsible for development and coordination of environmental programs with regard to the Water and Waste Disposal Program and directs the following two divisions:


(i) Water Programs Division. Headed by the division director, this division is responsible for administering the Water and Waste Disposal loan and grant making and servicing and special authorities activities nationwide. This office also makes allocation of loan and grant funds to field offices and manages National Office reserves.


(ii) Engineering and Environmental Staff. Headed by a staff director, this staff is responsible for engineering activities at all stages of program implementation, including: review of preliminary engineering plans and specifications, procurement practices, contract awards, construction monitoring, and system operation and maintenance. The staff also develops Agency engineering practices, policies, and technical data related to the construction and operation of community water and waste disposal systems. The staff is responsible for coordinating environmental policy and providing technical support in areas such as: hazardous waste, debarment and suspension, flood insurance, drug free workplace requirements, and computer program software.


[62 FR 67259, Dec. 24, 1997, as amended at 84 FR 59923, Nov. 7, 2019]


§§ 2003.23-2003.25 [Reserved]

§ 2003.26 Functional organization of RBS.

(a) General. The Secretary established RBS pursuant to section 234 of the Department of Agriculture Reorganization Act of 1994 (7 U.S.C. 6944).


(b) Office of the Administrator. According to 7 CFR 2.48, the Administrator is responsible for managing and administering the programs and support functions of RBS to provide assistance to disadvantaged communities through grants and loans and technical assistance to businesses and communities for rural citizens and cooperatives, pursuant to the following authorities: the Rural Electrification Act of 1936, as amended (7 U.S.C. 940c and 950aa et seq.), the Consolidated Farm and Rural Development Act (7 U.S.C. 1921 et seq.), the Cooperative Marketing Act of 1926 (7 U.S.C. 451-457), the Agricultural Marketing Act of 1946 (7 U.S.C. 1621-1627), and the Food Security Act of 1985 (7 U.S.C. 1932). These grants, loans, and technical assistance improve community welfare by enhancing organizational and management skills, developing effective economic strategies, and expanding markets for a wide range of rural products and services.


(1) Resources Coordination Staff. Headed by the staff director, this staff is responsible to the Administrator for preparing legislative initiatives and modifications for program enhancement. The staff monitors legislative and regulatory proposals that potentially impact RBS functions. The staff serves as liaison on budgetary and financial management matters between RBS staff and the Office of the Controller, and assists the Administrator in presenting and supporting RBS’s budget and program plans. The staff also advises the Administrator and RBS officials on management issues and policies related to: human resources, labor relations, civil rights, EEO, space, equipment, travel, Senior Executive Service and Schedule C activities, contracting, automated information systems, and accounting. The staff provides analysis and recommendations on the effectiveness of administrative and management activities, and performs liaison functions between RBS and the Office of the Deputy Under Secretary for O&M on a wide variety of administrative functions.


(2) Office of the Deputy Administrator, Business Programs. Headed by the Deputy Administrator, Business Programs, this office is responsible to the Administrator for overseeing and coordinating the Business and Industry Guaranteed and Direct Loan programs, Intermediary Relending Program loans, Rural Business Enterprise grants, Rural Business Opportunity grants, Rural Economic Development loan and grant programs, and the Rural Venture Capital Demonstration Program. The office participates in policy planning, and program development and evaluation. It also directs the following three divisions:


(i) Processing Division. Headed by the division director, this division is responsible for developing and maintaining loan processing regulations, and directs the processing and approval of guaranteed and direct business and industry loans, and the Rural Venture Capital Demonstration Program. It provides technical assistance to field employees and borrowers on loan processing and develops approval criteria and performance standards for loans. The division recommends plans, programs, and activities related to business loan programs and provides environmental guidance and support.


(ii) Servicing Division. Headed by the division director, this office is responsible for developing and maintaining servicing regulations. It directs and provides technical assistance to field employees and borrowers on servicing business loans and grants. The division reviews large, complex, or potentially controversial loan and grant dockets related to loan servicing and recommends servicing plans, programs, and activities related to business loan and grant programs.


(iii) Specialty Lenders Division. Headed by the division director, this office is responsible for directing and developing and maintaining regulations concerning the processing and approval of Intermediary Relending loans, Rural Business Enterprise grants, Rural Business Opportunity grants, and Rural Economic Development loan and grant programs. The division provides technical assistance to field employees and borrowers on loan and grant processing and other activities. It also develops approval criteria and performance standards and recommends plans, programs, and activities related to business loan and grant programs.


(3) Office of the Deputy Administrator, Cooperative Services Programs. Headed by the Deputy Administrator, Cooperative Services Programs, this office is responsible to the Administrator for providing service to cooperative associations by administering a program of research and analysis of economic, social, legal, financial, and other related issues concerning cooperatives. The office administers programs to assist cooperatives in the organization and management of their associations and a program for economic research and analysis of the marketing aspects of cooperatives. The division administers and monitors activities of the National Sheep Industry Improvement Center and the Appropriate Technology Transfer to Rural Areas Program, and the Rural Cooperative Development Grant Program. The office directs the following three divisions:


(i) Cooperative Marketing Division. Headed by the division director, this division is responsible for participating in the formulation of National policies and procedures on cooperative marketing. The division conducts research and analysis and gives technical assistance to farmer cooperatives on cooperative marketing of certain crops, livestock, aquaculture, forestry, poultry, semen, milk, and dairy products to improve their market performance and economic position.


(ii) Cooperative Development Division. Headed by the division director, this division is responsible for participating in the formulation of National policies and procedures on cooperative development. The office conducts evaluations and analysis of proposed new cooperatives to develop plans for implementing feasible operations, and advises and assists rural resident groups and developing cooperatives in implementing sound business plans for new cooperatives. It provides research, analysis, and technical assistance to rural residents on cooperative development initiatives and strategies to improve economic conditions through cooperative efforts.


(iii) Cooperative Resource Management Division. Headed by the division director, this division is responsible for participating in the formulating of National policies and procedures on cooperative resource management. The division conducts research and analysis and gives technical assistance to cooperatives on their overall structure, strategic management and planning, financial issues, and operational characteristics to improve their use of resources, financial policies, and ability to adapt to market conditions. The division conducts research and analysis of policy, taxation, Federal laws, State statutes, and common laws that apply to cooperative incorporation, structure, and operation to assist cooperatives in meeting legal requirements.


(4) Office of the Deputy Administrator, Community Development. Headed by the Deputy Administrator, Community Development, this office is responsible to the Under Secretary, Rural Development, for coordinating and overseeing all functions in the Community Outreach and Empowerment Program areas. The office assists in providing leadership and coordination to National and local rural economic and community development efforts. For appropriation and accounting purposes, this office is located under RBS. The office directs the following two divisions:


(i) Empowerment Program Division. Headed by the division director, this division is responsible for formulating policies and developing plans, standards, procedures, and schedules for accomplishing RBS activities related to “community empowerment programs”, including EZ/EC, AmeriCorps, and other initiatives. The office develops informational materials and provides technical advice and services to support States on community empowerment programs. It also generates information about rural conditions and strategies and techniques for promoting rural economic development for community empowerment programs.


(ii) Community Outreach Division. Headed by the division director, this division is responsible for designing and overseeing overall systems and developing resources to support State and community level implementation activities for RBS programs. The office designs program delivery systems and tools, removes impediments to effective community-level action, supports field offices with specialized skills, and establishes partnerships with National organizations with grass-roots membership to assure that programs and initiatives are designed and implemented in a way that empowers communities. It develops methods for working with rural business intermediaries to assist them in providing technical assistance to new, small business, and provides Internet-based services to 1890 Land-grant universities, EZ/EC, and AmeriCorps volunteers, linking RBS information support to communities with high levels of need.


(5) Alternative Agricultural Research and Commercialization Corporation. Headed by a director, this Corporation is responsible for providing and monitoring financial assistance for the development and commercialization of new nonfood and nonfeed products from agricultural and forestry commodities in accordance with 7 U.S.C. 5901 et seq. The Corporation acts as a catalyst in forming private and public partnerships and promotes new uses of agricultural materials. It expands market opportunities for U.S. farmers through development of value-added industrial products and promotes environmentally friendly products. For budget and accounting purposes, this office is assigned to RBS. The director of the Corporation is responsible to the Office of the Secretary.


§§ 2003.27-2003.50 [Reserved]

PART 2018 – GENERAL


Authority:5 U.S.C. 552.

Subparts A-E [Reserved]

Subpart F – Availability of Information


Source:61 FR 32645, June 25, 1996, unless otherwise noted.

§ 2018.251 General statement.

In keeping with the spirit of the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), the policy of Rural Development and its component agencies, Rural Housing Service (RHS), Rural Utilities Service (RUS), and Rural Business-Cooperative Service (RBS), governing access to information is one of nearly total availability, limited only by the countervailing policies recognized by the FOIA.


§ 2018.252 Public inspection and copying.

Facilities for inspection and copying are provided by the Freedom of Information Officer (FOIO) in the National Office, by the State Director in each State Office, by the Rural Development Manager (formerly, District Director) in each District Office, and by the Community Development Manager (formerly, County Supervisor) in each County Office. A person requesting information may inspect such materials and, upon payment of applicable fees, obtain copies. Material may be reviewed during regular business hours. If any of the Rural Development materials requested are not located at the office to which the request was made, the request will be referred to the office where such materials are available.


§ 2018.253 Indexes.

Since Rural Development does not maintain any materials to which 5 U.S.C. 552(a)(2) applies, it maintains no indexes.


§ 2018.254 Requests for records.

Requests for records are to be submitted in accordance with 7 CFR 1.3 and may be made to the appropriate Community Development Manager, Rural Development Manager, State Administrative Management Program Director (formerly, State Administrative Officer), State Director, Freedom of Information/Privacy Act Specialist, or Freedom of Information Officer. The last two positions are located in the Rural Development Support Services Division, Washington, DC 20250. The phrase “FOIA REQUEST” should appear on the outside of the envelope in capital letters. The FOIA requests under the Farm Credit Programs (formally FmHA Farmer Programs) should be forwarded to the Farm Service Agency (FSA), Freedom of Information Officer, Room 3624, South Agriculture Building, 14th & Independence Avenue, SW., Washington, DC 20250-0506. Requests should be as specific as possible in describing the records being requested. The FOIO, Freedom of Information/Privacy Act Specialist, each State Administrative Management Program Director, each State Director, each Rural Development Manager, and each Community Development Manager are delegated authority to act respectively at the national, state, district, or county level on behalf of Rural Development to:


(a) Deny requests for records determined to be exempt under one or more provisions of 5 U.S.C. 552(b);


(b) Make discretionary releases (unless prohibited by other authority) of such records when it is determined that the public interests in disclosure outweigh the public and/or private ones in withholding; and


(c) Reduce or waive fees to be charged where determined to be appropriate.


§ 2018.255 Appeals.

If all or any part of an initial request is denied, it may be appealed in accordance with 7 CFR 1.7 to that particular Agency possessing the documents. Please select the appropriate Agency to forward your FOIA appeal from the following addresses: Administrator, Rural Housing Service, Room 5014, AG Box 0701, 14th & Independence Avenue, SW. – South Building, Washington, DC 20250-0701; Administrator, Rural Business-Cooperative Service, Room 5045, AG Box 3201, 14th & Independence Avenue, SW. – South Building, Washington, DC 20250-3201 and Administrator, Rural Utilities Service, Room 4501, AG Box 1510, 14th & Independence Avenue, SW. – South Building, Washington, DC 20250-1510. The phrase “FOIA APPEAL” should appear on the front of the envelope in capital letters.


§§ 2018.256-2018.300 [Reserved]

PART 2045 – GENERAL


Authority:7 U.S.C. 1989; 42 U.S.C. 1480.


Source:43 FR 3694, Jan. 27, 1978, unless otherwise noted.

Subparts A-II [Reserved]

Subpart JJ – Rural Development – Utilization of Gratuitous Services

§ 2045.1751 General.

Section 331(b) of the Consolidated Farm and Rural Development Act (Pub. L. 92-419), and section 506(a) of the Housing Act of 1949, empower the Secretary of Agriculture to accept and utilize voluntary and uncompensated services in carrying out the provisions of the above cited Acts. The Secretary has delegated those authorities to the Administrator of the Farmers Home Administration (FmHA) or its successor agency under Public Law 103-354 in 7 CFR 2.70(a) (1) and (2).


§ 2045.1752 Policy.

Voluntary and uncompensated (gratuitous) services may be accepted with the consent of the agency concerned, from the following sources under the conditions set forth in Exhibit A, “Agreement for Utilization of Employee of (Enter Official Title of Governing Body or Other Authorized Organization) By the Farmers Home Administration or its successor agency under Public Law 103-354” (Agreement Form).


(a) Any agency of State government or of any territory or political subdivision.


(b) Non-profit, educational, and charitable organizations, provided that no partisan, political, or profit motive is involved either explicitly or implicitly.


§ 2045.1753 Authority to accept gratuitous services.

(a) State Directors, Director, Personnel Division, and Director, Finance Office, are hereby authorized to accept and utilize gratuitous services offered by the governmental agencies listed in § 2045.1752(a).


(b) An offer received by an FmHA or its successor agency under Public Law 103-354 State or County Office from a source listed in § 2045.1752(b) shall be transmitted to the National Office, Attention: Director, Personnel Division, for decision. The offer will be accompanied by copies of the Articles of Incorporation and By-laws (if the organization is incorporated), a statement that the organization accepts the conditions set forth in the Agreement Form, and evidence that the organization is financially able to meet the required fiscal obligations of the agreement.


§ 2045.1754 Scope of gratuitous services performed.

(a) Gratuitous services accepted in accordance with this subpart may be utilized to perform any function performed by regular FmHA or its successor agency under Public Law 103-354 employees (excluding Committee members). Such services must not result in the displacement of employees. Most of the gratuitous services should be performed at the County Office level and conform to a standard FmHA or its successor agency under Public Law 103-354 position description. A nonstandard position description may be developed and used, depending on current agency needs in a particular office and gratuitous skills available.


(b) Orientation and other training will be provided by FmHA or its successor agency under Public Law 103-354 so that gratuitous services may be performed in accordance with current FmHA or its successor agency under Public Law 103-354 procedure.


(c) Persons performing authorized gratuitous services will be held to the same standard as regular FmHA or its successor agency under Public Law 103-354 employees performing similar duties. The issuance of, and accountability for, identification cards and clearance of employee accountability will be as prescribed in FmHA or its successor agency under Public Law 103-354 Instruction 2024-B which is available in all FmHA or its successor agency under Public Law 103-354 Offices. Such persons, except Construction Inspectors may, when under direct supervision of County Supervisors, act as Collection Officers and be allowed to use receipt books.


[43 FR 3694, Jan. 27, 1978, as amended at 68 FR 61333, Oct. 28, 2003]


§ 2045.1755 Preparation and disposition of agreement forms.

(a) Agreements to accept and utilize gratuitous services must be identical to the attached Exhibit A (Agreement Form) with such exceptions as may be authorized by the Office of the General Counsel, Department of Agriculture.


(b) Two copies of each signed Agreement Form will be forwarded to the Personnel Division. One copy will be retained in the State or Finance Office.


§ 2045.1756 Records and reports.

The FmHA or its successor agency under Public Law 103-354 official signing the Agreement Form will maintain records to show the names, duty assignments, time worked and work locations of all persons performing gratuitous services. Copies of time reports submitted to the persons’ employers should suffice. These records will be necessary to respond to occasional requests for reports on the acceptance and utilization of gratuitous services in the FmHA or its successor agency under Public Law 103-354.


Exhibit A to Subpart JJ of Part 2045 – Agreement Form

for utilization of employees of (official title of governing body or other authorized organization, i.e., pickens county, ala., board of commissioners)

by the Farmers Home Administration or its successor agency under Public Law 103-354

1. This Agreement, date ___ between, __________, a (political subdivision), (educational), (charitable), (or nonprofit) an organization of the State of______(hereinafter called the Agency) and the United States of America acting through Farmers Home Administration or its successor agency under Public Law 103-354, U.S. Department of Agriculture (hereinafter called the Administration) is entered into for the purpose of permitting certain employees of the Agency (hereinafter called the Agency employees) to assist in the Administration’s effort to provide agricultural, housing and other assistance for rural people of the State of______in accordance with Section 331(b) of the Consolidated Farm and Rural Development Act and Section 506(a), Title V of the Housing Act of 1949.


2. The Administration certifies that it is empowered by the current Federal laws cited above, and related rules and regulations, to accept personnel assistance from the Agency as provided in paragraphs 4 and 5 below; and that the work assigned to Agency employees will be useful, in the public interest, could not otherwise be provided, and will not result in the displacement of employed workers.


3. The Agency certifies that it has the authority under the laws of the State of______to enter into this Agreement and to provide the services agreed upon in the manner provided for.


4. The Administration hereby supplies the Agency with a narrative description which is made a part of this Agreement as Attachment “A,” explicitly setting forth the duties, knowledge, skills, and abilities to be required of Agency employees.


5. The Administration agrees to:


(a) Provide training for and responsible supervision of qualified and acceptable Agency employees in accordance with Attachment “A.”


(b) Provide work within the State of______for qualified and acceptable Agency employees for periods not to exceed eight hours per day and 40 hours per week.


(c) Provide the office space, tools, equipment, and supplies to be used by Agency employees in performing work for the Administration.


(d) Report in the Agency, as required, the time worked by and work accomplishments of Agency employees.


(e) Consult with the Agency, as necessary, on situations involving delinquency, misconduct, neglect of work, and apparent conflicts of interest of Agency employees.


(f) Reimburse Agency employees for proper and reasonable travel and per diem expenses incurred in performing official duties for the Administration, in accordance with Administration travel regulations.


(g) Consider Agency employees to be Federal employees for the purposes of the Federal Employees Compensation Act (5 U.S.C. 8101) and of the Federal Tort Claims Act (28 U.S.C. 2671-2680).


6. The Agency agrees to:


(a) Not discriminate against any employee or applicant for employment because of race, color, religion, sex, age, marital status, physical handicap, or national origin. The Agency will take affirmative action to ensure that applicants are employed, and that employees are treated during employment, without regard to their race, color, religion, sex, age, marital status, physical handicap, or national origin. Such action shall include, but not be limited to, the following Employment, upgrading, demotion or transfer; recruitment or recruitment advertising; layoff or termination; rates of pay or other forms of compensation; and selection for training including apprenticeship. The Agency will post in conspicuous places, available to employees and appliants for employment, notices setting forth the provisions of this nondiscriminating clause.


(b) Obtain fingerprints, police records, and work qualifications checks on potential assignees, and divulge the results to the Administration or permit the Administration to obtain this information.


(c) Assign only Agency employees who are acceptable to the Administration in terms of meeting the same ability and suitability standards which are applied to Federal employment.


(d) Pay all salaries and other expenses of Agency employees and comply with Federal, State, and local minimum wage statutes. No monies will be paid by the Administration under this agreement, either to the Agency or its employees.


(e) Consider any Tort claims by third parties under applicable laws and regulations.


(f) Reassign or terminate the assignment of Agency employees upon request of the Administration.


7. The Agency and the Administration mutually understand and agree that the reasons for determining that an Agency employee is unacceptable or unsuitable for initial or continued assignment to Administration work may include but shall not be limited to the following:


(a) Practicing or appearing to practice discrimination for reasons of race, color, religion, sex, age, marital status, physical handicap, or national origin.


(b) Being or becoming involved in real or apparent conflicts of interest, such as, engaging directly or indirectly in business transactions with Administration applicants or borrowers, or using or appearing to use the Administration work assignment for private gain.


(c) Engaging in or having engaged in criminal, dishonest, or immoral conduct, or conducting himself in a manner which might embarrass or cause criticism of the Administration.


(d) Being absent from duty without authorization.


(e) Engaging in partisan political activity prohibited to Federal employees doing similar work.


(f) Lack of work.


(g) Inability of the employee to perform the duties of the assignment.


8. The term of this Agreement shall commence on the date thereof. It shall end on________, unless extended by mutual agreement, or unless terminated earlier by at least (30) days advanced written notice by either party to the other.


9. The Agency and the Administration respectively certify, each for itself, that its officer signing this Agreement is duly authorized thereto.


(Enter Official Title of Agency, i.e., City Council, Modesto, Calif.)

BY

Chairman, City Council,

Modesto, Calif.

FARMERS HOME

ADMINISTRATION or its successor agency under Public Law 103-354

BY

FmHA or its successor agency under Public Law 103-354 State Director for ( )

USDA


PARTS 2046-2099 [RESERVED]

CHAPTER XX [RESERVED]

PARTS 2200-2299 [RESERVED]

CHAPTER XXV – OFFICE OF ADVOCACY AND OUTREACH, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

PART 2500 – OAO FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS – GENERAL AWARD ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES


Authority:7 U.S.C. 6934, 7 U.S.C. 2279.


Source:76 FR 66170, Oct. 26, 2011, unless otherwise noted.

Subpart A – General Information

§ 2500.001 Applicability of regulations.

The regulations in subparts A through E of this part apply to the programs authorized under section 14013 of the FCEA to be administered within the Office of Advocacy and Outreach (OAO). The purpose of this part is to set forth regulations for competitive and noncompetitive grants, cooperative agreements, and other assistance agreements awarded through OAO.


§ 2500.002 Definitions.

Applicant means the entity that has submitted a proposal in response to an OAO Request For Proposal (RFP).


Authorized Departmental Officer (ADO) means the Secretary or any employee of the Department with delegated authority to issue or modify award instruments on behalf of the Secretary.


Authorized Organizational Representative (AOR) means the President or Chief Executive Officer of the applicant organization or the official, designated by the President or Chief Executive Officer of the applicant organization, who has the authority to commit the resources of the organization to the project.


Award means financial assistance that provides support to accomplish a public purpose. Awards may be grants, cooperative agreements, or other assistance agreements.


Award agreement means the agreement between OAO and the awardee which sets forth the terms and conditions under which the OAO funds will be made available. Award agreement is used as a general term to describe grant agreements, cooperative agreements, and other assistance agreements.


Award closeout means the process by which the award operation is concluded at the expiration of the award period or following a decision to terminate the award.


Award period means the timeframe of the award from the beginning date to the ending date as defined in the award agreement.


Awardee means the entity designated in the grant agreement, cooperative agreement, or other assistance agreement as the legal entity to which the award is given.


Baseline monitoring is the minimum, basic monitoring that will take place on an ongoing basis throughout the lifetime of every award.


Beginning date means the date the award agreement is executed by the awardee and OAO and from which costs can be incurred.


Community-based organization means a nongovernmental organization with a well-defined constituency that includes all or part of a particular community.


Cooperative agreement means the award of funds to an eligible awardee to assist in meeting the costs of conducting a project which is intended and designed to accomplish the purpose of the program as identified in the RFP, and where substantial involvement is expected between OAO and the awardee when carrying out the activities included in the agreement. This agreement may also be referred to more generally as an award.


Department means the U.S. Department of Agriculture.


Disallowed costs means the use of Federal financial assistance funds for unauthorized activities or items as stipulated in the applicable Federal cost principles (2 CFR part 220, 2 CFR part 225, and 2 CFR part 230).


Ending date means the date the award agreement is scheduled to be completed. It is also the latest date award funds will be provided under the award agreement, without an approved time extension.


Participant means an individual or entity that participates in awardee-led activities funded under the award agreement. Furthermore, a participant is any individual or entity who has applied for, otherwise participated in, or received a payment, or other benefit as a result of participating in an activity funded by an OAO award.


Partnering means a joint effort among two or more eligible entities with the capacity to conduct projects intended and designed to accomplish the purpose of the program.


Program leader means the program supervisor within OAO.


Project means activities supported under an OAO award.


Project Director (PD) means the individual designated by the awardee in the proposal and award documentation, and approved by the ADO who is responsible for the direction and management of the award.


Project Officer (PO) means an individual within OAO who is responsible for the programmatic oversight of the award on behalf of the Department.


Request for Proposals (RFP) means an official USDA funding opportunity. At OAO discretion, funding opportunities may be referred to as request for proposals, request for applications, notice of funding availability, or funding opportunity.


Review panel means an evaluation process involving qualified individuals within the relevant field to give advice on the merit of proposals submitted to OAO.


Secretary means the Secretary of Agriculture and any other officer or employee of the Department of Agriculture to whom authority may be delegated.


Terminate funding means the cancellation of Federal assistance, in whole or in part, at any time before the ending date.


§ 2500.003 Other applicable statutes and regulations.

Several Federal statutes and regulations apply to proposals for Federal assistance considered for review and to grants and cooperative agreements awarded by OAO. These include, but are not limited to:


(a) 7 CFR Part 1, Subpart A – USDA implementation of the Freedom of Information Act;


(b) 7 CFR Part 3 – USDA implementation of OMB Circular No. A-129, regarding debt management;


(c) Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (Pub. L. 88-352), as amended, which prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, or national origin, and 7 CFR part 15, subpart A (USDA implementation);


(d) 2 CFR part 415, General Program Administrative Regulations.


(e) 2 CFR part 416, General Program Administrative Regulations for Grants and Cooperative Agreements to State and Local Governments.


(f) 2 CFR part 417, Nonprocurement Debarment and Suspension.


(g) 2 CFR part 418, New Restrictions on Lobbying. Imposes prohibitions and requirements for disclosure and certification related to lobbying on awardees of Federal contracts, grants, cooperative agreements, and loans.


(h) 2 CFR part 200, subparts B – General Provisions, C – Pre-Federal Award Requirements and Contents of Federal Awards, and D – Post-Federal Award Requirements, as adopted by USDA through 2 CFR part 400.


(i) 2 CFR part 421, Requirements for Drug-Free Workplace (Financial Assistance).


(j) 2 CFR part 200, subpart F – Audit Requirements, as adopted by USDA through 2 CFR part 400.


(k) 7 U.S.C. 3318 – conferring upon the Secretary general authority to enter into contracts, grants, and cooperative agreements to further the research, extension, or teaching programs in the food and agricultural sciences of the Department of Agriculture.


(l) 29 U.S.C. 794 (Section 504, Rehabilitation Act of 1973) and 7 CFR part 15b (USDA implementation of statute) – prohibiting discrimination based upon physical or mental handicap in Federally assisted programs.


(m) 35 U.S.C. 200 et seq. – Bayh-Dole Act, promoting the utilization of inventions arising from federally supported research or development; encouraging maximum participation of small business firms in federally supported research and development efforts; and promoting collaboration between commercial concerns and nonprofit organizations, including universities, while ensuring that the Government obtains sufficient rights in federally supported inventions to meet the needs of the Government and protect the public against nonuse or unreasonable use of inventions (implementing regulations are contained in 37 CFR part 401)


(n) Title IX of the Education Amendment of 1972 (20 U.S.C. 1681-1683 and 1685-1686), as amended, which prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex;


(o) Age Discrimination Act of 1975 (42 U.S.C. 6101-6107), as amended, which prohibits discrimination on the basis of age;


(p) Drug Abuse Office and Treatment Act of 1972 (Pub. L. 92-255), as amended, relating to nondiscrimination on the basis of drug abuse;


(q) Comprehensive Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism Prevention, Treatment and Rehabilitation Act of 1970 (Pub. L. 91-616), as amended, relating to nondiscrimination on the basis of alcohol abuse or alcoholism;


(r) Sections 523 and 527 of the Public Health Service Act of 1912 (42 U.S.C. 290dd-3 and 290ee-3), as amended, relating to confidentiality of alcohol and drug abuse patient records;


(s) Title VIII of the Civil Rights Act of 1968 (42 U.S.C. 3601 et seq.), as amended, relating to nondiscrimination in the sale, rental or financing of housing;


(t) Any other nondiscrimination provisions in the specific statute(s) under which proposals for Federal assistance are made, and the requirements of any other nondiscrimination statute(s) which may apply to the proposal.


[76 FR 66170, Oct. 26, 2011, as amended at 85 FR 31938, May 28, 2020]


Subpart B – Pre-Award: Solicitation and Proposals

§ 2500.011 Competition.

(a) Standards for competition. Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, OAO will enter into discretionary grants or cooperative agreement only after competition, unless restricted by statute.


(b) Exception. The OAO ADO may make a determination in writing that competition is not deemed appropriate for a particular transaction. Such determination shall be limited to transactions where it can be adequately justified that a noncompetitive award is in the best interest of the Federal Government and necessary to the goals of the program. Non-competitive determinations will comply with regulations established in 7 CFR 3015.158(d).


§ 2500.012 Requests for proposals.

(a) General. For each competitive grant or cooperative agreement, OAO will prepare a program solicitation (also called a request for proposals (RFP)). The RFP may include all or a portion of the following items:


(1) Contact information.


(2) Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) number.


(3) Legislative authority and background information.


(4) Purpose, priorities, and fund availability.


(5) Program-specific eligibility requirements.


(6) Program-specific restrictions on the use of funds, if applicable.


(7) Matching requirements, if applicable.


(8) Acceptable types of proposals.


(9) Types of projects to be given priority consideration, including maximum anticipated awards and maximum project lengths, if applicable.


(10) Program areas, if applicable.


(11) Funding restrictions, if applicable.


(12) Directions for obtaining additional requests for proposals and proposal forms.


(13) Information about how to obtain proposal forms and the instructions for completing such forms.


(14) Instructions and requirements for submitting proposals, including submission deadline(s).


(15) Explanation of the proposal evaluation process.


(16) Specific evaluation criteria used in the review process.


(17) Type of Federal assistance awards (i.e., grants or cooperative agreements).


(b) RFP variations. Where program-specific requirements differ from the requirements established in this part, program solicitations will also address any such variation(s). Variations may occur in the following:


(1) Award management guidelines.


(2) Restrictions on the delegation of fiscal responsibility.


(3) Required approval for changes to project plans.


(4) Expected program outputs and reporting requirements, if applicable.


(5) Applicable Federal statutes and regulations.


(6) Confidential aspects of proposals and awards, if applicable.


(7) Regulatory information.


(8) Definitions.


(9) Minimum and maximum budget requests and whether proposals outside of these limits will be returned without further review.


(c) Program announcements. Occasionally, OAO will issue a program announcement (PA) to alert potential applicants and the public about new and ongoing funding opportunities. These PAs may provide tentative due dates and are released without associated proposal packages. No proposals are solicited under a PA. PAs will be announced in the Federal Register or on the OAO Web site.


§ 2500.013 Types of proposals.

The type of proposal acceptable may vary by funding opportunity. The RFP will stipulate what will be required for submission to OAO in response to the funding opportunity.


§ 2500.014 Eligibility requirements.

Program-specific eligibility requirements appear in the subpart applicable to each program and in the corresponding RFPs.


§ 2500.015 Content of a proposal.

The RFP provides instructions on how to access a funding opportunity. The funding opportunity contains the proposal package, which includes the forms necessary for completion of a proposal in response to the RFP. The RFP will be posted on http://www.Grants.gov. OAO may also publish the RFP in the Federal Register.


§ 2500.016 Submission of a proposal.

The RFP will provide deadlines for the submission of proposals. OAO may issue separate RFPs and/or establish separate deadlines for different types of proposals, different award instruments, or different topics or phases of the assistance programs. If proposals are not received by applicable deadlines, they will not be considered for funding. Exceptions will be considered only when extenuating circumstances exist, as determined by OAO, and justification and supporting documentation are provided by the applicant. Conformance with preparation and submission instructions is required and will be strictly enforced unless a deviation has been approved. OAO may establish additional requirements. OAO may return without review proposals that are not consistent with the RFP instructions.


§ 2500.017 Confidentiality of proposals and awards.

(a) General. Names of entities submitting proposals, as well as proposal contents and evaluations, except to those involved in the review process, will be kept confidential to the extent permissible by law.


(b) Identifying confidential and proprietary information in a proposal. If a proposal contains proprietary information that constitutes a trade secret, proprietary commercial or financial information, confidential personal information, or data affecting the national security, it will be treated in confidence to the extent permitted by law, provided that the information is clearly marked by the applicant with the term “confidential and proprietary information.” In addition, the following statement must be included at the bottom of the project narrative or any other attachment included in the proposal that contains such information: “The following pages (specify) contain proprietary information which (name of proposing organization) requests not to be released to persons outside the Government, except for purposes of evaluation.”


(c) Disposition of proposals. By law, OAO is required to make the final decisions as to whether the information is required to be kept in confidence. Information contained in unsuccessful proposals will remain the property of the applicant. However, the Department will retain for three years one file copy of each proposal received; extra copies will be destroyed. Public release of information from any proposal submitted will be subject to existing legal requirements. Any proposal that is funded will be considered an integral part of the award and normally will be made available to the public upon request, except for information designated proprietary by OAO.


(d) Submission of proprietary information. The inclusion of proprietary information is discouraged unless it is necessary for the proper evaluation of the proposal. If proprietary information is to be included, it should be limited, set apart from other text on a separate page, and keyed to the text by numbers. It should be confined to a few critical technical items that, if disclosed, could jeopardize the obtaining of foreign or domestic patents. Trade secrets, salaries, or other information that could jeopardize commercial competitiveness should be similarly keyed and presented on a separate page. Proposals or reports that attempt to restrict dissemination of large amounts of information may be found unacceptable by OAO and constitute grounds for return of the proposal without further consideration. Without assuming any liability for inadvertent disclosure, OAO will limit dissemination of such information to its employees and, where necessary for the evaluation of the proposal, to outside reviewers on a confidential basis.


§ 2500.018 Electronic submission.

Applicants and awardees are encouraged, but not required, to submit proposals and reports in electronic form as prescribed in the RFP issued by OAO and in the applicable award agreement.


Subpart C – Pre-Award: Proposal Review and Evaluation

§ 2500.021 Guiding principles.

The guiding principle for Federal assistance proposal review and evaluation is to ensure that each proposal is treated in a consistent and fair manner. After the evaluation process by the review panel, OAO will provide an opportunity for applicant feedback in as timely a manner as possible.


§ 2500.022 Preliminary proposal review.

Prior to technical examination, a preliminary review will be made of all proposals for responsiveness to the administrative requirements set forth in the RFP. Proposals that do not meet the administrative requirements may be eliminated from program competition. However, OAO retains the right to conduct discussions with applicants to resolve technical and/or budget issues, as deemed necessary by OAO.


§ 2500.023 Selection of reviewers.

(a) Requirement. OAO is responsible for performing a review of proposals submitted to OAO competitive award programs. The RFP will identify the criteria that OAO will use for the selection of the proposal review panel.


(b) Confidentiality. The identities of reviewers will remain confidential to the maximum extent possible. Therefore, the names of reviewers will not be released to applicants. Names of applicants, as well as proposal content and evaluation comments will be kept confidential to the extent permitted by law, except to those involved in the review process. Reviewers will comply with the above-mentioned confidentiality guidelines.


(c) Conflicts of interest. During the evaluation process, extreme care will be taken to prevent any actual or perceived conflicts of interest that may impact review or evaluation. Reviewers are expected to be in compliance with the Conflict-of-Interest process made a part of the RFP.


§ 2500.024 Evaluation criteria.

(a) General. To ensure any project receiving funds from OAO is consistent with the broad goals of the funding program, the content of each proposal submitted to OAO will be evaluated based on a pre-determined set of review criteria as indicated in the RFP.


(b) Guidance for reviewers. In order that all potential applicants for a program have similar opportunities to compete for funds, all reviewers will receive an orientation from the Program Leader of the review criteria. Reviewers are instructed to use those same evaluation criteria, and only those criteria, to judge the merit of the proposals they review.


§ 2500.025 Procedures to minimize or eliminate duplication of effort.

OAO may implement appropriate business processes to minimize or eliminate the awarding of Federal assistance to projects that unnecessarily duplicate activities already being sponsored under other awards, including awards made by other Federal agencies.


§ 2500.026 Applicant feedback.

Unsuccessful applicants may submit a request for applicant feedback in writing to OAO within 10 days after receiving written notice of not being selected for further processing. Applicant feedback requests are to be mailed to the Program Leader at the address below, unless otherwise stated in the “Notice of Non-Selection” or in the RFP. At OAO’s discretion, either written or oral feedback will be provided to unsuccessful applicants.


U.S. Department of Agriculture, Departmental Management, Office of Advocacy and Outreach, Attn: Program Leader (Applicant Feedback), Whitten Building, Rm. 520-A, stop 9821, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW., Washington, DC 20250-9821.


Subpart D – Award

§ 2500.031 Administration.

(a) General. Within the limit of funds available for such purpose, the OAO ADO shall make Federal assistance awards to those responsible, eligible applicants whose proposals are judged most meritorious under the procedures set forth in the RFP. The date specified by the OAO ADO as the effective date of the award shall be no later than September 30th of the Federal fiscal year in which the project is approved for support and funds are appropriated for such purpose, unless otherwise permitted by law. It should be noted that the project need not be initiated on the award effective date, but as soon thereafter as practical so that project goals may be attained within the funded project period. All funds awarded by OAO shall be expended solely for the purpose for which the funds are awarded in accordance with the approved statement of work and budget, the regulations, the terms and conditions of the OAO award agreement, the applicable Federal cost principles, and the Department’s assistance regulations (e.g., 7 CFR parts 3015, 3016, and 3019).


(b) Award agreement. The award agreement and accompanying terms and conditions will provide pertinent instructions and information including, at a minimum, the following:


(1) Legal name and address of performing organization or institution to which OAO has awarded a grant or cooperative agreement.


(2) Title of project.


(3) Name(s) of Project Director(s).


(4) Identifying award number assigned by OAO.


(5) Project period.


(6) Total amount of OAO financial assistance approved.


(7) Legal authority under which the grant or cooperative agreement is awarded.


(8) Appropriate CFDA number.


(9) Approved budget plan (that may be referenced).


(10) Terms and Conditions


Subpart E – Post-Award and Closeout

§ 2500.041 Payment.

(a) General. All payments will be made in advance unless a deviation is accepted or as specified in paragraph (b) of this section. All payments to the awardee shall be made via the approved electronic funds transfer (EFT) method. Awardees are expected to request funds via the federally-approved electronic payment system for reimbursement in a timely manner. Exact payment method will be described in the terms and conditions of the award agreement.


(b) Reimbursement method. OAO shall use the reimbursement method if it determines that advance payment is not feasible or that the awardee does not maintain or demonstrate the willingness to maintain written procedures that minimize the elapse of time between the transfer of funds and disbursement by the awardee, and financial management systems that meet the standards for fund control and accountability.


§ 2500.042 Cost sharing and matching.

(a) General. Awardees may be required to match the Federal funds received under an OAO award. The required percentage of matching, type of matching (e.g., cash and/or in-kind contributions), sources of match (e.g., non-Federal), and whether OAO has any authority to waive the match will be specified in the subpart applicable to the specific Federal assistance program, as well as in the RFP.


(b) Indirect costs as in-kind matching contributions. Indirect costs may be claimed under the Federal portion of the award budget. However, unless explicitly authorized in the RFP, indirect costs may not be claimed on both the Federal and nonfederal portion of the award budget.


§ 2500.043 Program income.

(a) General. OAO shall apply the standards set forth in this subpart in requiring awardee organizations to account for program income related to projects financed in whole or in part with Federal funds.


(b) Addition method. Unless otherwise provided in the authorizing statute, in accordance with the terms and conditions of the award, program income earned during the project period shall be retained by the awardee and shall be added to funds committed to the project by OAO and the awardee and used to further eligible project or program objectives. Any specific program deviations will be identified in the individual subparts.


(c) Award terms and conditions. Unless the program regulations identified in the individual subpart provide otherwise, awardees shall follow the terms and conditions of the OAO award. Such terms and conditions will be made a part of the OAO award agreement.


§ 2500.044 Indirect costs.

Indirect cost rates for grants and cooperative agreements shall be determined in accordance with the applicable assistance regulations and cost principles, unless superseded by another authority.


§ 2500.045 Technical reporting.

All projects supported with Federal funds under this part must be documented according to the terms and conditions of the OAO award agreement.


§ 2500.046 Financial reporting.

(a) SF-425, Federal Financial Report. As stated in the award terms and conditions of the OAO award agreement, a final SF-425, Federal Financial Report, is due 90 days after the expiration of the award and should be submitted to OAO electronically. The awardee shall report program outlays and program income on the same accounting basis (i.e., cash or accrual) that it uses in its normal accounting system. When submitting a final SF-425, Federal Financial Report, the total matching contribution, if required, should be shown in the report. The final SF-425 must not show any unliquidated obligations. If the awardee still has valid obligations that remain unpaid when the report is due, it shall request an extension of time for submitting the report pursuant to paragraph (c) of this section; submit a provisional report (showing the unliquidated obligations) by the due date; and submit a final report when all obligations have been liquidated, but no later than the approved extension date. SF-425, Federal Financial Reports, must be submitted by all awardees, including Federal agencies and national laboratories.


(b) Awards with required matching. For awards requiring a matching contribution, an annual SF-425, Federal Financial Report, is required and this requirement will be indicated in the terms and conditions of the OAO award agreement, in which case it must be submitted no later than 45 days following the end of the budget or reporting period.


(c) After the due date. Requests are considered late when they are submitted after the 90-day period following the award expiration date. Requests to submit a late final SF-425, Federal Financial Report, will only be considered, up to 30 days after the due date, in extenuating circumstances. This request should include a provisional report pursuant to paragraph (a) of this section, as well as an anticipated submission date, a justification for the late submission, and a justification for the extenuating circumstances. If an awardee needs to request additional funds, procedures in paragraph (d) of this section apply.


(d) Overdue SF-425, Federal Financial Reports. Awardees with overdue SF-425, Federal Financial Reports, or other required financial reports (as identified in the award terms and conditions), will have their applicable balances in the approved federal electronic funds transfer system restricted or placed on “manual review,” which restricts the awardee’s ability to draw funds, thus requiring prior approval from OAO. If any remaining available balances are needed by the awardee (beyond the 90-day period following the award expiration date) and the awardee has not requested an extension to submit a final SF-425, Financial Status Report, the awardee will be required to contact OAO to request permission to draw any additional funds and will be required to provide justification and documentation to support the draw. Awardees also will need to comply with procedures in paragraph (c) of this section. OAO will approve these draw requests only in extenuating circumstances.


(e) Additional reporting requirements. OAO may require forecasts of Federal cash requirements in the “Remarks” section of the report; and when practical and deemed necessary, OAO may require awardees to report in the “Remarks” section the amount of cash advances received in excess of three days (i.e., short narrative with explanations of actions taken to reduce the excess balances). When OAO needs additional information or more frequent reports, a special provision will be added to the award terms and conditions and identified in the OAO award agreement. Should OAO determine that an awardee’s accounting system is inadequate, additional pertinent information to further monitor awards may be requested from the awardee until such time as the system is brought up to standard, as determined by OAO. This additional reporting requirement will be required via a special provision to the award terms and conditions of the OAO award agreement.


§ 2500.047 Project meetings.

In addition to reviewing and monitoring the status of progress and final technical reports and financial reports, OAO Project Officers may use regular and periodic conference calls to monitor the awardee’s performance as well as conferences, workshops, meetings, and symposia to not only monitor the awards, but to facilitate communication and the sharing of project results. These opportunities also serve to eliminate or minimize OAO funding of unneeded duplicative project activities. Required attendance at these conference calls, conferences, workshops, meetings, and symposia will be identified in the RFP or award document.


§ 2500.048 Review of disallowed costs.

(a) Notice. If the OAO Project Officer (PO) determines that there is a basis for disallowing a cost, OAO shall provide the awardee written notice of its intent to disallow the cost. The written notice shall state the amount of the cost and the factual and legal basis for disallowing it.


(b) Awardee response. Within 60 days of receiving written notice of the PO’s intent to disallow the cost, the awardee may respond with written evidence and arguments to show the cost is allowable, or that, for equitable, practical, or other reasons, shall not recover all or part of the amount, or that the recovery should be made in installments. An extension of time will be granted only in extenuating circumstances.


(c) Decision. Within 60 days of receiving the awardee’s written response to the notice of intent to disallow the cost, the PO shall issue a management decision stating whether or not the cost has been disallowed, the reasons for the decision, and the method of appeal that has been provided under this section. If the awardee does not respond to the written notice under paragraph (a) of this section within the time frame specified in paragraph (b) of this section, the PO shall issue a management decision on the basis of the information available to it. The management decision shall constitute the final action with respect to whether the cost is allowed or disallowed. In the case of a questioned cost identified in the context of an audit subject to 7 CFR part 3052, the management decision will constitute the management decision under 7 CFR 3052.405(a).


(d) Demand for payment. If the management decision under paragraph (c) of this section constitutes a finding that the cost is disallowed and, therefore, that a debt is owed to the Government, the PO shall provide the required demand and notice pursuant to 7 CFR 3.11.


(e) Review process. Within 60 days of receiving the demand and notice referred to in paragraph (d) of this section, the awardee may submit a written request to the OAO Director for a review of the final management decision that the debt exists and the amount of the debt. Within 60 days of receiving the written request for a review, the OAO Director will issue a final decision regarding the debt. A review by the OAO Director or designee constitutes an administrative review for debts under 7 CFR part 3, subpart F.


§ 2500.049 Prior approvals.

(a) Subcontracts. No more than 50 percent of the award may be subcontracted to other parties without prior written approval of the ADO. Any subcontract awarded to a Federal agency under an award must have prior written approval of the ADO. To request approval, a justification for the proposed subcontractual arrangements, a performance statement, and a detailed budget for the subcontract must be submitted to the ADO.


(b) No-cost extensions of time – (1) General. Awardees may initiate a one-time no-cost extension of the expiration date of the award of up to 12 months unless one or more of the following conditions apply: the terms and conditions of the award prohibit the extension; the extension requires additional Federal funds; and the extension involves any change in the approved objectives or scope of the project. For the first no-cost extension, the awardee must notify OAO in writing with the supporting reasons and revised expiration date at least 10 days before the expiration date specified in the award.


(2) Additional requests for no-cost extensions of time before expiration date. When more than one no-cost extension of time or an extension of more than 12 months is required, the extension(s) must be approved in writing by the PO. The awardee must submit a written request, which must be received no later than 10 days prior to the expiration date of the award, to the PO. The request must contain, at a minimum, the following information: The length of the additional time required to complete the project objectives and a justification for the extension; a summary of the progress to date; an estimate of the funds expected to remain unobligated on the scheduled expiration date; a projected timetable to complete the portion(s) of the project for which the extension is being requested; and signature of the AOR and the PD.


(3) Requests for no-cost extensions of time after expiration date. OAO may consider and approve requests for no-cost extensions of time up to 120 days following the expiration of the award. These will be approved only for extenuating circumstances, as determined by OAO. The awardee’s AOR must submit the requirements identified under paragraph (b)(2) of this section as well as an “extenuating circumstance” justification and a description of the actions taken by the awardee to minimize these requests in the future.


(4) Other requirements. No-cost extensions of time may not be exercised merely for the purpose of using unobligated balances.


§ 2500.050 Suspension, termination, and withholding of support.

(a) General. If an awardee has failed to materially comply with the terms and conditions of the award, OAO may take certain enforcement actions, including, but not limited to, suspending the award pending corrective action and terminating the award for cause.


(b) Suspension. OAO generally will suspend (rather than immediately terminate) an award to allow the awardee an opportunity to take appropriate corrective action before OAO makes a termination decision. OAO may decide to terminate the award if the awardee does not take appropriate corrective action during the period of suspension. OAO may terminate, without first suspending, the award if the deficiency is so serious as to warrant immediate termination. Termination for cause may be appealed under the terms and conditions identified in the OAO award agreement.


(c) Termination. An award also may be terminated, partially or wholly, by the awardee or by OAO with the consent of the awardee. If the awardee decides to terminate a portion of the award, OAO may determine that the remaining portion of the award will not accomplish the purposes for which the award was originally made. In any such case, OAO will advise the awardee of the possibility of termination of the entire award and allow the awardee to withdraw its termination request. If the awardee does not withdraw its request for partial termination, OAO may initiate procedures to terminate the entire award for cause.


§ 2500.051 Debt collection.

The collection of debts owed to OAO by awardees, including those resulting from cost disallowances, recovery of funds, unobligated balances, or other circumstances, are subject to the Department’s debt collection procedures as set forth in 7 CFR part 3, and, with respect to cost disallowances, § 2500.048.


§ 2500.052 Award appeals procedures.

(a) General. OAO permits awardees to appeal certain adverse post-award administrative decisions made by OAO. Such adverse decisions include: Termination, in whole or in part, and determination that an award is void. An award may be terminated for failure of the awardee to carry out its approved project in accordance with the applicable law and the terms and conditions of award; or for failure of the awardee otherwise to comply with any law, regulation, assurance, term, or condition applicable to the award. Additionally, an award may be determined to be void if, for example, it was not authorized by statute or regulation or because it was fraudulently obtained. Appeals of determinations regarding the allowability of costs are subject to the procedures in § 2500.048.


(b) Appeal Procedures. The formal notification of an adverse determination will contain a statement of the awardee’s appeal rights. To appeal an adverse determination, the awardee must submit a request for review to the OAO official specified in the notification, detailing the nature of the disagreement with the adverse determination and providing supporting documents in accordance with the procedures contained in the notification. The awardee’s request to OAO for review must be received within 60 days after receipt of the written notification of the adverse determination; however, an extension may be granted if the awardee can show good cause why an extension is warranted. OAO will carefully consider the merits of all requests for appeals and further reviews. However, at the conclusion of the OAO appeal review process, the OAO decision rendered on the appeal is considered final. The awardee will be notified in writing by OAO of final appeal review determinations.


§ 2500.053 Expiring appropriations.

(a) OAO awards supported with office appropriations. Most OAO awards are supported with annual appropriations. On September 30th of the 5th fiscal year after the period of availability for obligation ends, the funds for these appropriations accounts expire per 31 U.S.C. 1552 and the account is closed, unless otherwise specified by law. Funds that have not been drawn through the approved electronic funds transfer system, by the awardee or disbursed through any other system or method by August 31st of that fiscal year are subject to be returned to the U.S. Department of the Treasury after that date. The August 31st requirement also applies to awards with a 90-day period concluding on a date after August 31st of that fifth year. Appropriations cannot be restored after expiration of the accounts. More specific instructions are provided in the OAO award terms and conditions.


(b) OAO awards supported with funds from other Federal agencies (reimbursable funds). OAO may require that all draws and reimbursements for awards supported with reimbursable funds (from other Federal agencies) be completed prior to June 30th of the 5th fiscal year after the period of availability for obligation ends to allow for the proper billing, collection, and close-out of the associated interagency agreement before the appropriations expire. The June 30th requirement also applies to awards with a 90-day period concluding on a date after June 30th of that fifth year. Appropriations cannot be restored after expiration of the accounts. More specific instructions are provided in the terms and conditions of the OAO award agreement.


§ 2500.055 Audit.

Awardees must comply with the audit requirements of 7 CFR part 3052. The audit requirements apply to the years in which Federal financial assistance funds are received and years in which work is accomplished using these funds.


§ 2500.056 Civil rights.

Awardees must comply with the civil rights requirements of 7 CFR part 15, subpart A – USDA implementation of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended. In accordance, no person in the United States shall, on the ground of race, color, or national origin, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be otherwise subjected to discrimination under any program or activity for which the recipient receives Federal financial assistance and will immediately take any measures necessary to effectuate this agreement.


Subpart F – Outreach and Assistance For Socially Disadvantaged Farmers and Ranchers Program

§ 2500.101 Applicability of regulations.

The regulations in this subpart apply to the Outreach and Assistance for Socially Disadvantaged Farmers and Ranchers (OASDFR) Program authorized under section 2501 of the Food, Agriculture, Conservation and Trade Act of 1990 (7 U.S.C. 2279), as amended. Unless otherwise specified in this subpart, the requirements of 7 CFR part 2500 subparts A through E will apply in addition to the requirements discussed in this subpart.


§ 2500.102 Purpose.

(a) The purpose of the OASDFR Program is to make competitive awards to provide outreach and technical assistance to encourage and assist socially disadvantaged farmers and ranchers in:


(1) Owning and operating farms, ranches and non-industrial forest lands; and


(2) In participating equitably in the full range of agricultural programs offered by the Department.


(b) The OASDFR Program awards shall be used exclusively to:


(1) Enhance coordination of the outreach, technical assistance, and education efforts authorized under agriculture programs;


(2) Assist in reaching current and prospective socially disadvantaged farmers, ranchers or forest landowners in a linguistically appropriate manner; and


(3) Improve the participation of those farmers and ranchers in agricultural programs.


§ 2500.103 Definitions.

The definitions provided in subpart A apply to this subpart. In addition, the definitions that apply specifically to the OASDFR Program under this subpart include:


Agriculture programs means those programs administered within the Department, by agencies including but not limited to: Forest Service (FS), Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), Farm Service Agency (FSA), Risk Management Agency (RMA), Rural Development (RD), Rural Business Cooperative Service (RBCS), National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA), and Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS), and other such programs as determined by the Department on a case-by-case basis either at the OAO Director’s initiative or in response to a written request with supporting explanation for inclusion of a program. (For further details on specific programs included under this subpart see 7 U.S.C. 2279(e)(3) or the RFP).


Alaska Native means a citizen of the United States who is a person of one-fourth or more Alaska Indian, Eskimo, or Aleut blood, or combination thereof. (For further specification, see 43 U.S.C 1602(b) or the RFP).


Alaska Native cooperative colleges means an eligible post-secondary educational institution that has an enrollment of undergraduate full-time equivalent students that is at least 20 percent Alaska Native students at the time of submission of a proposal.


Assistance means providing educational and technical assistance to socially disadvantaged farmers, ranchers, and forest landowners in (1) owning and operating farms, ranches, and non-industrial forest lands; and (2) in participating equitably in the full range of agricultural programs offered by the Department through workshops, site visits and other means of contact in a linguistically appropriate manner.


Farmer, rancher, or forest landowner means the person who primarily cultivates, operates, or manages a farm, ranch, or forest for profit, either as owner or tenant. A farm includes livestock, dairy, poultry, fish, fruit, and truck farms. It also includes plantations, ranches, ranges, and orchards.


Hispanic-serving institution means an eligible institution of higher education that has an enrollment of undergraduate full-time equivalent students that is at least 25 percent Hispanic students at the end of the award year immediately preceding the date of submission of a proposal (see 20 U.S.C. 1101a(5)).


Indian tribe means any Indian tribe, band, nation, or other organized group or community, including any Alaska Native village or regional or village corporation as defined in or established pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (85 Stat. 688) (43 U.S.C. 1601 et seq.), which is recognized as eligible for the special programs and services provided by the United States to Indians because of their status as Indians. (For further specification, see 25 U.S.C. 450b).


Indian tribal community college means a post-secondary education institution which is formally controlled, or has been officially sanctioned, or chartered, by the governing body of an Indian tribe or tribes. (See 25 U.S.C. 1801(a)(4)).


Institution of higher education means an educational institution in any State that is a public or other nonprofit institution that is legally authorized and accredited by a nationally recognized accrediting agency or association to provide a program of education beyond secondary education for which the institution awards a bachelor’s degree. (For further specification, see 20 U.S.C. 1001(a)).


Outreach means the use of formal and informal educational materials and activities in a linguistically appropriate manner that serve to encourage and assist socially disadvantaged farmers and ranchers in:


(1) Owning and operating farms and ranches; and in


(2) Participating equitably in the full range of agricultural programs offered by the Department.


Socially disadvantaged farmer, rancher or forest landowner means a farmer, rancher, or forest landowner who is a member of a socially disadvantaged group. (See 7 U.S.C. 2279(e)(2)).


Socially disadvantaged group means a group whose members have been subjected to racial or ethnic prejudice because of their identity as members of a group without regard to their individual qualities. (See 7 U.S.C. 2279(e)(1)).


State means any of the 50 States of the United States, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, Guam, the Virgin Islands of the United States, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, and federally recognized Indian tribes.


Supplemental funding means funding to an existing awardee in addition to the amount of the original award contained in the grant or cooperative agreement. Such additional funding is intended to continue or expand work that is within the scope of the original agreement and statement of work.


Tribal organization means the recognized governing body of any Indian tribe. A tribal organization is any legally established organization of Indians which is controlled, sanctioned, or chartered by such governing body or which is democratically elected by the adult members of the Indian community. In any case where an award is made to an organization to perform services benefiting more than one Indian tribe, the approval of each participating Indian tribe shall be a prerequisite to the making of such an award. (See 25 U.S.C. 1603(25).


§ 2500.104 Eligibility requirements.

Proposals may be submitted by any of the following:


(a) Any community-based organization, network, or coalition of community-based organizations that:


(1) Has demonstrated experience in providing agricultural education or other agriculturally related services to socially disadvantaged farmers, ranchers, and forest landowners;


(2) Has provided to the Secretary documentary evidence of work with, and on behalf of socially disadvantaged farmers, ranchers, or forest landowners during the three-year period preceding the submission of a proposal for assistance under this program; and


(3) Does not engage in activities prohibited under Section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986.


(b) An 1890 institution or 1994 institution (as defined in 7 U.S.C. 7601), including West Virginia State University.


(c) An Indian tribal community college or an Alaska Native cooperative college.


(d) A Hispanic-serving institution (as defined in 7 U.S.C. 3103).


(e) Any other institution of higher education (as defined in 20 U.S.C. 1001) that has demonstrated experience in providing agriculture education or other agriculturally related services to socially disadvantaged farmers, ranchers, and forest landowners in a region.


(f) An Indian tribe (as defined in 25 U.S.C. 450b) or a national tribal organization that has demonstrated experience in providing agriculture education or other agriculturally-related services to socially disadvantaged farmers, ranchers, and forest landowners in a region.


(g) Other organizations or institutions that received funding under this program before January 1, 1996, but only with respect to projects that the Secretary considers are similar to projects previously carried out by the entity under this program.


§ 2500.105 Project types and priorities.

For each RFP, OAO may develop and include the appropriate project types and focus areas based on the critical needs of the socially disadvantaged farmer and rancher community. For standard OASDFR projects, competitive grants or cooperative agreements will be awarded to support programs and services, as appropriate, to encourage and assist socially disadvantaged farmers and ranchers in the following focus areas:


(a) Owning and operating farms and ranches;


(b) Participating equitably in the full range of agricultural programs offered by the Department; and


(c) Other areas as specified by the Secretary in the RFP.


§ 2500.106 Funding restrictions.

Funds made available under this subpart shall not be used for the construction of a new building or facility or the acquisition, expansion, remodeling, or alteration of an existing facility (including site grading and improvement, and architect fees).


§ 2500.107 Matching.

Matching funds are not required as a condition of receiving awards under this subpart.


§ 2500.108 Term of award.

The award term will be defined in the OAO award agreement, and can be later amended upon approval of OAO.


§ 2500.109 Program requirements.

Grants and cooperative agreements under this subpart shall address the priorities in the Department that involve providing outreach and technical assistance to socially disadvantaged farmers, ranchers, and forest landowners to own and operate farms and participate equitably in agricultural programs; and other priorities as determined by the Secretary.


PART 2502 – AGRICULTURAL CAREER AND EMPLOYMENT (ACE) GRANTS PROGRAM


Authority:7 U.S.C. 2008q-1


Source:76 FR 69117, Nov. 8, 2011, unless otherwise noted.

Subpart A – General Information

§ 2502.1 Applicability of regulations.

(a) This part contains program-specific definitions for the ACE Grants Program.


(b) Subpart B establishes the criteria to be used in determining eligibility for an ACE grant award and the requirements for the delivery of program benefits and services, including who is considered eligible to receive such benefits and services and what the responsibilities are of ACE grantees.


(c) Subpart C establishes that, unless otherwise provided herein, the procedures for applying for ACE grants, the processes to be followed by OAO in evaluating grant proposals and awarding program funds, and the procedures for post-award administration of ACE grants are those set forth in a rule proposed ON DATE to codify provisions at 7 CFR part 2500, subparts A, B, C, D, and E.


§ 2502.2 Definitions.

As used in this part (unless otherwise indicated):


Agency means the Office of Advocacy and Outreach (OAO), an agency of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) or a successor agency.


Agricultural Employer means any person or entity which employs, as defined in the Migrant and Seasonal Agricultural Worker Protection Act, 29 U.S.C. 1802, individuals engaged in agricultural employment and may include farmers, ranchers, dairy operators, agricultural cooperatives, and farm labor contractors.


Agricultural Employment means any service or activity as defined in the Migrant and Seasonal Agricultural Worker Protection Act, 29 U.S.C. 1802, including any activity defined as “agriculture” in Section 3(f) or the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938, 29 U.S.C. 203(f), any activity defined as “agricultural labor” in 26 U.S.C. 3121(g) (the Internal Revenue Code); as well as the handling, planting, drying, packing, packaging, processing, freezing, or grading prior to delivery for storage of any agricultural or horticultural commodity in its unmanufactured state. Authorized Departmental Officer (ADO) means the individual, acting within the scope of delegated authority, who is responsible for executing and administering awards on behalf of the U.S. Department of Agriculture.


Community-based organization means a non-governmental organization with a well-defined constituency that includes all or part of a particular community.


Consortium means a group formed by entities with similar goals and objectives for the purpose of pooling resources to undertake a project that would otherwise be reasonably beyond the capabilities of any one member.


Eligible entity, as described in section 379C(a) of the Consolidated Farm and Rural Development Act (7 U.S.C. 2008q(a)), means a non-profit organization, or a consortium of nonprofit organizations, agribusinesses, State and local governments, agricultural labor organizations, farmer or rancher cooperatives, and community-based organizations with the capacity to train farm workers.


Farmworker means an individual hired to perform agricultural employment, including migrant, seasonal, and hired family farm workers. The term farmworker includes individuals who are not currently employed as a farmworker but who are actively seeking work as such. The term does not include agricultural employers or individuals who are self-employed.


Grantee means the organization designated in the grant award document as the responsible legal entity to which a grant is awarded.


Legally present in the United States shall have the same meaning as the term “lawfully present” in the United States as defined at 8 CFR 103.12(a) (addressing eligibility for Title II Social Security benefits under Pub. L. 104-193).


Notice of Funding Availability (NOFA) means a notice published in the Federal Register announcing the availability of money for the grants program which lists the application deadlines, eligibility requirements and locations where interested parties can get help in applying.


Office of Advocacy and Outreach (OAO) means the Office of Advocacy and Outreach, an office within the USDA’s Departmental Management.


Request for Proposal (RFP) refers to a grant competition and is used interchangeably with the phrase grant application notice and solicitation for grant applications (SFA).


Retaining an agricultural job means continuing agricultural employment, including upgraded employment.


Returning from an agricultural job means returning to a home area from a position in agricultural employment.


Secretary means the Secretary of Agriculture and any other officer or employee of the United States Department of Agriculture to whom the authority involved is delegated.


Securing an agricultural job means obtaining agricultural employment.


State means any of the States of the United States, the District of Columbia, the Virgin Islands, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, and Guam.


United States worker (U.S. worker) shall have the same meaning as the term U.S. worker defined by the Department of Labor at 20 CFR 655.4.


Upgrading an agricultural job means advancement to a position in agricultural employment which offers more hours of work and/or better terms and conditions of employment and/or an increase in wages.


§ 2502.3 Deviations.

Any request by the applicant or grantee for a waiver or deviation from any provision of this part shall be submitted to the ADO identified in the agency specific requirements. OAO shall review the request and notify the applicant/grantee whether the request to deviate has been approved within 30 calendar days from the date of receipt of the deviation request. If the deviation request is still under consideration at the end of 30 calendar days, OAO shall inform the applicant/grantee in writing of the date when the applicant/grantee may expect the decision.


Subpart B – Program Eligibility, Services and Delivery

§ 2502.4 Program eligibility.

(a) Entities eligible to apply for and receive a grant under this part include:


(1) A non-profit organization;


(2) A consortium of nonprofit organizations; or


(3) A consortium which includes a non-profit organization(s) and one or more of the following: agribusinesses, State and local governments, agricultural labor organizations, farmer or rancher cooperatives, and community-based organizations with the capacity to train farm workers.


(b) Additional information about eligible entities may be included in the RFP. In addition, the RFP will specify the criteria by which an entity’s capacity to train farm workers will be evaluated, but at a minimum, the entity shall be required to demonstrate that it has:


(1) An understanding of the issues facing hired farmworkers and conditions under which they work;


(2) Familiarity with the agricultural industry in the geographic area to be served, including agricultural labor needs and existing services for farmworkers; and


(3) The capacity to effectively administer a program of services and benefits authorized by the ACE program.


(c) An applicant will be required to submit information to OAO, as specified in the RFP and/or FOA as part of the grant application.


§ 2502.5 Program benefits and services.

(a) The ACE grants program will be centrally administered by the USDA in a manner consistent with these regulations, as well as the pertinent requirements of 7 CFR part 3015, 7 CFR part 3016, 7 CFR part 3018, 7 CFR part 3019 and 7 CFR 3052.


(b) The Office of Advocacy and Outreach (OAO) has been designated as the organizational unit responsible for administering the ACE program, including, among other things, determining the number and amount of grants to be awarded, the purposes for the grants to be awarded, as well as the criteria for the evaluation and award of grants.


(c) Services and benefits provided under the ACE grants program are limited to those which will assist eligible farmworkers in securing, retaining, upgrading or returning from agricultural jobs.


(d) Such services will include the following:


(1) Agricultural labor skills development


(2) Provision of agricultural labor market information:


(3) Transportation:


(4) Short-term housing while in transit to an agricultural worksite;


(5) Workplace literacy and assistance with English as a second language;


(6) Health and safety instruction, including ways of safeguarding the food supply of the United States;


(7) Such other services as the Secretary deems appropriate.


(e) Grant funds shall not be used to deliver or replace any services or benefits which an agricultural employer, association, contractor, or any other entity is legally obliged to provide.


§ 2502.6 Recipients of program benefits or services.

(a) Those eligible to receive program services or benefits under the ACE program are farmworkers who meet the definition of “United States Workers” as set forth in § 2502.2 of this part.


(b) Grantees shall be responsible for verifying the employment of farmworkers who are actively employed and are seeking to participate in program services or benefits. Unemployed farmworkers seeking to participate shall be required to certify to grantees that they are eligible for program services and benefits as provided herein. Additional eligibility requirements may be included in the RFP.


§ 2502.7 Responsibilities of grantees.

Each grantee is responsible for providing services and/or benefits authorized by this program in accord with a service delivery strategy described in its approved grant plan. The services must reflect the needs of the relevant farmworker population in the area to be served and be consistent with the goals of assisting farmworkers in securing, retaining, upgrading, or returning from agricultural jobs. The necessary components of a service delivery strategy and grant plan will be fully set forth in an RFP but the plan shall include, at a minimum, the following:


(a) The employment and education needs of the farmworker population to be served;


(b) The manner in which the proposed services to be delivered will assist agricultural employers and farmworkers in securing, retaining, upgrading or returning from agricultural jobs;


(c) The manner in which the proposed services will be coordinated with other available services;


(d) The number of participants the grantee expects to serve for each service provided, the results expected and the anticipated expenditures for each category of service.


Subpart C – Grant Applications and Administration

§ 2502.8 Pre-award, award, and post-award procedures and administration of grants.

(a) Unless otherwise provided in this rule, the requirements governing pre-award solicitation and submission of proposals and/or applications, the review and evaluation of such, the award of grant funds, and post-award and close-out procedures are those set forth at 7 CFR part 2500, subparts A, B, C, D, and E.


(b) For purposes of the ACE Grants Program, the provisions of Subpart E, at 7 CFR 2500.49, “Prior Approvals,” shall not apply. In lieu of that provision, the following requirements shall apply: Awardees may not subcontract more than 20 percent of the award to other parties without prior written approval of the ADO. To request approval, a justification for the proposed subcontract, a performance statement, and a detailed budget for the subcontract must be submitted in writing to the ADO.


PARTS 2503-2599 [RESERVED]

CHAPTER XXVI – OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

PARTS 2600-2609 [RESERVED]

PART 2610 – ORGANIZATION, FUNCTIONS, AND DELEGATIONS OF AUTHORITY


Authority:5 U.S.C. 301, 552; Inspector General Act of 1978, as amended, 5 U.S.C. app.; 7 U.S.C. 2270.


Source:81 FR 93574, Dec. 21, 2016, unless otherwise noted.

§ 2610.1 General statement.

(a) The Inspector General Act of 1978, as amended, 5 U.S.C. app. (IG Act), established an Office of Inspector General (OIG) in the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and transferred to it the functions, powers, and duties of offices referred to in the Department as the “Office of Investigation” and the “Office of Audit,” previously assigned to the OIG created by the Secretary’s Memoranda 1915 and 1727, dated March 23, 1977, and October 5, 1977, respectively. Under the IG Act, OIG was established as an independent and objective unit, headed by the Inspector General (IG), who is appointed by the President and reports to and is under the general supervision of the Secretary.


(b) OIG conducts and supervises audits and investigations relating to Department programs and operations; provides leadership and coordination and recommends policies for activities designed to promote economy, efficiency, and effectiveness in the administration of, and to prevent and detect fraud and abuse in, such programs and operations; and provides a means for keeping the Secretary of Agriculture and the Congress fully and currently informed about problems and deficiencies relating to the administration of such programs and operations and the necessity for and progress of corrective action.


(c) The IG has specific duties, responsibilities, and authorities pursuant to the IG Act, including to:


(1) Provide policy direction for, and conduct, supervise, and coordinate audits and investigations relating to USDA programs and operations.


(2) Review existing and proposed legislation and regulations related to USDA programs and operations and make recommendations to the Secretary and the Congress on the impact such laws or regulations will have on the economy and efficiency of program administration or in the prevention and detection of fraud and abuse in USDA programs and operations.


(3) Recommend policies for, and conduct, supervise, or coordinate other activities carried out or financed by USDA for the purpose of promoting economy and efficiency in the administration of, or preventing and detecting fraud and abuse, in USDA programs and operations.


(4) Recommend policies for, and conduct, supervise, or coordinate relationships between, USDA and other Federal, State, and local governmental agencies and nongovernmental entities regarding the promotion of economy and efficiency, prevention of fraud and abuse, or the identification and prosecution of participants in fraud and abuse.


(5) Keep the Secretary and the Congress fully and currently informed about problems, abuses, and deficiencies, and the necessity for and progress of corrective actions in the administration of USDA programs and operations.


(6) Report expeditiously to the Attorney General any matter where there are reasonable grounds to believe there has been a violation of Federal criminal law.


(7) Have access to all records, reports, audits, reviews, documents, papers, recommendations, or other material available to the Department which relate to programs and operations for which the IG has responsibility.


(8) Make such investigations and reports relating to the administration of USDA programs and operations as are, in the judgment of the IG, necessary or desirable.


(9) Request such information or assistance as may be necessary for carrying out the duties and responsibilities of the IG Act from any Federal, State, or local governmental agency or unit thereof.


(10) Issue subpoenas for the production of information, documents, reports, answers, records, accounts, papers, and other data in any medium (including electronically stored information, as well as any tangible thing) and documentary evidence necessary in the performance of functions assigned by the IG Act, except that procedures other than subpoenas shall be used to obtain documents and information from Federal agencies.


(11) Whenever necessary in the performance of functions assigned by the IG Act, administer to or take from any person an oath, affirmation, or affidavit, which shall have the same force and effect as if administered or taken by or before an officer having a seal.


(12) Have direct and prompt access to the Secretary when necessary for any purpose pertaining to the performance of functions and responsibilities under the IG Act.


(13) Select, appoint, and employ necessary officers and employees in OIG in accordance with laws and regulations governing the civil service, including an Assistant Inspector General for Audit (AIG/A) and an Assistant Inspector General for Investigations (AIG/I).


(14) Obtain services as authorized by 5 U.S.C. 3109.


(15) Enter into contracts and other arrangements for audits, inspections, studies, analyses, and other services with public agencies and private persons, and make such payments as may be necessary to carry out the provisions of the IG Act, to the extent and in such amounts as may be provided in advance by an appropriation act.


(16) Receive and investigate complaints or information from any Department employee concerning the possible existence of an activity constituting a violation of law, rules, or regulations, or mismanagement, gross waste of funds, abuse of authority, or a substantial and specific danger to the public health and safety.


(17) Designate a Whistleblower Protection Ombudsman, who will educate Department employees about prohibitions on retaliation for protected disclosures; and who have made or are contemplating making a protected disclosure about the rights and remedies against retaliation for protected disclosures.


(d) Pursuant to § 2.33 of this title, the Secretary has made the following delegations of authority to the IG:


(1) Advise the Secretary and General officers in the planning, development, and execution of Department policies and programs.


(2) At the request of the Secretary’s security office, determine the availability of OIG law enforcement personnel to assist the security office in providing for the personal security of the Secretary and Deputy Secretary.


(3) Serve as liaison official for the Department for all audits of USDA performed by the Government Accountability Office.


(e) The IG, under section 1337 of the Agriculture and Food Act of 1981, Public Law 97-98, 7 U.S.C. 2270, and pursuant to rules issued by the Secretary in part 1a of this title, has the authority to:


(1) Designate OIG employees who investigate alleged or suspected felony criminal violations of statutes administered by the Secretary of Agriculture or any agency of USDA, when engaged in the performance of official duties to:


(i) Make an arrest without a warrant for any such criminal felony violation if such violation is committed, or if the employee has probable cause to believe that such violation is being committed, in his/her presence;


(ii) Execute and serve a warrant for an arrest, for the search of premises, or the seizure of evidence when issued under authority of the United States upon probable cause to believe that such a violation has been committed; and


(iii) Carry a firearm.


(2) Issue directives and take the actions prescribed by the Secretary’s rules.


§ 2610.2 Headquarters organization.

(a) OIG has a headquarters office in Washington, DC, and regional offices throughout the United States. The headquarters office consists of the immediate office of the IG, which includes three component offices, and four operational units.


(b) Immediate Office Components. (1) The Director of the Office of Compliance and Integrity (OCI) performs independent quality assurance and internal control reviews of OIG operations. OCI also investigates allegations of criminal and/or serious administrative misconduct by OIG employees.


(2) Section 3(g) of the IG Act mandates that each IG shall obtain legal advice from a counsel either reporting directly to the IG or to another IG. Within USDA-OIG, such legal advice is provided by the Counsel to the Inspector General. The Office of Counsel (OC) provides legal advice and representation on issues arising during the course of audit, investigative, and Office of Data Sciences (ODS) activities or on internal administrative and management issues. OC also manages OIG’s congressional, media relations, ethics, Freedom of Information Act, and Privacy Act programs; and reviews proposed legislation, regulations, and procedures.


(3) The Director of the Office of Diversity and Conflict Resolution advises OIG leadership on applying the principles of civil rights, equal employment opportunity, dispute resolution, diversity, and inclusion, on matters affecting the OIG workforce, program activities, and development of policy. This office also guides all OIG personnel through the use of the Federal sector employment discrimination complaints and dispute resolution processes, as needed.


(c) Operational units. (1) The AIG/A carries out the OIG’s domestic and foreign audit operations through a headquarters office and three regional offices shown in § 2610.3(a). The staff provides for audit review of information technology (IT) security throughout USDA. Auditing officials conduct operational liaison on audit matters; schedule and conduct audits; release audit reports to management; monitor agency action to assure that audit reports have been properly acted upon through review of Department management follow up systems; monitor the quality of OIG audit reports; and coordinate activities with the AIG/I. The staff also provides an integrated approach to fraud prevention and detection and management improvement in USDA programs and operations; coordinates analyses and reports on vulnerability assessments; and recommends policies and provides technical assistance for audit operations. The Auditing headquarters office consists of the immediate office of the AIG/A and five staff divisions.


(2) The Assistant Inspector General for Data Sciences carries out OIG’s data sciences operations through a headquarters office. OIG officials within ODS perform predictive data analysis, statistical sampling, modeling, computer matching, data mining, and data warehousing of USDA programs and operations in support of OIG audits, investigations, and other activities.


(3) The AIG/I carries out OIG’s domestic and foreign investigative operations through a headquarters office and the five regional offices shown in § 2610.3(b). Investigations officials conduct operational and intelligence liaison on investigative matters with the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Secret Service, Internal Revenue Service, Interpol, and other Federal, State, and local law enforcement organizations; determine the need for investigative action; conduct investigations; prepare factual reports of investigative findings; refer reports for appropriate administrative or legal action; follow up on agency actions to assure that OIG investigative reports have been properly acted upon; monitor the quality of investigative reports; and coordinate activities with the AIG/A. The staff also conducts special investigations of major programs, operations, and high level officials; can assist the Secretary’s security office in providing for the protection of the Secretary and Deputy Secretary; and receives and processes employee complaints concerning possible violations of laws, rules, regulations or mismanagement. The OIG Whistleblower Protection Ombudsman described in § 2610.1(c)(17) is located within the Office of Investigations.


(4) The Assistant Inspector General for Management (AIG/M) manages formulation of OIG policies and procedures; develops, administers and directs comprehensive programs for the management, budget, financial, personnel, systems improvement, and information activities and operations of OIG; and is responsible for OIG IT and information management systems. The staff maintains OIG’s directives system, and Departmental Regulations and Federal Register issuances. The immediate office of the AIG/M and four divisions carry out these functions.


§ 2610.3 Regional organization.

(a) Each regional Audit Director is responsible to the IG and to the AIG/A for supervising the performance of all OIG auditing activities relating to the Department’s domestic and foreign programs and operations within an assigned geographic area. The addresses and telephone numbers of the three Audit regional offices and the territories served are as follows:


Audit Region, Address, Telephone Number, and Territory


Eastern Region, 5601 Sunnyside Avenue, Suite 2-2230 (Mail Stop 5300), Beltsville, Maryland 20705-5300, (301) 504-2100; Alabama, Arkansas, Connecticut, Delaware, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Mississippi, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Puerto Rico, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Vermont, Virgin Islands, Virginia, West Virginia, and Wisconsin.

Midwestern Region, 8930 Ward Parkway, Suite 3016, Kansas City, Missouri 64114, (816) 926-7667; Colorado, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Montana, Minnesota, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, Utah, and Wyoming.

Western Region, 1333 Broadway, Suite 400, Oakland, California 94612, (510) 208-6800; Alaska, Arizona, California, Hawaii, Idaho, Nevada, Oregon, Territory of Guam, Trust Territories of the Pacific, and Washington.

(b) Each regional Special Agent-in-Charge (SAC) is responsible to the IG and to the AIG/I for supervising the performance of all OIG investigative activities relating to the Department’s domestic and foreign programs and operations within an assigned geographic area. The addresses and telephone numbers of the five Investigations regional offices and the territories served are as follows:


Investigations Region, Address, Telephone Number, and Territory


Midwest Region, 111 N. Canal Street, Suite 325, Chicago, Illinois 60606-7296, (312) 353-1358; Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, and Wisconsin.

Northeast Region, 26 Federal Plaza, Room 1409, New York, New York 10278-0004, (212) 264-8400; Connecticut, Delaware, District of Columbia, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, Virginia, and West Virginia.

Southeast Region, 401 W. Peachtree Street NW., Room 2329, Atlanta, Georgia 30308, (404) 730-3274; Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, North Carolina, Puerto Rico, South Carolina, Tennessee, and the Virgin Islands.

Southwest Region, 101 South Main, Room 311, Temple, Texas 76501, (254) 743-6535; Arkansas, Kansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas.

Western Region, 1333 Broadway, Suite 400, Oakland, California 94612, (510) 208-6860; Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Territory of Guam, Trust Territories of the Pacific, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming.

§ 2610.4 Requests for service.

(a) Heads of USDA agencies will direct requests for audit or investigative service to the AIG/A, AIG/I, Audit Director, SAC, or to other OIG audit or investigation officials responsible for providing service of the type desired in the geographical area where service is desired.


(b) Agency officials or other employees may, at any time, direct to the personal attention of the IG any audit or investigation matter that warrants such attention.


(c) Other persons (i.e., non-USDA personnel) may address their communications regarding audit or investigative matters to: The Inspector General, U.S. Department of Agriculture, USDA Stop 2301, Washington, DC 20250.


(d) OIG has established several channels for USDA employees and the general public to report fraud, waste, abuse, and mismanagement in USDA programs, or misconduct by a USDA employee. These include a general OIG Hotline, a Bribery/Assault Line, and (for USDA employees) a Whistleblower Ombudsman.


(1) General fraud, waste, and abuse hotline:


(i) File complaint online: http://www.usda.gov/oig/hotline.htm (click on “Submit a Complaint” button);


(ii) Telephone: (800) 424-9121, (202) 690-1622, or (202) 690-1202 (Telecommunication Device for the Deaf);


(iii) Facsimile: (202) 690-2474; or


(iv) Write a letter to United States Department of Agriculture, Office of Inspector General, P.O. Box 23399, Washington, DC 20026.


(2) Bribery/Assault Line: (202) 720-7257 (24 hours a day).


(3) Whistleblower Protection Ombudsman. USDA employees may contact the Ombudsman via email at: [email protected]. Additional information about the Ombudsman is available online at https://www.usda.gov/oig/ombudsman.htm.


§ 2610.5 Delegations of authority.

(a) AIGs, Directors, and Counsel listed in § 2610.2, and Audit Directors and SACs listed in § 2610.3, are authorized to take whatever actions are necessary to carry out their assigned functions. This authority may be re-delegated.


(b) The IG reserves the right to establish audit and investigation policies, program, procedures, and standards; to allocate appropriated funds; to determine audit and investigative jurisdiction; and to exercise any of the powers or functions or perform any of the duties referenced in the above delegation.


PART 2620 – AVAILABILITY OF INFORMATION TO THE PUBLIC


Authority:5 U.S.C. 301, 552; Inspector General Act of 1978, as amended, 5 U.S.C. app. 3.



Source:81 FR 94230, Dec. 23, 2016, unless otherwise noted.

§ 2620.1 General statement.

This part supplements the regulations of the Secretary of Agriculture implementing the Freedom of Information Act, 5 U.S.C. 552 (FOIA) (subpart A of part 1 of this title, including the appendix), and governs the availability of records of the Office of Inspector General (OIG) to the public upon request.


§ 2620.2 Public inspection.

The FOIA requires that certain materials be made available for public inspection in an electronic format. OIG records are available for public inspection on OIG’s public Web site, https://www.usda.gov/oig/foia.htm.


§ 2620.3 Requests.

Requests for OIG records shall be submitted to OIG’s Office of Counsel and will be processed in accordance with subpart A of part 1 of this title. Specific guidance on how to submit requests (including current contact methods) is available through OIG’s Web site, https://www.usda.gov/oig/foiareq.htm, and USDA’s public FOIA Web site.


§ 2620.4 Denials.

If it is determined that a requested record is exempt from mandatory disclosure and that discretionary release would be improper, the Counsel to the Inspector General or the Counsel’s designee shall give written notice of denial in accordance with subpart A of part 1 of this title.


§ 2620.5 Appeals.

The denial of a requested record may be appealed in accordance with subpart A of part 1 of this title. Appeals shall be addressed to the Inspector General, U.S. Department of Agriculture, 1400 Independence Avenue SW., Whitten Building, Suite 441-E, Washington, DC 20250-2308. The Inspector General will give notice of the determination concerning an appeal in accordance with subpart A of part 1 of this title.


PARTS 2621-2699 [RESERVED]

CHAPTER XXVII – OFFICE OF INFORMATION RESOURCES MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

PART 2700 – ORGANIZATION AND FUNCTIONS


Authority:5 U.S.C. 301, 552; 7 CFR 2.81.


Source:47 FR 39128, Sept. 7, 1982, unless otherwise noted.

§ 2700.1 General statement.

This part is issued in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) to provide guidance for the general public as to the organization and functions of the Office of Information Resources Management.


§ 2700.2 Organization.

The Office of Information Resources Management (OIRM) was established on January 12, 1982. Delegations of authority to the Director, OIRM appear at 7 CFR 2.81. The organization is comprised of five headquarters divisions, an administrative staff and three computer centers to serve the Department. The organization is headed by the Director or, in the Director’s absence, by the Deputy Director or, in the absence of both, by the Director’s desginee.


§ 2700.3 Functions.

(a) Director. Provides executive direction for OIRM. Develops and recommends Departmental information resources management principles, policies, and objectives; develops and disseminates Departmental information resources management standards, guidelines, rules, and regulations necessary to implement approved principles, policies, and programs; designs, develops, implements, and revises systems, processes, work methods, and techniques to improve the management of information resources and the operational effectiveness of the Department; provides telecommunications and automated data processing services to the Department’s agencies and staff offices.


(b) Deputy Director. Assists the Director and, in the absence of the Director, serves as the Acting Director.


(c) Administrative Management Staff. Provides support for agency management regarding budget, accounting, personnel, and other administrative matters.


(d) Planning Division. Defines, develops, guides, and administers the Department’s long-range planning process for information resources.


(e) Information Management Division. Develops policy, standards and guidelines for collection, protection, access, use and management of information.


(f) Review and Evaluation Division. Reviews and evaluates information resources programs and activities of Department agencies and staff offices for conformance with plans, policies, and standards.


(g) Agency Technical Services Division. Advises and consults with and assists Department agencies and staff offices on activities related to the development and implementation of automated information systems.


(h) Operations and Telecommunications Division. Coordinates the development and implementation of programs for ADP and telecommunications resource planning within Departmental computer centers and the National Finance Center, and for the acquisition and use of Department-wide telecommunications facilities and services.


(i) Departmental Computer Centers. The following centers provide ADP facilities and services to agencies and staff offices of the Department.


(1) Washington Computer Center, 14th and Independence Ave., SW., Rm. S-107-South, Washington, DC 20250.


(2) Fort Collins Computer Center, 3825 E. Mulberry Street (P.O. Box 1206), Fort Collins, CO 80524.


(3) Kansas City Computer Center, 8930 Ward Parkway (P.O. Box 205), Kansas City, MO 64141.


PART 2710 – AVAILABILITY OF INFORMATION TO THE PUBLIC


Authority:5 U.S.C. 301, 552; 7 CFR 1.1-1.16.


Source:47 FR 39129, Sept. 7, 1982, unless otherwise noted.

§ 2710.1 General statement.

This part is issued in accordance with 7 CFR 1.4 of the U.S. Department of Agriculture regulations governing the availability of records (7 CFR 1.1-1.16 and Appendix A) under the Freedom of Information Act (5 U.S.C. 552). The Department’s regulations, as supplemented by the regulations in this part, provide guidance for any person wishing to request records from the Office of Information Resources Management (OIRM).


§ 2710.2 Public inspection and copying.

(a) Background. 5 U.S.C. 552(a)(2) required that each agency make certain kinds of records available for public inspection and copying.


(b) Procedure. Persons wishing to gain access to OIRM records should contact the Information Access & Disclosure Officer by writing to the address shown in 2710.4(b)(2).


§ 2710.3 Indexes.

(a) Background. 5 U.S.C. 552(a)(2) also required that each agency maintain and make available for public inspection and copying current indexes providing identifying information for the public with regard to any records which are made available for public inspection and copying.


(b) Procedure. Persons wishing to get an index may contact the division or center that maintains the records. Publication of these indexes as a separate document is unnecessary and impractical.


§ 2710.4 Initial request for records.

(a) Background. The Information Access and Disclosure Officer is authorized to:


(1) Grant or deny requests for OIRM records.


(2) Make discretionary releases of OIRM records when it is determined that the public interests in disclosure outweigh the public and/or private ones in withholding.


(3) Reduce or waive fees to be charged where determined to be appropriate.


(b) Procedure. Persons wishing to request records from the Office of Information Resources Management may do so as follows:


(1) How. Submit each initial request for OIRM records as prescribed in 7 CFR 1.3(a).


(2) Where. Submit each initial request to the Information Access and Disclosure Officer, Office of Information Resources Management, USDA, 14th and Independence Ave., SW., Room 407-W, Washington, DC 20250.


§ 2710.5 Appeals.

Procedure. Any person whose initial request is denied in whole or in part may appeal that denial, in accordance with 7 CFR 1.3(e) and 1.7, to the Director, Office of Information Resources Management, by sending the appeal to the Information Access and Disclosure Officer, Office of Information Resources Management, USDA, 14th and Independence Ave., SW., Room 407-W, Washington, DC 20250. The Director, Office of Information Resources Management, will make the determination on the appeal.


Appendix A to Part 2710 – List of Addresses

Section 1. General

This list provides the titles and mailing addresses of officials who have custody of OIRM records. This list also identifies the normal working hours, Monday through Friday, excluding holidays, during which public inspection and copying of certain kinds of records, and indexes to those records, is permitted.


Section 2. List of Addresses

Director, Office of Information Resources Management, 14th and Independence Ave., SW., Rm. 113-W, Washington, DC 20250; Hours: 8:30 a.m.-5:00 p.m.

Chief, Planning Division, OIRM, 14th and Independence Ave., SW., Rm. 446-W, Washington, DC 20250; Hours: 8:30 a.m.-5:00 p.m.

Chief, Review and Evaluation Division, OIRM, 14th and Independence Ave., SW., Rm. 442-W, Washington, DC 20250; Hours: 8:30 a.m.-5:00 p.m.

Chief, Agency Technical Services Division, OIRM, 14th and Independence Ave., SW., Rm. 416-W, Washington, DC 20250; Hours: 8:30 a.m.-5:00 p.m.

Chief, Operations and Telecommunications Division, OIRM, 14th and Independence Ave., SW., Rm. 419-W, Washington, DC 20250; Hours: 8:30 a.m.-5:00 p.m.

Chief, Information Management Division, OIRM, 14th and Independence Ave., SW., Rm. 404-W, Washington, DC 20250; Hours: 8:30 a.m.-5:00 p.m.

Chief, St. Louis Computer Center, OIRM, 1520 Market Street, Rm. 3441, St. Louis, MO 63101; Hours: 8:00 a.m.-4:40 p.m.

Director, Kansas City Computer Center, OIRM, 8930 Ward Parkway, (P.O. Box 205), Kansas City, MO 64141; Hours: 8:00 a.m.-4:45 p.m.

Director, Fort Collins Computer Center, OIRM, 3825 E. Mulberry Street, (P.O. Box 1206), Fort Collins, CO 80521; Hours: 8:00 a.m.-4:30 p.m.

Director, Washington Computer Center, OIRM, 14th and Independence Ave., SW., Rm. S-107-S, Washington, DC 20250; Hours: 8:30 a.m.-5:00 p.m.

Information Access and Disclosure Officer, OIRM, 14th and Independence Ave., SW., Rm. 407-W, Washington, DC 20250; Hours: 8:30 a.m.-5:00 p.m.


PARTS 2711-2799 [RESERVED]

CHAPTER XXVIII – OFFICE OF OPERATIONS, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

PARTS 2800-2809 [RESERVED]

PART 2810 – ORGANIZATION AND FUNCTIONS – OFFICE OF OPERATIONS


Authority:5 U.S.C. 301 and 552; 7 CFR 2.76.


Source:54 FR 52013, Dec. 20, 1989, unless otherwise noted.

§ 2810.1 General statement.

This part is issued in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) to provide guidance for the general public as to Office of Operations (OO) organization and functions.


§ 2810.2 Organization.

The Office of Operations (OO) was established January 12, 1982. Delegations of authority to the Director, OO, appear at 7 CFR 2.76. The organization is comprised of six divisions and one staff located at Department headquarters. Description of the functions of these organizational units are in the following section. The organization is headed by a Director.


§ 2810.3 Functions.

(a) Director. Provides executive direction for OO. Develops and promulgates overall policies and provides general direction, leadership, oversight, and coordination of USDA management of procurement, real and personal property activities, mail and copier management. Provides executive services to the Office of the Secretary and operates activities providing consolidated USDA administrative functions and services.


(b) Deputy Director. Assists the Director, and in the absence of the Director, serves as Acting Director.


(c) Administrative Unit. Provides support for agency management regarding budget, accounting, personnel, and other administrative matters.


(d) Executive Services Division. Provides executive services to the Office of the Secretary in travel arrangements, supplies, furnishings, communications, equipment, and records. Operates the central USDA DC imprest fund.


(e) Facilities Management Division. Operates and maintains the USDA DC headquarters building complex, including headquarters parking. Oversees management and operation of USDA buildings nationwide, and provides DC area labor services.


(f) Mail and Reproduction Management Division. Oversees USDA mail, copier, and duplicating programs. Operates DC area central activities in these areas.


(g) Personal Property Management Division. Oversees USDA supply, motor vehicle, and personal property programs. Operates centralized warehouse and property rehabilitation facilities.


(h) Procurement Division. Oversees USDA procurement programs. Operates centralized purchasing operations for ADP and Washington area activities.


(i) Real Property Management Division. Oversees USDA real property management programs.


PART 2811 – AVAILABILITY OF INFORMATION TO THE PUBLIC


Authority:5 U.S.C. 301 and 552 (as amended); 7 CFR 1.3.


Source:54 FR 52014, Dec. 20, 1989, unless otherwise noted.

§ 2811.1 General statement.

This part is issued in accordance with 7 CFR 1.3 of the Department of Agriculture regulations governing the availability of records (7 CFR 1.1-1.23 and Appendix A) under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), 5 U.S.C. 552. The Department’s regulations, as supplemented by the regulations in this part, provide guidance for any person wishing to request records from Office of Operations.


§ 2811.2 Public inspection and copying.

(a) Background. 5 U.S.C. 552(a)(2) requires that each agency maintain and make available for public inspection and copying certain kinds of records.


(b) Procedure. To gain access to OO records that are available for public inspection, contact the division that maintains them. See Appendix A, List of Addresses, for the location and hours of operation.


§ 2811.3 Indexes.

(a) Background. 15 U.S.C. 552(a)(2) also requires that each agency maintain and make available for public inspection and copying current indexes provided identifying information for the public with regard to any records which are made available for public inspection and copying. OO does not maintain any materials within the scope of these requirements.


§ 2811.4 Initial requests for records.

(a) Background. The head of each OO division, each OO contracting officer, each OO leasing officer, and the OO FOIA officer is authorized to:


(1) Grant or deny requests for OO records.


(2) Make discretionary release of OO records when it is determined that the public interest in disclosure outweighs the public and/or private ones in withholding.


(3) Reduce or waive fees to be charged where determined to be appropriate.


(4) Refer a request to the OO FOIA Officer for determination.


(b) Procedures. Persons wishing to request records from the Office of Operations may do so as follows:


(1) How. Submit each initial request for OO records as prescribed in 7 CFR 1.6.


(2) Where. Submit each initial request to the head of the unit that maintains the records. See Appendix A, List of Addresses. Contact the FOIA Officer for guidance as needed. Or, submit the request to the FOIA Officer for forwarding to the proper officials: FOIA Officer, Office of Operations, USDA, Room 134-W Administration Building, 14th & Independence Avenue SW., Washington, DC 20250.


§ 2811.5 Appeals.

Procedure. Any person whose initial request is denied in whole or in part may appeal that denial, in accordance with 7 CFR 1.6(e) and 1.8, to the Director, Office of Operations, USDA, Room 113-W Administration Building, 14th & Independence Avenue SW., Washington, DC 20250.


§ 2811.6 Fee schedule.

Department regulations provide for a schedule of reasonable standard charges for document search and duplication. See 7 CFR 1.2(b). Fees to be charged are set forth in 7 CFR part 1, subpart A, appendix A.


Appendix A to Part 2811 – List of Addresses

Section 1. General

This list provides the titles and mailing address of officials who have custody of OO records. The normal working hours of these offices are 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, exclusing holidays, during which public inspection and copying of certain kinds of records is permitted.


Section 2. List of Addresses

All of the following addresses are located at 14th Street and Independence Avenue, Washington, DC. Address mail as follows:


Director, Office of Operations, USDA, Room 113-W Administration Building, Washington, DC 20250.

FOIA Officer, Office of Operations, USDA, Room 134-W Administration Building, Washington, DC 20250.

Chief, Administrative Unit, Office of Operations, USDA, Room 134-W, Washington, DC 20250.

Chief, Executive Services Division, Office of Operations, USDA, Room 10-A, Administration Building, Washington, DC 20250.

Chief, Facilities Management Division, Office of Operations, USDA, Room S-313 South Building, Washington, DC 20250.

Chief, Mail and Reproduction Management Division, Office of Operations, USDA, Room 1540 South Building, Washington, DC 20250.

Chief, Personal Property Management Division, Office of Operations, USDA Room 1524 South Building, Washington, DC 20250.

Chief, Procurement Division, Office of Operations, USDA, Room 1550 South Building, Washington, DC 20250.

Chief, Real Property Management Division, Office of Operations, USDA, Room 1566, South Building, Washington, DC 20250.


PART 2812 – DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GUIDELINES FOR THE DONATION OF EXCESS RESEARCH EQUIPMENT UNDER 15 U.S.C. 3710(i)


Authority:5 U.S.C. 301; E.O. 12999, 61 FR 17227, 3 CFR, 1997 Comp., p. 180.


Source:60 FR 34456, July 3, 1995, unless otherwise noted.

§ 2812.1 Purpose.

This part sets forth the procedures to be utilized by USDA agencies and laboratories in the donation of excess research equipment to educational institutions and non-profit organizations for the conduct of technical and scientific education and research activities as authorized by 15 U.S.C. 3710(i). Title to excess research equipment donated pursuant to 15 U.S.C. 3710(i), shall pass to the donee.


§ 2812.2 Eligibility.

Eligible organizations are educational institutions or non-profit organizations involved in the conduct of technical and scientific educational and research activities.


§ 2812.3 Definitions.

(a) Cannibalization. The dismantling of equipment for parts to repair or enhance other equipment. The residual is reported for disposal. Cannibalization is only authorized if the property value is greater when cannibalized than retention in the original condition.


(b) Community-based educational organization means nonprofit organizations that are engaged in collaborative projects with pre-kindergarten through twelfth grade educational institutions or that have education as their primary focus. Such organizations shall qualify as nonprofit educational institutions for purposes of section 203(j) of the Federal Property and Administrative Services Act of 1949 (40 U.S.C. 484(j)).


(c) Educational institution means a public or private, non-profit educational institution, encompassing pre-kindergarten through twelfth grade and two- and four-year institutions of higher education, as well as public school districts.


(d) Educationally useful Federal equipment means computers and related peripheral tools (e.g., printers, modems, routers, and servers), including telecommunications and research equipment, that are appropriate for use in pre-kindergarten, elementary, middle, or secondary school education. It shall also include computer software, where the transfer of licenses is permitted.


(e) Excess personal property. Items of personal property no longer required by the controlling Federal agency.


(f) Federal empowerment zone or enterprise community (EZ/EC) means a rural area designated by the Secretary of Agriculture under 7 CFR part 25.


(g) Non-profit organization means any corporation, trust association, cooperative, or other organization which:


(1) Is operated primarily for scientific, educational, service, charitable, or similar purposes in the public interest;


(2) Is not organized primarily for profit; and


(3) Uses its net proceeds to maintain, improve, or expand its operations. For the purposes of this part, “non-profit organizations” may include utilities affiliated with institutions of higher education, or with state and local governments and federally recognized Indian tribes.


(h) Research equipment. Federal property determined to be essential to conduct scientific or technical educational research.


(i) Technical and scientific education and research activities. Non-profit tax exempt public educational institutions or government sponsored research organizations which serve to conduct technical and scientific education and research.


[60 FR 34456, July 3, 1995, as amended at 65 FR 69857, Nov. 21, 2000]


§ 2812.4 Procedures.

(a) [Reserved]


(b) Each agency head will designate in writing an authorized official to approve donations of excess property/equipment under this part.


(c) After USDA screening has been accomplished, excess personal property targeted for donation under this part will be made available on a first-come, first-served basis. If there are competing requests, donations will be made to eligible recipients in the following priority order:


(1) Educationally useful Federal equipment for pre-kindergarten through twelfth grade educational institutions and community-based educational organizations in rural EZ/EC communities;


(2) Educationally useful Federal equipment for pre-kindergarten through twelfth grade educational institutions and community-based educational organizations not in rural EZ/EC areas;


(3) All other eligible organizations.


(d) Upon reporting property for excess screening, if the pertinent USDA agency has an eligible organization in mind for donation under this part, it shall enter “P.L. 102-245” in the note field. The property will remain in the excess system approximately 30 days, and if no USDA agency or cooperator requests it during the excess cycle, the Departmental Excess Personal Property Coordinator will send the agency a copy of the excess report stamped, “DONATION AUTHORITY TO THE HOLDING AGENCY IN ACCORDANCE WITH P.L. 102-245.” The holding USDA agency may then donate the excess property to the eligible organization.


(e) Donations under this Part will be accomplished by preparing a Standard Form (SF) 122, “Transfer Order-Excess Personal Property”.


(f) The SF-122 should be signed by both an authorized official of the agency and the Agency Property Management Officer. The following information should also be provided.


(1) Name and address of Donee Institution (Ship to)


(2) Agency name and address (holding Agency)


(3) Location of property


(4) Shipping instructions (Donee contact person)


(5) Complete description of property, including acquisition amount, serial no., condition code, quantity, and agency order no.


(6) This statement needs to be added following property descriptions. “The property requested hereon is certified to be used for the conduct of technical and scientific education and research activities. This donation is pursuant to the provisions of Pub. L. 102-245.”


(g) Once the excess personal property/equipment is physically received, the donee is required to immediately return a copy of the SF-122 to the donating agency indicating receipt of requested items. Cancellations should be reported to DEPPC so the property can be reported to the General Services Administration (GSA).



Note:

The USDA agency shall send an informational copy of the transaction to GSA.


[60 FR 34456, July 3, 1995, as amended at 65 FR 69857, Nov. 21, 2000]


§ 2812.5 Restrictions.

(a) The authorized official (see § 2812.4(b)) will approve the donation of excess personal property/equipment in the following groups to educational institutions or nonprofit organizations for the conduct of technical and scientific educational and research activities.


Eligible Groups

FSC group
Name
19Ships, Small Craft, Pontoons, and Floating Docks.
23Vehicles, Trailers and Cycles.
24Tractors.
37Agricultural Machinery and Equipment.
43Pumps, Compressors.
48Valves.
58Communication, Detection, and Coherent Radiation Equipment.
59Electrical and Electronic Equipment Components.
65Medical, Dental, and Veterinary Equipment and Supplies.
66Instruments and Laboratory Equipment.
67Photographic Equipment.
68Chemicals and Chemical Products.
70General Purpose Automatic Data Processing Equipment, Software Supplies, and Support Equipment.
74Office Machines and Visible Record Equipment.


Note:

Requests for items in FSC Groups or Classes other than the above should be referred to the agency head for consideration and approval.


(b) Excess personal property/equipment may be donated for cannibalization purposes, provided the donee submits a supporting statement which clearly indicates that cannibalizing the requested property for secondary use has greater potential benefit than utilization of the item in its existing form.


§ 2812.6 Title.

Title to excess personal property/equipment donated under this Part will automatically pass to the donee once the sponsoring agency receives the SF-122 indicating that the donee has received the property.


§ 2812.7 Costs.

Donated excess personal property/equipment is free of charge. However, the donee must pay all costs associated with packaging and transportation, unless the sponsoring agency has made other arrangements. The donee should specify the method of shipment.


§ 2812.8 Accountability and recordkeeping.

USDA requires that property requested by a donee be placed into use by the donee within a year of receipt and used for at least 1 year thereafter. Donees must maintain accountable records for such property during this time period.


§ 2812.9 Disposal.

When the property is no longer needed by the donee, it may be used in support of other Federal projects or sold and the proceeds used for technical and scientific education and research activities.


§ 2812.10 Liabilities and losses.

USDA assumes no liability with respect to accidents, bodily injury, illness, or any other damages or loss related to excess personal property/equipment donated under this part. The donee is advised to insure or otherwise protect itself and others as appropriate.


PARTS 2813-2899 [RESERVED]

CHAPTER XXIX – OFFICE OF ENERGY POLICY AND NEW USES, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

PART 2900 – ESSENTIAL AGRICULTURAL USES AND VOLUMETRIC REQUIREMENTS – NATURAL GAS POLICY ACT


Authority:Pub. L. 95-621, Nov. 9, 1978.


Source:44 FR 28786, May 17, 1979, unless otherwise noted.

§ 2900.1 General.

Section 401(c) of the Natural Gas Policy Act of 1978 (NGPA) requires the Secretary of Agriculture to determine the essential uses of natural gas, and to certify to the Secretary of Energy and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) the natural gas requirements, expressed either as volumes or percentages of use, of persons, or classes thereof, for essential agricultural uses in order to meet requirements of full food and fiber production. This rule covers establishments performing functions classed as essential agricultural uses whose natural gas supplies are distributed through the interstate pipeline systems even though such establishments may receive such gas directly from an intrastate pipeline or local distribution company. The rule provides to the Secretary of Energy (for purposes of Section 401(a) of the NGPA) and to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission the following certifications:


(a) Essential agricultural uses of natural gas, expressed as classes of establishments that use gas for essential agricultural purposes; and


(b) Essential agricultural current requirements of natural gas, expressed as percentages of use.


§ 2900.2 Definitions.

(a) Full food and fiber production means the entire output of food and fiber produced for the domestic market, and for export, for building of reserves, and crops for soil building or conservation. This term also includes the processing of food and fiber into stable and storable products, and the maintenance of food quality after processing.


(b) Establishment means an economic unit, generally at a single physical location where business is conducted or where service or industrial operations are performed (for example, a factory, mill, store, mine, farm, sales office, or warehouse). (Note: This is the same definition used in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual, 1972 edition).


(c) Essential Agricultural Use Establishment means any Establishment, or the portion of an Establishment, which performs (or has the capability to perform) activities specified in § 2900.3.


(d) Current Natural Gas Requirements means the amount of natural gas required by an Essential Agricultural Use Establishment to perform the activities devoted to full food and fiber production.


(Pub. L. 95-621, Nov. 8, 1979, 92 Stat. 3350, 15 U.S.C. 3301 et seq.)

[44 FR 28786, May 17, 1979, as amended at 46 FR 47216, Sept. 25, 1981]


§ 2900.3 Essential agricultural uses.

For purposes of Section 401(c) of the NGPA the following classes or portions of classes are certified as essential agricultural uses in order to meet the requirements of full food and fiber production:



Essential Agricultural Uses

Industry SIC No. and Industry Description

Food and Natural Fiber Production

01 Agricultural Production – Crops


02 Agricultural Production – Livestock Excluding 0272 – Horses and Other Equines, and Nonfood Portions of 0279 – Animal Specialties, Not Elsewhere Classified.


0723 Crop Preparation Services for Market, Except Cotton Ginning (see fiber processing).


4971 Irrigation Systems.


Fertilizer and Agricultural Chemicals

(Process and Feedstock Use Only)

1474 Potash, Soda, and Borate Materials.


1475 Phosphate Rock.


1477 Sulfur.


2819 Industrial Inorganic Chemicals, n.e.c. (Agricultural related only).


2865 Cyclic Crudes and Cyclic Intermediates, Dyes and Organic Pigments (Agricutural related only).


2869 Industrial Organic Chemicals, n.e.c. (Agricutural related only).


287 Agricultural Chemicals.


2899 Chemicals and Chemical Preparations, n.e.c. (Salt – Feed grade only).


3274 Lime (Agricultural lime only).


Food and Natural Fiber Processing-Food

20 Food and Kindred Products Except 2047 Dog, Cat and Other Pet Food, and 2048 Prepared Feeds and Feed Ingredients for Animals and Fowls, Not Elsewhere Classified.


2869 Industrial Organic Chemicals (Monosodium Glutamate, Food-grade Citric Acid and Food-grade Enzymes only).


2899 Chemicals and Chemical Preparations, n.e.c. (Salt for food use only).


Animal Feeds, and Food

(Process and Feedstock Use Only)

2047 Dog, Cat and Other Pet Food.


2048 Prepared Feeds and Feed Ingredients for Animals and Fowls, Not Elsewhere Classified.


Natural Fiber

0724 Cotton Ginning.


2141 Tobacco Stemming and Redrying.


2299 Textile Goods, n.e.c. (wool tops, combing and converting).


3111 Leather Tanning and Finishing.


Food Quality Maintenance – Food Packaging

2641 Paper Coating and Glazing (food related only).


2643 Bags, Except Textile (food related only).


2645 Die Cut Paper and Paperboard (food related only).


2646 Pressed and Molded Pulp Goods (food related only).


2649 Converted Paper Products (food related only).


2651 Folding Paperboard Boxes (food related only).


2653 Corrugated and Solid Fiber Boxes (food related only).


2654 Sanitary Food Containers.


2655 Fiber Cans, Tubes, Drums, and Similar Products (food related only).


3079 Miscellaneous Plastic Products (food related only).


3221 Glass Containers (food related only).


3411 Metal Cans (food related only).


3412 Metal Shipping Barrels, Drums, Kegs, and Pails (food related only).


3466 Metal Crowns and Closures (Food Related Only).


3497 Metal Foil and Leaf (food related only).


Petroleum wax, synthetic petroleum wax and polyethylene wax (food grade only) as food containers.


Marketing and Distribution

4221 Farm Product Warehousing and Storage.


4222 Refrigerated Warehousing.


514 Groceries and Related Products.


5153 Farm Product Raw Materials – Grain.


54 Food Stores.


Energy Production

(1) Agricultural production on set-aside acreage or acreage diverted from the production of a commodity (as provided under the Agricultural Act of 1949) to be devoted to the production of any commodity for conversion into alcohol or hydrocarbons for use as motor fuel or other fuels;


(2) Sugar refining for production of alcohol; and


(3) Distillation of fuel-grade alcohol from food grains and other biomass by facilities in existence on June 30, 1980 which do not have the installed capability to burn coal lawfully, for a period ending June 29, 1985.


(Pub. L. 95-621, Nov. 8, 1978, 92 Stat. 3350; 15 U.S.C. 3301 et seq.)

[44 FR 28786, May 17, 1979, as amended at 45 FR 5298, Jan. 23, 1980; 45 FR 45887, 45888, July 8, 1980; 45 FR 50550, July 30, 1980; 47 FR 25320, June 11, 1982; 48 FR 43670, Sept. 26, 1983; 49 FR 37733, Sept. 26, 1984]


§ 2900.4 Natural gas requirements.

For purposes of Section 401(c), NGPA, the natural gas requirements for each Essential Agricultural Use Establishment, whether such Essential Agricultural Use Establishment is in existence on the effective date of this rule or comes into existence thereafter, are certified to be 100 percent of Current Natural Gas Requirements.


§ 2900.6 Effective date.

This rule shall become effective on May 14, 1979.


PART 2901 – ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES FOR ADJUSTMENTS OF NATURAL GAS CURTAILMENT PRIORITY


Authority:Secs. 502, 507. Pub. L. 95-621, 92 Stat. 3397, 3405, Nov. 9, 1978.


Source:44 FR 55803, Sept. 28, 1979, unless otherwise noted.

§ 2901.1 Purpose and scope.

The purpose of this part 2901 is to provide procedures for the making of certain adjustments to the Secretary of Agriculture’s Essential Agricultural Uses and Requirements regulations in accordance with section 502(c) of the Natural Gas Policy Act of 1978, in order to prevent special hardship, inequity, or an unfair distribution of burdens. The procedures in this part 2901 apply to any person seeking an interpretation of, modification of, rescission of, exception of, or exemption from the Essential Agricultural Uses and Requirements regulations in part 2900 of this chapter.


§ 2901.2 Definitions.

(a) Person means any individual, firm, sole proprietorship, partnership, association, company, joint venture or corporation.


(b) Director means the Director of the Office of Energy, U.S. Department of Agriculture.


(c) Secretary means the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Agriculture.


(d) Adjustment means an interpretation, modification, rescission of, exception to or exemption from the Essential Agricultural Uses and Requirements regulations, part 2900 of this chapter.


(e) NGPA means the Natural Gas Policy Act of 1978, Pub. L. 95-621.


(f) Petitioner means any person seeking an adjustment under this part 2901.


§ 2901.3 Oral presentation.

Any person seeking an adjustment under this part 2901 shall be given an opportunity to make an oral presentation of data, views and arguments in support of the request for an adjustment, provided that a request to make an oral presentation is submitted in writing with the request for the adjustment. An official of the Department of Agriculture shall preside at such oral presentation.


§ 2901.4 Interpretations.

(a) Request for an interpretation. (1) Any person seeking an interpretation of the Essential Agricultural Uses and Requirements regulations in part 2900 shall file a formal written request with the Director. The request should contain a full and complete statement of all relevant facts pertaining to the circumstances, act or transaction that is the subject of the request and to the action sought, and should state the special hardship, inequity, or unfair distribution of burdens that will be prevented by the interpretation sought and why the interpretation is consistent with the purposes of NGPA. The Director shall publish a notice in the Federal Register advising the public that a request for an interpretation has been received and that written comments will be accepted with respect thereto, if received within 20 days of the notice. The Federal Register notice will provide that copies of the request for interpretation from which confidential information has been deleted in accordance with paragraph (a)(2) of this section may be obtained from the petitioner.


(2) If the petitioner wishes to claim confidential treatment for any information contained in the request or other documents submitted under this part 2901, such person shall file together with the document a second copy of the document from which has been deleted the information for which such person wishes to claim confidential treatment. The petitioner shall indicate in the original document that it is confidential or contains confidential information and may file a statement specifying the justification for non-disclosure of the information for which non-disclosure is sought. The Director shall consider such requests, and subject to the Freedom of Information Act, 5 U.S.C. 552 and other applicable laws and regulations, shall treat such information as confidential.


(b) Investigations. The Director may initiate an investigation of any statement in a request and utilize in his evaluation any relevant facts obtained in such investigation. The Director may accept submissions from third persons relevant to any request for interpretation provided that the petitioner is afforded an opportunity to respond to all such submissions. In evaluating a request for interpretation, the Director may consider any other source of information.


(c) Applicability. Any interpretation issued hereunder shall be issued on the basis of the information provided on the request, as supplemented by other information brought to the attention of the Director during the consideration of the request. The interpretation shall, therefore, depend for its authority on the accuracy of the factual statement and may be relied upon only to the extent that the facts of the actual situation correspond to those upon which the interpretation was based.


(d) Issuance of an interpretation. Upon consideration of the request for interpretation and other relevant information received or obtained by the Director, the Director may issue a written interpretation. A copy of the written interpretation shall be provided to FERC and the Secretary of Energy. Notice of the issuance of the written interpretation shall be published in the Federal Register. The granting of a request for issuance of an interpretation shall be considered final agency action for purposes of judicial review under § 2901.8.


(e) Denial of an interpretation. An interpretation shall be considered denied for purpose of review of such denial under § 2901.7 only if:


(1) The Director notifies the petitioner in writing that the request is denied and that an interpretation will not be issued; or


(2) The Director does not respond to a request for an interpretation, by (i) issuing an interpretation, or (ii) giving notice of when an interpretation will be issued within 45 days of the date of receipt of the request, or within such extended time as the Director may prescribe by written notice within the 45-day period.


(f) For purposes of this part 2901 the word interpretation shall not be deemed to include a simple clarification of an actual or purported ambiguity in part 2900. The Director reserves the right to determine whether a request involves simple clarification and shall advise the requester of his decision.


§ 2901.5 Modifications and rescissions.

(a) Request for modification or rescission. (1) Any person seeking a modification or a rescission of the Essential Agricultural Uses and Requirements regulations of part 2900 shall file a formal written request with the Director. The request shall contain a full and complete statement of all relevant facts pertaining to the circumstance, act or transaction that is the subject of the request and to the action sought. The request should state the special hardship, inequity or unfair distribution of burdens that will be prevented by making the modification or rescission.


(2) If the petitioner wishes to claim confidential treatment for any information contained in the request or other documents submitted under this part 2901, such person shall file together with the document a second copy of the document from which has been deleted the information for which such person wishes to claim confidential treatment. The petitioner shall indicate in the original document that it is confidential or contains confidential information and may file a statement specifying the justification for non-disclosure of the information for which non-disclosure is sought. The Director shall consider such requests, and subject to the Freedom of Information Act, 5 U.S.C. 552 and other applicable laws and regulations, shall treat such information as confidential.


(3) The request shall be filed as a petition for rulemaking and treated in accordance with the procedures, as applicable, of 7 CFR part 1, subpart B.


(b) Institution of rulemaking. Upon consideration of the request for modification or rescission and other relevant information received or obtained by the Director, the Director may institute rulemaking proceedings in accordance with the Administrative Procedures Act 5 U.S.C. 551 et seq. and applicable regulations.


(c) Denial of a modification or rescission. If the Director (1) denies the request for modification or rescission in writing by notifying the petitioner that he does not intend to institute rulemaking proceedings as proposed and stating the reasons therefor, or (2) does not respond to a request for a modification or rescission in accordance with paragraph (b) of this section or (3) notifies the petitioner in writing that the matter is under continuing consideration and that no decision can be made at that time because of the inadequacy of available information, changing circumstances or other reasons as set forth therein, within 45 days of the date of the receipt thereof, or within such extended time as the Director may prescribe by written notice within that 45-day period, the request shall be considered denied for the purpose of review of such denial under § 2901.7.


§ 2901.6 Exceptions and exemptions.

(a) Request for exception or exemption. (1) Any person seeking an exception or exemption from the Essential Agricultural Uses and Requirements regulations in part 2900 shall file a formal written request with the Director. The request shall contain a full and complete statement of all relevant facts pertaining to the circumstance, act, or transaction that is the subject of the request and to the action sought. The request should state the special hardship, inequity or unfair distribution of burdens that will be prevented by making the exception or exemption. The Director shall publish a notice in the Federal Register advising the public that a request for an exception or exemption has been received and that written comments will be accepted with respect thereto if received within 20 days of the notice. The Federal Register notice will provide that copies of the request from which confidential information has been deleted in accordance with paragraph (a)(2) of this section may be obtained from the petitioner. The Petitioner shall be afforded an opportunity to respond to such submissions.


(2) If the petitioner wishes to claim confidential treatment for any information contained in the request or other documents submitted under this part 2901, such person shall file together with the document a second copy of the document from which has been deleted the information for which such person wishes to claim confidential treatment. The petitioner shall indicate in the original document that it is confidential or contains confidential information and may file a statement specifying the justification for non-disclosure of the information for which non-disclosure is sought. The Director shall consider such requests, and subject to the Freedom of Information Act, 5 U.S.C. 552 and other applicable laws and regulations, shall treat such information as confidential.


(b) Decision and order. Upon consideration of the request for an exception or exemption and other relevant information received or obtained during the proceedings, the Director shall issue an order granting or denying the request. The Director shall publish a notice in the Federal Register of the issuance of a decision and order on the request. The granting of a request for an exception or exemption shall be considered final agency action for purposes of judicial review under § 2901.8.


(c) Denial of an exception or exemption. A request for an exception or exemption shall be considered denied for purposes of review of such denial under § 2901.7 only if:


(1) The Director has notified the petitioner in writing that the request is denied under paragraph (b) of this section; or


(2) The Director does not respond to a request for an exception or exemption by (i) granting the request for an exception or exemption under paragraph (b) of this section or (ii) giving notice of when a decision will be made within 45 days of the receipt of the request, or with such extended time as the Director may prescribe by written notice within the 45-day period.


§ 2901.7 Review of denials.

(a) Request for review. (1) Any person aggrieved or adversely affected by a denial of a request for any interpretation under § 2901.4 may request a review of the denial by the Secretary, within 30 days from the date of the denial.


(2) Any person aggrieved or adversely affected by a denial of a request for a modification or rescission under § 2901.5, may request a review of the denial by the Secretary within 30 days from the date of the denial.


(3) Any person aggrieved or adversely affected by a denial of a request for an exception or an exemption under § 2901.6, may request a review of the denial by the Secretary within 30 days from the date of the denial.


(b) Procedures. Any request for review under § 2901.7(a) shall be in writing and shall set forth the specific ground upon which the request is based. There is no final agency action for purposes of judicial review under § 2901.8 until that request has been acted upon. If the request for review has not been acted upon within 30 days after it is received, the request shall be deemed to have been denied. That denial shall then constitute final agency action for the purpose of judicial review under § 2901.8.


§ 2901.8 Judicial review.

Any person aggrieved or adversely affected by a final agency action taken on a request for an adjustment under this section may obtain judicial review in accordance with section 506 of the Natural Gas Policy Act of 1978.


§ 2901.9 Effective date.

This rule shall become effective on October 29, 1979.


PART 2902 [RESERVED]

PART 2903 – BIODIESEL FUEL EDUCATION PROGRAM


Authority:7 U.S.C. 8104; 5 U.S.C. 301.


Source:68 FR 56139, Sept. 30, 2003, unless otherwise noted.

Subpart A – General Information

§ 2903.1 Applicability of regulations.

(a) The regulations of this part only apply to Biodiesel Fuel Education Program grants awarded under the provisions of section 9004 of the Farm Security and Rural Investment Act of 2002 (FSRIA) (7 U.S.C. 8104) which authorizes the Secretary to award competitive grants to eligible entities to educate governmental and private entities that operate vehicle fleets, other interested entities (as determined by the Secretary), and the public about the benefits of biodiesel fuel use. Eligibility is limited to nonprofit organizations and institutions of higher education (as defined in sec. 101 of the Higher Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 1001)) that have demonstrated both knowledge of biodiesel fuel production, use, or distribution and the ability to conduct educational and technical support programs. The Secretary delegated this authority to the Chief Economist, who in turn delegated this authority to the Director of OEPNU.


(b) The regulations of this part do not apply to grants awarded by the Department of Agriculture under any other authority.


§ 2903.2 Purpose of the program.

The Biodiesel Fuel Education Program seeks to familiarize public and private vehicle fleet operators, other interested entities, and the public, with the benefits of biodiesel, a relatively new fuel option in the United States. It will also address concerns previously identified by fleet operators and other potential users of this alternative fuel, including the need to balance the positive environmental, social and human health impacts of biodiesel utilization with the increased per gallon cost to the user. It is the Program’s goal to stimulate biodiesel demand and encourage the further development of a biodiesel industry in the United States.


§ 2903.3 Eligibility.

(a) Eligibility is limited to nonprofit organizations and institutions of higher education that have demonstrated both knowledge of biodiesel fuel production, use, or distribution and the ability to conduct educational and technical support programs.


(b) Award recipients may subcontract to organizations not eligible to apply provided such organizations are necessary for the conduct of the project.


§ 2903.4 Indirect costs.

(a) For the Biodiesel Fuel Education Program, applicants should use the current indirect cost rate negotiated with the cognizant Federal negotiating agency. Indirect costs may not exceed the negotiated rate. If no indirect cost rate has been negotiated, a reasonable dollar amount for indirect costs may be requested, which will be subject to approval by USDA. In the latter case, if a proposal is recommended for funding, an indirect cost rate proposal must be submitted prior to award to support the amount of indirect costs requested.


(b) A proposer may elect not to charge indirect costs and, instead, charge only direct costs to grant funds. Grantees electing this alternative will not be allowed to charge, as direct costs, indirect costs that otherwise would be in the grantee’s indirect cost pool under the applicable Office of Management and Budget cost principles. Grantees who request no indirect costs will not be permitted to revise their budgets at a later date to charge indirect costs to grant funds.


§ 2903.5 Matching requirements.

There are no matching funds requirements for the Biodiesel Fuel Education Program and matching resources will not be factored into the review process as evaluation criteria.


Subpart B – Program Description

§ 2903.6 Project types.

OEPNU intends to award continuation grants to successful Biodiesel Fuel Education Program applicants. A continuation grant is a grant instrument by which the Department agrees to support a specified level of effort for a predetermined project period with a statement of intention to provide additional support at a future date, provided that performance has been satisfactory, appropriations are available for this purpose, and continued government support would be in the best interest of the Federal government and the public. If these three elements are met, OEPNU plans to provide additional support to the funded project(s).


§ 2903.7 Project objectives.

(a) Successful projects will develop practical indicators or milestones to measure their progress towards achieving the following objectives:


(1) Enhance current efforts to collect and disseminate biodiesel information;


(2) Coordinate with other biodiesel educational or promotional programs, and with Federal, State and local programs aimed at encouraging biodiesel use, including the EPAct program;


(3) Create a nationwide networking system that delivers biodiesel information to targeted audiences, including users, distributors and other infrastructure-related personnel;


(4) Identify and document the benefits of biodiesel (e.g., lifecycle costing); and


(5) Gather data pertaining to information gaps and develop strategies to address the gaps.


(b) [Reserved]


Subpart C – Preparation of an Application

§ 2903.8 Program application materials.

OEPNU will publish periodic program announcements to notify potential applicants of the availability of funds for competitive continuation grants. The program announcement will provide information about obtaining program application materials.


§ 2903.9 Content of an application.

(a) Applications should be prepared following the guidelines and the instructions in the program announcement. At a minimum, applications shall include: a proposal cover page, project summary, project description, information about key personnel, documentation of collaborative arrangements, information about potential conflicts-of-interest, budget forms and a budget narrative, information about current and pending support, and assurance statements.


(b) Proper preparation of applications will assist reviewers in evaluating the merits of each application in a systematic, consistent fashion. Specific instructions regarding additional application content requirements and the ordering of application contents will be included in the program announcement. These will include instructions about paper size, margins, font type and size, line spacing, page numbering, the inclusion of illustrations, and electronic submission.


§ 2903.10 Submission of an application.

The program announcement will provide the deadline date for submitting an application, the number of copies of each application that must be submitted, and the address to which proposals must be submitted.


§ 2903.11 Acknowledgment of applications.

The receipt of all applications will be acknowledged. Applicants who do not receive an acknowledgment within 60 days of the submission deadline should contact the program contact indicated on the program announcement. Once the application has been assigned a proposal number, that number should be cited on all future correspondence.


Subpart D – Application Review and Evaluation

§ 2903.12 Application review.

(a) Reviewers will include government and non-government individuals. All reviewers will be selected based upon training and experience in relevant scientific, extension, or education fields, taking into account the following factors:


(1) The level of relevant formal scientific, technical education, or extension experience of the individual, as well as the extent to which an individual is engaged in relevant research, education, or extension activities; and


(2) The need to include as reviewers experts from various areas of specialization within relevant scientific, education, or extension fields.


(b) In addition, when selecting non-government reviewers, the following factors will be considered:


(1) The need to include as reviewers other experts (e.g., producers, range or forest managers/operators, and consumers) who can assess relevance of the applications to targeted audiences and to program needs;


(2) The need to include as reviewers experts from a variety of organizational types (e.g., colleges, universities, industry, state and Federal agencies, private profit and non-profit organizations) and geographic locations;


(3) The need to maintain a balanced composition of reviewers with regard to minority and female representation and an equitable age distribution; and


(4) The need to include reviewers who can judge the effective usefulness to producers and the general public of each application.


(c) Authorized departmental officers will compile application reviews and recommend awards to OEPNU. OEPNU will make final award decisions.


§ 2903.13 Evaluation criteria.

(a) The following evaluation criteria will be used in reviewing applications submitted for the Biodiesel Fuel Education Program:


(1) Relevance of proposed project to current and future issues related to the production, use, distribution, fuel quality, and fuel properties of biodiesel, including:


(i) Demonstrated knowledge about markets, state initiatives, impacts on local economies, regulatory issues, standards, and technical issues;


(ii) Demonstrated knowledge about issues associated with developing a biodiesel infrastructure; and


(iii) Quality and extent of stakeholder involvement in planning and accomplishment of program objectives.


(2) Reasonableness of project proposal, including:


(i) Sufficiency of scope and strategies to provide a consistent message in keeping with existing standards and regulations;


(ii) Adequacy of Project Description, suitability and feasibility of methodology to develop and implement program;


(iii) Clarity of objectives, milestones, and indicators of progress;


(iv) Adequacy of plans for reporting, assessing and monitoring results over project’s duration; and


(v) Demonstration of feasibility, and probability of success.


(3) Technical quality of proposed project, including:


(i) Suitability and qualifications of key project personnel;


(ii) Institutional experience and competence in providing alternative fuel education, including:


(A) Demonstrated knowledge about programs involved in alternative fuel research and education;


(B) Demonstrated knowledge about other fuels, fuel additives, engine performance, fuel quality and fuel emissions;


(C) Demonstrated knowledge about Federal, State and local programs aimed at encouraging alternative fuel use;


(D) Demonstrated ability in providing educational programs and developing technical programs; and


(E) Demonstrated ability to analyze technical information relevant to the biodiesel industry.


(iii) Adequacy of available or obtainable resources; and


(iv) Quality of plans to administer and maintain the project, including collaborative efforts, evaluation and monitoring efforts.


(b) [Reserved]


§ 2903.14 Conflicts of interest and confidentiality.

(a) During the peer evaluation process, extreme care will be taken to prevent any actual or perceived conflicts of interest that may impact review or evaluation. Determinations of conflicts of interest will be based on the academic and administrative autonomy of an institution. The program announcement will specify the methodology for determining such autonomy.


(b) Names of submitting institutions and individuals, as well as application content and peer evaluations, will be kept confidential, except to those involved in the review process, to the extent permitted by law. In addition, the identities of peer reviewers will remain confidential throughout the entire review process. Therefore, the names of the reviewers will not be released to applicants. At the end of the fiscal year, names of reviewers will be made available in such a way that the reviewers cannot be identified with the review of any particular application.


Subpart E – Award Administration

§ 2903.15 General.

Within the limit of funds available for such purpose, the Authorized Departmental Officer (ADO) shall make grants to those responsible, eligible applicants whose applications are judged most meritorious under the procedures set forth in this part. The date specified by the ADO as the effective date of the grant shall be no later than September 30 of the Federal fiscal year in which the project is approved for support and funds are appropriated for such purpose, unless otherwise permitted by law. It should be noted that the project need not be initiated on the grant effective date, but as soon thereafter as practical so that project goals may be attained within the funded project period. All funds granted by OEPNU under this program shall be expended solely for the purpose for which the funds are granted in accordance with the approved application and budget, the regulations of this part, the terms and conditions of the award, the applicable Federal cost principles, and the applicable Department assistance regulations (including part 3019 of this title).


§ 2903.16 Organizational management information.

Specific management information relating to an applicant shall be submitted on a one-time basis as part of the responsibility determination prior to the award of a grant identified under this program, if such information has not been provided previously. Copies of forms recommended for use in fulfilling these requirements will be provided as part of the preaward process.


§ 2903.17 Award document and notice of award.

(a) The award document will provide pertinent instructions and information including, at a minimum, the following:


(1) Legal name and address of performing organization or institution to whom OEPNU has issued an award under this program;


(2) Title of project;


(3) Name(s) and institution(s) of PDs chosen to direct and control approved activities;


(4) Identifying award number assigned by the Department;


(5) Project period;


(6) Total amount of Departmental financial assistance approved by OEPNU during the project period;


(7) Legal authority(ies) under which the award is issued;


(8) Appropriate Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) number;


(9) Approved budget plan for categorizing allocable project funds to accomplish the stated purpose of the award; and


(10) Other information or provisions deemed necessary by OEPNU and the Authorized Departmental Officer to carry out the awarding activities or to accomplish the purpose of a particular award.


(b) [Reserved]


Subpart F – Supplementary Information

§ 2903.18 Access to review information.

Copies of reviews, not including the identity of reviewers, and a summary of the comments will be sent to the applicant PD after the review process has been completed.


§ 2903.19 Use of funds; changes.

(a) Delegation of fiscal responsibility. Unless the terms and conditions of the award state otherwise, the awardee may not in whole or in part delegate or transfer to another person, institution, or organization the responsibility for use or expenditure of award funds.


(b) Changes in project plans. (1) The permissible changes by the awardee, PD(s), or other key project personnel in the approved project shall be limited to changes in methodology, techniques, or other similar aspects of the project to expedite achievement of the project’s approved goals. If the awardee or the PD(s) is uncertain as to whether a change complies with this provision, the question must be referred to the Authorized Departmental Officer (ADO) for a final determination. The ADO is the signatory of the award document, not the program contact.


(2) Changes in approved goals or objectives shall be requested by the awardee and approved in writing by the ADO prior to effecting such changes. In no event shall requests for such changes be approved which are outside the scope of the original approved project.


(3) Changes in approved project leadership or the replacement or reassignment of other key project personnel shall be requested by the awardee and approved in writing by the ADO prior to effecting such changes.


(4) Transfers of actual performance of the substantive programmatic work in whole or in part and provisions for payment of funds, whether or not Federal funds are involved, shall be requested by the awardee and approved in writing by the ADO prior to effecting such transfers, unless prescribed otherwise in the terms and conditions of the award.


(5) Changes in project period. The project period may be extended by OEPNU without additional financial support, for such additional period(s) as the ADO determines may be necessary to complete or fulfill the purposes of an approved project, but in no case shall the total project period exceed five years. Any extension of time shall be conditioned upon prior request by the awardee and approval in writing by the ADO, unless prescribed otherwise in the terms and conditions of award.


(6) Changes in approved budget. Changes in an approved budget must be requested by the awardee and approved in writing by the ADO prior to instituting such changes if the revision will involve transfers or expenditures of amounts requiring prior approval as set forth in the applicable Federal cost principles, Departmental regulations, or award.


§ 2903.20 Reporting requirements.

The award document will give instructions regarding the submission of progress reports, including the frequency and required contents of the reports.


§ 2903.21 Applicable Federal statutes and regulations.

Several Federal statutes and regulations apply to grant applications considered for review and to project grants awarded under this program. These include, but are not limited to:


(a) 7 CFR part 1, subpart A – USDA implementation of the Freedom of Information Act.


(b) 7 CFR part 3 – USDA implementation of OMB Circular No. A-129 regarding debt collection.


(c) 7 CFR part 15, subpart A – USDA implementation of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended.


(d) 2 CFR part 417, Nonprocurement Debarment and Suspension.


(e) 2 CFR part 418, New Restrictions on Lobbying. Imposes prohibitions and requirements for disclosure and certification related to lobbying on recipients of Federal contracts, grants, cooperative agreements, and loans.


(f) 2 CFR part 200, subparts B – General Provisions, C – Pre-Federal Award Requirements and Contents of Federal Awards, and D – Post-Federal Award Requirements, as adopted by USDA through 2 CFR part 400.


(g) 2 CFR part 421, Requirements for Drug-Free Workplace (Financial Assistance).


(h) 2 CFR part 200, subpart F – Audit Requirements, as adopted by USDA through 2 CFR part 400. Title 29 U.S.C. 794 (sec. 504, Rehabilitation Act of 1973) and 7 CFR part 15b (USDA implementation of statute) – prohibiting discrimination based upon physical or mental handicap in federally assisted programs. Title 35 U.S.C. 200 et seq. – Bayh-Dole Act, controlling allocation of rights to inventions made by employees of small business firms and domestic nonprofit organizations, including universities, in federally assisted programs (implementing regulations are contained in 37 CFR part 401).


[85 FR 31939, May 28, 2020]


§ 2903.22 Confidential aspects of applications and awards.

When an application results in an award, it becomes a part of the record of USDA transactions, available to the public upon specific request. Information that the Secretary determines to be of a confidential, privileged, or proprietary nature will be held in confidence to the extent permitted by law. Therefore, any information that the applicant wishes to have considered as confidential, privileged, or proprietary should be clearly marked within the application. The original copy of an application that does not result in an award will be retained by the Agency for a period of one year. Other copies will be destroyed. Such an application will be released only with the consent of the applicant or to the extent required by law. An application may be withdrawn at any time prior to the final action thereon.


§ 2903.23 Definitions.

For the purpose of this program, the following definitions are applicable:


Authorized departmental officer or ADO means the Secretary or any employee of the Department who has the authority to issue or modify grant instruments on behalf of the Secretary.


Authorized organizational representative or AOR means the president or chief executive officer of the applicant organization or the official, designated by the president or chief executive officer of the applicant organization, who has the authority to commit the resources of the organization.


Biodiesel means a monoalkyl ester that meets the requirements of an appropriate American Society for Testing and Materials Standard.


Budget period means the interval of time (usually 12 months) into which the project period is divided for budgetary and reporting purposes.


Department or USDA means the United States Department of Agriculture.


Education activity means an act or process that imparts knowledge or skills through formal or informal training and outreach.


Grant means the award by the Secretary of funds to an eligible recipient for the purpose of conducting the identified project.


Grantee means the organization designated in the award document as the responsible legal entity to which a grant is awarded.


Institution of higher education, as defined in sec. 101 of the Higher Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 1001), means an educational institution in any State that:


(1) Admits as regular students only persons having a certificate of graduation from a school providing secondary education, or the recognized equivalent of such a certificate;


(2) Is legally authorized within such State to provide a program of education beyond secondary education;


(3) Provides an educational program for which the institution awards a bachelor’s degree or provides not less than a two-year program that is acceptable for full credit toward such a degree;


(4) Is a public or other nonprofit institution; and


(5) Is accredited by a nationally recognized accrediting agency or association, or if not so accredited, is an institution that has been granted preaccreditation status by such an agency or association that has been recognized by the Secretary of Education for the granting of preaccreditation status, and the Secretary of Education has determined that there is satisfactory assurance that the institution will meet the accreditation standards of such an agency or association within a reasonable time.


OEPNU means the Office of Energy Policy and New Uses.


Peer review is an evaluation of a proposed project performed by experts with the scientific knowledge and technical skills to conduct the proposed work whereby the technical quality and relevance to the program are assessed.


Prior approval means written approval evidencing prior consent by an authorized departmental officer (as defined in this section).


Program means the Biodiesel Fuel Education Program.


Project means the particular activity within the scope of the program supported by a grant award.


Project director or PD means the single individual designated by the grantee in the grant application and approved by the Secretary who is responsible for the direction and management of the project, also known as a principal investigator for research activities.


Project period means the period, as stated in the award document and modifications thereto, if any, during which Federal sponsorship begins and ends.


Secretary means the Secretary of Agriculture and any other officer or employee of the Department to whom the authority involved may be delegated.


PARTS 2904-2999 [RESERVED]

CHAPTER XXX – OFFICE OF THE CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

PARTS 3000-3010 [RESERVED]

PART 3011 – AVAILABILITY OF INFORMATION TO THE PUBLIC


Authority:5 U.S.C. 301 and 522; 7 CFR 1.3.


Source:54 FR 51869, Dec. 19, 1989, unless otherwise noted.

§ 3011.1 General statement.

This part is issued in accordance with 7 CFR 1.3 of the Department of Agriculture regulations governing the availability of records (7 CFR 1.1-1.23 and Appendix A) under the Freedom of Information Act (5 U.S.C. 552, as amended). These regulations supplement the Department’s regulations by providing guidance for any person wishing to request records from the Office of Finance and Management (OFM).


§ 3011.2 Public inspection and copying.

(a) Background. 5 U.S.C. 552(a)(2) requires each agency to maintain and make available for public inspection and copying certain kinds of records.


(b) Procedure. To gain access to OFM records that are available for public inspection, contact the Freedom of Information Act Officer by writing to the address shown in § 3011.4(b) of this title.


§ 3011.3 Indexes.

5 U.S.C. 552(a)(2) also requires that each agency maintain and make available for public inspection and copying current indexes providing identifying information for the public with regard to any records which are made available for public inspection and copying. OFM does not maintain any materials within the scope of these requirements.


§ 3011.4 Initial requests for records.

(a) Background. The Freedom of Information Act Officer is authorized to:


(1) Grant or deny requests for OFM records,


(2) Make discretionary release of OFM records when the benefit to the public in releasing the document outweighs any harm likely to result from disclosure,


(3) Reduce or waive fees to be charged where determined to be appropriate.


(b) Procedures. This part provides the titles and mailing address of officials who are authorized to release records to the public. The normal working hours of these offices are 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., local time, Monday through Friday, excluding holidays, during which public inspection and copying of certain kinds of records is permitted. Persons wishing to request records from the Office of Finance and Management may do so by submitting each initial written request for OFM records to the appropriate OFM official shown below:


(1) For records held at the Washington, DC Headquarters units, submit initial requests to the Freedom of Information Act Officer, Office of Finance and Management, USDA, 14th and Independence Ave., SW., Room 117-W, Administration Building, Washington, DC 20250-9000.


(2) For records held at the National Finance Center in New Orleans, Louisiana, submit initial requests to the Freedom of Information Act Officer, National Finance Center, OFM, USDA, 13800 Old Gentilly Road, Building 350, (P.O. Box 60,000, New Orleans, LA 70160), New Orleans, Louisiana 70129.


If the requester is unable to determine the official to whom the request should be addressed, it should be submitted to the Headquarters Freedom of Information Act Officer who will refer such requests to the appropriate officials.


§ 3011.5 Appeals.

Any person whose initial request is denied in whole or in part may appeal that denial, in accordance with 7 CFR 1.6(e) and 1.8, to the Director, Office of Finance and Management, USDA, Room 117-W, Administration Building, 14th and Independence Ave., Washington, DC 20250-9000.


§ 3011.6 Fee schedule.

Departmental regulations provide for a schedule of reasonable standard charges for document search and duplication. See 7 CFR 1.2(b). Fees to be charged are set forth in 7 CFR part 1, subpart A, Appendix A.


PARTS 3053-3099 [RESERVED]

CHAPTER XXXI – OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

PART 3100 – CULTURAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY

Subparts A-B [Reserved]

Subpart C – Enhancement, Protection, and Management of the Cultural Environment


Authority:Sec. 106, National Historic Preservation Act, as amended (16 U.S.C. 470f); National Environmental Policy Act, as amended (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.); E.O. 11593, 36 FR 8921, May 13, 1971.


Source:44 FR 66181, Nov. 19, 1979, unless otherwise noted.

§ 3100.40 Purpose.

(a) This subpart establishes USDA policy regarding the enhancement, protection, and management of the cultural environment.


(b) This subpart establishes procedures for implementing Executive Order 11593, and regulations promulgated by the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP) “Protection of Historical and Cultural Properties” in 36 CFR part 800 as required by § 800.10 of those regulations.


(c) Direction is provided to the agencies of USDA for protection of the cultural environment.


§ 3100.41 Authorities.

These regulations are based upon and implement the following laws, regulations, and Presidential directives:


(a) Antiquities Act of 1906 (Pub. L. 59-209; 34 Stat. 225; 16 U.S.C. 431 et seq.) which provides for the protection of historic or prehistoric remains or any object of antiquity on Federal lands; establishes criminal sanctions for unauthorized destruction or appropriation of antiquities; and authorizes scientific investigation of antiquities on Federal lands, subject to permit and regulations. Paleontological resources also are considered to fall within the authority of this Act.


(b) Historic Sites Act of 1935 (Pub. L. 74-292; 49 Stat. 666; 16 U.S.C. 461 et seq.) which authorizes the establishment of National Historic Sites and otherwise authorizes the preservation of properties of national historical or archeological significance; authorizes the designation of National Historic Landmarks; establishes criminal sanctions for violation of regulations pursuant to the Act; authorizes interagency, intergovernmental, and interdisciplinary efforts for the preservation of cultural resources; and other provisions.


(c) Reservoir Salvage Act of 1960 (Pub. L. 86-521; 74 Stat. 220; 16 U.S.C. 469-469c.) which provides for the recovery and preservation of historical and archeological data, including relics and specimens, that might be lost or destroyed as a result of the construction of dams, reservoirs, and attendant facilities and activities.


(d) The National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 as amended (16 U.S.C. 470), which establishes positive national policy for the preservation of the cultural environment, and sets forth a mandate for protection in section 106. The purpose of section 106 is to protect properties on or eligible for the National Register of Historic Places through review and comment by the ACHP of Federal undertakings that affect such properties. Properties are listed on the National Register or declared eligible for listing by the Secretary of the Interior. As developed through the ACHP’s regulations, section 106 establishes a public interest process in which the Federal agency proposing an undertaking, the State Historic Preservation Officer, the ACHP, interested organizations and individuals participate. The process is designed to insure that properties, impacts on them, and effects to them are identified, and that alternatives to avoid or mitigate an adverse effect on property eligible for the National Register are adequately considered in the planning process.


(e) The National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) (Pub. L. 91-190; 83 Stat. 852; 42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.) which declares that it is the policy of the Federal Government to preserve important historic, cultural, and natural aspects of our national heritage. Compliance with NEPA requires consideration of all environmental concerns during project planning and execution.


(f) Executive Order 11593, “Protection and Enhancement of the Cultural Environment”, which gives the Federal Government the responsibility for stewardship of our nation’s heritage resources and charges Federal agencies with the task of inventorying historic and prehistoric sites on their lands. E.O. 11593 also charges agencies with the task of identifying and nominating all historic properties under their jurisdiction, and exercising caution to insure that they are not transferred, sold, demolished, or substantially altered.


(g) Historical and Archeological Data Preservation Act of 1974. (Pub. L. 93-291; 88 Stat. 174.) which amends the Reservoir Salvage Act of 1960 to extend its provisions beyond the construction of dams to any alteration of the terrain caused as a result of any Federal construction project or federally licensed activity or program. In addition, the Act provides a mechanism for funding the protection of historical and archeological data.


(h) Presidential memorandum of July 12, 1978, “Environmental Quality and Water Resource Management” which directs the ACHP to publish final regulations, implementing section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA), and further directs each agency with water and related land resources responsibilities to publish procedures implementing those regulations.


(i) 36 CFR part 800, “Protection of Historic and Cultural Properties” which establishes procedures for the implementation of section 106 of the NHPA, and directs publication of agency implementing procedures.


(j) Land use policy of the USDA (Secretary’s Memorandum No. 1827 Revised, with Supplement) which establishes a commitment by the Department to the preservation of farms, rural communities, and rural landscapes.


(k) Public Buildings Cooperative Use Act of 1976 (40 U.S.C. 611) and Executive Order 12072 (Federal Space Management). The Act encourages adaptive use of historic buildings as administrative facilities for Federal agencies and activities; the Executive Order directs Federal agencies to locate administrative and other facilities in central business districts.


(l) American Indian Religious Freedom Act of 1978 (42 U.S.C. 1996) which declares it to be the policy of the United States to protect and preserve for American Indians their inherent right of freedom to believe, express, and exercise the traditional religions of the American Indian, Eskimo, Aleut, and Native Hawaiians.


§ 3100.42 Definitions.

All definitions are those which appear in 36 CFR part 800. In addition, the following apply in this rule:


Cultural resources (heritage resources) are the remains or records of districts, sites, structures, buildings, networks, neighborhoods, objects, and events from the past. They may be historic, prehistoric, archeological, or architectural in nature. Cultural resources are an irreplaceable and nonrenewable aspect of our national heritage.


Cultural environment is that portion of the environment which includes reminders of the rich historic and prehistoric past of our nation.


§ 3100.43 Policy.

(a) The nonrenewable cultural environment of our country constitutes a valuable and treasured portion of the national heritage of the American people. The Department of Agriculture is committed to the management – identification, protection, preservation, interpretation, evaluation and nomination – of our prehistoric and historic cultural resources for the benefit of all people of this and future generations.


(b) The Department supports the cultural resource goals expressed in Federal legislation. Executive orders, and regulations.


(c) The Department supports the preservation and protection of farms, rural landscapes, and rural communities.


(d) The Department is committed to consideration of the needs of American Indians, Eskimo, Aleut, and Native Hawaiians in the practice of their traditional religions.


(e) The Department will aggressively implement these policies to meet goals for the positive management of the cultural environment.


§ 3100.44 Implementation.

(a) It is the intent of the Department to carry out its program of management of the cultural environment in the most effective and efficient manner possible. Implementation must consider natural resource utilization, must exemplify good government, and must constitute a noninflationary approach which makes the best use of tax dollars.


(b) The commitment to cultural resource protection is vital. That commitment will be balanced with the multiple departmental goals of food and fiber production, environmental protection, natural resource and energy conservation, and rural development. It is essential that all of these be managed to reduce conflicts between programs. Positive management of the cultural environment can contribute to achieving better land use, protection of rural communities and farm lands, conservation of energy, and more efficient use of resources.


(c) In reaching decisions, the long-term needs of society and the irreversible nature of an action must be considered. The Department must act to preserve future options; loss of important cultural resources must be avoided except in the face of overriding national interest where there are no reasonable alternatives.


(d) To assure the protection of Native American religious practices, traditional religious leaders and other native leaders (or their representatives) should be consulted about potential conflict areas in the management of the cultural environment and the means to reduce or eliminate such conflicts.


§ 3100.45 Direction to agencies.

(a) Each agency of the Department shall consult with OEQ to determine whether its programs and activities may affect the cultural environment. Then, if needed, the agency, in consultation with the OEQ, shall develop its own specific procedures for implementing section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act, Executive Order 11593, the regulations of the ACHP (36 CFR part 800), the American Indian Religious Freedom Act of 1978 and other relevant legislation and regulations in accordance with the agency’s programs, mission and authorities. Such implementing procedures shall be published as proposed and final procedures in the Federal Register, and must be consistent with the requirements of 36 CFR part 800 and this subpart. Where applicable, each agency’s procedures must contain mechanisms to insure:


(1) Compliance with section 106 of NHPA and mitigation of adverse effects to cultural properties on or eligible for the National Register of Historic Places;


(2) Clear definition of the kind and variety of sites and properties which should be managed;


(3) Development of a long-term program of management of the cultural environment on lands administered by USDA as well as direction for project-specific protection;


(4) Identification of all properties listed on or eligible for listing in the National Register that may be affected directly or indirectly by a proposed activity;


(5) Location, identification and nomination to the Register of all sites, buildings, objects, districts, neighborhoods, and networks under its management which appear to qualify (in compliance with E.O. 11593);


(6) The exercise of caution to assure that properties managed by USDA which may qualify for nomination are not transferred, sold, demolished, or substantially altered;


(7) Early consultation with, and involvement of, the State Historic Preservation Officer(s), the ACHP, Native American traditional religious leaders and appropriate tribal leaders, and others with appropriate interests or expertise;


(8) Early notification to insure substantive and meaningful involvement by the public in the agency’s decisionmaking process as it relates to the cultural environment;


(9) Identification and consideration of alternatives to a proposed undertaking that would mitigate or minimize adverse effects to a property identified under paragraph (a)(4) of this section;


(10) Funding of mitigation measures where required to minimize the potential for adverse effects on the cultural environment. Funds for mitigation shall be available and shall be spent when needed during the life of the project to mitigate the expected loss; and


(11) Development of plans to provide for the management, protection, maintenance and/or restoration of Register sites under its management.


(b) Each agency of the Department which conducts programs or activities that may have an effect on the cultural environment shall recruit, place, develop, or otherwise have available, professional expertise in anthropology, archeology, history, historic preservation, historic architecture, and/or cultural resource management (depending upon specific need). Such arrangements may include internal hiring, Intergovernmental Personnel Act assignments, memoranda of agreement with other agencies or Departments, or other mechanisms which insure a professionally directed program. Agencies should use Department of the Interior professional standards (36 CFR 61.5) as guidelines to insure Departmentwide competence and consistency.


(c) Compliance with cultural resource legislation is the responsibility of each individual agency. Consideration of cultural resource values must begin during the earliest planning stages of any undertaking.


(d) Agency heads shall insure that cultural resource management activities meet professional standards as promulgated by the Department of the Interior (e.g., 36 CFR parts 60, 63, 66, 1208).


(e) Cultural resource review requirements and compliance with section 106 of NHPA and Executive Order 11593 shall be integrated and run concurrently, rather than consecutively, with the other environmental considerations under NEPA regulations. As such, direct and indirect impacts on cultural resources must be addressed in the environmental assessment for every agency undertaking. In meeting these requirements, agencies shall be guided by regulations implementing the procedural provisions of NEPA (40 CFR parts 1500-1508) and Department of Agriculture regulations (7 CFR part 3100, subpart B).


(f) Each agency shall work closely with the appropriate State Historic Preservation Officer(s) in their preparation of State plans, determination of inventory needs, and collection of data relevant to general plans or specific undertakings in carrying out mutual cultural resource responsibilities.


(g) Each agency shall, to the maximum extent possible, use existing historic structures for administrative purposes in compliance with Public Buildings Cooperative Use Act of 1976 and Executive Order 12072, “Federal Space Management”.


(h) Each agency should consult with Native American traditional religious leaders or their representatives and other native leaders in the development and implementation of cultural resource programs which may affect their religious customs and practices.


§ 3100.46 Responsibilities of the Department of Agriculture.

(a) Within the Department, the responsibility for the protection of the cultural environment is assigned to the Office of Environmental Quality (OEQ). The Office is responsible for reviewing the development and implementation of agency procedures and insuring Departmental commitment to cultural resource goals.


(b) The Director of the OEQ is the Secretary’s Designee to the ACHP.


(c) In order to carry out cultural resource responsibilities, there will be professional expertise within the OEQ to advise agencies, aid the Department in meeting its cultural resource management goals, and to insure that all Departmental and agency undertakings comply with applicable cultural resource protection legislation and regulations.


(d) The OEQ will be involved in individual compliance cases only where resolution cannot be reached at the agency level. Prior to the decision to refer a matter to the full Council of the ACHP, the OEQ will review the case and make recommendations to the Secretary regarding the position of the Department. The agency also will consult with the OEQ before reaching a final decision in response to the Council’s comments. Copies of correspondence relevant to compliance with Section 106 shall be made available to OEQ.


PARTS 3101-3199 [RESERVED]

CHAPTER XXXII – OFFICE OF PROCUREMENT AND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

PART 3200 – DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GUIDELINES FOR THE ACQUISITION AND TRANSFER OF EXCESS PERSONAL PROPERTY


Authority:5 U.S.C. 301; 7 U.S.C. 2206a.


Source:63 FR 57234, Oct. 27, 1998, unless otherwise noted.

§ 3200.1 Purpose.

This Part sets forth the procedures to be utilized by Department of Agriculture (USDA) in the acquisition and transfer of excess property to the 1890 Land Grant Institutions (including Tuskegee University), 1994 Land Grant Institutions, and the Hispanic-Serving Institutions in support of research, educational, technical, and scientific activities or for related programs as authorized by 7 U.S.C. 2206a. Title to the personal property shall pass to the institution.


§ 3200.2 Eligibility.

Institutions that are eligible to receive Federal excess personal property pursuant to the provisions of this part are the 1890 Land Grant Institutions (including Tuskegee University), 1994 Land Grant Institutions, and the Hispanic-Serving Institutions conducting research, educational, technical, and scientific activities or related programs.


§ 3200.3 Definitions.

(a) 1890 Land grant institutions – any college or university eligible to receive funds under the Act of August 30, 1890 (7 U.S.C. 321 et. seq.), including Tuskegee University.


(b) 1994 Land grant institutions – any of the tribal colleges or universities as defined in section 532 of the Equity in Educational Land-Grant Status Act of 1994 (7 U.S.C. 301 note).


(c) Hispanic-serving institutions – institutions of higher education as defined in section 316(b) of the Higher Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 1059c (b)).


(d) Property management officer – is an authorized USDA or institution official responsible for property management.


(e) Screener – is an individual designated by an eligible institution and authorized by the General Services Administration (GSA) to visit property sites for the purpose of inspecting personal property intended for use by the institution.


(f) Excess personal property – is any personal property under the control of a Federal agency that is no longer needed.


(g) Cannibalization – is the dismantling of equipment for parts to repair or enhance other equipment.


§ 3200.4 Procedures.

(a) To receive information concerning the availability of Federal excess personal property, an eligible institution’s property management officer may contact their regional GSA, Area Utilization Officer. For information on USDA excess personal property, visit the USDA Web site at http://www.nfc.usda.gov/propexcs. USDA excess property will first be screened by USDA agencies through the Departmental Excess Personal Property Coordinator (DEPPC) using the Departmental Property Management Information System.


(b) Excess property selected by screeners of eligible institutions should be inspected whenever possible, or the holding agency should be contacted to verify the condition of the items, because interpretation of condition codes varies among Federal agencies.


(c) If the condition of the item is acceptable, the institution should “freeze” (reserve) items by calling the appropriate GSA office or USDA Departmental Excess Personal Property Coordinator (DEPPC). Since GSA may have several “freezes” on a piece of equipment, it is critical that the paperwork be submitted as soon as possible. Further, while transfers of excess personal property normally will be approved by GSA on a first-come-first-serve basis, consideration will be given to such factors as national defense requirements, emergency needs, preclusion of new procurement, energy conservation, equitable distribution, and retention of title in the Government.


(d) Eligible institutions may submit property requests by mail or fax on a Standard Form 122, “Transfer Order Excess Personal Property”.


(e) The SF-122 should be signed by the eligible institution’s property management officer or authorized designee.


(1) The following information should also be provided:


(i) Date prepared.


(ii) GSA/DEPPC address.


(iii) Ordering Agency and address.


(iv) Holding Agency and address.


(v) Name and address of Institution.


(vi) Location of property.


(vii) Shipping instruction (including institution contact person and phone number).


(viii) Complete description of property including original acquisition cost, serial number, condition code, and quantity.


(2) This statement needs to be added following the property description:



“The property requested hereon is certified to be used in support of research, educational, technical, and scientific activities or for related programs. This transfer is requested pursuant to the provisions of Section 923 Pub. L. 104-127 (7 U.S.C. 2206a). Also, in accordance with these provisions USDA authorizes transfer of title of this property to the college/university/institution.”


(f) The SF-122 should be forwarded to USDA for approval and signature by an authorized USDA official. As confirmation of approval, the eligible institution’s property management officer will receive a stamped copy of the SF-122. If the request is disapproved, it will be returned to the property management officer of the eligible institution with an appropriate explanation. All USDA approved SF-122’s will be forwarded to DEPPC or the appropriate GSA office for final approval.


(g) Once the excess personal property is physically received, the institution is required to immediately return a copy of the SF-122 to USDA indicating receipt of requested items. Cancellations should also be reported to USDA.



Note:

USDA shall send an informational copy of all SF-122’s transactions to GSA.


[63 FR 57234, Oct. 27, 1998, as amended at 68 FR 75107, Dec. 30, 2003]


§ 3200.5 Dollar limitation.

There is no dollar limitation on excess personal property obtained under these procedures.


§ 3200.6 Restrictions.

(a) Property in the following Federal Supply Groups are prohibited from transfer.


Ineligible Federal Supply Code Groups

FSC Group
Name
10Weapons.
11Nuclear ordinance.
13Ammunition and explosives.
14Guided missiles.
18Space vehicles.

(b) The property in the FSC’s listed below are discouraged from transfer and not approved on a routine basis. However, Institutions may request items in these FSC groups, but all requests will be referred to the Director, Office of Procurement and Property Management for consideration and approval:


FSC Group
Name
15Aircraft and airframe structural components.
16Aircraft components and accessories.
17Aircraft launching, landing and ground handling equipment.
20Ship and marine equipment.

(c) Excess personal property may be transferred for the purpose of cannibalization, provided the eligible institution submits a supporting statement which clearly indicates that cannibalizing the requested property for secondary use has greater benefit than utilization of the item in its existing form.


(d) Use of the procedures in this part for the purpose of stockpiling of excess personal property for future cannibalization is prohibited. Transfer requests for the purpose of cannibalization will be considered, but are normally subordinate to requests for complete items.


[63 FR 57234, Oct. 27, 1998, as amended at 68 FR 75107, Dec. 30, 2003]


§ 3200.7 Title.

Title to excess personal property obtained under Part 3200 will automatically pass to the 1890 Land Grant Institutions (including Tuskegee University), 1994 Land Grant Institutions, and the Hispanic-Serving Institutions once USDA receives the SF-122 indicating that the institution has received the property. Note: When competing Federal claims are made for particular items of excess personal property held by agencies other than USDA, with or without payment of reimbursement, GSA will give preference to the Federal agency that will retain title in the Government.


§ 3200.8 Costs.

Excess personal property obtained under this part is provided free of charge. However, the institution must pay all costs associated with packaging and transportation. The institution should specify the method of shipment on the SF-122.


§ 3200.9 Accountability and record keeping.

USDA requires that Federal excess personal property received by an eligible institution pursuant to this part shall be placed into use for a research, educational, technical, or scientific activity, or for a related purpose, within 1 year of receipt of the property, and used for such purpose for at least 1 year thereafter. The institution’s property management officer must establish and maintain accountable records identifying the property’s location, description, utilization and value. To ensure that the excess personal property is being used for its intended purpose under this part, compliance reviews will be conducted by an authorized representative of USDA. The review will include site visit inspections of the property and the accountability and record keeping systems.


§ 3200.10 Disposal.

Once the requirements in § 3200.9 are met for retention and use of property by the Institution and title is transferred, Federal excess personal property (FEPP) no longer needed by an Institution will be disposed of in accordance with the Institution’s disposal practices. Regardless of ownership, FEPP must never be disposed of in any manner which is detrimental or dangerous to public health or safety. Also, any costs incurred during the disposal process are the responsibility of the Institution.


[68 FR 75108, Dec. 30, 2003]


§ 3200.11 Liabilities and losses.

USDA assumes no liability with respect to accidents, bodily injury, illness, or any other damages or loss related to excess personal property transferred under this part.


PART 3201 – GUIDELINES FOR DESIGNATING BIOBASED PRODUCTS FOR FEDERAL PROCUREMENT


Source:70 FR 1809, Jan. 11, 2005, unless otherwise noted.


Authority:7 U.S.C. 8102.

Subpart A – General


Source:70 FR 1809, Jan. 11, 2005, unless otherwise noted. Redesignated at 76 FR 53632, Aug. 29, 2011.

§ 3201.1 Purpose and scope.

(a) Purpose. The purpose of the guidelines in this part is to assist procuring agencies in complying with the requirements of section 9002 of the Farm Security and Rural Investment Act of 2002 (FSRIA), Public Law 107-171, 116 Stat. 476 (7 U.S.C. 8102), as amended by the Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008, Public Law 110-246, 122 Stat. 1651, as they apply to the procurement of the products designated in subpart B of this part.


(b) Scope. The guidelines in this part establish a process for designating categories of products that are, or can be, produced with biobased components and materials and whose procurement by procuring agencies and other relevant stakeholders will carry out the objectives of section 9002 of FSRIA. The guidelines also establish a process for designating categories of intermediate ingredients and feedstocks that are, or can be, used to produce final products that will be designated and, thus, subject to Federal preferred procurement. The guidelines also establish a process for calculating the biobased content of complex assembly products, whose biobased content cannot be measured following ASTM Standard Method D6866, and for designating complex assembly product categories.


[76 FR 6321, Feb. 4, 2011, as amended at 79 FR 44654, Aug. 1, 2014]


§ 3201.2 Definitions.

These definitions apply to this part:


Agricultural materials. Agricultural-based, including plant, animal, and marine materials, raw materials or residues used in the manufacture of commercial or industrial, nonfood/nonfeed products.


ASTM International. ASTM International, a nonprofit organization organized in 1898, is one of the largest voluntary standards development organizations in the world with about 30,000 members in over 100 different countries. ASTM provides a forum for the development and publication of voluntary consensus standards for materials, products, systems, and services.


BEES. An acronym for “Building for Environmental and Economic Sustainability,” an analytic tool used to determine the environmental and health benefits and life cycle costs of products and materials, developed by the U.S. Department of Commerce National Institute of Standards and Technology.


Biobased components. Any intermediary biobased materials or parts that, in combination with other components, are functional parts of the biobased product.


Biobased content. Biobased content shall be determined based on the amount of biobased carbon in the material or product as a percent of weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the material or product.


Biobased product. (1) A product determined by USDA to be a commercial or industrial product (other than food or feed) that is:


(i) Composed, in whole or in significant part, of biological products, including renewable domestic agricultural materials and forestry materials; or


(ii) An intermediate ingredient or feedstock.


(2) The term “biobased product” includes, with respect to forestry materials, forest products that meet biobased content requirements, notwithstanding the market share the product holds, the age of the product, or whether the market for the product is new or emerging.


Biodegradability. A quantitative measure of the extent to which a material is capable of being decomposed by biological agents, especially bacteria.


Biological products. Products derived from living materials other than agricultural or forestry materials.


Complex assembly. A system of distinct materials and components assembled to create a finished product with specific functional intent where some or all of the system inputs contain some amount of biobased material or feedstock.


Designated intermediate ingredient or feedstock category. A generic grouping of biobased intermediate ingredients or feedstocks identified in subpart B of this part that, when comprising more than 50 percent (or another amount as specified in subpart B of this part) of a resultant final product, qualifies the resultant final product for the procurement preference established under section 9002 of FSRIA.


Designated product category. A generic grouping of biobased products, including those final products made from designated intermediate ingredients or feedstocks, or complex assemblies identified in subpart B of this part, that is eligible for the procurement preference established under section 9002 of FSRIA.


Diluent. A substance used to diminish the strength, scent, or other basic property of a substance.


Engineered wood products. Products produced with a combination of wood, food fibers and adhesives.


EPA-designated recovered content product. A product, designated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, that is subject to Federal procurement as specified in section 6002 of the Solid Waste Disposal Act (42 U.S.C. 6962), whereby Federal agencies must give preferred procurement to those products composed of the highest percentage of recovered materials practicable, subject to availability, cost, and performance.


FCEA. The Food, Conservation and Energy Act of 2008, Pub. L. 110-246.


Federal agency. Any executive agency or independent establishment in the legislative or judicial branch of the Government (except the Senate, the House of Representatives, the Architect of the Capitol, and any activities under the Architect’s direction).


Filler. A substance added to a product to increase the bulk, weight, viscosity, strength, or other property.


Forest product. A product made from materials derived from the practice of forestry or the management of growing timber. The term “forest product” includes:


(1) Pulp, paper, paperboard, pellets, lumber, and other wood products; and


(2) Any recycled products derived from forest materials.


Forest thinnings. Refers to woody materials removed from a dense forest, primarily to improve growth, enhance forest health, or recover potential mortality. (To recover potential mortality means to remove trees that are going to die in the near future.)


Formulated product. A product that is prepared or mixed with other ingredients, according to a specified formula and includes more than one ingredient.


FSRIA. The Farm Security and Rural Investment Act of 2002, Public Law 107-171, 116 Stat. 134 (7 U.S.C. 8102).


Functional unit. A measure of product technical performance that provides a common reference to which all environmental and economic impacts of the product are scaled. This reference is necessary to ensure comparability of performance results across competing products. Comparability of results is critical when competing product alternatives are being assessed to ensure that such comparisons are made on a common basis. For example, the functional unit for competing interior paint products may be defined as “protecting one square foot of interior wall surface for 50 years.”


Ingredient. A component; part of a compound or mixture; may be active or inactive.


Intermediate ingredient or feedstock. A material or compound made in whole or in significant part from biological products, including renewable agricultural materials (including plant, animal, and marine materials) or forestry materials that have undergone value added processing (including thermal, chemical, biological, or a significant amount of mechanical processing), excluding harvesting operations, offered for sale by a manufacturer or vendor and that is subsequently used to make a more complex compound or product.


ISO. The International Organization for Standardization, a network of national standards institutes from 145 countries working in partnership with international organizations, governments, industries, business, and consumer representatives.


Neat product. A product that is made of only one ingredient and is not diluted or mixed with other substances.


Procuring agency. Any Federal agency that is using Federal funds for procurement or any person contracting with any Federal agency with respect to work performed under the contract.


Qualified biobased product. A product that is eligible for Federal preferred procurement because it meets the definition and minimum biobased content criteria for one or more designated product categories, or one or more designated intermediate ingredient or feedstock categories, as specified in subpart B of this part.


Relative price. The price of a product as compared to the price of other products on the market that have similar performance characteristics.


Relevant stakeholder. Individuals or officers of state or local government organizations, private non-profit institutions or organizations, and private businesses or consumers.


Renewable chemical. A monomer, polymer, plastic, formulated product, or chemical substance produced from renewable biomass.


Residues. That which remains after a part is taken, separated, removed, or designated; a remnant; a remainder; and, for this purpose, is from agricultural materials, biological products, or forestry materials.


Secretary. The Secretary of the United States Department of Agriculture.


Small and emerging private business enterprise. Any private business which will employ 50 or fewer new employees and has less than $1 million in projected annual gross revenues.


Sustainably managed forests. Refers to the practice of a land stewardship ethic that integrates the reforestation, management, growing, nurturing, and harvesting of trees for useful products while conserving soil and improving air and water quality, wildlife, fish habitat, and aesthetics.


[70 FR 1809, Jan. 11, 2005, as amended at 71 FR 13704, Mar. 16, 2006; 71 FR 42575, July 27, 2006; 76 FR 6321, Feb. 4, 2011; 79 FR 44654, Aug. 1, 2014; 80 FR 34029, June 15, 2015]


§ 3201.3 Applicability to Federal procurements.

(a) Applicability to procurement actions. The guidelines in this part apply to all procurement actions by procuring agencies involving items designated by USDA in this part, where the procuring agency purchases $10,000 or more worth of one of these items during the course of a fiscal year, or where the quantity of such items or of functionally equivalent items purchased during the preceding fiscal year was $10,000 or more. The $10,000 threshold applies to Federal agencies as a whole rather than to agency subgroups such as regional offices or subagencies of a larger Federal department or agency.


(b) Exception for procurements subject to EPA regulations under the Solid Waste Disposal Act. For any procurement by any procuring agency that is subject to regulations of the Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency under section 6002 of the Solid Waste Disposal Act as amended by the Resource Conservation Act of 1976 (40 CFR part 247), these guidelines do not apply to the extent that the requirements of this part are inconsistent with such regulations.


(c) Procuring products composed of the highest percentage of biobased content. Section 9002(a)(2) of FSRIA requires procuring agencies to procure qualified biobased products composed of the highest percentage of biobased content practicable or such products that comply with the regulations issued under section 103 of Public Law 100-556 (42 U.S.C. 6914b-1). Procuring agencies may decide not to procure such qualified biobased products if they are not reasonably priced or readily available or do not meet specified or reasonable performance standards.


(d) This guideline does not apply to purchases of qualified biobased products that are unrelated to or incidental to Federal funding; i.e., not the direct result of a contract or agreement with persons supplying items to a procuring agency or providing support services that include the supply or use of products.


(e) Exemptions. The following applications are exempt from the preferred procurement requirements of this part:


(1) Military equipment: Products or systems designed or procured for combat or combat-related missions.


(2) Spacecraft systems and launch support equipment.


[71 FR 42575, July 27, 2006, as amended at 73 FR 27953, May 14, 2008; 76 FR 6321, Feb. 4, 2011; 79 FR 44655, Aug. 1, 2014]


§ 3201.4 Procurement programs.

(a) Integration into the Federal procurement framework. The Office of Federal Procurement Policy, in cooperation with USDA, has the responsibility to coordinate this policy’s implementation in the Federal procurement regulations. These guidelines are not intended to address full implementation of these requirements into the Federal procurement framework. This will be accomplished through revisions to the Federal Acquisition Regulation.


(b) Federal agency preferred procurement programs. (1) On or before July 31, 2015, each Federal agency shall develop a procurement program which will assure that qualified biobased products are purchased to the maximum extent practicable and which is consistent with applicable provisions of Federal procurement laws. Each procurement program shall contain:


(i) A preference program for purchasing qualified biobased products;


(ii) A promotion program to promote the preference program;


(iii) Provisions for the annual review and monitoring of the effectiveness of the procurement program; and


(iv) Provisions for reporting quantities and types of biobased products purchased by the Federal agency.


(2) In developing the preference program, Federal agencies shall adopt one of the following options, or a substantially equivalent alternative, as part of the procurement program:


(i) A policy of awarding contracts on a case-by-case basis to the vendor offering a qualified biobased product composed of the highest percentage of biobased content practicable except when such products:


(A) Are not available within a reasonable time;


(B) Fail to meet performance standards set forth in the applicable specifications, or the reasonable performance standards of the Federal agency; or


(C) Are available only at an unreasonable price.


(ii) A policy of setting minimum biobased content specifications in such a way as to assure that the required biobased content of qualified biobased products is consistent with section 9002 of FSRIA and the requirements of the guidelines in this part except when such products:


(A) Are not available within a reasonable time;


(B) Fail to meet performance standards for the use to which they will be put, or the reasonable performance standards of the Federal agency; or


(C) Are available only at an unreasonable price.


(3) In implementing the preference program, Federal agencies shall treat as eligible for the preference biobased products from “designated countries,” as that term is defined in section 25.003 of the Federal Acquisition Regulation, provided that those products otherwise meet all requirements for participation in the preference program.


(4) No later than June 15, 2016, each Federal agency shall establish a targeted biobased-only procurement requirement under which the procuring agency shall issue a certain number of biobased-only contracts when the procuring agency is purchasing products, or purchasing services that include the use of products, that are included in a biobased product category designated by the Secretary.


(c) Procurement specifications. After the publication date of each designated product category and each designated intermediate ingredient or feedstock category, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for products procured by Federal agencies shall ensure within a specified time frame that their specifications require the use of qualified biobased products, consistent with the guidelines in this part. USDA will specify the allowable time frame in each designation rule. The biobased content of qualified biobased products within a designated product category or a designated intermediate ingredient or feedstock category may vary considerably from product to product based on the mix of ingredients used in its manufacture. Likewise, the biobased content of qualified biobased products that qualify because they are made from materials within designated intermediate ingredient or feedstock categories may also vary significantly. In procuring qualified biobased products, the percentage of biobased content should be maximized, consistent with achieving the desired performance for the product.


[70 FR 1809, Jan. 11, 2005, as amended at 71 FR 42575, July 27, 2006; 76 FR 6322, Feb. 4, 2011; 79 FR 44655, Aug. 1, 2014; 80 FR 34029, June 15, 2015]


§ 3201.5 Category designation.

(a) Procedure. Designated product categories, designated intermediate ingredient or feedstock categories, and designated final product categories composed of qualifying intermediate ingredients or feedstocks are listed in subpart B of this part.


(1) In designating product categories, USDA will designate categories composed of generic groupings of specific products or complex assemblies and will identify the minimum biobased content for each listed category or subcategory. As product categories are designated for procurement preference, they will be added to subpart B of this part.


(2) In designating intermediate ingredient or feedstock categories, USDA will designate categories composed of generic groupings of specific intermediate ingredients or feedstocks, and will identify the minimum biobased content for each listed category or sub-category. As categories are designated for product qualification, they will be added to subpart B of this part. USDA encourages manufacturers and vendors of intermediate ingredients or feedstocks to provide USDA with information relevant to significant potential applications for intermediate ingredients or feedstocks, including estimates of typical formulation rates.


(3) During the process of designating intermediate ingredient or feedstock categories, USDA will also gather information on the various types of final products that are, or can be, made from those intermediate ingredients or feedstocks. Final products that fall within existing designated product categories will be subject to the minimum biobased content requirements for those product categories, as specified in subpart B of this part. New product categories that are identified during the information gathering process will be listed in the Federal Register proposed rule for designating the intermediate ingredient or feedstock categories. A minimum biobased content for each of the final product categories will also be identified based on the amount of designated intermediate ingredients or feedstocks such products contain. Public comment will be invited on the list of potential final product categories, and the minimum biobased content for each, as well as on the intermediate ingredient and feedstock categories being proposed for designation. Public comments on the list of potential final product categories will be considered, along with any additional information gathered by USDA, and the list will be finalized. When the final rule designating the intermediate ingredient or feedstock categories, by adding them to subpart B of this part, is published in the Federal Register, the list of final product categories will also be added to subpart B of this part. Once these final product categories are listed in subpart B of this part, they will become eligible for the Federal procurement preference.


(b) Considerations. (1) In designating product categories and intermediate ingredient or feedstock categories, USDA will consider the availability of qualified biobased products and the economic and technological feasibility of using such products, including price. USDA will gather information on individual qualified biobased products within a category and extrapolate that information to the category level for consideration in designating categories.


(2) In designating product categories and intermediate ingredient or feedstock categories for the BioPreferred Program, USDA will consider as eligible only those products that use innovative approaches in the growing, harvesting, sourcing, procuring, processing, manufacturing, or application of the biobased product. USDA will consider products that meet one or more of the criteria in paragraphs (b)(2)(i) through (iv) of this section to be eligible for the BioPreferred Program. USDA will also consider other documentation of innovative approaches in the growing, harvesting, sourcing, procuring, processing, manufacturing, or application of biobased products on a case-by-case basis. USDA may exclude from the BioPreferred Program any products whose manufacturers are unable to provide USDA with the documentation necessary to verify claims that innovative approaches are used in the growing, harvesting, sourcing, procuring, processing, manufacturing, or application of their biobased products.


(i) Product applications. (A) The biobased product or material is used or applied in applications that differ from historical applications; or


(B) The biobased product or material is grown, harvested, manufactured, processed, sourced, or applied in other innovative ways; or


(C) The biobased content of the product or material makes its composition different from products or material used for the same historical uses or applications.


(ii) Manufacturing and processing. (A) The biobased product or material is manufactured or processed using renewable, biomass energy or using technology that is demonstrated to increase energy efficiency or reduce reliance on fossil-fuel based energy sources; or


(B) The biobased product or material is manufactured or processed with technologies that ensure high feedstock material recovery and use.


(iii) Environmental Product Declaration. The product has a current Environmental Product Declaration as defined by International Standard ISO 14025, Environmental Labels and Declarations – Type III Environmental Declarations – Principles and Procedures.


(iv) Raw material sourcing. (A) The raw material used in the product is sourced from a Legal Source, a Responsible Source, or a Certified Source as designated by ASTM D7612-10, Standard Practice for Categorizing Wood and Wood-Based Products According to Their Fiber Sources; or


(B) The raw material used in the product is 100% resourced or recycled (such as material obtained from building deconstruction); or


(C) The raw material used in the product is from an urban environment and is acquired as a result of activities related to a natural disaster, land clearing, right-of-way maintenance, tree health improvement, or public safety.


(c) Exclusions. Motor vehicle fuels, heating oil, and electricity are excluded by statute from this program.


[79 FR 44655, Aug. 1, 2014, as amended at 80 FR 34029, June 15, 2015]


§ 3201.6 Providing product information to Federal agencies.

(a) Informational Web site. An informational USDA Web site implementing section 9002 of FSRIA can be found at: http://www.biopreferred.gov. USDA will maintain a voluntary Web-based information site for manufacturers and vendors of qualified biobased products and Federal agencies to exchange information, as described in paragraphs (a)(1) and (2) of this section.


(1) Product information. The Web site will, as determined to be necessary by the Secretary based on the availability of data, provide information as to the availability, price, biobased content, performance and environmental and public health benefits of the designated product categories and designated intermediate ingredient or feedstock categories. USDA encourages manufacturers and vendors to provide product and business contact information for designated categories. Instructions for posting information are found on the Web site itself. USDA also encourages Federal agencies to utilize this Web site to obtain current information on designated categories, contact information on manufacturers and vendors, and access to information on product characteristics relevant to procurement decisions. In addition to any information provided on the Web site, manufacturers and vendors are expected to provide relevant information to Federal agencies, subject to the limitations specified in § 3201.8(a), with respect to product characteristics, including verification of such characteristics if requested.


(2) National Testing Center Registry. The Web site will include an electronic listing of recognized industry standard testing organizations that will serve biobased product manufacturers such as ASTM International, Society of Automotive Engineers, and the American Petroleum Institute. USDA encourages stakeholders to submit information on other possible testing resources to the BioPreferred program for inclusion.


(b) Advertising, labeling and marketing claims. Manufacturers and vendors are reminded that their advertising, labeling, and other marketing claims, including claims regarding health and environmental benefits of the product, must conform to the Federal Trade Commission “Guides for the Use of Environmental Marketing Claims,” 16 CFR part 260 (see: http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/cfr/waisidx_08/16cfr260_08.html). For further requirements, click on the link to the “Guidelines for Marketing the BioPreferred Program.”


[70 FR 1809, Jan. 11, 2005, as amended at 76 FR 6322, Feb. 4, 2011; 79 FR 44656, Aug. 1, 2014; 80 FR 34030, June 15, 2015]


§ 3201.7 Determining biobased content.

(a) Certification requirements. For any qualified biobased product offered for preferred procurement, manufacturers and vendors must certify that the product meets the biobased content requirements for the designated product category or designated intermediate ingredient or feedstock category within which the qualified biobased product falls. Paragraph (c) of this section addresses how to determine biobased content. Upon request, manufacturers and vendors must provide USDA and Federal agencies information to verify biobased content for products certified to qualify for preferred procurement.


(b) Minimum biobased content. Unless specified otherwise in the designation of a particular product category or intermediate ingredient or feedstock category, the minimum biobased content requirements in a specific category designation refer to the organic carbon portion of the product, and not the entire product.


(c) Determining biobased content. Verification of biobased content must be based on third party ASTM/ISO compliant test facility testing using the ASTM Standard Method D6866, “Standard Test Methods for Determining the Biobased Content of Solid, Liquid, and Gaseous Samples Using Radiocarbon Analysis.” ASTM Standard Method D6866 determines biobased content based on the amount of biobased carbon in the material or product as percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the material or product.


(1) Biobased products, intermediate ingredients or feedstocks. Biobased content will be based on the amount of biobased carbon in the product or material as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the product or material.


(2) Final products composed of designated intermediate ingredient or feedstock materials. The biobased content of final products composed of designated intermediate ingredient or feedstock materials will be determined by calculating the percentage by weight (mass) that the biobased component of each designated intermediate ingredient or feedstock material represents of the total organic carbon content of the final product and summing the results (if more than one designated intermediate ingredient or feedstock is used). If the final product also contains biobased content from intermediate ingredient or feedstock material that is not designated, the percentage by weight that these biobased ingredients represent of the total organic carbon content should be included in the calculation.


(3) Complex assemblies. The biobased content of a complex assembly product, where the product has “n” components whose biobased and organic carbon content can be experimentally determined, will be calculated using the following equation:




Where:

Mi = mass of the nth component

BCCi = biobased carbon content of the nth component (%)

OCCi = organic carbon content of the nth component (%)

(d) Products and intermediate ingredients or feedstocks with the same formulation. In the case of products and intermediate ingredients or feedstocks that are essentially the same formulation, but marketed under more than one brand name, biobased content test data need not be brand-name specific.


[79 FR 44656, Aug. 1, 2014]


§ 3201.8 Determining price, environmental and health benefits, and performance.

(a) Providing information on price and environmental and health benefits. Federal agencies may not require manufacturers or vendors of qualified biobased products to provide to procuring agencies more data than would be required of other manufacturers or vendors offering products for sale to a procuring agency (aside from data confirming the biobased contents of the products) as a condition of the purchase of biobased products from the manufacturer or vendor. USDA will work with manufacturers and vendors to collect information needed to estimate the price of biobased products, complex assemblies, intermediate materials or feedstocks as part of the designation process, including application units, average unit cost, and application frequency. USDA encourages industry stakeholders to provide information on environmental and public health benefits based on industry accepted analytical approaches including, but not limited to: Material carbon footprint analysis, the ASTM D7075 standard for evaluating and reporting on environmental performance of biobased products, the International Standards Organization ISO 14040, the ASTM International life-cycle cost method (E917) and multi-attribute decision analysis (E1765), the British Standards Institution PAS 2050, and the National Institute of Standards and Technology BEES analytical tool. USDA will make such stakeholder-supplied information available on the BioPreferred Web site.


(b) Performance test information. In assessing performance of qualified biobased products, USDA requires that procuring agencies rely on results of performance tests using applicable ASTM, ISO, Federal or military specifications, or other similarly authoritative industry test standards. Such testing must be conducted by a laboratory compliant with the requirements of the standards body. The procuring official will decide whether performance data must be brand-name specific in the case of products that are essentially of the same formulation.


(c) Biodegradability information. If biodegradability is claimed by the manufacturer of a qualifying biobased product as a characteristic of that product, USDA requires that, if requested by procuring agencies, these claims be verified using the appropriate, product-specific ASTM biodegradability standard(s). Such testing must be conducted by an ASTM/ISO-compliant laboratory. The procuring official will decide whether biodegradability data must be brand-name specific in the case of products that are essentially of the same formulation. ASTM biodegradability standards include:


(1) D5338 “Standard Test Method for Determining Aerobic Biodegradation of Plastic Materials Under Controlled Composting Conditions”;


(2) D5864 “Standard Test Method for Determining the Aerobic Aquatic Biodegradation of Lubricants or Their Components”;


(3) D6006 “Standard Guide for Assessing Biodegradability of Hydraulic Fluids”;


(4) D6400 “Standard Specification for Compostable Plastics” and the standards cited therein;


(5) D6139 “Standard Test Method for Determining the Aerobic Aquatic Biodegradation of Lubricants or Their Components Using the Gledhill Shake Flask”;


(6) D6868 “Standard Specification for Biodegradable Plastics Used as Coatings on Paper and Other Compostable Substrates”; and


(7) D7081 “Standard Specification for Non-Floating Biodegradable Plastics in the Marine Environment.”


[70 FR 1809, Jan. 11, 2005, as amended at 71 FR 13704, Mar. 16, 2006; 71 FR 42575, July 27, 2006; 76 FR 6322, Feb. 4, 2011; 79 FR 44657, Aug. 1, 2014]


§ 3201.9 [Reserved]

Subpart B – Designated Product Categories and Intermediate Ingredients or Feedstocks


Source:71 FR 13705, Mar. 16, 2006, unless otherwise noted. Redesignated at 76 FR 53632, Aug. 29, 2011.

§ 3201.10 Mobile equipment hydraulic fluids.

(a) Definition. Hydraulic fluids formulated for general use in non-stationary equipment, such as tractors, end loaders, or backhoes.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The minimum biobased content is 44 percent and shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference effective date. No later than March 16, 2007, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased mobile equipment hydraulic fluids. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for items to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased mobile equipment hydraulic fluids.


(d) Determining overlap with an EPA-designated recovered content product. Qualifying biobased products that fall under this item may, in some cases, overlap with the following EPA-designated recovered content product: Re-refined Lubricating Oils. USDA is requesting that manufacturers of these qualifying biobased products provide information for the BioPreferred Web site of qualifying biobased products about the intended uses of the product, information on whether or not the product contains petroleum-based ingredients, re-refined oil, and/or any other recovered material, in addition to biobased ingredients, and performance standards against which the product has been tested. This information will assist Federal agencies in determining whether or not a qualifying biobased product overlaps with EPA-designated lubricating oils containing re-refined oil and which product should be afforded the preference in purchasing.



Note to paragraph (d):

Mobile equipment hydraulic fluid products within this designated item can compete with similar lubricating oils containing re-refined oil. Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976, section 6002, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency designated lubricating oils containing re-refined oil as items for which Federal agencies must give preference in their purchasing programs. The designation can be found in the Comprehensive Procurement Guideline, 40 CFR 247.11.


[71 FR 13705, Mar. 16, 2006, as amended at 73 FR 27953, May 14, 2008]


§ 3201.11 Roof coatings.

(a) Definition. Coatings formulated for use in commercial roof deck systems to provide a single-coat monolith coating system.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The minimum biobased content is 20 percent and shall be based on the entire product.


(c) Preference effective date. No later than March 16, 2007, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased roof coatings. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for items to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased roof coatings.


(d) Determining overlap with an EPA-designated recovered content product. Qualifying biobased products that fall under this item may, in some cases, overlap with the following EPA-designated recovered content product: Roofing Materials. USDA is requesting that manufacturers of these qualifying biobased products provide information for the BioPreferred Web site of qualifying biobased products about the intended uses of the product, information on whether or not the product contains any type of recovered material, in addition to biobased ingredients, and performance standards against which the product has been tested. This information will assist Federal agencies in determining whether or not a qualifying biobased product overlaps with recovered content roofing materials and which product should be afforded the preference in purchasing.



Note to paragraph (d):

Roof coating products within this designated item can compete with similar roofing material products. Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976, section 6002, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency designated roofing material containing recycled material as items for which Federal agencies must give preference in their purchasing programs. The designation can be found in the Comprehensive Procurement Guideline, 40 CFR 247.12.


[71 FR 13705, Mar. 16, 2006, as amended at 73 FR 27953, May 14, 2008]


§ 3201.12 Water tank coatings.

(a) Definition. Coatings formulated for use in potable water storage systems.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The minimum biobased content is 59 percent and shall be based on the entire product.


(c) Preference effective date. No later than November 20, 2007, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased water tank coatings. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for items to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased water tank coatings.


[71 FR 13705, Mar. 16, 2006, as amended at 71 FR 67032, Nov. 20, 2006]


§ 3201.13 Diesel fuel additives.

(a) Definition. (1) Any substance, other than one composed solely of carbon and/or hydrogen, that is intentionally added to diesel fuel (including any added to a motor vehicle’s fuel system) and that is not intentionally removed prior to sale or use.


(2) Neat biodiesel, also referred to as B100, when used as an additive. Diesel fuel additive does not mean neat biodiesel when used as a fuel or blended biodiesel fuel (e.g., B20).


(b) Minimum biobased content. The minimum biobased content is 90 percent and shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference effective date. No later than March 16, 2007, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased diesel fuel additives. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for items to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased diesel fuel additives.


[71 FR 13705, Mar. 16, 2006, as amended at 73 FR 27953, May 14, 2008]


§ 3201.14 Penetrating lubricants.

(a) Definition. Products formulated to provide light lubrication and corrosion resistance in close tolerant internal and external applications including frozen nuts and bolts, power tools, gears, valves, chains, and cables.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The minimum biobased content is 68 percent and shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference effective date. No later than March 16, 2007, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased penetrating lubricants. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for items to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased penetrating lubricants.


(d) Determining overlap with an EPA-designated recovered content product. Qualifying biobased products that fall under this item may, in some cases, overlap with the following EPA-designated recovered content product: Re-refined Lubricating Oils. USDA is requesting that manufacturers of these qualifying biobased products provide information for the BioPreferred Web site of qualifying biobased products about the intended uses of the product, information on whether or not the product contains petroleum-based ingredients, re-refined oil, and/or any other recovered material, in addition to biobased ingredients, and performance standards against which the product has been tested. This information will assist Federal agencies in determining whether or not a qualifying biobased product overlaps with EPA-designated lubricating oils containing re-refined oil and which product should be afforded the preference in purchasing.



Note to paragraph (d):

Penetrating lubricant products within this designated item can compete with similar re-refined lubricating oil products. Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976, section 6002, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency designated re-refined lubricating oils containing recycled material as items for which Federal agencies must give preference in their purchasing programs. The designation can be found in the Comprehensive Procurement Guideline, 40 CFR 247.11.


[71 FR 13705, Mar. 16, 2006, as amended at 73 FR 27953, May 14, 2008]


§ 3201.15 Bedding, bed linens, and towels.

(a) Definition. (1) Bedding is that group of woven cloth products used as coverings on a bed. Bedding includes products such as blankets, bedspreads, comforters, and quilts.


(2) Bed linens are woven cloth sheets and pillowcases used in bedding.


(3) Towels are woven cloth products used primarily for drying and wiping.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The minimum biobased content is 12 percent and shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the finished product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product. The 12 percent biobased content must be of a qualifying biobased feedstock. Cotton, wool, linen, and silk are not qualifying biobased feedstocks for the purpose of determining the biobased content of bedding, bed linens, and towels.


(c) Preference effective date. No later than November 20, 2007, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased bedding, bed linens, and towels. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for items to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased bedding, bed linens, and towels.


[71 FR 13705, Mar. 16, 2006, as amended at 71 FR 67032, Nov. 20, 2006]


§ 3201.16 Adhesive and mastic removers.

(a) Definition. Solvent products formulated for use in removing asbestos, carpet, and tile mastics as well as adhesive materials, including glue, tape, and gum, from various surface types.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The preferred procurement product must have a biobased content of at least 58 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than May 14, 2009, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased adhesive and mastic removers. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for items to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased adhesive and mastic removers.


[73 FR 27953, May 14, 2008]


§ 3201.17 Plastic insulating foam for residential and commercial construction.

(a) Definition. Spray-in-place plastic foam products designed to provide a sealed thermal barrier for residential or commercial construction applications.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The preferred procurement product must have a biobased content of at least 7 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than May 14, 2009, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased plastic insulating foam for residential and commercial construction. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for items to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased plastic insulating foam for residential and commercial construction.


(d) Determining overlap with an EPA-designated recovered content product. Qualifying biobased products that fall under this item may, in some cases, overlap with the EPA-designated recovered content product: Building Insulation. USDA is requesting that manufacturers of these qualifying biobased products provide information on the BioPreferred Web site of qualifying biobased products about the intended uses of the product, information on whether or not the product contains any recovered material, in addition to biobased ingredients, and performance standards against which the product has been tested. This information will assist Federal agencies in determining whether or not a qualifying biobased product overlaps with EPA-designated building insulation and which product should be afforded the preference in purchasing.



Note to paragraph (d):

Biobased insulating products within this designated item can compete with similar insulating products with recycled content. Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976, section 6002, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency designated building insulation containing recovered materials as items for which Federal agencies must give preference in their purchasing programs. The designation can be found in the Comprehensive Procurement Guideline, 40 CFR 247.12. EPA provides recovered materials content recommendations for building insulation products in the Recovered Materials Advisory Notice (RMAN) published for these products. The RMAN recommendations can be found by accessing EPA’s Web site http://www.epa.gov/epaoswer/non-hw/procure/products.htm and then clicking on the appropriate product name.


[73 FR 27953, May 14, 2008]


§ 3201.18 Hand cleaners and sanitizers.

(a) Definitions – (1) Hand cleaners. Products formulated for personal care use in removing a variety of different soils, greases, and similar substances from human hands with or without the use of water.


(2) Hand sanitizers. Products formulated for personal care use in removing bacteria from human hands with or without the use of water. Personal care products that are formulated for use in removing a variety of different soils, greases and similar substances and bacteria from human hands with or without the use of water are classified as hand sanitizers for the purposes of this rule.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The minimum biobased content requirement for all hand cleaners and/or sanitizers shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product. The applicable minimum biobased contents are:


(1) Hand cleaners – 64 percent.


(2) Hand sanitizers (including hand cleaners and sanitizers) – 73 percent.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than May 14, 2009, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased hand cleaners and sanitizers. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for items to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased hand cleaners and sanitizers.


[73 FR 27953, May 14, 2008]


§ 3201.19 Composite panels.

(a) Definitions – (1) Plastic lumber composite panels. Engineered products suitable for non-structural outdoor needs such as exterior signs, trash can holders, and dimensional letters.


(2) Acoustical composite panels. Engineered products designed for use as structural and sound deadening material suitable for office partitions and doors.


(3) Interior panels. Engineered products designed specifically for interior applications and providing a surface that is impact-, scratch-, and wear-resistant and that does not absorb or retain moisture.


(4) Structural interior panels. Engineered products designed for use in structural construction applications, including cabinetry, casework, paneling, and decorative panels.


(5) Structural wall panels. Engineered products designed for use in structural walls, curtain walls, floors and flat roofs in commercial buildings.


(6) Countertops. Engineered products designed to serve as horizontal work surfaces in locations such as kitchens, break rooms or other food preparation areas, bathrooms or lavatories, and workrooms.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The minimum biobased content requirement for all composite panels shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product. The applicable minimum biobased contents are:


(1) Plastic lumber composite panels – 23 percent.


(2) Acoustical composite panels – 37 percent.


(3) Interior panels – 55 percent.


(4) Structural interior panels – 89 percent.


(5) Structural wall panels – 94 percent.


(6) Countertops – 89 percent.


(c) Preference compliance dates. (1) No later than May 14, 2009, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for those qualifying biobased composite panels specified in paragraphs (a)(1) through (a)(5) of this section. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for items to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased composite panels.


(2) No later than June 11, 2014, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for those qualifying biobased composite panels specified in paragraph (a)(6) of this section. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for items to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased composite panels.


(d) Determining overlap with an EPA-designated recovered content product. Qualifying biobased products that fall under this item may, in some cases, overlap with the following EPA-designated recovered content products: Laminated Paperboard and Structural Fiberboard; Shower and Restroom Dividers; and Signage. USDA is requesting that manufacturers of these qualifying biobased products provide information on the BioPreferred Web site of qualifying biobased products about the intended uses of the product, information on whether or not the product contains any recovered material, in addition to biobased ingredients, and performance standards against which the product has been tested. This information will assist Federal agencies in determining whether or not a qualifying biobased product overlaps with EPA-designated laminated paperboard, structural fiberboard, shower and restroom dividers, and signage, and which product should be afforded the preference in purchasing.



Note to paragraph (d):

Composite panel products within this designated item can be made with recycled material. Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976, section 6002, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency designated laminated paperboard and structural fiberboard, shower and restroom dividers, and signage containing recovered materials as items for which Federal agencies must give preference in their purchasing programs. The designation can be found in the Comprehensive Procurement Guideline, 40 CFR 247.12. EPA provides recovered materials content recommendations for laminated paperboard and structural fiberboard, shower and restroom dividers, and signage in the Recovered Materials Advisory Notice (RMAN) published for these products. The RMAN recommendations can be found by accessing EPA’s Web site http://www.epa.gov/epaoswer/non-hw/procure/products.htm and then clicking on the appropriate product name.


[73 FR 27953, May 14, 2008, as amended at 78 FR 34872, June 11, 2013]


§ 3201.20 Fluid-filled transformers.

(a) Definition – (1) Synthetic ester-based fluid-filled transformers. Electric power transformers that are designed to utilize a synthetic ester-based dielectric (non-conducting) fluid to provide insulating and cooling properties.


(2) Vegetable oil-based fluid-filled transformers. Electric power transformers that are designed to utilize a vegetable oil-based dielectric (non-conducting) fluid to provide insulating and cooling properties.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The minimum biobased content requirement for all fluid-filled transformers shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product. The applicable minimum biobased contents are:


(1) Synthetic ester-based fluid-filled transformers – 66 percent.


(2) Vegetable oil-based fluid-filled transformers – 95 percent.


(c) Preference compliance date – (1) Synthetic ester-based fluid-filled transformers. Determination of the compliance date for synthetic ester-based fluid-filled transformers is deferred until USDA identifies two or more manufacturers of synthetic ester-based fluid-filled transformers. At that time, USDA will publish a document in the Federal Register announcing that Federal agencies have one year from the date of publication to give procurement preference to biobased synthetic ester-based fluid-filled transformers.


(2) Vegetable oil-based fluid-filled transformers. No later than May 14, 2009, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased vegetable oil-based fluid-filled transformers. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for items to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased vegetable oil-based fluid-filled transformers.


[73 FR 27953, May 14, 2008]


§ 3201.21 Disposable containers.

(a) Definition. Products designed to be used for temporary storage or transportation of materials including, but not limited to, food items.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The preferred procurement product must have a biobased content of at least 72 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Biodegradability. At the time a manufacturer offers a product under this item for Federal purchase under the BioPreferred Program, the preferred procurement product must be capable of meeting the current version of ASTM D6400 if disposed of in a non-marine environment, the current version of ASTM D7081 if disposed of in a marine environment, or other appropriate and applicable standard for biodegradability.


(d) Determining overlap with an EPA-designated recovered content product. Qualifying biobased products that fall under this item may, in some cases, overlap with the EPA-designated recovered content product: Paper and Paper Products. USDA is requesting that manufacturers of these qualifying biobased products provide information on the BioPreferred Web site of qualifying biobased products about the intended uses of the product, information on whether or not the product contains any recovered material, in addition to biobased ingredients, and performance standards against which the product has been tested. This information will assist Federal agencies in determining whether or not a qualifying biobased product overlaps with EPA-designated paper and paper products and which product should be afforded the preference in purchasing.



Note to paragraph (d):

Disposable containers can include boxes and packaging made from paper. Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976, section 6002, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency designated paper and paper products containing recovered materials as items for which Federal agencies must give preference in their purchasing programs. The designation can be found in the Comprehensive Procurement Guideline, 40 CFR 247.10. EPA provides recovered materials content recommendations for paper and paper products in the Recovered Materials Advisory Notice (RMAN) published for these products. The RMAN recommendations can be found on EPA’s Web site http://www.epa.gov/epaoswer/non-hw/procure/products.htm and then clicking on the appropriate product name.


(e) Preference compliance date. No later than May 14, 2009, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased disposable containers. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for items to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased disposable containers.


[73 FR 27953, May 14, 2008]


§ 3201.22 Fertilizers.

(a) Definition. Products formulated or processed to provide nutrients for plant growth and/or beneficial bacteria to convert nutrients into plant usable forms. Biobased fertilizers, which are likely to consist mostly of biobased components, may include both biobased and chemical components.



Note to paragraph (a):

Biobased fertilizers, as well as other fertilizers, may be made with recycled hazardous waste. Such fertilizers need to meet applicable land disposal restriction standards for any hazardous constituents they contain, as required under 40 CFR 266.20(d).


(b) Minimum biobased content. The preferred procurement product must have a biobased content of at least 71 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than May 14, 2009, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased fertilizers. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for items to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased fertilizers.


(d) Determining overlap with an EPA-designated recovered content product. Qualifying biobased products that fall under this item may, in some cases, overlap with the EPA-designated recovered content product: Fertilizer. USDA is requesting that manufacturers of these qualifying biobased products provide information on the BioPreferred Web site of qualifying biobased products about the intended uses of the product, information on whether or not the product contains any recovered material, in addition to biobased ingredients, and performance standards against which the product has been tested. This information will assist Federal agencies in determining whether or not a qualifying biobased product overlaps with EPA-designated fertilizer product and which product should be afforded the preference in purchasing.



Note to paragraph (d):

Fertilizers within this designated item can be made with recycled materials. Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976, section 6002, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency designated fertilizers containing recovered materials as items for which Federal agencies must give preference in their purchasing programs. The designation can be found in the Comprehensive Procurement Guideline, 40 CFR 247.15. EPA provides recovered materials content recommendations for fertilizers in the Recovered Materials Advisory Notice (RMAN) published for these products. The RMAN recommendations can be found by accessing EPA’s Web site http://www.epa.gov/epaoswer/non-hw/procure/products.htm and then clicking on the appropriate product name.


[73 FR 27953, May 14, 2008]


§ 3201.23 Sorbents.

(a) Definition. Materials formulated for use in the cleanup and bioremediation of oil and chemical spills, the disposal of liquid materials, or the prevention of leakage or leaching in maintenance applications, shop floors, and fuel storage areas.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The preferred procurement product must have a biobased content of at least 89 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than May 14, 2009, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased sorbents. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for items to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased sorbents.


(d) Determining overlap with an EPA-designated recovered content product. Qualifying biobased products that fall under this item may, in some cases, overlap with the EPA-designated recovered content product: Sorbents. USDA is requesting that manufacturers of these qualifying biobased products provide information on the BioPreferred Web site of qualifying biobased products about the intended uses of the product, information on whether or not the product contains any recovered material, in addition to biobased ingredients, and performance standards against which the product has been tested. This information will assist Federal agencies in determining whether or not a qualifying biobased product overlaps with EPA-designated sorbents and which product should be afforded the preference in purchasing.



Note to paragraph (d):

Sorbents within this designated item can be made with recycled materials. Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976, section 6002, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency designated sorbents containing recovered materials as items for which Federal agencies must give preference in their purchasing programs. The designation can be found in the Comprehensive Procurement Guideline, 40 CFR 247.17. EPA provides recovered materials content recommendations for sorbents in the Recovered Materials Advisory Notice (RMAN) published for these products. The RMAN recommendations can be found by accessing EPA’s Web site http://www.epa.gov/epaoswer/non-hw/procure/products.htm and then clicking on the appropriate product name.


[73 FR 27953, May 14, 2008]


§ 3201.24 Graffiti and grease removers.

(a) Definition. Industrial solvent products formulated to remove automotive, industrial, or kitchen soils and oils, including grease, paint, and other coatings, from hard surfaces.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The preferred procurement product must have a biobased content of at least 34 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product. If the finished product is to be diluted before use, the biobased content of the remover must be determined before dilution.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than May 14, 2009, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying graffiti and grease removers. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for items to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased graffiti and grease removers.


[73 FR 27953, May 14, 2008]


§ 3201.25 2-Cycle engine oils.

(a) Definition. Lubricants designed for use in 2-cycle engines to provide lubrication, decreased spark plug fouling, reduced deposit formation, and/or reduced engine wear.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The preferred procurement product must have a biobased content of at least 34 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than May 14, 2009, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased 2-cycle engine oils. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for items to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased 2-cycle engine oils.


[73 FR 27973, May 14, 2008]


§ 3201.26 Lip care products.

(a) Definition. Personal care products formulated to replenish the moisture and/or prevent drying of the lips.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The preferred procurement product must have a biobased content of at least 82 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than May 14, 2009, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased lip care products. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for items to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased lip care products.


[73 FR 27973, May 14, 2008]


§ 3201.27 Films.

(a) Definition. (1) Products that are used in packaging, wrappings, linings, and other similar applications.


(2) Films for which preferred procurement applies are:


(i) Semi-durable films. Films that are designed to resist water, ammonia, and other compounds, to be re-used, and to not readily biodegrade. Products in this item are typically used in the production of bags and packaging materials.


(ii) Non-durable films. Films that are intended for single use for short-term storage or protection before being discarded. Non-durable films that are designed to have longer lives when used are included in this item.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The minimum biobased content for all films shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product. The applicable minimum biobased contents are:


(1) Semi-durable films – 45 percent.


(2) Non-durable films – 85 percent.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than May 14, 2009, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased semi-durable and non-durable films. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for items to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased semi-durable and non-durable films.


(d) Determining overlap with an EPA-designated recovered content product. Qualifying products within the semi-durable films subcategory may overlap with the EPA-designated recovered content product: Plastic trash bags. USDA is requesting that manufacturers of these qualifying biobased products provide information for the BioPreferred Web site of qualifying biobased products about the intended uses of the product, information on whether or not the product contains any recovered material, in addition to biobased ingredients, and performance standards against which the product has been tested. This information will assist Federal agencies in determining whether or not a qualifying biobased product overlaps with EPA-designated plastic trash bags and which product should be afforded the preference in purchasing.



Note to paragraph (d):

Biobased semi-durable film products within this designated item can compete with plastic trash bag products with recycled content. Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976, section 6002, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency designated plastic trash bags containing recovered materials as items for which Federal agencies must give preference in their purchasing programs. The designation can be found in the Comprehensive Procurement Guideline, 40 CFR 247.16. EPA provides recovered materials content recommendations for plastic trash bags in the May 1, 1995, Recovered Materials Advisory Notice (RMAN I). The RMAN recommendations can be found on EPA’s Web site http://www.epa.gov/epaoswer/non-hw/procure/products.htm and then clicking on the appropriate product name.


[73 FR 27973, May 14, 2008]


§ 3201.28 Stationary equipment hydraulic fluids.

(a) Definition. Fluids formulated for use in stationary hydraulic equipment systems that have various mechanical parts, such as cylinders, pumps, valves, pistons, and gears, that are used for the transmission of power (and also for lubrication and/or wear, rust, and oxidation protection).


(b) Minimum biobased content. The preferred procurement product must have a biobased content of at least 44 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than May 14, 2009, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased stationary equipment hydraulic fluids. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for items to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased stationary equipment hydraulic fluids.


(d) Determining overlap with an EPA-designated recovered content product. Qualifying biobased products that fall under this item may, in some cases, overlap with the EPA-designated recovered content product: Re-refined lubricating oils. USDA is requesting that manufacturers of these qualifying biobased products provide information for the BioPreferred Web site of qualifying biobased products about the intended uses of the product, information on whether or not the product contains any recovered material, in addition to biobased ingredients, and performance standards against which the product has been tested. This information will assist Federal agencies in determining whether or not a qualifying biobased product overlaps with EPA-designated re-refined lubricating oils and which product should be afforded the preference in purchasing.



Note to paragraph (d):

Stationary equipment hydraulic fluid products within this designated item can compete with hydraulic fluid products with recycled content. Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976, section 6002, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency designated re-refined lubricating oils containing recovered materials as items for which Federal agencies must give preference in their purchasing programs. The designation can be found in the Comprehensive Procurement Guideline, 40 CFR 247.11. EPA provides recovered materials content recommendations for re-refined lubricating oils in the May 1, 1995, Recovered Materials Advisory Notice (RMAN I). The RMAN recommendations can be found by accessing EPA’s Web site http://www.epa.gov/epaoswer/non-hw/procure/products.htm and then clicking on the appropriate product name.


[73 FR 27973, May 14, 2008]


§ 3201.29 Disposable cutlery.

(a) Definition. Hand-held, disposable utensils designed for one-time use in eating food.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The preferred procurement product must have a biobased content of at least 48 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than May 14, 2009, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased disposable cutlery. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for items to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased disposable cutlery.


[73 FR 27973, May 14, 2008]


§ 3201.30 Glass cleaners.

(a) Definition. Cleaning products designed specifically for use in cleaning glass surfaces, such as windows, mirrors, car windows, and computer monitors.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The preferred procurement product must have a biobased content of at least 49 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product. If the finished product is to be diluted before use, the biobased content of the cleaner must be determined before dilution.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than May 14, 2009, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased glass cleaners. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for items to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased glass cleaners.


[73 FR 27973, May 14, 2008]


§ 3201.31 Greases.

(a) Definitions. (1) Lubricants composed of oils thickened to a semisolid or solid consistency using soaps, polymers or other solids, or other thickeners.


(2) Greases for which preferred procurement applies are:


(i) Food grade greases. Lubricants that are designed for use on food-processing equipment as a protective anti-rust film, as a release agent on gaskets or seals of tank closures, or on machine parts and equipment in locations in which there is exposure of the lubricated part to food.


(ii) Multipurpose greases. Lubricants that are designed for general use.


(iii) Rail track greases. Lubricants that are designed for use on railroad tracks or heavy crane tracks.


(iv) Truck greases. Lubricants that are designed for use on the fifth wheel of tractor trailer trucks onto which the semi-trailer rests and pivots.


(v) Greases not elsewhere specified. Lubricants that meet the general definition of greases as defined in paragraph (a)(1) of this section, but are not otherwise covered by paragraphs (a)(2)(i) through (iv) of this section.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The minimum biobased content for all greases shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product. The applicable minimum biobased contents are:


(1) Food grade grease – 42 percent.


(2) Multipurpose grease – 72 percent.


(3) Rail track grease – 30 percent.


(4) Truck grease – 71 percent.


(5) Greases not elsewhere specified – 75 percent.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than May 14, 2009, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased greases. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for items to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased greases.


[73 FR 27973, May 14, 2008]


§ 3201.32 Dust suppressants.

(a) Definition. Products formulated to reduce or eliminate the spread of dust associated with gravel roads, dirt parking lots, or similar sources of dust, including products used in equivalent indoor applications.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The preferred procurement product must have a biobased content of at least 85 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product. If the finished product is to be diluted before use, the biobased content of the suppressant must be determined before dilution.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than May 14, 2009, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased dust suppressants. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for items to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased dust suppressants.


[73 FR 27973, May 14, 2008]


§ 3201.33 Carpets.

(a) Definition. Floor coverings composed of woven, tufted, or knitted fiber and a backing system.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The preferred procurement product must have a biobased content of at least 7 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than May 14, 2009, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased carpet. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for items to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased carpet.


(d) Determining overlap with an EPA-designated recovered content product. Qualifying biobased products that fall under this item may, in some cases, overlap with the EPA-designated recovered content product: Carpets (polyester). USDA is requesting that manufacturers of these qualifying biobased products provide information for the BioPreferred Web site of qualifying biobased products about the intended uses of the product, information on whether or not the product contains any recovered material, in addition to biobased ingredients, and performance standards against which the product has been tested. This information will assist Federal agencies in determining whether or not a qualifying biobased product overlaps with EPA-designated carpets (polyester) and which product should be afforded the preference in purchasing.



Note to paragraph (d):

Biobased carpets within this designated item can compete with polyester carpet products with recycled content. Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976, section 6002, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency designated carpets (polyester) containing recovered materials as items for which Federal agencies must give preference in their purchasing programs. The designation can be found in the Comprehensive Procurement Guideline, 40 CFR 247.12. EPA provides recovered materials content recommendations for carpets (polyester) in the May 1, 1995, Recovered Materials Advisory Notice (RMAN I). The RMAN recommendations can be found on EPA’s Web site http://www.epa.gov/epaoswer/non-hw/procure/products.htm and then clicking on the appropriate product name.


[73 FR 27973, May 14, 2008]


§ 3201.34 Carpet and upholstery cleaners.

(a) Definition. (1) Cleaning products formulated specifically for use in cleaning carpets and upholstery, through a dry or wet process, found in locations such as houses, cars, and workplaces.


(2) Carpet and upholstery cleaners for which preferred procurement applies are:


(i) General purpose cleaners. Carpet and upholstery cleaners formulated for use in cleaning large areas such as the carpet in an entire room or the upholstery on an entire piece of furniture.


(ii) Spot removers. Carpet and upholstery cleaners formulated for use in removing spots or stains in a small confined area.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The minimum biobased content for all carpet and upholstery cleaners shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product. The applicable minimum biobased contents are:


(1) General purpose cleaners – 54 percent.


(2) Spot removers – 7 percent.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than May 14, 2009, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased carpet and upholstery cleaners. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for items to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased carpet and upholstery cleaners.


[73 FR 27973, May 14, 2008]


§ 3201.35 Bathroom and spa cleaners.

(a) Definition. Products that are designed to clean and/or prevent deposits on surfaces found in bathrooms and spas including, but not necessarily limited to, bath tubs and spas, shower stalls, shower doors, shower curtains, and bathroom walls, floors, doors, and counter and sink tops. Products in this item may be designed to be applied to a specific type of surface or to multiple surface types. They are available both in concentrated and ready-to-use forms.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 74 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than May 14, 2009, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased bathroom and spa cleaners. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for items to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased bathroom and spa cleaners.


[73 FR 27994, May 14, 2008]


§ 3201.36 Concrete and asphalt release fluids.

(a) Definition. Products that are designed to provide a lubricating barrier between the composite surface materials (e.g., concrete or asphalt) and the container (e.g., wood or metal forms, truck beds, roller surfaces).


(b) Minimum biobased content. The preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 87 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than May 14, 2009, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased concrete and asphalt release fluids. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for items to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased concrete and asphalt release fluids.


[73 FR 27994, May 14, 2008]


§ 3201.37 De-Icers.

(a) Definition. Chemical products (e.g., salts, fluids) that are designed to aid in the removal of snow and/or ice, and/or in the prevention of the buildup of snow and/or ice, by lowering the freezing point of water.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 93 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance dates. No later than July 6, 2020, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased de-icers. By that date, Federal agencies responsible for drafting or reviewing specifications for products to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased de-icers.


[73 FR 27994, May 14, 2008, as amended at 84 FR 32020, July 5, 2019]


§ 3201.38 Firearm cleaners, lubricants, and protectants.

(a) Definition. Products that are designed to care for firearms by cleaning, lubricating, protecting, or any combination thereof. Examples include products that are designed for use in firearms to reduce the friction and wear between the moving parts of a firearm, to keep the weapon clean, and/or to prevent the formation of deposits that could cause the weapon to jam.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 32 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance dates. No later than July 6, 2020, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased firearm cleaners, lubricants, and protectants. By that date, Federal agencies responsible for drafting or reviewing specifications for products to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased firearm cleaners, lubricants, and protectants.


[84 FR 32020, July 5, 2019]


§ 3201.39 Floor strippers.

(a) Definition. Products that are formulated to loosen waxes, resins, or varnishes from floor surfaces. They can be in either liquid or gel form, and may also be used with or without mechanical assistance.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 78 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than May 14, 2009, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased floor strippers. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for items to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased floor strippers.


[73 FR 27994, May 14, 2008]


§ 3201.40 Laundry products.

(a) Definitions. (1) Products that are designed to clean, condition, or otherwise affect the quality of the laundered material. Such products include but are not limited to laundry detergents, bleach, stain removers, and fabric softeners.


(2) Laundry products for which preferred procurement applies are:


(i) Pretreatment/spot removers. These are laundry products specifically used to pretreat laundry to assist in the removal of spots and stains during laundering.


(ii) General purpose laundry products. These are laundry products used for regular cleaning activities.


(iii) Dryer sheets. These are small sheets that are added to laundry in clothes dryers to eliminate static cling, soften fabrics, or otherwise improve the characteristics of the fabric.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The minimum biobased content shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product. The applicable minimum biobased contents for the preferred procurement product are:


(1) Pretreatment/spot removers – 46 percent.


(2) General purpose laundry products – 34 percent.


(3) Dryer sheets – 90 percent.


(c) Preference compliance dates. (1) No later than May 14, 2009, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for those qualifying biobased laundry products specified in paragraphs (a)(2)(i) and (ii) of this section. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for items to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased laundry products.


(2) No later than July 6, 2020, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for those qualifying biobased laundry products specified in paragraph (a)(2)(iii) of this section. By that date, Federal agencies responsible for drafting or reviewing specifications for products to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased laundry products.


[73 FR 27994, May 14, 2008, as amended at 84 FR 32020, July 5, 2019]


§ 3201.41 Metalworking fluids.

(a) Definition. (1) Fluids that are designed to provide cooling, lubrication, corrosion prevention, and reduced wear on the contact parts of machinery used for metalworking operations such as cutting, drilling, grinding, machining, and tapping.


(2) Metalworking fluids for which preferred procurement applies are:


(i) Straight oils. Metalworking fluids that are not diluted with water prior to use and are generally used for metalworking processes that require lubrication rather than cooling.


(ii) General purpose soluble, semi-synthetic, and synthetic oils. Metalworking fluids formulated for use in a re-circulating fluid system to provide cooling, lubrication, and corrosion prevention when applied to metal feedstock during normal grinding and machining operations.


(iii) High performance soluble, semi-synthetic, and synthetic oils. Metalworking fluids formulated for use in a re-circulating fluid system to provide cooling, lubrication, and corrosion prevention when applied to metal feedstock during grinding and machining operations involving unusually high temperatures or corrosion potential.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The minimum biobased content shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product. The applicable minimum biobased contents for the preferred procurement product are:


(1) Straight oils – 66 percent.


(2) General purpose soluble, semi-synthetic, and synthetic oils – 57 percent.


(3) High performance soluble, semi-synthetic, and synthetic oils – 40 percent.


(c) Preference compliance date – (1) Straight oils. No later than May 14, 2009, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased metalworking fluids – straight oils. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for items to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased metalworking fluids – straight oils.


(2) General purpose soluble, semi-synthetic, and synthetic oils. No later than May 14, 2009, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased metalworking fluids – general purpose soluble, semi-synthetic, and synthetic oils. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for items to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased metalworking fluids – general purpose soluble, semi-synthetic, and synthetic oils.


(3) High performance soluble, semi-synthetic, and synthetic oils. Determination of the preference compliance date for metalworking fluids – high performance soluble, semi-synthetic, and synthetic oils is deferred until USDA identifies two or more manufacturers of biobased products within this subcategory. At that time, USDA will publish a document in the Federal Register announcing that Federal agencies have one year from the date of publication to give procurement preference to biobased metalworking fluids – high performance soluble, semi-synthetic, and synthetic oils.


[73 FR 27994, May 14, 2008]


§ 3201.42 Wood and concrete sealers.

(a) Definition. (1) Products that are penetrating liquids formulated to protect wood and/or concrete, including masonry and fiber cement siding, from damage caused by insects, moisture, and decaying fungi and to make surfaces water resistant.


(2) Wood and concrete sealers for which preferred procurement applies are:


(i) Penetrating liquids. Wood and concrete sealers that are formulated to penetrate the outer surface of the substrate.


(ii) Membrane concrete sealers. Concrete sealers that are formulated to form a protective layer on the surface of the substrate.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The minimum biobased content shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product. The applicable minimum biobased contents for the preferred procurement product are:


(1) Penetrating liquids – 79 percent.


(2) Membrane concrete sealers – 11 percent.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than May 14, 2009, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased wood and concrete sealers. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for items to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased wood and concrete sealers.


[73 FR 27994, May 14, 2008]


§ 3201.43 Chain and cable lubricants.

(a) Definition. Products designed to provide lubrication in such applications as bar and roller chains, sprockets, and wire ropes and cables. Products may also prevent rust and corrosion in these applications.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 77 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than October 27, 2010, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased chain and cable lubricants. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for items to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased chain and cable lubricants.


[74 FR 55093, Oct. 27, 2009]


§ 3201.44 Corrosion preventatives.

(a) Definition. Products designed to prevent the deterioration (corrosion) of metals.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 53 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than October 27, 2010, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased corrosion preventatives. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for items to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased corrosion preventatives.


[74 FR 55093, Oct. 27, 2009]


§ 3201.45 Food cleaners.

(a) Definition. Anti-microbial products designed to clean the outer layer of various food products, such as fruit, vegetables, and meats.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 53 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than October 27, 2010, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased food cleaners. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for items to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased food cleaners.


[74 FR 55093, Oct. 27, 2009]


§ 3201.46 Forming lubricants.

(a) Definition. Products designed to provide lubrication during metalworking applications that are performed under extreme pressure. Such metalworking applications include tube bending, stretch forming, press braking, and swaging.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 68 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than October 27, 2010, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased forming lubricants. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for items to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased forming lubricants.


[74 FR 55093, Oct. 27, 2009]


§ 3201.47 Gear lubricants.

(a) Definition. Products, such as greases or oils, that are designed to reduce friction when applied to a toothed machine part (such as a wheel or cylinder) that meshes with another toothed part to transmit motion or to change speed or direction.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 58 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than October 27, 2010, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased gear lubricants. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for items to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of gear lubricants.


(d) Determining overlap with an EPA-designated recovered content product. Qualifying biobased products that fall under this item may, in some cases, overlap with the following EPA-designated recovered content product: Lubricating oils containing re-refined oil. USDA is requesting that manufacturers of these qualifying biobased products provide information for the BioPreferred Web site of qualifying biobased products about the intended uses of the product, information on whether or not the product contains any recovered material, in addition to biobased ingredients, and performance standards against which the product has been tested. This information will assist Federal agencies in determining whether or not a qualifying biobased product overlaps with EPA-designated re-refined lubricating oils and which product should be afforded the preference in purchasing.



Note to paragraph (d):

Biobased gear lubricant products within this designated item can compete with similar gear lubricant products with recycled content. Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976, section 6002, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency designated re-refined lubricating oils containing recovered materials as items for which Federal agencies must give preference in their purchasing programs. The designation can be found in the Comprehensive Procurement Guideline, 40 CFR 247.11.


[74 FR 55093, Oct. 27, 2009]


§ 3201.48 General purpose household cleaners.

(a) Definition. Products designed to clean multiple common household surfaces. This designated item does not include products that are formulated for use as disinfectants. Task-specific cleaning products, such as spot and stain removers, upholstery cleaners, bathroom cleaners, glass cleaners, etc., are not included in this item.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 39 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than October 27, 2010, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased general purpose household cleaners. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for items to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased general purpose household cleaners.


[74 FR 55093, Oct. 27, 2009]


§ 3201.49 Industrial cleaners.

(a) Definition. Products used to remove contaminants, such as adhesives, inks, paint, dirt, soil, and grease, from parts, products, tools, machinery, equipment, vessels, floors, walls, and other production-related work areas. The cleaning products within this item are usually solvents, but may take other forms. They may be used in either straight solution or diluted with water in pressure washers, or in hand wiping applications in industrial or manufacturing settings, such as inside vessels. Task-specific cleaners used in industrial settings, such as parts wash solutions, are not included in this definition.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 41 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than October 27, 2010, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased industrial cleaners. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for items to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased industrial cleaners.


[74 FR 55093, Oct. 27, 2009]


§ 3201.50 Multipurpose cleaners.

(a) Definition. Products used to clean dirt, grease, and grime from a variety of items in both industrial and domestic settings. This designated item does not include products that are formulated for use as disinfectants.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 56 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than October 27, 2010, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased multipurpose cleaners. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for items to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased multipurpose cleaners.


[74 FR 55093, Oct. 27, 2009]


§ 3201.51 Parts wash solutions.

(a) Definition. Products that are designed to clean parts in manual or automatic cleaning systems. Such systems include, but are not limited to, soak vats and tanks, cabinet washers, and ultrasonic cleaners.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 65 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than October 27, 2010, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased parts wash solutions. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for items to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased parts wash solutions.


[74 FR 55093, Oct. 27, 2009]


§ 3201.52 Disposable tableware.

(a) Definition. Products made from, or coated with, plastic resins and used in dining, such as drink ware and dishware, including but not limited to cups, plates, bowls, and serving platters, and that are designed for one-time use. This item does not include disposable cutlery, which is a separate item.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 72 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than October 18, 2011, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased disposable tableware. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for items to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased disposable tableware.


[75 FR 63701, Oct. 18, 2010]


§ 3201.53 Expanded polystyrene (EPS) foam recycling products.

(a) Definition. Products formulated to dissolve EPS foam to reduce the volume of recycled or discarded EPS items.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 90 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than October 18, 2011, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased EPS foam recycling products. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for items to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased EPS foam recycling products.


[75 FR 63701, Oct. 18, 2010]


§ 3201.54 Heat transfer fluids.

(a) Definition. Products with high thermal capacities used to facilitate the transfer of heat from one location to another, including coolants or refrigerants for use in HVAC applications, internal combustion engines, personal cooling devices, thermal energy storage, or other heating or cooling closed-loops.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 89 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than October 18, 2011, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased heat transfer fluids. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for items to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased heat transfer fluids.


[75 FR 63701, Oct. 18, 2010]


§ 3201.55 Ink removers and cleaners.

(a) Definition. Chemical products designed to remove ink, haze, glaze, and other residual ink contaminants from the surfaces of equipment, such as rollers, used in the textile and printing industries.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 79 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than October 18, 2011, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased ink removers and cleaners. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for items to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased ink removers and cleaners.


[75 FR 63701, Oct. 18, 2010]


§ 3201.56 Mulch and compost materials.

(a) Definition. Products designed to provide a protective covering placed over the soil, primarily to keep down weeds and to improve the appearance of landscaping. Compost is the aerobically decomposed remnants of organic materials used in gardening and agriculture as a soil amendment, and commercially by the landscaping and container nursery industries.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 95 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than October 18, 2011, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased mulch and compost materials. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for items to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased mulch and compost materials.


(d) Determining overlap with an EPA-designated recovered content product. Qualifying products within this item may overlap with the EPA-designated recovered content product: Landscaping products – “compost” and “hydraulic mulch”. USDA is requesting that manufacturers of these qualifying biobased products provide information on the USDA Web site of qualifying biobased products about the intended uses of the product, information on whether or not the product contains any recovered material, in addition to biobased ingredients, and performance standards against which the product has been tested. This information will assist Federal agencies in determining whether or not a qualifying biobased product overlaps with EPA-designated landscaping products and which product should be afforded the preference in purchasing.



Note to paragraph (d):

Biobased mulch and compost materials within this designated item can compete with similar landscaping products with recycled content. Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976, section 6002, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency designated landscaping products containing recovered materials as items for which Federal agencies must give preference in their purchasing programs. The designation can be found in the Comprehensive Procurement Guideline, 40 CFR 247.15.


[75 FR 63701, Oct. 18, 2010]


§ 3201.57 Multipurpose lubricants.

(a) Definition. Products designed to provide lubrication under a variety of conditions and in a variety of industrial settings to prevent friction or rust. Greases, which are lubricants composed of oils thickened to a semisolid or solid consistency using soaps, polymers or other solids, or other thickeners, are not included in this item. In addition, task-specific lubricants, such as chain and cable lubricants and gear lubricants, are not included in this item.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 88 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than October 18, 2011, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased multipurpose lubricants. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for items to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased multipurpose lubricants.


(d) Determining overlap with an EPA-designated recovered content product. Qualifying products within this item may overlap with the EPA-designated recovered content product: Re-refined lubricating oils. USDA is requesting that manufacturers of these qualifying biobased products provide information on the BioPreferred Web site about the intended uses of the product, information on whether or not the product contains any recovered material, in addition to biobased ingredients, and performance standards against which the product has been tested. This information will assist Federal agencies in determining whether or not a qualifying biobased product overlaps with EPA-designated re-refined lubricating oils and which product should be afforded the preference in purchasing.



Note to paragraph (d):

Biobased multipurpose lubricant products within this designated item can compete with similar multipurpose lubricant products with recycled content. Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976, section 6002, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency designated re-refined lubricating oils containing recovered materials as items for which Federal agencies must give preference in their purchasing programs. The designation can be found in the Comprehensive Procurement Guideline, 40 CFR 247.11.


[75 FR 63701, Oct. 18, 2010]


§ 3201.58 [Reserved]

§ 3201.59 Topical pain relief products.

(a) Definition. Products that can be balms, creams and other topical treatments used for the relief of muscle, joint, headache, and nerve pain, as well as sprains, bruises, swelling, and other aches.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 91 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than October 18, 2011, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased topical pain relief products. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for items to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased topical pain relief products.


[75 FR 63701, Oct. 18, 2010]


§ 3201.60 Turbine drip oils.

(a) Definition. Products that are lubricants for use in drip lubrication systems for water well line shaft bearings, water turbine bearings for irrigation pumps, and other turbine bearing applications.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 87 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than October 18, 2011, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased turbine drip oils. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for items to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased turbine drip oils.


[75 FR 63701, Oct. 18, 2010]


§ 3201.61 Animal repellents.

(a) Definition. Products used to aid in deterring animals that cause destruction to plants and/or property.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 79 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than July 23, 2012, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased animal repellents. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for items to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased animal repellents.


[76 FR 43817, July 22, 2011]


§ 3201.62 Bath products.

(a) Definition. Personal hygiene products including bar soaps, liquids, or gels that are referred to as body washes, body shampoos, or cleansing lotions, but excluding products marketed as hand cleaners and/or hand sanitizers.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 61 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than July 23, 2012, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased bath products. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for items to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased bath products.


[76 FR 43817, July 22, 2011]


§ 3201.63 Bioremediation materials.

(a) Definition. Dry or liquid solutions (including those containing bacteria or other microbes but not including sorbent materials) used to clean oil, fuel, and other hazardous spill sites.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 86 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than July 23, 2012, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased bioremediation materials. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for items to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased bioremediation materials.


[76 FR 43817, July 22, 2011]


§ 3201.64 Compost activators and accelerators.

(a) Definition. Products in liquid or powder form designed to be applied to compost piles to aid in speeding up the composting process and to ensure successful compost that is ready for consumer use.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 95 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than July 23, 2012, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased compost activators and accelerators. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for items to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased compost activators and accelerators.


[76 FR 43817, July 22, 2011]


§ 3201.65 Concrete and asphalt cleaners.

(a) Definition. Chemicals used in concrete etching as well as to remove petroleum-based soils, lubricants, paints, mastics, organic soils, rust, and dirt from concrete, asphalt, stone and other hard porous surfaces. Products within this item include only those marketed for use in commercial or residential construction or industrial applications.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 70 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than July 23, 2012, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased concrete and asphalt cleaners. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for items to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased concrete and asphalt cleaners.


[76 FR 43817, July 22, 2011]


§ 3201.66 Cuts, burns, and abrasions ointments.

(a) Definition. Products designed to aid in the healing and sanitizing of scratches, cuts, bruises, abrasions, sun damaged skin, tattoos, rashes and other skin conditions.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 84 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than July 23, 2012, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased cuts, burns, and abrasions ointments. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for items to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased cuts, burns, and abrasions ointments.


[76 FR 43817, July 22, 2011]


§ 3201.67 Dishwashing products.

(a) Definition. Soaps and detergents used for cleaning and clean rinsing of tableware in either hand washing or dishwashing.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 58 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than July 23, 2012, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased dishwashing products. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for items to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased dishwashing products.


[76 FR 43817, July 22, 2011]


§ 3201.68 Erosion control materials.

(a) Definition. Woven or non-woven fiber materials manufactured for use on construction, demolition, or other sites to prevent wind or water erosion of loose earth surfaces, which may be combined with seed and/or fertilizer to promote growth.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 77 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than July 23, 2012, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased erosion control materials. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for items to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased erosion control materials.


[76 FR 43817, July 22, 2011]


§ 3201.69 Floor cleaners and protectors.

(a) Definition. Cleaning solutions for either direct application or use in floor scrubbers for wood, vinyl, tile, or similar hard surface floors. Products within this item are marketed specifically for use on industrial, commercial, and/or residential flooring.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 77 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than July 23, 2012, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased floor cleaners and protectors. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for items to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased floor cleaners and protectors.


[76 FR 43817, July 22, 2011]


§ 3201.70 Hair care products.

(a) Definitions. (1) Personal hygiene products specifically formulated for hair cleaning and treating applications, including shampoos and conditioners.


(2) Hair care products for which Federal preferred procurement applies are:


(i) Shampoos. These are products whose primary purpose is cleaning hair. Products that contain both shampoos and conditioners are included in this subcategory because the primary purpose of these products is cleaning the hair.


(ii) Conditioners. These are products whose primary purpose is treating hair to improve the overall condition of hair.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The minimum biobased content for all hair care products shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product. The applicable minimum biobased contents for the Federal preferred procurement products are:


(1) Shampoos – 66 percent.


(2) Conditioners – 78 percent.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than July 23, 2012, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased hair care products. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for items to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased hair care products.


[76 FR 43817, July 22, 2011]


§ 3201.71 Interior paints and coatings.

(a) Definition. (1) Pigmented liquids, formulated for use indoors, that dry to form a film and provide protection and added color to the objects or surfaces to which they are applied.


(2) Interior paints and coatings products for which Federal preferred procurement applies are:


(i) Interior latex and waterborne alkyd paints and coatings.


(ii) Interior oil-based and solventborne alkyd paints and coatings.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The minimum biobased content for all interior paints and coatings products shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product. The applicable minimum biobased contents for the Federal preferred procurement products are:


(1) Interior latex and waterborne alkyd paints and coatings – 20 percent.


(2) Interior oil-based and solventborne alkyd paints and coatings – 67 percent.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than July 23, 2012, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased interior paints and coatings. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for items to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased interior paints and coatings.


(d) Determining overlap with an EPA-designated recovered content product. Qualifying biobased products within the interior latex and waterborne alkyd paints and coatings subcategory may, in some cases, overlap with the EPA-designated recovered content products: Reprocessed latex paints and consolidated latex paints. USDA is requesting that manufacturers of these qualifying biobased products provide information on the USDA Web site of qualifying biobased products about the intended uses of the product, information on whether or not the product contains any recovered material, in addition to biobased ingredients, and performance standards against which the product has been tested. This information will assist Federal agencies in determining whether or not a qualifying biobased product overlaps with EPA-designated reprocessed latex paints and consolidated latex paints and which product should be afforded the preference in purchasing.



Note to paragraph (d):

Biobased interior latex and waterborne alkyd paints and coatings products within this subcategory can compete with similar reprocessed latex paint and consolidated latex paint products with recycled content. Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976, section 6002, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency designated reprocessed latex paints and consolidated latex paints containing recovered materials as items for which Federal agencies must give preference in their purchasing programs. The designation can be found in the Comprehensive Procurement Guideline, 40 CFR 247.12.


[76 FR 43817, July 22, 2011]


§ 3201.72 Oven and grill cleaners.

(a) Definition. Liquid or gel cleaning agents used on high temperature cooking surfaces such as barbeques, smokers, grills, stoves, and ovens to soften and loosen charred food, grease, and residue.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 66 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than July 23, 2012, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased oven and grill cleaners. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for items to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased oven and grill cleaners.


[76 FR 43817, July 22, 2011]


§ 3201.73 Slide way lubricants.

(a) Definition. Products used to provide lubrication and eliminate stick-slip and table chatter by reducing friction between mating surfaces, or slides, found in machine tools.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 74 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than July 23, 2012, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased slide way lubricants. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for items to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased slide way lubricants.


[76 FR 43817, July 22, 2011]


§ 3201.74 Thermal shipping containers.

(a) Definitions. (1) Insulated containers designed for shipping temperature-sensitive materials.


(2) Thermal shipping containers for which Federal preferred procurement applies are:


(i) Durable thermal shipping container. These are thermal shipping containers that are designed to be reused over an extended period of time.


(ii) Non-durable thermal shipping containers. These are thermal shipping containers that are designed to be used once.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The minimum biobased content for all thermal shipping container products shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product. The applicable minimum biobased contents for the Federal preferred procurement products are:


(1) Durable thermal shipping containers – 21 percent.


(2) Non-durable thermal shipping containers – 82 percent.


(c) Preference compliance date – (1) Durable thermal shipping containers. Determination of the preference compliance date for durable thermal shipping containers is deferred until USDA identifies two or more manufacturers of biobased durable thermal shipping containers. At that time, USDA will publish a document in the Federal Register announcing that Federal agencies have one year from the date of publication to give procurement preference to biobased durable thermal shipping containers.


(2) Non-durable thermal shipping containers. Determination of the preference compliance date for non-durable thermal shipping containers is deferred until USDA identifies two or more manufacturers of biobased non-durable thermal shipping containers. At that time, USDA will publish a document in the Federal Register announcing that Federal agencies have one year from the date of publication to give procurement preference to biobased non-durable thermal shipping containers.


[76 FR 43817, July 22, 2011]


§ 3201.75 Air fresheners and deodorizers.

(a) Definition. Products used to alleviate the experience of unpleasant odors by chemical neutralization, absorption, anesthetization, or masking.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 97 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than April 4, 2013, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased air fresheners and deodorizers. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for products to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased air fresheners and deodorizers.


[77 FR 20289, Apr. 4, 2012]


§ 3201.76 Asphalt and tar removers.

(a) Definition. Cleaning agents designed to remove asphalt or tar from equipment, roads, or other surfaces.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 80 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than April 4, 2013, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased asphalt and tar removers. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for products to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased asphalt and tar removers.


[77 FR 20289, Apr. 4, 2012]


§ 3201.77 Asphalt restorers.

(a) Definition. Products designed to seal, protect, or restore poured asphalt and concrete surfaces.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 68 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than April 4, 2013, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased asphalt restorers. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for products to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased asphalt restorers.


[77 FR 20289, Apr. 4, 2012]


§ 3201.78 Blast media.

(a) Definition. Abrasive particles sprayed forcefully to clean, remove contaminants, or condition surfaces, often preceding coating.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 94 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than April 4, 2013, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased blast media. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for products to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased blast media.


(d) Determining overlap with an EPA-designated recovered content product. Qualifying products within this item may overlap with the EPA-designated recovered content product: Miscellaneous products – blasting grit. USDA is requesting that manufacturers of these qualifying biobased products provide information on the USDA Web site of qualifying biobased products about the intended uses of the product, information on whether or not the product contains any recovered material, in addition to biobased ingredients, and performance standards against which the product has been tested. This information will assist Federal agencies in determining whether or not a qualifying biobased product overlaps with EPA-designated blasting grit products and which product should be afforded the preference in purchasing.



Note to paragraph (d):

Biobased blast media within this designated product category can compete with similar blasting grit products with recycled content. Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976, section 6002, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency designated blasting grit products containing recovered materials as products for which Federal agencies must give preference in their purchasing programs. The designation can be found in the Comprehensive Procurement Guideline, 40 CFR 247.17.


[77 FR 20289, Apr. 4, 2012]


§ 3201.79 Candles and wax melts.

(a) Definition. Products composed of a solid mass and either an embedded wick that is burned to provide light or aroma, or that are wickless and melt when heated to produce an aroma.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 88 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than April 4, 2013, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased candles and wax melts. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for products to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased candles and wax melts.


[77 FR 20289, Apr. 4, 2012]


§ 3201.80 Electronic components cleaners.

(a) Definition. Products that are designed to wash or remove dirt or extraneous matter from electronic parts, devices, circuits, or systems.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 91 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than April 4, 2013, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased electronic components cleaners. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for products to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased electronic components cleaners.


[77 FR 20289, Apr. 4, 2012]


§ 3201.81 Floor coverings (non-carpet).

(a) Definition. Products, other than carpet products, that are designed for use as the top layer on a floor. Examples are bamboo, hardwood, and cork tiles.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 91 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than April 4, 2013, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased floor coverings (non-carpet). By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for products to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased floor coverings (non-carpet).


(d) Determining overlap with an EPA-designated recovered content product. Qualifying products within this item may overlap with the EPA-designated recovered content product: Construction Products – floor tiles. USDA is requesting that manufacturers of these qualifying biobased products provide information on the USDA Web site of qualifying biobased products about the intended uses of the product, information on whether or not the product contains any recovered material, in addition to biobased ingredients, and performance standards against which the product has been tested. This information will assist Federal agencies in determining whether or not a qualifying biobased product overlaps with EPA-designated floor tile products and which product should be afforded the preference in purchasing.



Note to paragraph (d):

Biobased floor coverings within this designated product category can compete with similar floor tile products with recycled content. Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976, section 6002, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency designated floor tile products containing recovered materials as products for which Federal agencies must give preference in their purchasing programs. The designation can be found in the Comprehensive Procurement Guideline, 40 CFR 247.17.


[77 FR 20289, Apr. 4, 2012]


§ 3201.82 Foot care products.

(a) Definition. Products formulated to be used in the soothing or cleaning of feet.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 83 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than April 4, 2013, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased foot care products. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for products to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased foot care products.


[77 FR 20289, Apr. 4, 2012]


§ 3201.83 Furniture cleaners and protectors.

(a) Definition. Products designed to clean and provide protection to the surfaces of household furniture other than the upholstery.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 71 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than April 4, 2013, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased furniture cleaners and protectors. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for products to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased furniture cleaners and protectors.


[77 FR 20289, Apr. 4, 2012]


§ 3201.84 Inks.

(a) Definitions. (1) Inks are liquid or powdered materials that are available in several colors and that are used to create the visual image on a substrate when writing, printing, and copying.


(2) Inks for which Federal preferred procurement applies are:


(i) Specialty inks. Inks used by printers to add extra characteristics to their prints for special effects or functions. Specialty inks include, but are not limited to: CD printing, erasable, FDA compliant, invisible, magnetic, scratch and sniff, thermochromic, and tree marking inks.


(ii) Inks (sheetfed – color). Pigmented inks (other than black inks) used on coated and uncoated paper, paperboard, some plastic, and foil to print in color on annual reports, brochures, labels, and similar materials.


(iii) Inks (sheetfed – black). Black inks used on coated and uncoated paper, paperboard, some plastic, and foil to print in black on annual reports, brochures, labels, and similar materials.


(iv) Inks (printer toner – Inks that are a powdered chemical, used in photocopying machines and laser printers, which is transferred onto paper to form the printed image. These inks are formulated to be used in printers with standard fusing mechanisms and print speeds of less than 25 ppm.


(v) Inks (printer toner – ≥25 ppm). Inks that are a powdered chemical, used in photocopying machines and laser printers, which is transferred onto paper to form the printed image. These inks are formulated to be used in printers with advanced fusing mechanisms and print speeds of 25 ppm or greater.


(vi) Inks (news). Inks used primarily to print newspapers.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The minimum biobased content for all inks shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product. The applicable minimum biobased contents for the Federal preferred procurement products are:


(1) Specialty inks – 66 percent.


(2) Inks (sheetfed – color) – 67 percent.


(3) Inks (sheetfed – black) – 49 percent.


(4) Inks (printer toner – – 34 percent.


(5) Inks (printer toner – ≥25 ppm) – 20 percent.


(6) Inks (news) – 32 percent.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than April 4, 2013, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased inks. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for products to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased inks.


[77 FR 20289, Apr. 4, 2012]


§ 3201.85 Packing and insulating materials.

(a) Definition. Pre-formed and molded materials that are used to hold package contents in place during shipping or for insulating and sound proofing applications.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 74 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than April 4, 2013, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased packing and insulating materials. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for products to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased packing and insulating materials.


[77 FR 20289, Apr. 4, 2012]


§ 3201.86 Pneumatic equipment lubricants.

(a) Definition. Lubricants designed specifically for pneumatic equipment, including air compressors, vacuum pumps, in-line lubricators, rock drills, jackhammers, etc.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 67 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than April 4, 2013, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased pneumatic equipment lubricants. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for products to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased pneumatic equipment lubricants.


(d) Determining overlap with an EPA-designated recovered content product. Qualifying products within this item may overlap with the EPA-designated recovered content product: Vehicular Products – re-refined lubricating oils. USDA is requesting that manufacturers of these qualifying biobased products provide information on the USDA Web site of qualifying biobased products about the intended uses of the product, information on whether or not the product contains any recovered material, in addition to biobased ingredients, and performance standards against which the product has been tested. This information will assist Federal agencies in determining whether or not a qualifying biobased product overlaps with EPA-designated re-refined lubricating oil products and which product should be afforded the preference in purchasing.



Note to paragraph (d):

Biobased pneumatic equipment lubricants within this designated product category can compete with similar re-refined lubricating oil products with recycled content. Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976, section 6002, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency designated re-refined lubricating oil products containing recovered materials as products for which Federal agencies must give preference in their purchasing programs. The designation can be found in the Comprehensive Procurement Guideline, 40 CFR 247.17.


[77 FR 20289, Apr. 4, 2012]


§ 3201.87 Wood and concrete stains.

(a) Definition. Products that are designed to be applied as a finish for concrete and wood surfaces and that contain dyes or pigments to change the color without concealing the grain pattern or surface texture.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 39 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than April 4, 2013, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased wood and concrete stains. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for products to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased wood and concrete stains.


[77 FR 20289, Apr. 4, 2012]


§ 3201.88 Agricultural spray adjuvants.

(a) Definition. Products mixed in the spray tank with the herbicide, pesticide, or fertilizer formulas that will improve the efficiency and the effectiveness of the chemicals, including sticking agents, wetting agents, etc.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 50 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than November 19, 2013, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased agricultural spray adjuvants. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for products to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased agricultural spray adjuvants.


[77 FR 69386, Nov. 19, 2012]


§ 3201.89 Animal cleaning products.

(a) Definition. Products designed to clean, condition, or remove substances from animal hair or other parts of an animal.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 57 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than November 19, 2013, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased animal cleaning products. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for products to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased animal cleaning products.


[77 FR 69386, Nov. 19, 2012]


§ 3201.90 Deodorants.

(a) Definition. Products that are designed for inhibiting or masking perspiration and other body odors and that are often combined with an antiperspirant.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 73 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than November 19, 2013, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased deodorants. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for products to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased deodorants.


[77 FR 69386, Nov. 19, 2012]


§ 3201.91 Dethatcher products.

(a) Definition. Products used to remove non-decomposed plant material accumulated in grassy areas.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 87 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than November 19, 2013, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased dethatchers. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for products to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased dethatchers.


[77 FR 69386, Nov. 19, 2012]


§ 3201.92 Fuel conditioners.

(a) Definition. Products formulated to improve the performance and efficiency of engines by providing benefits such as removing accumulated deposits, increasing lubricity, removing moisture, increasing the cetane number, and/or preventing microbial growths within the fuel system.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 64 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than November 19, 2013, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased fuel conditioners. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for products to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased fuel conditioners.


[77 FR 69386, Nov. 19, 2012]


§ 3201.93 Leather, vinyl, and rubber care products.

(a) Definition. Products that help clean, nourish, protect, and restore leather, vinyl, and rubber surfaces, including cleaners, conditioners, protectants, polishes, waxes, etc.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 55 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than November 19, 2013, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased leather, vinyl, and rubber care products. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for products to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased leather, vinyl, and rubber care products.


[77 FR 69386, Nov. 19, 2012]


§ 3201.94 Lotions and moisturizers.

(a) Definition. Creams and oils used to soften and treat damaged skin.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 59 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than November 19, 2013, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased lotions and moisturizers. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for products to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased lotions and moisturizers.


[77 FR 69386, Nov. 19, 2012]


§ 3201.95 Shaving products.

(a) Definition. Products designed for every step of the shaving process, including shaving creams, gels, soaps, lotions, and aftershave balms.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 92 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than November 19, 2013, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased shaving products. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for products to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased shaving products.


[77 FR 69386, Nov. 19, 2012]


§ 3201.96 Specialty precision cleaners and solvents.

(a) Definition. Cleaners and solvents used in specialty applications. These materials may be used in neat solution, diluted with water, or in hand wiping applications.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 56 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than November 19, 2013, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased specialty precision cleaners and solvents. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for products to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased specialty precision cleaners and solvents.


[77 FR 69386, Nov. 19, 2012]


§ 3201.97 Sun care products.

(a) Definition. Products including sunscreens, sun blocks, and suntan lotions that are topical products that absorb or reflect the sun’s ultraviolet radiation to protect the skin.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 53 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than November 19, 2013, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased sun care products. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for products to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased sun care products.


[77 FR 69386, Nov. 19, 2012]


§ 3201.98 Wastewater systems coatings.

(a) Definition. Coatings that protect wastewater containment tanks, liners, roofing, flooring, joint caulking, manholes and related structures from corrosion. Protective coatings may cover the entire system or be used to fill cracks in systems.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 47 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than November 19, 2013, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased wastewater systems coatings. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for products to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased wastewater systems coatings.


[77 FR 69386, Nov. 19, 2012]


§ 3201.99 Water and wastewater treatment chemicals.

(a) Definition. Chemicals that are specifically formulated to purify raw water or to treat and purify wastewater from residential, commercial, industrial, and agricultural systems. Examples include coagulants, flocculants, neutralizing agents, activated carbon, or defoamers. This category excludes microbial cleaning products.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 87 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than July 6, 2020, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased water and wastewater treatment chemicals. By that date, Federal agencies responsible for drafting or reviewing specifications for products to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased water and wastewater treatment chemicals.


[84 FR 32021, July 5, 2019]


§ 3201.100 Aircraft and boat cleaners.

(a) Definition. (1) Aircraft and boat cleaners are products designed to remove built-on grease, oil, dirt, pollution, insect reside, or impact soils on both interior and exterior of aircraft and/or boats.


(2) Aircraft and boat cleaners for which Federal preferred procurement applies are:


(i) Aircraft cleaners. Cleaning products designed to remove built-on grease, oil, dirt, pollution, insect reside, or impact soils on both interior and exterior of aircraft.


(ii) Boat cleaners. Cleaning products designed to remove built-on grease, oil, dirt, pollution, insect reside, or impact soils on both interior and exterior of boats.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The minimum biobased content for all aircraft and boat cleaners shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product. The applicable minimum biobased contents for the Federal preferred procurement products are:


(1) Aircraft cleaners – 48 percent.


(2) Boat cleaners – 38 percent.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than June 11, 2014, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased aircraft and boat cleaners. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for products to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased aircraft and boat cleaners.


[78 FR 34872, June 11, 2013]


§ 3201.101 Automotive care products.

(a) Definition. Products such as waxes, buffing compounds, polishes, degreasers, soaps, wheel and tire cleaners, leather care products, interior cleaners, and fragrances that are formulated for cleaning and protecting automotive surfaces.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 75 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than June 11, 2014, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased automotive care products. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for products to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased automotive care products.


[78 FR 34872, June 11, 2013]


§ 3201.102 Engine crankcase oils.

(a) Definition. Lubricating products formulated to provide lubrication and wear protection for four-cycle gasoline or diesel engines.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 25 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than June 11, 2014, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased engine crankcase oils. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for products to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased engine crankcase oils.


(d) Determining overlap with an EPA-designated recovered content product. Qualifying products within this item may overlap with the EPA-designated recovered content product: Re-refined lubricating oils. USDA is requesting that manufacturers of these qualifying biobased products provide information on the USDA Web site of qualifying biobased products about the intended uses of the product, information on whether or not the product contains any recovered material, in addition to biobased ingredients, and performance standards against which the product has been tested. This information will assist Federal agencies in determining whether or not a qualifying biobased product overlaps with EPA-designated re-refined lubricating oil products and which product should be afforded the preference in purchasing.



Note to paragraph (d):

Engine crankcase oils within this designated product category can compete with similar re-refined lubricating oil products with recycled content. Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976, section 6002, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency designated re-refined lubricating oil products containing recovered materials as products for which Federal agencies must give preference in their purchasing programs. The designation can be found in the Comprehensive Procurement Guideline, 40 CFR 247.17.


[78 FR 34872, June 11, 2013]


§ 3201.103 Gasoline fuel additives.

(a) Definition. Chemical agents added to gasoline to increase octane levels, improve lubricity, and provide engine cleaning properties to gasoline-fired engines.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 92 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than June 11, 2014, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased gasoline fuel additives. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for products to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased gasoline fuel additives.


[78 FR 34872, June 11, 2013]


§ 3201.104 Metal cleaners and corrosion removers.

(a) Definition. (1) Products that are designed to clean and remove grease, oil, dirt, stains, soils, and rust from metal surfaces.


(2) Metal cleaners and corrosion removers for which Federal preferred procurement applies are:


(i) Corrosion removers. Products that are designed to remove rust from metal surfaces through chemical action.


(ii) Stainless steel cleaners. Products that are designed to clean and remove grease, oil, dirt, stains, and soils from stainless steel surfaces.


(iii) Other metal cleaners. Products that are designed to clean and remove grease, oil, dirt, stains, and soils from metal surfaces other than stainless steel.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The minimum biobased content for all metal cleaners and corrosion removers shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product. The applicable minimum biobased contents for the Federal preferred procurement products are:


(1) Corrosion removers – 71 percent.


(2) Stainless steel cleaners – 75 percent.


(3) Other metal cleaners – 56 percent.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than June 11, 2014, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased metal cleaners and corrosion removers. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for products to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased metal cleaners and corrosion removers.


[78 FR 34872, June 11, 2013]


§ 3201.105 Microbial cleaning products.

(a) Definition. (1) Cleaning agents that use microscopic organisms to treat or eliminate waste materials within drains, plumbing fixtures, sewage systems, wastewater treatment systems, or on a variety of other surfaces. These products typically include organisms that digest protein, starch, fat, and cellulose.


(2) Microbial cleaning products for which Federal preferred procurement applies are:


(i) Drain maintenance products. Products containing microbial agents that are intended for use in plumbing systems such as sinks, showers, and tubs.


(ii) Wastewater maintenance products. Products containing microbial agents that are intended for use in wastewater systems such as sewer lines and septic tanks.


(iii) General cleaners. Products containing microbial agents that are intended for multi-purpose cleaning in locations such as residential and commercial kitchens and bathrooms.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The minimum biobased content for all microbial cleaning products shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product. The applicable minimum biobased contents for the Federal preferred procurement products are:


(1) Drain maintenance products – 45 percent.


(2) Wastewater maintenance products – 44 percent.


(3) General cleaners – 50 percent.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than June 11, 2014, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased microbial cleaning products. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for products to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased microbial cleaning products.


[78 FR 34872, June 11, 2013]


§ 3201.106 Paint removers.

(a) Definition. Products formulated to loosen and remove paint from painted surfaces.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 41 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than June 11, 2014, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased paint removers. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for products to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased paint removers.


[78 FR 34872, June 11, 2013]


§ 3201.107 Water turbine bearing oils.

(a) Definition. Lubricants that are specifically formulated for use in the bearings found in water turbines for electric power generation. Previously designated turbine drip oils are used to lubricate bearings of shaft driven water well turbine pumps.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 46 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than June 11, 2014, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased water turbine bearing oils. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for products to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased water turbine bearing oils.


[78 FR 34872, June 11, 2013]


§ 3201.108 Intermediates – Plastic Resins.

(a) Definition. Intermediates – Plastic Resins are materials that are typically viscous liquids with the ability to harden permanently and may exist in liquid or solid (powder or pellets) states. Intermediates – Plastic Resins may be used in a variety of finished products neat, consisting of a single resin or polymer, or a homogeneous blend of two or more neat resins or polymers, or a composite, containing two or more distinct materials such as fiber-reinforced resins. Additionally, Intermediates – Plastic Resins may be used in finished products as additives such as plasticizers, pigments, thermal stability agents, or impact modifiers.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 22 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than July 10, 2019, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased Intermediates – Plastic Resins. By that date, Federal agencies responsible for drafting or reviewing specifications for products to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased Intermediates – Plastic Resins.


[83 FR 31848, July 10, 2018]


§ 3201.109 Intermediates – Chemicals.

(a) Definition. Intermediates – Chemicals are those used as reactants for organic synthesis reactions rather than for their functional properties in a chemical mixture; those used as building block chemicals and secondary chemicals such as glycerol, succinic acid, propanediol, and monomers such as lactic acid and propylene; those used for specific functional properties during manufacturing of other products such as pH regulators, flocculants, precipitants, neutralizing agents, emulsifiers, viscosity reducers, rheology modifiers, adhesion agents, detergents, wetting agents, foaming agents, or dispersants; those that are added to end-use products for their specific functional properties including polyols, polymers, and solvents for thinning and drying applications but excluding solvents used for cleaning; and those used for dyes, pigments, and scents including flavorings for non-food products such as lip balm.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 22 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than July 10, 2019, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased Intermediates – Chemicals. By that date, Federal agencies responsible for drafting or reviewing specifications for products to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased Intermediates – Chemicals.


[83 FR 31848, July 10, 2018]


§ 3201.110 Intermediates – Paint and Coating Components.

(a) Definition. Intermediates – Paint and Coating Components are ingredients used to formulate finished waterborne or solvent borne paint and coating products. Examples of Intermediates – Paint and Coating Components include binders, pigments, thickeners, curing agents, modifiers, humectants, open time additives, alkyd latex resins, polymers, polyols, reactive oligomers, or reactive diluents.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 22 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than July 10, 2019, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased Intermediates – Paint and Coating Components. By that date, Federal agencies responsible for drafting or reviewing specifications for products to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased Intermediates – Paint and Coating Components.


[83 FR 31848, July 10, 2018]


§ 3201.111 Intermediates – Textile Processing Materials.

(a) Definition. Intermediates – Textile Processing Materials are used to treat or finish textiles for the purposes of altering textile characteristics such as color, fading, wrinkle resistance, texture, or moisture management.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 22 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than July 10, 2019, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased Intermediates – Textile Processing Materials. By that date, Federal agencies responsible for drafting or reviewing specifications for products to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased Intermediates – Textile Processing Materials.


[83 FR 31848, July 10, 2018]


§ 3201.112 Intermediates – Foams.

(a) Definition. Intermediates – Foams are dry polymer foams used for non-construction purposes, such as cushions for furniture.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 22 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than July 10, 2019, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased Intermediates – Foams. By that date, Federal agencies responsible for drafting or reviewing specifications for products to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased Intermediates – Foams.


[83 FR 31848, July 10, 2018]


§ 3201.113 Intermediates – Fibers and Fabrics.

(a) Definition. Intermediates – Fibers and Fabrics encompasses plant and animal fibers, fibers made from plant-derived polymers that are not yet formed into more complex products such as carpet or fabrics, fabrics made from natural fibers, fabrics made from synthetic fibers, or fabrics made from a blend of the two. These materials are used to manufacture finished products such as clothing, upholstery, or drapes.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 25 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than July 10, 2019, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased Intermediates – Fibers and Fabrics. By that date, Federal agencies responsible for drafting or reviewing specifications for products to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased Intermediates – Fibers and Fabrics.


[83 FR 31848, July 10, 2018]


§ 3201.114 Intermediates – Lubricant Components.

(a) Definition. Intermediates – Lubricant Components are ingredients that used specifically to formulate finished lubricant products. Examples of Intermediates – Lubricant Components include base oils, base fluids, additives, or friction modifiers.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 44 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than July 10, 2019, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased Intermediates – Lubricant Components. By that date, Federal agencies responsible for drafting or reviewing specifications for products to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased Intermediates – Lubricant Components.


[83 FR 31848, July 10, 2018]


§ 3201.115 Intermediates – Binders.

(a) Definition. Intermediates – Binders are materials used to provide cohesiveness throughout an entire finished product. Binders are generally polymers or polymer precursors (such as epoxies) and include the polymeric materials used to formulate coatings, adhesives, sealants, and elastomers. The product category does not include adhesives and glues that are finished products used to attach the surfaces of two or more distinct and separate components to one another.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 47 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than July 10, 2019, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased Intermediates – Binders. By that date, Federal agencies responsible for drafting or reviewing specifications for products to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased Intermediates – Binders.


[83 FR 31848, July 10, 2018]


§ 3201.116 Intermediates – Cleaner Components.

(a) Definition. Intermediates – Cleaner Components are intermediate ingredients used specifically for formulating finished cleaning products. Examples of Intermediates – Cleaner Components include chelating agents, surfactants, hydrotropes, fatty acids, or solvents.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 55 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than July 10, 2019, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased Intermediates – Cleaner Components. By that date, Federal agencies responsible for drafting or reviewing specifications for products to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased Intermediates – Cleaner Components.


[83 FR 31848, July 10, 2018]


§ 3201.117 Intermediates – Personal Care Product Components.

(a) Definition. Intermediates – Personal Care Product Components are ingredients used to formulate finished personal care products. Examples of Intermediates – Personal Care Product Components include surfactants, oils, humectants, emollients, or emulsifiers.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 62 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than July 10, 2019, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased Intermediates – Personal Care Product Components. By that date, Federal agencies responsible for drafting or reviewing specifications for products to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased Intermediates – Personal Care Product Components.


[83 FR 31848, July 10, 2018]


§ 3201.118 Intermediates – Oils, Fats, and Waxes.

(a) Definition. Intermediates – Oils, Fats, and Waxes include raw or modified fats and oils derived from plants or animals.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 65 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than July 10, 2019, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased Intermediates – Oils, Fats, and Waxes. By that date, Federal agencies responsible for drafting or reviewing specifications for products to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased Intermediates – Oils, Fats, and Waxes.


[83 FR 31848, July 10, 2018]


§ 3201.119 Intermediates – Rubber Materials.

(a) Definition. Intermediates – Rubber Materials are used in finished products such as rubber gloves, vehicle tires, footwear, sports apparel and equipment, bedding and pillow foams, tubing, catheters, gasketing, or cosmetic adhesives and bases.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 96 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than July 10, 2019, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased Intermediates – Rubber Materials. By that date, Federal agencies responsible for drafting or reviewing specifications for products to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased Intermediates – Rubber Materials.


[83 FR 31848, July 10, 2018]


§ 3201.120 Adhesives.

(a) Definition. Adhesives are compounds that temporarily or permanently bind two item surfaces together. These products include glues and sticky tapes used in construction, household, flooring, and industrial settings. This category excludes epoxy systems.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 24 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than July 6, 2020, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased adhesives. By that date, Federal agencies responsible for drafting or reviewing specifications for products to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased adhesives.


[84 FR 32021, July 5, 2019]


§ 3201.121 Animal habitat care products.

(a) Definition. Animal habitat care products are products that are intended to improve the quality of animal habitats such as cleaning supplies, sanitizers, feeders, and products that control, mask, or suppress pet odors. This category excludes animal bedding or litter products and animal cleaning products.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 22 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than July 6, 2020, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased animal habitat care products. By that date, Federal agencies responsible for drafting or reviewing specifications for products to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased animal habitat care products.


[84 FR 32021, July 5, 2019]


§ 3201.122 Cleaning tools.

(a) Definition. Cleaning tools are objects that are used to clean a variety of surfaces or items and can be used multiple times. This category includes tools such as brushes, scrapers, abrasive pads, and gloves that are used for cleaning. The expendable materials used in cleaning, such as glass cleaners, single-use wipes, and all-purpose cleaners, are excluded from this category, as these materials better fit in other categories.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 22 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than July 6, 2020, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased cleaning tools. By that date, Federal agencies responsible for drafting or reviewing specifications for products to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased cleaning tools.


[84 FR 32021, July 5, 2019]


§ 3201.123 Concrete curing agents.

(a) Definition. Concrete curing agents are products that are designed to enhance and control the curing process of concrete.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 59 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than July 6, 2020, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased concrete curing agents. By that date, Federal agencies responsible for drafting or reviewing specifications for products to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased concrete curing agents.


(d) Determining overlap with a designated product category in the EPA’s Comprehensive Procurement Guideline (CPG) program. Qualifying products within this product category may overlap with the EPA’s CPG-designated recovered content product category of Construction Products: Cement and Concrete. USDA is requesting that manufacturers of these qualifying biobased products provide information on the BioPreferred Program’s website about the intended uses of the product, information on whether the product contains any recovered material, in addition to biobased ingredients, and performance standards against which the product has been tested. This information will assist Federal agencies in determining whether a qualifying biobased product overlaps with the EPA’s CPG-designated product category of Construction Products: Cement and Concrete and which product should be afforded the preference in purchasing.



Note 1 to Paragraph (d):

Concrete curing agents within this designated product category can compete with similar concrete curing agents with recycled content. Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976, section 6002, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency CPG-designated Construction Products: Cement and Concrete containing recovered materials as products for which Federal agencies must give preference in their purchasing programs. The designation can be found in the Comprehensive Procurement Guideline, 40 CFR 247.12.


[84 FR 32021, July 5, 2019]


§ 3201.124 Concrete repair materials.

(a) Definition. (1) Products that are designed to repair cracks and other damage to concrete.


(2) Concrete repair materials for which preferred procurement applies are:


(i) Concrete repair materials – concrete leveling. Concrete repair materials – concrete leveling are products that are designed to repair cracks and other damage to concrete by raising or stabilizing concrete.


(ii) Concrete repair materials – concrete patching. Concrete repair materials – concrete patching are products that are designed to repair cracks and other damage to concrete by filling and patching the concrete.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The minimum biobased content for all concrete repair materials shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the total organic carbon in the finished product. The applicable minimum biobased contents are:


(1) Concrete repair materials – concrete leveling – 23 percent.


(2) Concrete repair materials – concrete patching – 69 percent.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than July 6, 2020, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased concrete repair materials. By that date, Federal agencies responsible for drafting or reviewing specifications for products to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased concrete repair materials.


(d) Determining overlap with a designated product category in the EPA’s CPG program. Qualifying products within this product category may overlap with the EPA’s CPG-designated recovered content product category of Construction Products: Cement and Concrete. USDA is requesting that manufacturers of these qualifying biobased products provide information on the BioPreferred Program’s website about the intended uses of the product, information on whether the product contains any recovered material, in addition to biobased ingredients, and performance standards against which the product has been tested. This information will assist Federal agencies in determining whether a qualifying biobased product overlaps with the EPA’s CPG-designated product category of Construction Products: Cement and Concrete and which product should be afforded the preference in purchasing.



Note 1 to Paragraph (d):

Concrete repair materials within this designated product category can compete with similar concrete repair materials with recycled content. Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976, section 6002, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency CPG-designated Construction Products: Cement and Concrete containing recovered materials as products for which Federal agencies must give preference in their purchasing programs. The designation can be found in the Comprehensive Procurement Guideline, 40 CFR 247.12.


[84 FR 32021, July 5, 2019]


§ 3201.125 Durable cutlery.

(a) Definition. Durable cutlery consists of dining utensils that are designed to be used multiple times.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 28 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than July 6, 2020, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased durable cutlery. By that date, Federal agencies responsible for drafting or reviewing specifications for products to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased durable cutlery.


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§ 3201.126 Durable tableware.

(a) Definition. Durable tableware consists of multiple-use drinkware and dishware including cups, plates, bowls, and serving platters.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 28 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than July 6, 2020, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased durable tableware. By that date, Federal agencies responsible for drafting or reviewing specifications for products to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased durable tableware.


[84 FR 32021, July 5, 2019]


§ 3201.127 Epoxy systems.

(a) Definition. Epoxy systems are two-component systems that are epoxy-based and are used as coatings, adhesives, surface fillers, and composite matrices.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 23 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than July 6, 2020, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased epoxy systems. By that date, Federal agencies responsible for drafting or reviewing specifications for products to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased epoxy systems.


[84 FR 32021, July 5, 2019]


§ 3201.128 Exterior paints and coatings.

(a) Definition. Exterior paints and coatings are pigmented liquid products that typically contain pigments to add color and are formulated for use on outdoor surfaces. When these products dry, they typically form a protective layer and provide a coat of color to the applied surface. This category includes paint and primers but excludes wood and concrete sealers and stains and specialty coatings such as roof coatings, wastewater system coatings, and water tank coatings.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 83 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than July 6, 2020, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased exterior paints and coatings. By that date, Federal agencies responsible for drafting or reviewing specifications for products to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased exterior paints and coatings.


(d) Determining overlap with a designated product category in the EPA’s CPG program. Qualifying products within this product category may overlap with the EPA’s CPG-designated recovered content product category of Construction Products: Consolidated and Reprocessed Latex Paint for Specified Uses. USDA is requesting that manufacturers of these qualifying biobased products provide information on the BioPreferred Program’s website about the intended uses of the product, information on whether the product contains any recovered material, in addition to biobased ingredients, and performance standards against which the product has been tested. This information will assist Federal agencies in determining whether a qualifying biobased product overlaps with the EPA’s CPG-designated product category of Construction Products: Consolidated and Reprocessed Latex Paint for Specified Uses and which product should be afforded the preference in purchasing.



Note 1 to Paragraph (d):

Exterior paints and coatings within this designated product category can compete with similar exterior paints and coatings with recycled content. Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976, section 6002, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency CPG-designated Construction Products: Consolidated and Reprocessed Latex Paint for Specified Uses containing recovered materials as products for which Federal agencies must give preference in their purchasing programs. The designation can be found in the Comprehensive Procurement Guideline, 40 CFR 247.12.


[84 FR 32021, July 5, 2019]


§ 3201.129 Facial care products.

(a) Definition. Facial care products are cleansers, moisturizers, and treatments specifically designed for the face. These products are used to care for the condition of the face by supporting skin integrity, enhancing its appearance, and relieving skin conditions. This category does not include tools and applicators, such as those used to apply facial care products.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 88 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than July 6, 2020, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased facial care products. By that date, Federal agencies responsible for drafting or reviewing specifications for products to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased facial care products.


[84 FR 32021, July 5, 2019]


§ 3201.130 Feminine care products.

(a) Definition. Feminine care products are products that are designed for maintaining feminine health and hygiene. This category includes sanitary napkins, panty liners, and tampons.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 65 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than July 6, 2020, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased feminine care products. By that date, Federal agencies responsible for drafting or reviewing specifications for products to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased feminine care products.


[84 FR 32021, July 5, 2019]


§ 3201.131 Fire logs and fire starters.

(a) Definition. Fire logs and fire starters are devices or substances that are used to start a fire intended for uses such as comfort heat, decoration, or cooking. Examples include fire logs and lighter fluid. This category excludes heating fuels for chafing dishes, beverage urns, warming boxes, and wick lamps.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 92 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than July 6, 2020, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased fire logs and fire starters. By that date, Federal agencies responsible for drafting or reviewing specifications for products to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased fire logs and fire starters.


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§ 3201.132 Folders and filing products.

(a) Definition. Folders and filing products are products that are designed to hold together items such as loose sheets of paper, documents, and photographs with clasps, fasteners, rings, or folders. This category includes binders, folders, and document covers.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 56 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than July 6, 2020, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased folders and filing products. By that date, Federal agencies responsible for drafting or reviewing specifications for products to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased folders and filing products.


(d) Determining overlap with a designated product category in the EPA’s CPG program. Qualifying products within this product category may overlap with the EPA’s CPG-designated recovered content product categories of Non-Paper Office Products: Binders, Clipboards, File Folders, Clip Portfolios, and Presentation Folders and Non-Paper Office Products: Plastic Envelopes. USDA is requesting that manufacturers of these qualifying biobased products provide information on the BioPreferred Program’s website about the intended uses of the product, information on whether the product contains any recovered material, in addition to biobased ingredients, and performance standards against which the product has been tested. This information will assist Federal agencies in determining whether a qualifying biobased product overlaps with the EPA’s CPG-designated product categories of Non-Paper Office Products: Binders, Clipboards, File Folders, Clip Portfolios, and Presentation Folders and Non-Paper Office Products: Plastic Envelopes and which product should be afforded the preference in purchasing.



Note 1 to Paragraph (d):

Biobased folders and filing products within this designated product category can compete with similar folders and filing products with recycled content. Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976, section 6002, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency CPG-designated Non-Paper Office Products: Binders, Clipboards, File Folders, Clip Portfolios, and Presentation Folders and Non-Paper Office Products: Plastic Envelopes containing recovered materials as products for which Federal agencies must give preference in their purchasing programs. The designation can be found in the Comprehensive Procurement Guideline, 40 CFR 247.16.


[84 FR 32021, July 5, 2019]


§ 3201.133 Foliar sprays.

(a) Definition. Foliar sprays are products that are applied to the leaves of plants and provide plants with nutrients. These products may also repair plants from previous pest attacks. Examples include liquid fertilizers, foliar feeds, and micronutrient solutions.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 50 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than July 6, 2020, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased foliar sprays. By that date, Federal agencies responsible for drafting or reviewing specifications for products to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased foliar sprays.


[84 FR 32021, July 5, 2019]


§ 3201.134 Gardening supplies and accessories.

(a) Definition. Gardening supplies and accessories are products that are used to grow plants in outdoor and indoor settings. Examples include seedling starter trays, nonwoven mats or substrates for hydroponics, and flower or plant pots. This category excludes compost activators and accelerators; erosion control materials; fertilizers, including soil inoculants; foliar sprays; mulch and compost materials; and soil amendments.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 43 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than July 6, 2020, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased gardening supplies and accessories. By that date, Federal agencies responsible for drafting or reviewing specifications for products to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased gardening supplies and accessories.


[84 FR 32021, July 5, 2019]


§ 3201.135 Heating fuels and wick lamps.

(a) Definition. Heating fuels and wick lamps are products that create controlled sources of heat or sustain controlled open flames that are used for warming food, portable stoves, beverage urns, or fondue pots. This category also includes wick lamps and their fuels that create controlled sources of light indoors and in camping or emergency preparedness situations. This category excludes fire logs and fire starters and candles and wax melts.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 75 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than July 6, 2020, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased heating fuels and wick lamps. By that date, Federal agencies responsible for drafting or reviewing specifications for products to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased heating fuels and wick lamps.


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§ 3201.136 Kitchenware and accessories.

(a) Definition. Kitchenware and accessories are products designed for food or drink preparation. These products include cookware and bakeware, such as baking cups, cookie sheets, parchment paper, and roasting bags or pans; cooking utensils, such as brushes, tongs, spatulas, and ladles; and food preparation items, such as cutting boards, measuring cups, mixing bowls, coffee filters, food preparation gloves, and sandwich and snack bags. These products exclude kitchen appliances, such as toasters, blenders, and coffee makers; disposable tableware; disposable cutlery; disposable containers; durable tableware; durable cutlery; and cleaning tools.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 22 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than July 6, 2020, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased kitchenware and accessories. By that date, Federal agencies responsible for drafting or reviewing specifications for products to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased kitchenware and accessories.


[84 FR 32021, July 5, 2019]


§ 3201.137 Other lubricants.

(a) Definition. Other lubricants are lubricant products that do not fit into any of the BioPreferred Program’s specific lubricant categories. This category includes lubricants that are formulated for specialized uses. Examples of other lubricants include lubricants used for sporting or exercise gear and equipment, musical instruments, and specialized equipment such as tree shakers. This category excludes lubricants that are covered by the specific lubricant categories such as chain and cable lubricants, firearm lubricants, forming lubricants, gear lubricants, multi-purpose lubricants, penetrating lubricants, pneumatic equipment lubricants, and slide way lubricants.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 39 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than July 6, 2020, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased other lubricants. By that date, Federal agencies responsible for drafting or reviewing specifications for products to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased other lubricants.


(d) Determining overlap with a designated product category in the EPA’s CPG program. Qualifying products within this product category may overlap with the EPA’s CPG-designated recovered content product category of Vehicular Products: Re-Refined Lubricating Oil. USDA is requesting that manufacturers of these qualifying biobased products provide information on the BioPreferred Program’s website about the intended uses of the product, information on whether the product contains any recovered material, in addition to biobased ingredients, and performance standards against which the product has been tested. This information will assist Federal agencies in determining whether a qualifying biobased product overlaps with the EPA’s CPG-designated product category of Vehicular Products: Re-Refined Lubricating Oil and which product should be afforded the preference in purchasing.



Note 1 to Paragraph (d):

Other lubricants within this designated product category can compete with similar other lubricants with recycled content. According to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976, section 6002, Federal agencies must give preference in their purchasing programs for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s CPG-designated Vehicular Products: Re-Refined Lubricating Oil containing recovered materials as products. The designation can be found in the Comprehensive Procurement Guideline, 40 CFR 247.11.


[84 FR 32021, July 5, 2019]


§ 3201.138 Phase change materials.

(a) Definition. Phase change materials are products that are capable of absorbing and releasing large amounts of thermal energy by freezing and thawing at certain temperatures. Heat is absorbed or released when the material changes from solid to liquid and vice versa. Applications may include, but are not limited to, conditioning of buildings, medical applications, thermal energy storage, or cooling of food. Materials such as animal fats and plant oils that melt at desirable temperatures are typically used to make products in this category.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 71 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than July 6, 2020, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased phase change materials. By that date, Federal agencies responsible for drafting or reviewing specifications for products to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased phase change materials.


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§ 3201.139 Playground and athletic surface materials.

(a) Definition. Playground and athletic surface materials are products that are designed for use on playgrounds and athletic surfaces. Examples include materials that are applied to the surfaces of playgrounds, athletic fields, and other sports surfaces to enhance or change the color or general appearance of the surface and to provide safety and/or performance benefits. Such materials include, but are not limited to, top coatings, primers, line marking paints, and rubberized pellets that are used on athletic courts, tracks, natural or artificial turf, and other playing surfaces. This category does not include the artificial turf or surface itself, as that is included in the carpets product category.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 22 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than July 6, 2020, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased playground and athletic surface materials. By that date, Federal agencies responsible for drafting or reviewing specifications for products to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased playground and athletic surface materials.


(d) Determining overlap with a designated product category in the EPA’s CPG program. Qualifying products within this product category may overlap with the EPA’s CPG-designated recovered content product categories of Parks and Recreation Products: Playground Surfaces and Running Tracks. USDA is requesting that manufacturers of these qualifying biobased products provide information on the BioPreferred Program’s website about the intended uses of the product, information on whether the product contains any recovered material, in addition to biobased ingredients, and performance standards against which the product has been tested. This information will assist Federal agencies in determining whether a qualifying biobased product overlaps with the EPA’s CPG-designated product categories of Parks and Recreation Products: Playground Surfaces and Running Tracks and which product should be afforded the preference in purchasing.



Note 1 to Paragraph (d):

Playground and athletic surface materials within this designated product category can compete with similar playground and athletic surface materials with recycled content. According to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976, section 6002, Federal agencies must give preference in their purchasing programs for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s CPG-designated product categories of Parks and Recreation Products: Playground Surfaces and Running Tracks containing recovered materials as products. The designation can be found in the Comprehensive Procurement Guideline, 40 CFR 247.10.


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§ 3201.140 Powder coatings.

(a) Definition. Powder coatings are polymer resin systems that are combined with stabilizers, curatives, pigments, and other additives and ground into a powder. These coatings are applied electrostatically to metallic surfaces and then cured under heat. Powder coatings are typically used for coating metals, such as vehicle and bicycle parts, household appliances, and aluminum extrusions.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 34 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than July 6, 2020, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased powder coatings. By that date, Federal agencies responsible for drafting or reviewing specifications for products to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased powder coatings.


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§ 3201.141 Product packaging.

(a) Definition. Product packaging items are used to protect, handle, and retain a product during activities related but not limited to its storage, distribution, sale, and use. These containers are typically designed to be used once. This category excludes packing and insulating materials and shopping and trash bags.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 25 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than July 6, 2020, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased product packaging. By that date, Federal agencies responsible for drafting or reviewing specifications for products to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased product packaging.


(d) Determining overlap with a designated product category in the EPA’s CPG program. Qualifying products within this product category may overlap with the EPA’s CPG-designated recovered content product category of Paper Products: Paperboard and Packaging. USDA is requesting that manufacturers of these qualifying biobased products provide information on the BioPreferred Program’s website about the intended uses of the product, information on whether the product contains any recovered material, in addition to biobased ingredients, and performance standards against which the product has been tested. This information will assist Federal agencies in determining whether a qualifying biobased product overlaps with the EPA’s CPG-designated product category of Paper Products: Paperboard and Packaging and which product should be afforded the preference in purchasing.



Note 1 to Paragraph (d):

Product packaging within this designated product category can compete with similar product packaging with recycled content. Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976, section 6002, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency CPG-designated Paper Products: Paperboard and Packaging containing recovered materials as products for which Federal agencies must give preference in their purchasing programs. The designation can be found in the Comprehensive Procurement Guideline, 40 CFR 247.10.


[84 FR 32021, July 5, 2019]


§ 3201.142 Rugs and floor mats.

(a) Definition. Rugs or floor mats are floor coverings that are used for decorative or ergonomic purposes and that are not attached to the floor. This category includes items such as area rugs, rug runners, chair mats, and bathroom and kitchen mats. This category excludes products composed of woven, tufted, or knitted fiber and a backing system because these products fall under the “Carpets” product category.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 23 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than July 6, 2020, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased rugs and floor mats. By that date, Federal agencies responsible for drafting or reviewing specifications for products to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased rugs and floor mats.


(d) Determining overlap with a designated product category in the EPA’s CPG program. Qualifying products within this product category may overlap with the EPA’s CPG-designated recovered content product category of Miscellaneous Products: Mats. USDA is requesting that manufacturers of these qualifying biobased products provide information on the BioPreferred Program’s website about the intended uses of the product, information on whether the product contains any recovered material, in addition to biobased ingredients, and performance standards against which the product has been tested. This information will assist Federal agencies in determining whether a qualifying biobased product overlaps with the EPA’s CPG-designated product category of Miscellaneous Products: Mats and which product should be afforded the preference in purchasing.



Note 1 to Paragraph (d):

Rugs and floor mats within this designated product category can compete with similar rugs or floor mats with recycled content. Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976, section 6002, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency CPG-designated Miscellaneous Products: Mats containing recovered materials as products for which Federal agencies must give preference in their purchasing programs. The designation can be found in the Comprehensive Procurement Guideline, 40 CFR 247.17.


[84 FR 32021, July 5, 2019]


§ 3201.143 Shopping and trash bags.

(a) Definition. Shopping and trash bags are open-ended bags that are typically made of thin, flexible film and are used for containing and transporting items such as consumer goods and waste. Examples include trash bags, can liners, shopping or grocery bags, pet waste bags, compost bags, and yard waste bags. This category does not include product packaging, disposable containers, or semi-durable and non-durable films.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 22 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than July 6, 2020, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased shopping and trash bags. By that date, Federal agencies responsible for drafting or reviewing specifications for products to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased shopping and trash bags.


(d) Determining overlap with a designated product category in the EPA’s CPG program. Qualifying products within this product category may overlap with the EPA’s CPG-designated recovered content product category of Non-Paper Office Products: Plastic Trash Bags. USDA is requesting that manufacturers of these qualifying biobased products provide information on the BioPreferred Program’s website about the intended uses of the product, information on whether the product contains any recovered material, in addition to biobased ingredients, and performance standards against which the product has been tested. This information will assist Federal agencies in determining whether a qualifying biobased product overlaps with the EPA’s CPG-designated product category of Non-Paper Office Products: Trash Bags and which product should be afforded the preference in purchasing.



Note 1 to Paragraph (d):

Shopping and trash bags within this designated product category can compete with similar shopping and trash bags with recycled content. Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976, section 6002, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency CPG-designated Non-Paper Office Products: Trash Bags containing recovered materials as products for which Federal agencies must give preference in their purchasing programs. The designation can be found in the Comprehensive Procurement Guideline, 40 CFR 247.17.


[84 FR 32021, July 5, 2019]


§ 3201.144 Soil amendments.

(a) Definition. Soil amendments are materials that enhance the physical characteristics of soil through improving water retention or drainage, improving nutrient cycling, promoting microbial growth, or changing the soil’s pH. This category excludes foliar sprays and chemical fertilizers.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 72 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than July 6, 2020, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased soil amendments. By that date, Federal agencies responsible for drafting or reviewing specifications for products to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased soil amendments.


(d) Determining overlap with a designated product category in the EPA’s CPG program. Qualifying products within this product category may overlap with the EPA’s CPG-designated recovered content product categories of Landscaping Products: Compost Made From Recovered Organic Materials and Landscaping Products: Fertilizer Made From Recovered Organic Materials. USDA is requesting that manufacturers of these qualifying biobased products provide information on the BioPreferred Program’s website about the intended uses of the product, information on whether the product contains any recovered material, in addition to biobased ingredients, and performance standards against which the product has been tested. This information will assist Federal agencies in determining whether a qualifying biobased product overlaps with the EPA’s CPG-designated product categories Landscaping Products: Compost Made From Recovered Organic Materials and Landscaping Products: Fertilizer Made From Recovered Organic Materials and which product should be afforded the preference in purchasing.



Note 1 to Paragraph (d):

Soil amendments within this designated product category can compete with similar soil amendments with recycled content. Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976, section 6002, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency CPG-designated Landscaping Products: Compost Made From Recovered Organic Materials and Landscaping Products: Fertilizer Made From Recovered Organic Materials containing recovered materials as products for which Federal agencies must give preference in their purchasing programs. The designation can be found in the Comprehensive Procurement Guideline, 40 CFR 247.15.


[84 FR 32021, July 5, 2019]


§ 3201.145 Surface guards, molding, and trim.

(a) Definition. Surface guards, molding, and trim products are typically used during construction or manufacturing. These products are designed to protect surfaces, such as walls and floors, from damage or to cover the exposed edges of furniture or floors.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 26 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than July 6, 2020, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased surface guards, molding, and trim. By that date, Federal agencies responsible for drafting or reviewing specifications for products to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased surface guards, molding, and trim.


[84 FR 32021, July 5, 2019]


§ 3201.146 Toys and sporting gear.

(a) Definition. Toys and sporting gear are products that are designed for indoor or outdoor recreational use including, but not limited to, toys; games; and sporting equipment and accessories such as balls, bats, racquets, nets, and bicycle seats. This category does not include products such as cleaners, lubricants, and oils that are used to maintain or clean toys and sporting gear.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 32 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than July 6, 2020, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased toys and sporting gear. By that date, Federal agencies responsible for drafting or reviewing specifications for products to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased toys and sporting gear.


[84 FR 32021, July 5, 2019]


§ 3201.147 Traffic and zone marking paints.

(a) Definition. Traffic and zone marking paints are products that are formulated and marketed for marking and striping parking lots, roads, streets, highways, or other traffic surfaces including, but not limited to, curbs, crosswalks, driveways, sidewalks, and airport runways.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 30 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than July 6, 2020, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased traffic and zone marking paints. By that date, Federal agencies responsible for drafting or reviewing specifications for products to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased traffic and zone marking paints.


[84 FR 32021, July 5, 2019]


§ 3201.148 Transmission fluids.

(a) Definition. Transmission fluids are liquids that lubricate and cool the moving parts in a transmission to prevent wearing and to ensure smooth performance.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 60 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than July 6, 2020, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased transmission fluids. By that date, Federal agencies responsible for drafting or reviewing specifications for products to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased transmission fluids.


(d) Determining overlap with a designated product category in the EPA’s CPG program. Qualifying products within this product category may overlap with the EPA’s CPG-designated recovered content product category of Vehicular Products: Re-refined Lubricating Oil. USDA is requesting that manufacturers of these qualifying biobased products provide information on the BioPreferred Program’s website about the intended uses of the product, information on whether the product contains any recovered material, in addition to biobased ingredients, and performance standards against which the product has been tested. This information will assist Federal agencies in determining whether a qualifying biobased product overlaps with the EPA’s CPG-designated Vehicular Products: Re-Refined Lubricating Oil and which product should be afforded the preference in purchasing.



Note 1 to Paragraph (d):

Transmission fluids within this designated product category can compete with similar transmission fluids with recycled content. Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976, section 6002, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency CPG-designated product categories Vehicular Products: Re-Refined Lubricating Oil containing recovered materials as products for which Federal agencies must give preference in their purchasing programs. The designation can be found in the Comprehensive Procurement Guideline, 40 CFR 247.11.


[84 FR 32021, July 5, 2019]


§ 3201.149 Wall coverings.

(a) Definition. Wall coverings are materials that are applied to walls using an adhesive. This category includes, but is not limited to, wallpaper, vinyl wall coverings, and wall fabrics. This category excludes all types of paints or coatings.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have a minimum biobased content of at least 62 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the total organic carbon in the finished product.


(c) Preference compliance date. No later than July 6, 2020, procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased wall coverings. By that date, Federal agencies responsible for drafting or reviewing specifications for products to be procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased wall coverings.


[84 FR 32021, July 5, 2019]


PART 3202 – VOLUNTARY LABELING PROGRAM FOR BIOBASED PRODUCTS


Authority:7 U.S.C. 8102.


Source:76 FR 3806, Jan. 20, 2011, unless otherwise noted. Redesignated at 76 FR 53632, Aug. 29, 2011.

§ 3202.1 Purpose and scope.

The purpose of this part is to set forth the terms and conditions for voluntary use of the “USDA Certified Biobased Product” certification mark. This part establishes the criteria that biobased products must meet in order to be eligible to become certified biobased products to which the “USDA Certified Biobased Product” mark can be affixed, the process manufacturers and vendors must use to obtain and maintain USDA certification, and the recordkeeping requirements for manufacturers and vendors who obtain certification. In addition, this part establishes specifications for the correct and incorrect uses of the certification mark, which apply to manufacturers, vendors, and other entities. Finally, this part establishes actions that constitute voluntary labeling program violations.


§ 3202.2 Definitions.

Applicable minimum biobased content. The biobased content at or above the level set by USDA to qualify for use of the certification mark.


ASTM International (ASTM). American Society for Testing and Materials is a nonprofit organization that provides an international forum for the development and publication of voluntary consensus standards for materials, products, systems, and services.


Biobased content. The amount of biobased carbon in the material or product expressed as a percent of weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the material or product. For BioPreferred Products (products that have been identified for Federal preferred procurement), the biobased content shall be defined and determined as specified in the applicable section of subpart B of part 3201. For all other products, the biobased content is to be determined using ASTM Method D6866, Standard Test Methods for Determining the Biobased Content of Solid, Liquid, and Gaseous Samples Using Radiocarbon Analysis.


Biobased product. (1) A product determined by USDA to be a commercial or industrial product (other than food or feed) that is:


(i) Composed, in whole or in significant part, of biological products, including renewable domestic agricultural materials and forestry materials; or


(ii) An intermediate ingredient or feedstock.


(2) The term “biobased product” includes, with respect to forestry materials, forest products that meet biobased content requirements, notwithstanding the market share the product holds, the age of the product, or whether the market for the product is new or emerging.


Certification mark. A combination of the certification mark artwork (as defined in this subpart); one of three statements identifying whether the USDA certification applies to the product, the package, or both the product and package; and, where applicable, the letters “FP” to indicate that the product is within a designated product category and eligible for Federal preferred procurement. The certification mark is owned, and its use is managed by, USDA (standard trademark law definition applies).


Certification mark artwork. The distinctive image, as shown in Figures 1-3, that identifies products as USDA Certified.



Certified biobased product. A biobased product for which the manufacturer or vendor of the product has received approval from USDA to affix to the product the “USDA Certified Biobased Product” certification mark.


Days. As used in this part means calendar days.


Designated product category. A generic grouping of biobased products, including those final products made from designated intermediate ingredients or feedstocks, or complex assemblies identified in subpart B of 7 CFR part 3201, that is eligible for the procurement preference established under section 9002 of FSRIA.


Designated representative. An entity authorized by a manufacturer or vendor to affix the USDA certification mark to the manufacturer’s or vendor’s certified biobased product or its packaging.


Forest product. A product made from materials derived from the practice of forestry or the management of growing timber. The term “forest product” includes:


(1) Pulp, paper, paperboard, pellets, lumber, and other wood products; and


(2) Any recycled products derived from forest materials.


Intermediate ingredient or feedstock. A material or compound made in whole or in significant part from biological products, including renewable agricultural materials (including plant, animal, and marine materials) or forestry materials that have undergone value added processing (including thermal, chemical, biological, or a significant amount of mechanical processing), excluding harvesting operations, offered for sale by a manufacturer or vendor and that is subsequently used to make a more complex compound or product.


ISO. The International Organization for Standardization, a network of national standards institutes working in partnership with international organizations, governments, industries, business, and consumer representatives.


ISO 9001 conformant. An entity that meets all of the requirements of the ISO 9001 standard, but that is not required to be ISO 9001 certified. ISO 9001 refers to the International Organization for Standardization’s standards and guidelines relating to “quality management” systems. “Quality management” is defined as what the manufacturer does to ensure that its products or services satisfy the customer’s quality requirements and comply with any regulations applicable to those products or services.


Manufacturer. An entity that performs the necessary chemical and/or mechanical processes to make a final marketable product.


Other entity. Any person, group, public or private organization, or business other than USDA, or manufacturers or vendors of biobased products that may wish to use the “USDA Certified Biobased Product” certification mark in informational or promotional material related to a certified biobased product.


Program Manager. The manager of the BioPreferred Program.


Qualified biobased product. A product that is eligible for federal preferred procurement because it meets the definition and minimum biobased content criteria for one or more designated product categories, or one or more designated intermediate ingredient or feedstock categories, as specified in subpart B of 7 CFR part 3201.


Renewable chemical. A monomer, polymer, plastic, formulated product, or chemical substance produced from renewable biomass.


USDA. The United States Department of Agriculture.


Vendor. An entity that offers for sale final marketable biobased products that are produced by manufacturers.


[76 FR 3806, Jan. 20, 2011. Redesignated and amended at 76 FR 53632, Aug. 29, 2011; 80 FR 34036, June 15, 2015]


§ 3202.3 Applicability.

(a) Manufacturers, vendors, and designated representatives. The requirements in this part apply to all manufacturers and vendors, and their designated representatives, who wish to participate in the USDA voluntary labeling program for biobased products. Manufacturers and vendors wishing to participate in the voluntary labeling program are required to obtain and maintain product certification.


(b) Other entities. The requirements in this part apply to other entities who wish to use the certification mark in promoting the sales or the public awareness of certified biobased products.


§ 3202.4 Criteria for product eligibility to use the certification mark.

A product must meet each of the criteria specified in paragraphs (a) through (c) of this section in order to be eligible to receive biobased product certification.


A product must meet each of the criteria specified in paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section in order to be eligible to receive biobased product certification.


(a) Biobased product. The product for which certification is sought must be a biobased product as defined in § 3202.2 of this part.


(b) Minimum biobased content. The biobased content of the product must be equal to or greater than the applicable minimum biobased content, as described in paragraphs (b)(1) through (b)(4) of this section.


(1) Qualified Biobased Products – (i) Product is within a single product category. If the product is within a single product category that, at the time the application for certification is submitted, has been designated by USDA for Federal preferred procurement, the applicable minimum biobased content is the minimum biobased content specified for the item as found in subpart B of 7 CFR part 3201.


(ii) Product is within multiple product categories. If a biobased product is marketed within more than one product category identified for preferred Federal purchasing, uses the same packaging for each product, and the applicant seeks certification of the product, the product’s biobased content must meet or exceed the specified minimum biobased content for each of the applicable product categories in order to use the certification mark on the product. However, if the manufacturer packages the product differently for each product category, then the applicable minimum biobased contents are those established under paragraph (b)(1)(i) of this section for each product category for which the applicant seeks to use the certification mark.


(2) Finished biobased products that are not Qualified Biobased Products. (i) If the product is not an intermediate ingredient or feedstock, and is not within a product category eligible for Federal preferred procurement at the time the application for certification is submitted, the applicable minimum biobased content is 25 percent. Manufacturers, vendors, groups of manufacturers and/or vendors, and trade associations may propose an alternative applicable minimum biobased content for the product by developing, in consultation with USDA, and conducting an analysis to support the proposed alternative applicable minimum biobased content. If approved by USDA, the proposed alternative applicable minimum biobased content would become the applicable minimum biobased content for the product to be labeled.


(ii) If a product certified under paragraph (b)(2)(i) of this section is within a product category that USDA subsequently designates for Federal preferred procurement, the applicable minimum biobased content shall become, as of the effective date of the final designation rule, the minimum biobased content specified for the item as found in subpart B of 7 CFR part 3201.


(3) Products that are intermediate ingredients or feedstocks. (i) If the product is an intermediate ingredient or feedstock that is not eligible for Federal preferred procurement at the time the application for certification is submitted, the applicable minimum biobased content is 25 percent. Manufacturers, vendors, groups of manufacturers and/or vendors, and trade associations may propose an alternative applicable minimum biobased content for the product by developing, in consultation with USDA, and conducting an analysis to support the proposed alternative applicable minimum biobased content. If approved by USDA, the proposed alternative applicable minimum biobased content would become the applicable minimum biobased content for the intermediate ingredient or feedstock product to be labeled.


(ii) If a product certified under paragraph (b)(3)(i) of this section is within a category that USDA subsequently designates for Federal preferred procurement, the applicable minimum biobased content shall become, as of the effective date of the final designation rule, the minimum biobased content specified for the item as found in subpart B of 7 CFR part 3201.


(4) Finished products that are complex assemblies. (i) If the product is a complex assembly, as defined in subpart A of 7 CFR part 3201, that is not eligible for federal preferred procurement at the time the application for certification is submitted, the applicable minimum biobased content is 25 percent. The biobased content shall be determined using the procedures specified in § 3201.7(c)(3) of this chapter. Manufacturers, vendors, groups of manufacturers and/or vendors, and trade associations may propose an alternative applicable minimum biobased content for the product by developing, in consultation with USDA, and conducting an analysis to support the proposed alternative applicable minimum biobased content. If approved by USDA, the proposed alternative applicable minimum biobased content would become the applicable minimum biobased content for the complex assembly to be labeled.


(ii) If a product certified under paragraph (b)(4)(i) of this section is within a category that USDA subsequently designates for federal preferred procurement, the applicable minimum biobased content shall become, as of the effective date of the final designation rule, the minimum biobased content specified for the item as found in subpart B of 7 CFR part 3201.


(c) Innovative approach. In determining eligibility for certification under the BioPreferred Program, USDA will consider as eligible only those products that use innovative approaches in the growing, harvesting, sourcing, procuring, processing, manufacturing, or application of the biobased product. USDA will consider products that meet one or more of the criteria in paragraphs (c)(1) through (4) of this section to be eligible for certification. USDA will also consider other documentation of innovative approaches in the growing, harvesting, sourcing, procuring, processing, manufacturing, or application of biobased products on a case by case basis. USDA may deny certification for any products whose manufacturers are unable to provide USDA with the documentation necessary to verify claims that innovative approaches are used in the growing, harvesting, sourcing, procuring, processing, manufacturing, or application of their biobased products.


(1) Product applications. (i) The biobased product or material is used or applied in applications that differ from historical applications; or


(ii) The biobased product or material is grown, harvested, manufactured, processed, sourced, or applied in other innovative ways; or


(iii) The biobased content of the product or material makes its composition different from products or material used for the same historical uses or applications.


(2) Manufacturing and processing. (i) The biobased product or material is manufactured or processed using renewable, biomass energy or using technology that is demonstrated to increase energy efficiency or reduce reliance on fossil-fuel based energy sources; or


(ii) The biobased product or material is manufactured or processed with technologies that ensure high feedstock material recovery and use.


(3) Environmental Product Declaration. The product has a current Environmental Product Declaration as defined by International Standard ISO 14025, Environmental Labels and Declarations – Type III Environmental Declarations – Principles and Procedures.


(4) Raw material sourcing. (i) The raw material used in the product is sourced from a Legal Source, a Responsible Source, or a Certified Source as designated by ASTM D7612 – 10, Standard Practice for Categorizing Wood and Wood-Based Products According to Their Fiber Sources; or


(ii) The raw material used in the product is 100% resourced or recycled (such as material obtained from building deconstruction); or


(iii) The raw material used in the product is from an urban environment and is acquired as a result of activities related to a natural disaster, land clearing, right-of-way maintenance, tree health improvement, or public safety.


[76 FR 3806, Jan. 20, 2011. Redesignated and amended at 76 FR 53632, Aug. 29, 2011; 80 FR 34038, June 15, 2015]


§ 3202.5 Initial approval process.

(a) Application. Manufacturers and vendors seeking USDA approval to use the certification mark for an eligible biobased product must submit a USDA-approved application for each biobased product. A standardized application form and instructions are available on the USDA BioPreferred Program Web site (http://www.biopreferred.gov). The contents of an acceptable application are as specified in paragraphs (a)(1) through (a)(4) of this section.


(1) General content. The applicant must provide contact information and product information including all brand names or other identifying information, intended uses of the product, information to document that one or more of the innovative approach criteria specified in section 3202.4(c) has been met, and, if applicable, the corresponding product category classification for federal preferred procurement. The applicant must also provide a sample of the product to be analyzed by a third-party, ISO 9001 conformant, testing entity for determination of the biobased content. In situations where a new product for which certification is sought is composed of the same biobased ingredients and has the same biobased content as a product that has already been certified, the manufacturer may, in lieu of having the new product tested, self-declare the biobased content of the new product by referencing the tested biobased content of the original certified product. Certification of the original product must have been obtained by either the manufacturer of the new product or by the supplier of the biobased ingredients used in the new product.


(2) Certifications. The applicant must certify in the application that the product for which use of the certification mark is sought is a biobased product as defined in § 3202.2 of this part.


(3) Commitments. The applicant must sign a statement in the application that commits the applicant to submitting to USDA the information specified in paragraph (c)(1) through (c)(4) of this section, which USDA will post to the USDA BioPreferred Program Web site, and to providing USDA with up-to-date information for posting on this Web site.


(4) Application fee. Effective (date to be added after authority to collect fee is granted), applicants must submit an application fee of $500 with each completed application for certification. Instructions for submitting the application fee are available on the USDA BioPreferred Program Web site (http://www.biopreferred.gov), along with the application form and instructions.


(b) Evaluation of applications. (1) USDA will evaluate each application to determine if it contains the information specified in paragraph (a) of this section. If USDA determines that the application is not complete, USDA will return the application to the applicant with an explanation of its deficiencies. Once the deficiencies have been addressed, the applicant may resubmit the application, along with a cover letter explaining the changes made, for re-evaluation by USDA. USDA will evaluate resubmitted applications separately from first-time applications, and those with the earliest original application submittal date will be given first priority.


(2)(i) USDA will evaluate each complete application to determine compliance with the criteria specified in § 3202.4. USDA will provide a written response to each applicant within 60 days after the receipt of a complete application, informing the applicant of whether the application has been conditionally approved or has been disapproved.


(ii) For those applications that are conditionally approved, a notice of certification, as specified in paragraph (c) of this section, must be issued before the use of the certification mark can begin.


(iii) For those applications that are disapproved, USDA will issue a notice of denial of certification and will inform the applicant in writing of each criterion not met. Applicants who receive a notice of denial of certification may appeal using the procedures specified in § 3202.6.


(c) Notice of certification. After notification that its application has been conditionally approved, the applicant must provide to USDA (for posting by USDA on the USDA BioPreferred Program Web site) the information specified in paragraphs (c)(1) through (c)(4) of this section. Once USDA confirms that the information is received and complete, USDA will issue a notice of certification to the applicant. Upon receipt of a notice of certification, the applicant may begin using the certification mark on the certified biobased product. Paragraph (c)(5) of this section presents the procedures for revising the information provided under paragraphs (c)(1) through (4) of this section after a notice of certification has been issued.


(1) The product’s brand name(s), or other identifying information.


(2) Contact information, including the name, mailing address, email address, and telephone number of the applicant.


(3) The biobased content of the product.


(4) A hot link directly to the applicant’s Web site (if available).


(5) If at any time, during the application process or after a product has been certified, any of the information specified in paragraphs (c)(1) through (4) of this section changes, the applicant must notify USDA of the change within 30 days. Such notification must be provided in writing to USDA.


(d) Term of certification. (1) The effective date of certification is the date on which the applicant receives a notice of certification from USDA. Except as specified in paragraphs (d)(2)(i) through (d)(2)(v) of this section, certifications will remain in effect as long as the product is manufactured and marketed in accordance with the approved application and the requirements of this subpart.


(2)(i) If the product formulation of a certified product is changed such that the biobased content of the product is reduced to a level below that reported in the approved application, the existing certification will not be valid for the product under the revised conditions and the manufacturer or vendor, as applicable, and its designated representatives must discontinue affixing the certification mark to the product and must not initiate any further advertising of the product using the certification mark. USDA will consider a product under such revised conditions to be a reformulated product, and the manufacturer or vendor, as applicable, must submit a new application for certification using the procedures specified in paragraph (a) of this section.


(ii) If the product formulation of a certified product is changed such that the biobased content of the product is increased from the level reported in the approved application, the existing certification will continue to be valid for the product.


(iii) If the applicable required minimum biobased content for a product to be eligible to display the certification mark is revised by USDA, manufacturers and vendors may continue to label their previously certified product only if it meets the new minimum biobased content level. In those cases where the biobased content of a certified product fails to meet the new minimum biobased content level, USDA will notify the manufacturer or vendor that their certification is no longer valid. Such manufacturers and vendors must increase the biobased content of their product to a level at or above the new minimum biobased content level and must re-apply for certification within 60 days if they wish to continue to use the certification mark. Manufacturers and vendors who have re-applied for certification may continue using the existing certification mark until they receive notification from USDA on the results of their re-application for certification.


(iv) All certifications are subject to USDA periodic auditing activities, as described in § 3202.10(d). If a manufacturer or vendor of a certified biobased product fails to participate in such audit activities or if such audit activities reveal biobased content violations, as specified in § 3202.8(b)(1), the certification will be subject to suspension and revocation according to the procedures specified in § 3202.8(c).


(v) If USDA discovers that a certification has been issued for an ineligible biobased product as a result of errors on the part of USDA during the approval process, USDA will notify the product’s manufacturer or vendor in writing that the certification is revoked effective 30 days from the date of the notice.


[76 FR 3806, Jan. 20, 2011. Redesignated and amended at 76 FR 53632, Aug. 29, 2011; 80 FR 34038, June 15, 2015]


§ 3202.6 Appeal processes.

An applicant for certification may appeal a notice of denial of certification to the Program Manager. Entities that have received a notice of violation, and manufacturers and vendors of certified biobased products who have received a notice of suspension or revocation, may appeal to the Program Manager.


(a)(1) Appeals to the Program Manager must be filed within 30 days of receipt by the appellant of a notice of denial of certification, a notice of violation, a notice of suspension, or a notice of revocation. Appeals must be filed in writing and addressed to: Program Manager, USDA Voluntary Labeling Program for Biobased Products, Room 361, Reporters Building, 300 Seventh Street, SW., Washington, DC 20024.


(2) All appeals must include a copy of the adverse decision and a statement of the appellant’s reasons for believing that the decision was not made in accordance with applicable program regulations, policies, or procedures, or otherwise was not proper.


(b)(1) If the Program Manager sustains an applicant’s appeal of a notice of denial of certification, USDA will issue a notice of certification to the applicant for its biobased product.


(2) If the Program Manager sustains a manufacturer’s or vendor’s appeal of a notice of violation, USDA will rescind the notice and no further action will be taken by USDA.


(3) If the Program Manager sustains a manufacturer’s or vendor’s appeal of a notice of suspension, the manufacturer, vendor, and their designated representative(s) may immediately resume affixing the certification mark to the certified biobased product and USDA will reinstate the product’s information to the USDA BioPreferred Program Web site.


(4) If the Program Manager sustains a manufacturer’s or vendor’s appeal of a notice of revocation, the manufacturer or vendor, and its designated representatives may immediately resume affixing the certification mark to the certified biobased product and sell and distribute the certified biobased product with the certification mark. In addition, USDA will reinstate the product’s information to the USDA BioPreferred Program Web site.


(c) If the Program Manager sustains a manufacturer’s or vendor’s appeal of its product’s exclusion from the program, the manufacturers or vendors may then apply for certification to use the certification mark on that product, as specified in § 3202.5(a) of this part.


(d) Appeals of any of the Program Manager’s decisions may be made to the USDA Assistant Secretary for Administration. Appeals must be made, in writing, within 30 days of receipt of the Program Manager’s decision and addressed to: Assistant Secretary for Administration, Room 209A, Whitten Building, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW., Washington, DC 20250-0103. If the Assistant Secretary for Administration sustains an appeal, the provisions of paragraph (b) of this section will apply.


[76 FR 3806, Jan. 20, 2011. Redesignated and amended at 76 FR 53632, Aug. 29, 2011]


§ 3202.7 Requirements associated with the certification mark.

(a) Who may use the certification mark? (1) Manufacturers and vendors. Only manufacturers and vendors who have received a notice of certification, or designated representatives of the manufacturer or vendor, may affix the official certification mark (in one of the three variations, as applicable) to the product or its packaging. A manufacturer or vendor who has received a notice of certification for a product under this part:


(i) May use the certification mark on the product, its packaging, and other related materials including, but not limited to, advertisements, catalogs, specification sheets, procurement databases, promotional material, Web sites, or user manuals for that product, according to the requirements set forth in this section; and


(ii) Is responsible for the manner in which the mark is used by its companies, as well as its designated representatives, including advertising agencies, marketing and public relations firms and subcontractors.


(2) Other entities. (i) Other entities may use the mark to advertise or promote certified biobased products in materials including, but not limited to, advertisements, catalogs, procurement databases, Web sites, and promotional and educational materials, as long as the manufacturer or vendor of the product, or one of their designated representatives, has affixed the mark to the product or its packaging.


(ii) Other entities may use the certification mark; the phrase “USDA Certified Biobased Product/Package/Product & Package,” as applicable; and the BioPreferred Program name in general statements as described in paragraph (b) of this section, as long as the statements do not imply that a non-certified biobased product is certified.


(b) Correct usage of the certification mark. (1) The certification mark can be affixed only to certified biobased products and their associated packaging.


(2) The certification mark may be used in material including, but not limited to, advertisements, catalogs, procurement databases, Web sites, and promotional and educational materials to distinguish products that are certified for use of the label from those that are not certified. The certification mark may be used in advertisements for both certified biobased products and non-certified/labeled products if the advertisement clearly indicates which products are certified/labeled. Care must be taken to avoid implying that any non-certified products are certified.


(3) The certification mark may be used without reference to a specific certified biobased product only when informing the public about the purpose of the certification mark. For example, the following or similar claim is acceptable: “Look for the ‘USDA Certified Biobased Product’ certification mark. It means that the product meets USDA standards for the amount of biobased content and the manufacturer or vendor has provided relevant information on the product to be posted on the USDA BioPreferred Program Web site.” This exception allows manufacturers, vendors, and other entities to use the certification mark in documents such as corporate reports, but only in an informative manner, not as a statement of product certification.


(4) The certification mark may appear next to a picture of the product(s) or text describing it.


(5) The certification mark must stand alone and not be incorporated into any other certification mark or logo designs.


(6) The certification mark may be used as a watermark provided the use does not violate any usage restrictions specified in this part.


(7) The text portion of the certification mark must be written in English and may not be translated, even when the certification mark is used outside of the United States.


(c) Incorrect usage of the certification mark. (1) The certification mark shall not be used on any product that has not been certified by USDA as a “USDA Certified Biobased Product.”


(2) The certification mark shall not be used on any advertisements or informational materials where both certified biobased products and non-certified products are shown unless it is clear that the certification mark applies to only the certified biobased product(s).


(3) The certification mark shall not be used to imply endorsement by USDA or the BioPreferred Program of any particular product, service, or company.


(4) The certification mark shall not be used in any form that could be misleading to the consumer.


(5) The certification mark shall not be used by manufacturers or vendors of certified products in a manner disparaging to USDA or any other government body.


(6) The certification mark shall not be used with an altered certification mark or incorporated into other label or logo designs.


(7) The certification mark shall not be used on business cards, company letterhead, or company stationery.


(8) The certification mark shall not be used in, or as part of, any company name, logo, product name, service, or Web site, except as may be provided for in this part.


(9) The certification mark shall not be used in a manner that violates any of the applicable requirements contained in this part.


(d) Imported products. The certification mark can be used only with a product that is certified by USDA under this part. The certification mark cannot be used to imply that a product meets or exceeds the requirements of biobased programs in other countries. Products imported for sale in the U.S. must adhere to the same guidelines as U.S.-sourced biobased products. Any product sold in the U.S. as a “USDA Certified Biobased Product/Package/Product & Package” must have received certification from USDA.


(e) Contents of the certification mark. The certification mark shall consist of the certification mark artwork, the biobased content percentage, and one of the three variations of text specified in paragraphs (e)(1) through (e)(3) of this section, as applicable.


(1) USDA Certified Biobased Product.


(2) USDA Certified Biobased Product: Package.


(3) USDA Certified Biobased Product & Package.


(f) Physical aspects of the certification mark. The certification mark artwork may not be altered, cut, separated into components, or distorted in appearance or perspective. Certification marks that are applied to biobased products that have been designated for preferred Federal procurement will include the letters “FP” as part of the certification mark artwork. The certification mark must appear only in the colors specified in paragraphs (f)(1) through (f)(3) of this section, unless approval is given by USDA for an exception.


(1) A multi-color version of the certification mark is preferred. The certification mark colors to be applied will be stipulated in the “Marketing Guides” document available on the USDA BioPreferred Program Web site (http://www.biopreferred.gov).


(2) A one-color version of the certification mark may be substituted for the multi-color version as long as the one color used is one of the multi-color choices reapplied without modification. Further guidance on the one-color certification mark application will also be detailed in the “Marketing Guides.”


(3) A black and white version of the certification mark is acceptable.


(g) Placement of the certification mark. (1) The certification mark can appear directly on a product, its associated packaging, in user manuals, and in other materials including, but not limited to, advertisements, catalogs, procurement databases, and promotional and educational materials.


(2) The certification mark shall not be placed in a manner that is ambiguous about which product is a certified biobased product or that could indicate certification of a non-certified product.


(3) When used to distinguish a certified biobased product in material including, but not limited to, advertisements, catalogs, procurement databases, Web sites, and promotional and educational materials, the certification mark must appear near a picture of the product or the text describing it.


(i) If all products on a page are certified biobased products, the certification mark may be placed anywhere on the page.


(ii) If a page contains a mix of certified biobased products and non-certified products, the certification mark shall be placed in close proximity to the certified biobased products. An individual certification mark near each certified biobased product may be necessary to avoid confusion.


(h) Minimum size and clear space recommendations for the certification mark – (1) The certification mark may be sized to fit the individual application as long as the correct proportions are maintained and the certification mark remains legible.


(2) A border of clear space must surround the certification mark and must be of sufficient width to offset it from surrounding images and text and to avoid confusion. If the certification mark’s color is similar to the background color of the product or packaging, the certification mark in a contrasting (i.e., black, white) color may be used.


(i) Where to obtain copies of the certification mark artwork. The certification mark artwork is available at the USDA BioPreferred Program Web site http://www.biopreferred.gov.


§ 3202.8 Violations.

This section identifies the types of actions that USDA considers violations under this part and the penalties (e.g., the suspension or revocation of certification) associated with such violations.


(a) General. Violations under this section occur on a per product basis and the penalties are to be applied on a per product basis. Entities cited for a violation under this section may appeal using the provisions in § 3202.6. If certification for a product is revoked, the manufacturer or vendor whose certification has been revoked may seek re-certification for the product using the procedures specified under the provisions in § 3202.5.


(b) Types of violations. Actions that will be considered violations of this part include, but are not limited to, the following specific examples:


(1) Biobased content violations. The Program Manager will utilize occasional random testing of certified biobased products to compare the biobased content of the tested product with the product’s applicable minimum biobased content and the biobased content reported by the manufacturer or vendor in its approved application. Such testing will be conducted using ASTM Method D6866. USDA will provide a copy of the results of its testing to the applicable manufacturer or vendor.


(i) If USDA testing shows that the biobased content of a certified biobased product is less than its applicable minimum biobased content, then a violation of this part will have occurred.


(ii) If USDA testing shows that the biobased content is less than that reported by the manufacturer or vendor in its approved application, but is still equal to or greater than its applicable minimum biobased content(s), USDA will provide written notification to the manufacturer or vendor. The manufacturer or vendor must